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“A Study on Customer Satisfaction of Honda Activa in

Chennai”.
MINI PROJECT REPORT

Submitted to the

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

By

ANSIYA SAINUDEEN

130292601007

Under the guidance of

Dr. JAMAL MOHAMMED ZUBAIR

ASST PROFESSOR

CRESCENT BUSINESS SCHOOL

B.S. ABDUR RAHMAN UNIVERSITY CHENNAI-600 048

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A STUDY ON CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION OF HONDA ACTIVA IN
CHENNAI

MINI PROJECT REPORT

Submitted to the

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

By

ANSIYA SAINUDEEN

130292601007

CRESCENT BUSINESS SCHOOL

B.S. ABDUR RAHMAN UNIVERSITY CHENNAI-600 048

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DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the project entitled ““A Study on Customer Satisfaction of Honda Activa in
Chennai”, submitted to Crescent Business School in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the
“Research Methodology MS-626”. It is record of original work done by me under the guidance of Dr.
Jamal Mohammed Zubair, Asst Professor, Crescent Business School.

ANSIYA SAINUDEEN

RRN: NO: 130292601007

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would then like to thank my faculty guide, Dr. Jamal Mohammed Zubair, Asst Professor for all
his valuable inputs and constant support towards me throughout my project and providing me an
opportunity to learn outside the classroom. It was a truly wonderful learning experience.

I would like to dedicate this project to my parents. Without their help and constant support this
project would not have been possible.

Last but not the least I would like to thank all the respondents who offered their opinions and
suggestions and sometimes-critical views throughout the survey that made me constantly update
myself come out with a successful project.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTERS CONTENTS PAGE NO

CHAPTER 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION 8


1.2 NEED FOR THE STUDY 15
1.3 STATEMENT OF PROBLEM 16

1.4 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 16


16
1.5 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED

1.5.1 DATA COLLECTION 17


1.5.2 TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION 18
1.5.3 CONSTRUCTION OF QUESTIONNAIRE 18
1.6 SCOPE OF THE STUDY 19
1.7 PERIOD OF STUDY 19
1.8 LIMITATION OF STUDY 19
1.9 ORGANIZATION OF STUDY 20

CHAPTER 2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE 21


CHAPTER 3 COMPANY PROFILE 29
CHAPTER 4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPERTATION 33

CHAPTER 5 5.1 FINDINGS 57

5.2 SUGGESTIONS 58

5.3 CONCLUSION 59

BIBLIOGRAPHY 60
ANNEXURE 61

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Chapter-1
INTRODUCTION AND DESIGN OF THE STUDY

1.1 INTRODUCTION

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Customer satisfaction is a term frequently used in marketing. It is a measure of how products


and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. Customer satisfaction
is defined as "the number of customers, or percentage of total customers, whose reported
experience with a firm, its products, or its services (ratings) exceeds specified satisfaction goals.”
Customer satisfaction provides a leading indicator of consumer purchase intentions and
loyalty." Customer satisfaction data are among the most frequently collected indicators of market
perceptions.

The goal for every company should be to make its customers satisfied. Satisfied customers will
come again and might stay as customers for a longer period. It is important for the company to
actually care and appreciate the customer. It is clear that if the company can make the customer
satisfied the customer will come back again and the customers might tell to some of their friends
about the good service they got. So through satisfied customers it is possible to save in marketing
expenses.

Customer satisfaction is the overall impression of customer about the supplier and the products
and services delivered by the supplier. Following are the important factors that could affect
customer satisfaction:

 Department wise capability of the supplier.


 Technological and engineering or re-engineering aspects of products and services.

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 Type and quality of response provided by the supplier.
 Supplier’s capability to commit on deadlines and how efficiently they are met.
 Customer service provided by the supplier.
 Complaint management.
 Cost, quality, performance and efficiency of the product.
 Supplier’s personal facets like etiquettes and friendliness.
 Supplier’s ability to manage whole customer life cycle.
 Compatible and hassle free functions and operations.

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The above factors could be widely classified under two categories i.e. suppliers behavior and
performance of product and services. The supplier’s behavior mostly depends on the behavior of
its senior subordinates, managers and internal employees. All the functional activities like
customer response, direct product and maintenance services, complaint management etc. are the
factors that rely on how skillful and trained the internal and human resources of the supplier are.
The second category is regarding all the products and services. This depends on the capability of
supplier to how to nurture the products and service efficiently and how skilled the employees
are. It’s all about how the skills are implemented to demonstrate engineering, re-engineering and
technological aspects of the products and services. The quality and efficaciousness of the
products is also an important factor that enables compatible and hassle free functions and
operations. This bears to lower maintenance and higher life of the product, which is highly
admired by the customers. There are three steps to increase customer satisfaction. They are :

1. Justify the Sale with Social Proof

When most sales are made, chances are that the buyer will have to justify the purchase to
another person – a boss, spouse, or anyone that may pass judgment.

To make this go smoothly, you should arm each one of your customers with testimonials from
other people and companies. Alternatively, if you have a low return rate, you might emphasize
how few people returned it.

2. Surprise Customers with a Bonus

When people spend money on a product, the last thing you want them to think is “was this worth
it?” To combat this, you should surprise each one of your customers with a little bonus. To
elaborate, let me share the fascinating experiment that helped waiters – service professionals –
increase their tips by 23%.

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3. Offer Free Product Training and Support

This is a clear, business-winning decision. Nothing decreases customer satisfaction more than
being confused with how to make a product work. And free product training and support will be
how you alleviate this customer frustration.

The Bottom Line

Just because you made the sale, it doesn’t mean the work is over. Your job is to turn one-time
buyers into loyal customers.

Factors affecting customer satisfaction

The counterparts of satisfaction are always expectations and experiences. Level of expectations
level will create a basis and comparison base for experiences. For example, if you have two
hotels, one a five star hotel and the other just a two star hotel, of course your expectations for the
five star hotel are much higher than for the other one. If the service level in both is equal, when a
customer has high expectations like with the five star hotel he might feel disappointed and with
the two star hotel with which the customer had lower expectations he would be positively
surprised. In customer satisfaction leadership when creating satisfaction, it is important that you
can affect both expectations and experiences. Still the expectations are always a starting point
when building action.

 Expectations

When talking about the relationship between expectations and experiences, expectations are
usually seen as one whole field. In reality, there are several kinds of expectations and one of the
most functional classifications is tripartition of expectations:

1. Ideal expectations

2. Pre-expectations

3. Minimum expectations

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Ideal expectations tell about person’s own values and hope for the action that he/she expects
from a company or from a product. Ideal expectations, for example, of a shop’s services can be
included:

- Cheap prices

- Friendly personal service

- Perfect assortments and selection

- High quality products

- Close location

When looking at ideal expectations it is important to see that different persons have different
expectations. Even persons in different segments differ from each other in relation to ideal
expectations. It is impossible for companies to combine all the above-mentioned ideal
expectations features. This is why the company has to choose just some of these features, the
ones that are best for the company and then the company should fulfill these expectations as well
as possible.

Pre-expectations mean the level of expectations the person has on a certain company and/or its
product and its different features. Pre-expectations mean quite the same thing as the company or
product image. This way the customer satisfaction leadership is connected to mental image
marketing. There are several factors affecting pre-expectations, such as experiences, mouth-to-
mouth communication, branch, business idea, basic elements of marketing, marketing
communication and publicity. All these factors are connected to each other, either directly or
indirectly.

Minimum expectations describe the minimum level that customer has set for him/herself, what
he/she requires from the company or from the product. There are four different factors affecting
the minimum expectations. These are:

1. Situational factors (e.g. buying situation, surrounding situation)

2. Customer’s background factors (e.g. values, income level, and personality)

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3. Branch factors (e.g. competition situation)

4. Company factors (e.g. business idea, marketing)

And again all these factors influence on each other. When working in a service profession a
customer servant needs to be a good judge of character. All customers cannot be served the same
way. Behavior needs to be changed even a little with every customer. Having a good customer
servant is a huge bonus for a company. Through a good customer servant, the company can win
many competition situations.

 Experiences

Expectations are proportioned to experiences and this creates reaction in the scale of satisfied-
dissatisfied. This satisfaction scale is divided in three basic categories:

 Under expectation situation = positive experience


 Balance situation = match to the expectations
 Over expectation situation = negative experience

In the under expectation situation the service or the product is experienced in a positive way, but
when once positively surprised the level of expectations towards the company rises. In this
positive surprise case, the person is often eager to tell his/her friends about a good service or a
good product. If the company keeps up the good service and/or good products, there is a chance
that a new customer relationship is born. When the customer gets a negative experience and the
company’s image lowers, it is more possible that the customer relationship will break.
Disappointed customers are bad advertisement for the company because they tend to tell their
friends and family about the negative experience.

Satisfaction levels

The customer satisfaction levels can be divided into different categories according to how
strongly and to which direction the customers have reacted. The first three categories are:
negatively surprised, expectations fulfilled and the last one is positively surprised. The
negatively surprised category can be further divided into two subcategories: great
disappointments and mild disappointments. In addition, the positively surprised category can be

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divided in the same way into two subcategories: mild positive surprises and great positive
surprises.

1. Greatly disappointed customers

These customers usually complain right away, they might break the customer relationship and
spread the negative word about the company. The customer relationship breakage and the
negative word of mouth occur most likely if the company does not take action when the
customer complains. The complaint situation should be seen as an opportunity to fix the negative
disappointment and this way to keep the customer.

2. Mildly disappointed customers

This customer type does not react straight away; instead, the next time they go shopping they
choose any other product. If asked about this negatively surprised company, these customers are
also ready to recommend using another company. With these customers, it is very important that
the company has a system for collecting customer feedback. If the company does not have a
feedback system, they might lose a lot of customers.

3. Experience according to expectations

Depending on the customer’s expectations level consequences are slightly different. In high
expectations case the customer relationship is strengthened because the customer had very high
expectations and the company could fulfill these high expectations. In average expectations
situation, even though the company performs according to customer’s expectations it does not
necessarily improve or weaken the customer relationship. In this situation, it is possible for the
competitor to make a better offer for the customer and this way “steal” the customer. However,
without the competitor’s offer there is every chance to continue the customer relationship with
these existing customers. In low expectations situation, when the expectations are fulfilled, you
cannot really describe the customer as satisfied; the customer just found out that the company
answered his/her low expectations. Without any good alternatives, the customer relationship can
continue if the relationship is based on personal acquaintance. In case a better competitor occurs
and is active the customer may start to use this competitor’s services.

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4. Mildly positively surprised

These customers do not usually give feedback on their positive experiences. But one way to
experience their satisfaction is that they stay customers and they are ready to recommend this
company or product to their friends. This mildly positively surprised group is the most
committed customer group. The customer relationship keeps on going if the company keeps
surprising the customers in the future as well. The surprises do not have to be very big ones: just
a small positive surprise is enough.

5. Greatly positively surprised customers

Customers feel greatly surprised when:

 They have a very low expectation level and the company performs in an exemplary way.
 Contact situation is exceptional
 Some part of company’s actions or the whole process worked in such a fine level that the
customer is not used to.

Such strongly positively surprises do not happen that often, but when they do happen the
customer will on his own thank for the treatment he got. The customer is very likely to also
spread positive word-of-mouth.

1.2 NEED FOR THE STUDY

The necessity for studying customer satisfaction arises because of the fact that in today’s
dynamic environment customers are the king and it is the customer who determines the success
or failure of any business organization. Customer satisfaction leads to customer loyalty and
product repurchase which is essential for sustainability of any organization. This in turn enables
the company to enhance its stringent competitiveness in the auto components market.
• To know the satisfaction level of customers on HONDA ACTIVA in Chennai.
• To know the grievances of customer while using HONDA ACTIVA.
• The purpose of this study is to identify the customer behavior, customer perception, how often
they are using and what they are expecting from HONDA ACTIVA.

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1.3 STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

With the recent influx of different brands in today’s four wheel auto-segment each striving to
satisfy customer with the end results of maintaining loyalty, at present cars as such have become
necessity but not nicety. With this outlook of today’s market it is even layman’s perceptive that
Honda has stood against all odds this indicates that Honda , by itself reflects a satisfied customer.
Keeping in mind curriculum requirement and organizational requirement , the study has been
conducted to find out customer satisfaction towards Honda Activa.

1.4 OBJECTIVES OF STUDY

The main objectives of the study are:

 To find customer satisfaction level towards Honda Activa


 To find out the customer satisfaction level to various groups of people towards Honda
Activa.
 To understand the expectations and requirements of all your customers.

1.5 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED

Research Methodology is an essential aspect of any research or investigation. It enables the


investigator to look at the problem in a systematic, meaningful and orderly way. This study is
based on descriptive research. The data obtained from the survey was out in a proper
sequence for analysis purpose. The research design is probability research design and is
descriptive research. As such the design includes an outline of what the researcher will do
from writing the hypothesis and its operational implications to the final analysis of data.

 Research Design

It has been assumed that source of data are the foundation, based upon which the actual
required information can be extracted.

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 Sample Procedure

Empirical field studies require collection of first hand information on data pertaining to
the unit of study from the field.

1.5.1 DATA COLLECTION

Data collection is an important aspect of any type of research study. The type of
information required for the study was satisfactory level of the consumers who own
Honda Activa. So data is collected through ‘personal interview method’ and some
secondary method . This method has helped in obtaining data on factors such as attitude,
satisfaction level, mode of purchase etc. by this method one can expect a reliable
information, which is referred to as quantitative research design method. The following
methods were adopted for data collection :

1. PRIMARY DATA
There are five useful methods for collecting data. These primary methods are direct
observation, indirect oral interviews, mailed questionnaires, schedule method, and local
agents.

2. SECONDARY DATA

Secondary data is all the information collected for purposes other than the
completion of a research project and it’s used to gain initial insight into the
research problem. It is classified in terms of its source – either internal or external.
Mostly secondary data are collected from published sources. Some important
sources of published data are the following.

 Published reports of Central and State Governments and local bodies.


 Official publications of the foreign Governments.
 Reports and Publications of trade associations, chambers of commerce,
financial institutions etc.

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 Journals, Magazines and periodicals
 Reports submitted by Economists, Research Scholars, Bureaus etc.
 Published works of research institutions and Universities etc.

1.5.2 TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION

 Questionnaire Survey.
 Books.
 Journals.
 Magazines.
 Internet.
 Annual report of the company.

1.5.3 CONSTRUCTION OF QUESTIONNAIRE

The questionnaire used was a printed, well-structured formalized schedule to obtain and
record specified and relevant information with fair accuracy and completeness. It is a
series of questions asked to individuals to obtain statistically useful information about a
given topic. When properly constructed and responsibly administered, questionnaires
become a vital instrument by which statements can be made about specific groups, or
people, or entire populations. They are a valuable method of collecting a wide range of
information from a large number of individuals, often referred to as respondents.
Questionnaires are used in sample surveys or censuses to elicit reports of facts, attitudes,
and other subjective states. A questionnaire can be a useful tool for gathering
information. It can be used for survey research, gathering data or testing a
hypothesis. Constructing a questionnaire involves many decisions about the wording and
ordering of questions, selection and wording of response categories, formatting and mode
of administration of the questionnaire, and introducing and explaining the survey.
Although designing a questionnaire remains an art, there is increasing knowledge
available to inform these decisions.

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1.6 SCOPE OF STUDY

 It helps the marketer to understand the customers in the market and their expectations.
 The study also helps the company to improve their standard of service & handle the
competition in the near future.
 It also helps in putting in possible improvements, additions, and new strategies and offers
the customers.

1.7 PERIOD OF STUDY

The period of study of this dissertation is from February to April 2014

1.8 LIMITATION OF STUDY

As no person is perfect in this world, in the same way no study can be considered as fully
reliable at one glance. There are number of uncontrollable factors acting as limitations in
conducting the study. Some of such limitations encountered by me in my study are -
 Since the survey was done only in Chennai the result obtained may not be taken as
universal suggestion.
 Quality of the information highly dependent on the knowledge of the respondents.
 Concern person of shop keeping in charge will always change, so that their assessment
of the product and the relationship with the company officials could not be adequate.
 Respondents in some department gave biased responses for fear of their position in the
company. This may have influenced the results.
 Some people at top level were afraid and showed complete reluctance to give responses
to some questions.
 The study is confined only to Chennai.

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1.9 ORGANIZATION OF THE STUDY

Chapter 1 present an introduction to the topic customer satisfaction, need for the study, objective
of the study, scope of the study, statement of problem and method , period and limitation if the
study.

Chapter 2 deals with literature review on the topics related to the research study.

Chapter 3 present an insight into the Company Profile.

Chapter 4 deals with the Data analysis and Interpretation.

Chapter 5 deals with findings, suggestions and conclusions.

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Chapter-2
REVIEWS OF LITERATURE

 Rade B. Vukmir, (2006)1 (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Northwest,


Seneca, Pennsylvania, USA) "Customer satisfaction", International Journal of Health
Care Quality Assurance. This paper seeks to present an analysis of the literature
examining objective information concerning the subject of customer service, as it
applies to the current medical practice. Hopefully, this information will be
synthesized to generate a cogent approach to correlate customer service with quality.
Articles were obtained by an English language search of MEDLINE from January
1976 to July 2005. This computerized search was supplemented with literature from
the author's personal collection of peer-reviewed articles on customer service in a
medical setting. This information was presented in a qualitative fashion. There is a
significant lack of objective data correlating customer service objectives, patient
satisfaction and quality of care. Patients present predominantly for the convenience of
emergency department care. Specifics of satisfaction are directed to the timing, and
amount of “caring”. Demographic correlates including symptom presentation,
practice style, location and physician issues directly influence satisfaction. It is most
helpful to develop a productive plan for the “difficult patient”, emphasizing
communication and empathy. Profiling of the customer satisfaction experience is best
accomplished by examining the specifics of satisfaction, nature of the ED patient,
demographic profile, symptom presentation and physician interventions emphasizing
communication – especially with the difficult patient. The current emergency
medicine customer service dilemmas are a complex interaction of both patient and
physician factors specifically targeting both efficiency and patient satisfaction.
Awareness of these issues particular to the emergency patient can help to maximize
efficiency, minimize subsequent medico legal risk and improve patient care if a
tailored management plan is formulated.

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 Don O'Sullivan, John McCallig, (2012)2 "Customer satisfaction, earnings and firm
value", in their research the aim of this study is to examine the relationship between
customer satisfaction, earnings and firm value. A model borrowed from the accounting
literature – the Ohlson model – is used to consider the impact of customer satisfaction on
Tobin's q – a capital market-based measure of firm performance widely used in
marketing research. Data on firm performance is drawn from COMPUSTAT and
integrated with data on customer satisfaction from the American Customer Satisfaction
Index (ACSI).Results show that customer satisfaction has a positive impact on firm
value. Critically, the authors find that this impact is over and above the impact that
earnings has on firm value. They also find that customer satisfaction positively and
significantly moderates the earnings-firm value relationship. Findings are limited to firms
covered by the American Customer Satisfaction Index and subject to the assumptions
underpinning the Ohlson model. This study's demonstration of the complementary
relationship between earnings and customer satisfaction in determining firm value should
encourage managers to engage with satisfaction as a driver of business performance and
value. – Findings extend recent studies on the impact of customer satisfaction on business
performance. While prior studies either ignore earnings or focus on the relationship
between satisfaction and stock returns, the authors show the impact of satisfaction on
firm value, in a model that includes earnings. Importantly, they also extend prior studies
by showing that the interaction between customer satisfaction and earnings is central to
understanding the impact of both satisfaction and earnings on firm value. In addition,
they demonstrate the usefulness of an earnings-based valuation model, to explore the
relationship between a marketing metric and firm value. The authors' approach may be
adopted to consider the impact of other measures of marketing performance. Thus, they
hope that this study helps to further bridge the gap between marketing and the financial
disciplines.

 Qingyu Zhang, Mark A. Vonderembse, Jeen-Su Lim, (2005)3 "Logistics flexibility


and its impact on customer satisfaction", – in their research, the aim is to succeed in an
uncertain environment, firms must respond to changing customer needs, and logistics
flexibility is an important part of the response. This paper defines logistics flexibility,

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creates a framework to understand it, and shows how it relates to customer satisfaction.
The study uses a large sample survey (n=273) from the Society of Manufacturing
Engineers to develop valid and reliable instruments to measure logistics flexibility and to
test the relationships among the variables using structural equation modeling. The results
indicate strong, positive, and direct relationships between flexible logistics competence
and capability, and between flexible logistics capability and customer satisfaction. The
dependent and independent variables were measured through a single respondent, which
may introduce common-method bias. The respondents were manufacturing executives,
which provides only a single perspective. The dichotomy of flexible logistics competence
and capability can help managers differentiate between the elements of logistics
flexibility that are critical to customers from the elements that support these capabilities.
Standing alone, flexible competence may not be sufficient to build a sustainable
competitive edge. The paper organizes literature on logistics flexibility and classifies it
according to competence and capability theory. It describes a framework to explore the
relationships among flexible competence, flexible capability, and customer satisfaction.

 Johra Kayeser Fatima, Mohammed Abdur Razzaque, (2013)4 "Roles of customer


involvement in rapport and satisfaction", The study investigates different roles
(antecedent, mediator and moderator roles) of customer involvement in rapport and
satisfaction. It is also designed to reveal the comparative impact of three types of
relational benefits (confidential, social and special treatment benefits) on customer
involvement. Structural equation modeling (using Amos) is used for analyzing the data,
collected from a survey of 212 sample respondents of the private commercial banking
sector. Results suggest that customer involvement does have antecedent and mediated
influence on rapport-satisfaction link while the moderation impact of customer
involvement is not supported. In contrast, social treatment benefit is found as the most
important relational benefit for developing customer involvement in Bangladesh followed
by confidence and special treatment benefit. Findings will assist bank management to set
effective future strategies and to manage successful relationships with customers in order
to motivate customer satisfaction with the bank. But the study may suffer from lack of
generalization and poor sample representation as it focuses on a single country

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(Bangladesh) and a single industry (banking sector).The paper for the first time attempts
to reveal antecedent, mediator and moderator role of customer involvement in rapport
and satisfaction. It also identifies the level of importance among three relational benefits
for Bangladeshi bank customers.

 Dima Jamali, (2007)5 "A study of customer satisfaction in the context of a public private
partnership” they explored that the purpose of this paper is to present the results of an
original satisfaction survey in the context of a new public private partnership (PPP) in the
Lebanese postal sector, highlighting traditionally overlooked linkages between PPPs,
quality management and customer satisfaction. The ascendancy of PPPs in recent years
has been attributed to key drivers including greater value for money, and enhanced
service quality. However, very few studies to date have investigated the success of
service performance improvement in the PPP context, by gauging customer satisfaction.
The paper is a literature review and customer satisfaction survey. The findings in this
paper suggest a good level of satisfaction with the quality of services received through
the PPP in question but mixed results concerning the impact of consumer characteristics
on satisfaction ratings. In this paper, the relationship between customer satisfaction and
quality is reviewed. Customer satisfaction is measured in the PPP context and a neglected
dimension in customer satisfaction measurement addressed namely, whether ratings of
satisfaction vary systematically on the basis of customer characteristics.

 Manuela Vega-Vazquez, María Ángeles Revilla-Camacho, Francisco J. Cossío-Silva,


(2013)6 "The value co-creation process as a determinant of customer satisfaction", the
purpose of their study is the greater part of the academic literature coincides in
highlighting the positive influence that consumer participation has on the value created in
service delivery. In this sense, research stands out which studies the consumer's role as a
value co-creator in the service. However, there are few studies, which analyze the
consequences of co-creation behavior from the customer perspective. This research aims
to fill this gap. To do so, it sets out from the measuring of co-creation from the
perspective of the customers themselves and proposes that there is a direct relationship
between value co-creation behavior and customer satisfaction with the service

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experience. To verify the hypothesis proposed, adults over 18 were personally
interviewed. They had to be regular users of firms in the beauty parlor and personal care
sector. The data collection finished with 547 duly completed questionnaires. The SPSS
20 and AMOS 20 statistical programs were used for the data analysis. Regarding the
causal model proposed, the data confirm the relationship set out in the hypothesis. It can
therefore be stated that there is a positive relation between value co-creation and
customer satisfaction. It allows a greater comprehension of the value creation process,
analyzing the consequences for customer satisfaction. In this sense, the findings of the
study suggest that service firms dedicated to personal care should foster the customers'
active participation in the value creation process. The analysis highlights the positive
influence which taking part in the value co-creation has on satisfaction. This is the first
study that clearly shows this relationship from the empirical point-of-view.

 Rhonda L. Hensley, Joanne Sulek, (2007)7 "Customer satisfaction with waits in multi-
stage services", The purpose of this study is to examine the relative importance of
customer perceptions of waits in a multi-stage service. The stages included the wait at the
point of service-entry, the wait during the service stage in which the core service was
experienced and the wait at the service-exit stage as the customer was preparing to leave.
Satisfaction with the waits and satisfaction with the core service product, employees'
behavior and the physical setting were examined in relation to customers' perceptions of
service quality. Four measures of customers' perceptions of service quality were used in
this study. These included overall customer satisfaction, willingness to recommend the
service to friends, willingness to bring friends to the service and repatronage intentions.
A survey was developed based on a review of the literature and in collaboration with the
manager of a full-service restaurant. Restaurant employees administered the survey
during the course of the meal. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the extent
to which satisfaction with each wait affected the four customer perceptions of service
quality. Results showed that the only wait satisfaction that consistently affected customer
perceptions of service quality involved the service-entry wait. This study is one of the
first to empirically examine the effect of service waits at multiple stages of a service
operation on perceptions of service quality.

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 Eduardo Torres-Moraga, Arturo Z. Vásquez-Parraga, Jorge Zamora-González,
(2008)8 "Customer satisfaction and loyalty: start with the product, culminate with the
brand”, in their Studies on customer satisfaction and loyalty have focused on brand rather
than product. It is not that brand is not important, but the process of loving a brand starts
with a product. Customers appreciate products by themselves, independent of the brand,
as shown in their pursuit of satisfaction and development of loyalty. Such appreciation
seems to be prominent regarding innovative products when compared to traditional
products. This paper aims to investigate this issue and provide a product-brand typology.
The paper takes the form of empirical research on a partial application of the typology.
Results show that the relationship satisfaction-loyalty is significantly present when
evaluating products alone albeit a weaker presence than when evaluating brand alone.
Such unequal presence is corroborated in both traditional (bottled wine) and innovative
(electronic) products even though it is much stronger in innovative products. The
relationship satisfaction-loyalty is also present when evaluating product and brand
combined, indicating that there is an intermediate position between product and brand. In
contrast, the literature treats brand and product-brand as being in the same category
thereby diminishing the importance of a useful difference between brand and product-
brand. There are practical consequences of applying the typology and examining the
findings. The relationship satisfaction-loyalty starts with the product, includes the
product-brand, and culminates with the brand. This process is significantly more
important regarding innovative products, such as electronics, as compared to traditional
products such as wine. This study introduces a typology underscoring the pursuit of
satisfaction and development of loyalty in three conditions of product presence versus
brand presence, that is, product alone, brand alone, and product and brand combined.

 Brian George Nagy, K. Michele Kacmar, (2013)9 "Increasing customer satisfaction in


the new venture context",– The purpose of their study is to test the effects of cognitive
legitimacy and the assets of newness in the new venture context. The authors wish to
provide evidence related to how best to market and manage some of the assets and

24 | P a g e
liabilities of newness.236 customers of three recently opened retailing businesses were
surveyed to investigate the relationships among organizational energy, organizational
flexibility, cognitive legitimacy, and customer satisfaction. A mediation model including
all four variables is developed and tested in the paper. Evidence is presented suggesting
cognitive legitimacy plays a significant mediating role in both the positive relationship
between organizational energy and customer satisfaction, and the positive relationship
between organizational flexibility and customer satisfaction. The paper offers thoughts
regarding the theoretical implications of the study, as well as future research
opportunities related to future marketing and entrepreneurship studies. Entrepreneurs are
informed how to further market and manage the characteristics that marks their new
ventures. The study is the first to link the assets of newness, cognitive legitimacy, and
customer satisfaction. Given the importance of customer perceptions in the new venture
context, the manuscript offers insight into how to possibly increase customer satisfaction
by managing the perceptions of customers related to newness.

 Birgit Leisen Pollack, (2009)10 "Linking the hierarchical service quality model to
customer satisfaction and loyalty"– in their study the purpose is to reassess the properties
of the hierarchical service quality model (HSQM) – a previously introduced service
quality assessment tool. The HSQM views service quality as a three-tiered concept with
interaction quality, outcome quality, and physical environment quality as initial sub-
dimensions. The study aims to apply HSQM to two new service contexts and to further
investigate the relationship between service quality, as measured by this instrument, and
satisfaction and customer loyalty. To this end, five hypotheses are to be submitted to
empirical tests. The data for empirically re-assessing the scale's properties and for testing
the proposed hypotheses were collected from convenience samples of 250 customers of
hairdresser/barber services and 300 customers of local phone service subscribers. The
measurement model of the HSQM was re-assessed using confirmatory factor analysis.
The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. The results confirm the
HSQM as predictor of satisfaction and loyalty. However, the results suggest that the
significance of various service quality dimensions differs depending on the type of

25 | P a g e
service. From a managerial perspective, the HSQM is useful for assessing service quality
at various levels. It allows firms to recognize problems in their delivered interaction
quality, outcome quality, or the physical service environment. The paper provides further
evidence for the validity and reliability of the HSQM service quality measure.

26 | P a g e
CHAPTER -3

COMPANY PROFILE

 HONDA

Honda is the world's largest manufacturer of 2-wheelers. Its symbol, the Wings, represents the
company's unwavering dedication in achieving goals that are unique and above all, conforming
to international norms. These wings are now in India as Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India Pvt.
Ltd. (HMSI), a wholly owned subsidiary of Honda Motor Company Ltd., Japan. These wings are
here to initiate a change and make a difference in the Indian 2-wheeler industry. Honda's dream
for India is to not only manufacture 2-wheelers of global quality, but also meet and exceed the
expectations of Indian customers with outstanding after sales support.

 ORIGIN OF THE ORGANIZATION

Honda Activa is the first scooter model of HMSI for the Indian market. It has revitalized the
Indian scooter market after its launch in the year 2000. Within the 1st year of its launch it has
been awarded the 'Scooter of the Year' by Overdrive magazine and also the 'Readers Choice
Award' for the best scooter by Auto India Magazine. The Honda Activa has set a new standard
for new era of scooters in India. It has been developed exclusively for the Indian market after
closely examining the changing lifestyles, wants and needs of the consumers.

The Honda Activa has been designed to cater people who believe:

• The conventional Indian scooter is too big and difficult to handle.

• The scooterette is too small and similar to mopeds 18.

The Honda Activa is equipped with a number of new functions and mechanisms, introduced for
the first time in India. It is designed to offer greater functionality, performance, economy, and
ease of handling and maintenance to a wide cross-section of the Indian society.

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As responsible members of society and industry, Honda Motorcycle and Scooters India Pvt. Ltd.
manufacturer of two wheelers, recognize that wellbeing of humans and conservation of earth's
environment is important. By adopting environmental management system, HMSI is moving
towards realization of Honda's green factory concept. HMSI tries continually to monitor,
improve and conserve the environment in which we operate. HMSI is committed to achieve,
environmental excellence in all its industrial activities, in the following ways:

 Conserving environment through preventing pollution at its source of generation and


strengthening our existing pollution control system.
 Promoting conservation of resources such as energy, water, oil and grease and other raw
materials, by reusing, recycling and minimizing the waste generation.
 Complying with all applicable legal/regulatory requirements and strive to go beyond
wherever possible.
 Regular monitoring and reviewing of environmental objectives and targets.
 Increasing environment awareness and competence amongst our employees and
encourage vendors & dealers to adopt Execution Management System.

PRODUCT PROFILE

HONDA ACTIVA
Technical Specifications:
Engine:
Engine 4-stroke, single cylinder, air cooled,
OHC
Displacement 109cc
Maximum Power 8 bhp @ 7500 rpm
Maximum Torque 0.9 Kg-m @5500 rpm
Transmission V- matic
Ignition Self & Kick
Electricals :
Battery 12V, 5Ah
Headlamp 35/35W Halogen
Chassis :
Frame High Rigidity Underbone Type

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Dimension 1761 x 710 x 1147mm
Wheel base 1238mm
Seat Height 765mm
Ground Clearance 145mm
Suspension :
Front Bottom link with Spring loaded
Hydraulic Damper
Rear Unit Swing with Spring loaded
Hydraulic Damper
Tyre size:
Front 90/100-10 53 J
Rear 90/100-10 53 J

Brakes :
Front Drum, 130mm Diameter (with CBS)
Rear Drum, 130mm Diameter (with CBS)

Fuel Tank Capacity:


Fuel Tank Capacity 5.3 Litres
Under seat Storage 18 litres

Colours:
➢Strand silver metallic

➢Black

➢Laser red

➢Precious gold metallic

➢Azure blue metallic

Features:

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 Aerodynamic Design: The Honda Activa has an aerodynamic body that helps
cool the engine through smoother airflow. It also helps to lower fuel consumption
by lowering air resistance.

 Tuff up Tube: The Tyres of the Honda Activa have double layered tubes with
fluid in between. This seals the air leakage in case of a puncture to ensure that the
rider enjoys a hassle-free ride.
 Under Seat Box: Neatly hidden beneath the seat of the Honda Activa is space
that can comfortably hold a helmet or any other thing you wish to put away.

 CLIC: The „Convenient Lift-up Independent Cover‟ enables one to easily lift-up
the Honda Activa‟s body cover, like the bonnet of a car.This makes routine
maintenance easier and faster.

 Multi-Reflector headlamp: Honda Activa has a powerful and very stylish multi-
reflector headlamp that increases road visibility to make night driving a safe
experience.

30 | P a g e
CHAPTER- 4
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

TABLE NO 4.1 - Gender analysis

Gender Frequency Percentage

Male 14 46
Female 16 54
Total 30 100

120

100

80

Frequency
60
Percentage
40

20

0
Male Female Total

Inference:

This chart shows that 46% of the respondents belongs to male and 54% of the respondents
belongs to female.

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TABLE NO: 4.2 - Age analysis

Age Frequency Percentage

20-30 23 76.67
31-40 3 10
41-50 3 10
above 1 3.33
50
Total 30 100

Frequency

20-30
31-40
41-50
above 50
Total

Inference:

This chart shows that 76.67% of the respondents are from 20-30 age and 10% of the respondents
are from each 31-40 age group and 41-50 age group. 3.33% of the respondent is above 50 age.

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TABLE NO: 4.3 - Occupation analysis

Occupation Frequency percentage

Employee 2 6.67

Professional 21 70

Business 0 0
Student 7 23.33
Total 30 100

120

100

80

60
Frequency
40
percentage
20

Inference :

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This graph shows that 6.67% of the respondents are employee, 70% of the respondents are
professional and 23.33% of the respondents are students. There is no respondent is from business
field.

Education Frequency Percentage

Graduate 2 6.67
Post 21 70
graduate

Professional 0 0
degree

TABLE NO: 4.4 -


Other 7 23.33
Education analysis
Total 30 100

120
100
80
60
40
Frequency
20
Percentage
0

Inference :

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This graph shows that 70% of the respondents are post graduate, 23.33% of the respondents are
from category and 6.67 % of the respondents are graduate.
Family Frequency Percentage
Income

less 3 10
than
10,000
10,001- 12 40
20,000

20,001- 4 13.33
30,000

above 11 36.67
TABLE 30,000 NO :4.5 - Family Income
Analysis Total 30 100

100
80
60
40
20
Frequency
0
Percentage

35 | P a g e
Inference :

This graph shows that 10% of the respondents are having less than 10,000 monthly income, 40%
of the respondents having 10,001-20,000 and 13.33% of the respondents having 20,000-30,001
and 36.67% of the respondents having above 30,000 monthly income.

Table: 4.6 - Ownership status


Ownership Frequency Percentage
status

Self- 15 50
Owned

Company 13 43.33
owned

Company 2 6.67
leased

Total 30 100

120
100
80
60 Frequency
40 Percentage
20
0
Self- Company Company Total
Owned owned leased

Inference :

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This graph shows that the ownership status of 50% of the respondents are self owned , 43.33%
of the respondents are company owned and 6.67% of the respondents are company leased.

Dealers Frequency Percentage


name

Silicon 4 13.33
Honda

City 20 66.67
Honda

Haiku 6 20
Honda
Table : 4.7 -Dealers analysis
Planet 0 0
Honda

Total 30 100

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120

100

80

60

40 Frequency
20 Percentage
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 13.33% of the respondents are bought from Silicon Honda dealer , 66.67%
of the respondents bought from City Honda dealer and 20% of the respondents bought from
Haiku Honda dealers. No respondents are bought from planet Honda.

Table: 4.8 -Reason for selecting the dealers


Dealer Frequency Percentage
selection
reason

Service 11 36.67
Performance
facilities

Friends 9 30
Advertisement 2 6.67

Others 8 26.66
Total 30 100

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120
100
80
60
40
Frequency
20
Percentage
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 36.67% of the respondents reason for selecting dealers on the basis of
service performance facilities, 30% of the respondents are friends basis, and 6.67% of the
respondents advertisement, 26.67% respondents others.

Table : 4.9 - Recommendation of Honda Activa analysis.

Recommendation Frequency Percentage


of Honda Activa

Yes 26 86.67
No 4 13.33
Total 30 100

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100
90
80
70
60
Frequency
50
Percentage
40
30
20
10
0
Yes No Total

Inference :

This graph shows that 86.67% of the respondents would recommend Honda Activa , 13.33% of
the respondents would not recommend Honda Activa.

Table : 4.10 - Sales and service opinion


Opinion on Frequency Percentage
sales and
service

Highly Satisfied 5 16.67

Satisfied 17 56.67
Neutral 8 26.67
Dissatisfied 0 0

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highly 0 0
dissatisfied

Total 30 100

120

100

80

60

40 Frequency
Percentage
20

Inference :

This graph shows that 16.67% of the respondents opinion on sales and service is highly satisfied,
56.67% of the respondents opinion on sales and service is satisfied, 20% of the respondents
opinion on sales and service is neutral and none of the respondents are dissatisfied and highly
dissatisfied.

Table : 4.11 - Road grip of Honda Activa


Road Frequency Percentage
Grip

Strongly 9 30
agree

Agree 19 63.33
Neutral 2 6.67
Disagree 0 0
Strongly 0 0
Disagree

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Total 30 100

120

100

80

60 Frequency

40 Percentage

20

0
Strongly Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Total
agree Disagree

Inference :

This graph shows that 30% of the respondents are strongly agree with the road grip, 63.33% of
the respondents are agree with road grip, 6.67% of the respondents are neutral and none of the
respondents are disagree and strongly disagree.

Table : 4.12 - Comfort analysis

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Comfort Frequency Percentage

Excellent 5 16.67
Good 21 70
Average 3 10
Fair 1 3.33
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

100

80

60
40
20 Frequency
0 Percentage
Frequency

Inference :

This graph shows that 16.67% of the respondents rated comfort level is excellent, 70% of the
respondents rated as Good, 10% of the respondents rated as average, 3.33% of the respondent
rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

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Table: 4. 13 - Mileage analysis
Mileage Frequency Percentage

More than 4 13.33


50km/Litre

Between 45- 10 33.33


49km/Litre

Between 40- 9 30
44km/Litre

Between 35- 7 23.33


39km/Litre

Total 30 100

120
100
80
60
40
Frequency
20
Percentage
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 13.33% of the respondents said that mileage of Honda Activa is more than
50km/litre, 33.33% of the respondents said between 45-49km/litre, 30%of the respondents said
between 40-44km/litre and 23.33%of the respondents said between 35-39km/litre.

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Table : 4.14 - Design analysis

Design Frequency Percentage

Excellent 6 20
Good 13 43.33
Average 7 23.33
Fair 4 13.33
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

100
90
80
70
60
50
40 Frequency
30
Percentage
20
10
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 20% of the respondents rated design of Honda Activa is excellent,
43.33% of the respondents rated as Good, 23.33% of the respondents rated as average, 13.33%
of the respondent rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

Table: 4.15 - Engine performance analysis

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Engine Frequency Percentage
Performance

Excellent 5 16.67
Good 15 50
Average 9 30
Fair 1 3.33
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

120

100

80

60
Frequency
40 Percentage
20

Inference :

This graph shows that 16.67% of the respondents rated engine performance of Honda Activa is
excellent, 50% of the respondents rated as Good, 30% of the respondents rated as average,
3.33% of the respondent rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

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Table : 4.16 - Breaking analysis

Breaking Frequency Percentage


Pick Up Frequency Percentage
Excellent 6 20
Good 14 46.67
Average 5 16.67
Fair 5 16.67
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

120

100

80

60 Frequency
Percentage
40

20

0
Excellent Good Average Fair Poor Total

Inference :

This graph shows that 20% of the respondents rated the breaking of Honda Activa is excellent,
46.67% of the respondents rated as Good, 16.67% of the respondents rated as average, 16.67% of
the respondent rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

Table: 4.17 - Pick up analysis

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Excellent 7 23.3
Good 11 36.67
Average 10 33.33
Fair 4 13.33
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

100

80

60

40 Frequency
20 Percentage

0
Frequency

Inference :

This graph shows that 23.3% of the respondents rated the Pick Up of Honda Activa is excellent,
36.67% of the respondents rated as Good, 33.33% of the respondents rated as average, 13.33%
of the respondent rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

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Table : 4.18 - Electric start analysis

Electric Frequency Percentage


Start

Excellent 6 20
Good 13 43.33
Average 10 33.33
Fair 1 3.33
Poor 0 0
Total 30 100

100
90
80
70
60
50
40 Frequency
30
Percentage
20
10
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 20% of the respondents rated the electric start of Honda Activa is
excellent, 43.33% of the respondents rated as Good, 23.33% of the respondents rated as
average, 13.33% of the respondent rated as fair and none of the respondents rated as poor.

Table : 4.19 - Service center preference analysis


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Service center Frequency Percentage
preference
Authorized 14 46.67
selling dealer

Other 10 33.33
authorized
servicing
center
Private shop 6 20

Total 30 100

100

80

60

40

20
Frequency
0
Percentage
Authorized
Other
selling Private
authorized Total
dealer shop
servicing
center

Inference :

This graph shows that 46.67% of the respondents prefer authorized selling dealers, 33.33% of
the respondents prefer other authorized servicing center, 20% of the respondents prefer private
shop.

Table : 4.20 - Future purchase of Honda Activa

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Future Frequency Percentage
purchase
of Honda
Activa

Yes 17 56.67
No 13 43.33
Total 30 100

Frequency

Yes
No
Total

Inference :

This graph shows that 56.67% of the respondents are planning to buy for future, 43.33% of the
respondents are not planning to buy for near future.

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Table : 4.21 - Payment mode preference analysis

Mode of Frequency Percentage


Payment
Cash 9 30
Finance 8 26.67
schemes
Company 6 20
Loan
Others 7 23.33
Total 30 100
120

100

80

60

40

20

0
Cash Finance
schemes

Inference :

This graph shows that 30% of the respondents prefer cash, 26.67% of the respondents prefer
finance schemes , 20% of the respondents prefer company loan , 23.33% of the respondent prefer
others.

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Table : 4.22 - Brand awareness analysis
Sources Frequency Percentage
create brand
awareness

News papers 8 26.67

Television 14 46.67

Show-room 4 13.33
display

Journals or 4 13.33
others
Total 30 100

100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20 Frequency
10
Percentage
0

Inference :

This graph shows that 26.67% of the respondents are aware of the brand through News papers,
46.67% of the respondents are aware through television, 13.33% of the respondents are aware
through show room display and 13.33% of the respondent are aware through journals or others.

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Table : 4.23 - Service regularity analysis

Service Frequency Percentage


regularity
rating

Regular 15 50
Irregular 9 30
Average 6 20
Total 30 100

Frequency

Regular
Irregular
Average
Total

Inference :

This graph shows that 30% of the respondents rated the service regularity as regular, 30% of the
respondents rated as irregular, 20% of the respondents rated as average.

Table : 4.24 - Overall satisfaction analysis

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Overall Frequency Percentage
Satisfaction of
Honda Activa

Excellent 6 20
Good 12 40
Satisfactory 10 33.33

Not- Satisfactory 2 6.67

Total 30 100

100

50

Frequency
0
Percentage

Inference :

This graph shows that the overall satisfaction level of 20% of the respondents are excellent, 40%
of the respondents are rated as Good, 33.33% of the respondents are satisfactory, 6.67% of the
respondents are not satisfactory.

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CHAPTER- 5
FINDINGS , SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

5.1 FINDINGS
 City Honda Pvt. Ltd. Occupy prime position with 66.67% of sample size
recommending the dealers for Honda Activa two wheelers.
 50%of the customer’s ownership status of Activa is self-owned.
 56.67% of the sample size told that the service given by the City Honda was
satisfied.
 Service performance facilities have popularized as the reason for selecting City
Honda with 36.67% .
 46.67% customers say that they prefer to service their vehicles at the authorized
selling dealers only.
 56.67% of the customers told that they would purchase another Honda Activa in
future for their family members or for their relatives.
 70% of the customers said that they purchased Activa for its travelling comfort.
 63.33% of the customers said that they were mutually agreed with the road grip of
Honda Activa.
 33.33% of the customers said that the mileage of the Honda Activa is only
Between 45-49km/litre.
 43.33% of the customers felt that the design of Honda Activa was good.
 50% of the customers felt that the engine performance was good.
 36.67% of the customers felt that the pick-up and 43.33% felt that the electric
start of Honda Activa was good.
 Indian market is full of middle class customers and most of the customers owning
Activa belonged to middle class category.
 46.67%customers got aware of Honda Activa largely through Televisions.
 23.33% of the customers were students and 70% of them were professionals.
 46% of the customers were male and 54% of them were female.

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5.2 SUGGESTIONS

This study is aimed at analyzing customer satisfaction with sample of 30 members, which has
helped in getting an overall view of customer satisfaction towards Honda Activa considering
different criteria. It was evident from the study that most of the respondents are satisfied with
their Honda Activa. However some of the respondents were dissatisfied. Base on the study
following suggestions can be considered.

 Providing more techno-driven, sophisticated exteriors keeping track of present situation.


 To increase the mileage efficiency
 To provide mobile servicing a should be able to reach the spot in case of any breakdown
 To bring down the cost of spares and to improve genuinely.
 To change shape or body design of Omni so as to increase road safety especially during
swift turns.
 To give more ads on to drive slowly and safely.
 Sales executives should constantly review the present, the past and the future objectives
and there by evaluate their performance.
 Gathering and processing data through electronic data processing system there by time
spent on information evaluation feed back can be reduced.
 Building satisfaction: sales person should reassure the customer regarding decision taken
by him while ordering product/service.
 They should constantly provide adequate solutions for purchasing a product.
 Final buyer relation: sales personnel who are in contact with final buyer should be
courteous, friendly and competent in their jobs.
 Customer care is best way to build long-term relation, because they also have emotional
and psychological needs when they purchase a car.

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5.3 CONCLUSION

This study concludes that improved product and process quality will result in customer
satisfaction. And it incorporates learned and best practices from global automotive industry leads
to additional confidence for global souring that provides a global quality system approach in the
supply chain for subcontractor development and consistency. It may result in reduction in
variation, waste and increased efficiency that provides a common language for worldwide
quality system requirements.

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CHAPTER-6

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books:
 Principles of Marketing Management By Philip Kotler.
 Research Methodology By C.R.Kothari.
 Hsieh, An-Tien and Li, Chung-Kang.2008.Themoderating effect of brand image on
public relations perception and customer loyalty. Marketing Intelligence & Planning Vol.
26 No. 1, pp. 26-42
 Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics Vol. 20 No. 2, 2008 pp. 139-155 #
Emerald Group Publishing Limited 1355-5855 DOI 10.1108/13555850810864524
 Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal Vol. 13 No. 3, 2010 pp. 309-323
Emerald Group Publishing Limited 1352-2752 DOI 10.1108/13522751011053653

 International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management Vol. 40 No. 7, 2012 pp. 528-
543 q Emerald Group Publishing Limited 0959-0552 DOI 10.1108/09590551211239846

News Papers:
 Times of India.
 Economic Times.

Web Sites:
www.honda2wheelersindia.com

www.activa.com

www.hondabick.com

www.emaraldinsight.com

ANNEXURE
A STUDY ON “CUSTOMER SATISFACTION OF HONDA ACTIVA 5G” IN
TUMKUR DISTRICT
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QUESTIONNAIRE

I am Akshatha Sena , pursuing my MBA Programme in IIPM, Bengaluru University. Currently


doing my project in the topic “A study of customer satisfaction on Honda Activa5G in Tumkur
District” Under the supervision of Dr. Prakash K C, as a part of my research, data has to be
collected using questionnaire, so I request you kindly spare your valuable time to fill up the
questionnaire, the collected data will be kept as a confidential and it will be used only for
academic research and the individual data will not be shared with anybody under any
circumstance.

1. Personal Details

a) Name :

b) Address :

c) E-mail :

2. Gender : Male Female

3. Age group (in years): a) 20-30 b) 31-40 c) 41-50 d) above 50

4. Occupation : a) Employee b) Professional c) Business d) Student

5. Education :

a) Graduate b) Post graduate c) Professional Degree d) Others

6. Monthly Family Income (In Rupees):

a) Less than 10000 b) 10001 to 20000 c) 20001 to 30000 d) Above 30000

7. Ownership status of Honda Activa.

a) Self owned

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b) Company owned

c) Company leased

8. Where did you buy your scooter?

Dealers Name:

a)Silicon Honda

b)City Honda

c)Haiku Honda

d) Planet Honda

9. Reason for above dealers?

a) Service performance facilities

b) Friends

c) Advertisement

d) Others

10. If you were to recommend a scooter, would you recommend Honda Activa?

a) Yes

b) No

11. Your opinion on sales and service provided by Honda Activa dealers.

a) Highly satisfied

b) Satisfied

c) Neutral

d) Dissatisfied

e) Highly dissatisfied.

12. Honda Activa provides good road grip

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a) Strongly Agree

b) Agree

c) Neutral

d) Disagree

e) Strongly Disagree

13. Give you response on comfort of Honda Activa scooter

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

14. Indicate your response on mileage of Honda Activa scooter

a) More than 50 km/ litre

b) Between 45 – 49km/litre

c) Between 40-44 km/litre

d) Between 35-39 km/litre

15. How do you rate the design of Honda Activa scooter

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

16. Indicate your response on engine performance of Honda Activa scooter

a) Excellent

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b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

17. Indicate your response on breaking of Honda Activa scooter.

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

18. How do you rate on pick-up of Honda Activa Scooter?

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

19. Give your opinion on electric start of Honda Activa scooter.

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Average

d) Fair

e) Poor

20. Where do you usually go for service?

a) Authorized selling dealer


b) Other authorized service center

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c) Private shop
21. Are you planning to buy another Activa in the near future?

a) Yes
b) No
22. What mode of payment do you prefer?

a) Cash
b) Finance schemes
c) Company loan
d) Others
23. What are the sources that created brand awareness?

a) News papers
b) Television
c) Show-room display
d) journals or others.
24. Ratings for service regularity

a) Regular
b) Irregular
c) Average
25. Overall Satisfaction with regards to the use of Honda Activa

a) Excellent

b) Good

c) Satisfactory

d) Not-satisfactory

64 | P a g e
65 | P a g e