Anda di halaman 1dari 20

NEUL SIMON Y LA DRAMATURGIA

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/1994/neil-simon-the-art-of-theater-no-10-neil-simon

INTERVIEWER

Lillian Hellman once said she always began work on a play with something very small—a scene or even
two vague lines of dialogue whose meaning was utterly unknown to her. What starts you, what makes you
think there’s a play there?

NEIL SIMON

As many plays as I’ve written—twenty-seven, twenty-eight—I can’t recollect a moment when I’ve said,
This would make a good play. I never sit down and write bits and pieces of dialogue. What I might do is
make a few notes on who’s in the play, the characters I want, where it takes place, and the general idea of
it. I don’t make any outlines at all. I just like to plunge in. I’ll start right from page one because I want to
hear how the people speak. Are they interesting enough for me? Have I captured them? It goes piece by
piece, brick by brick. I don’t know that I have a play until I’ve reached thirty, thirty-five pages.

INTERVIEWER

Have you ever started thematically?

SIMON

I think about thematic plays but I don’t believe I write them. Nothing really takes shape until I become
specific about the character and the dilemma he’s in. Dilemma is the key word. It is always a dilemma,
not a situation. To tell the truth, I really don’t know what the theme of the play is until I’ve written it and
the critics tell me.

INTERVIEWER

Every playwright, every director, every actor, speaks about conflict. We’re all supposed to be in the
conflict business. When you speak of dilemma, are you talking about conflict?

SIMON

Yes. In Broadway Bound I wanted to show the anatomy of writing comedy—with the older brother
teaching Eugene, which was the case with my brother Danny and me. Stan keeps asking Eugene for the
essential ingredient in comedy and when Eugene can’t answer, Stan says, “Conflict!” When he asks for
the other key ingredient, and Eugene can only come up with, “More conflict?” Stan says, “The key word
is wants. In every comedy, even drama, somebody has to want something and want it bad. When
somebody tries to stop him—that’s conflict.” By the time you know the conflicts, the play is already
written in your mind. All you have to do is put the words down. You don’t have to outline the play, it
outlines itself. You go by sequential activity. One thing follows the other. But it all starts with that first
seed, conflict. As Stan says, it’s got to be a very, very strong conflict, not one that allows the characters to
say, Forget about this! I’m walking out. They’ve got to stay there and fight it out to the end.

INTERVIEWER

You said that it isn’t until you get to page thirty-five that you know whether or not you’ve got a play. Are
there times when you get to page thirty-five and decide the conflict isn’t strong enough and the play
disappears to languish forever in a drawer?
SIMON

I’ve got infinitely more plays in the drawer than have seen the lights of the stage. Most of them never
come out of the drawer, but occasionally one will and it amazes me how long it has taken to germinate
and blossom. The best example would be Brighton Beach Memoirs. I wrote the first thirty-five pages of
the play and gave it to my children, Nancy and Ellen, and Marsha, my wife at the time. They read it and
said, This is incredible. You’ve got to go on with it. I showed it to my producer, Manny Azenberg and to
Gordon Davidson, and they said, This is going to be a great play. I knew the play was a turn in style for
me, probing more deeply into myself, but maybe the pressure of the words great play scared me, so I put
it away. Periodically, I would take it out and read it and I wouldn’t know how to do it. After nine years I
took it out one day, read the thirty-five pages, picked up my pen and the pad I write on and finished the
play in six weeks. I have the feeling that in the back of your mind there’s a little writer who writes while
you’re doing other things, because I had no trouble at that point. Obviously, what had happened in the
ensuing years in my life made clear to me what it should be about. Somewhere in the back of my head I
grew up, I matured. I was ready to write that play. Sometimes it helps to have some encouragement. Once
I was having dinner with Mike Nichols and he asked, What are you doing? I said, I’m working on a play
about two ex-vaudevillians who haven’t worked together or seen each other in eleven years and they get
together to do an Ed Sullivan Show. He said, That sounds wonderful. Go back and finish it. So I did. It
was as though a critic had already seen the play and said, I love it. But there are many, many plays that
get to a certain point and no further. For years I’ve been trying to write the play of what happened to me
and the seven writers who wrote Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows. But I’ve never got past page twenty-
two because there are seven conflicts rather than one main conflict. I’ve been writing more subtext and
more subplot lately—but in this situation everybody was funny. I didn’t have somebody to be serious, to
anchor it. I always have to find the anchor. I have to find the Greek chorus in the play, the character who
either literally talks to the audience or talks to the audience in a sense. For example, Oscar in The Odd
Couple is the Greek chorus. He watches, he perceives how Felix behaves, and he comments on it. Felix
then comments back on what Oscar is, but Oscar is the one who is telling us what the play is about. More
recently, in the Brighton Beach trilogy, I’ve been literally talking to the audience, through the character
of Eugene, because it is the only way I can express the writer’s viewpoint. The writer has inner thoughts
and they are not always articulated on the stage—and I want the audience to be able to get inside his
head. It’s what I did in Jake’s Women. In the first try out in San Diego the audience didn’t know enough
about Jake because all he did was react to the women in his life, who were badgering him, trying to get
him to open up. We didn’t know who Jake was. So I introduced the device of him talking to the audience.
Then he became the fullest, richest character in the play, because the audience knew things I never
thought I would reveal about Jake—and possibly about myself.

INTERVIEWER

Will you return to the Show of Shows play?

SIMON

I do very often think about doing it. What was unique about that experience was that almost every one of
the writers has gone on to do really major things—Mel Brooks’s whole career . . . Larry Gelbart . . .
Woody Allen . . . Joe Stein who wrote Fiddler on the Roof . . . Michael Stewart who wrote Hello, Dolly . .
. it was a group of people only Sid Caesar knew how to put together. Maybe it was trial and error because
the ones who didn’t work fell out, but once we worked together it was the most excruciatingly hilarious
time in my life. It was also one of the most painful because you were fighting for recognition and there
was no recognition. It was very difficult for me because I was quiet and shy, so I sat next to Carl Reiner
and whispered my jokes to him. He was my spokesman, he’d jump up and say, He’s got it! He’s got it!
Then Carl would say the line and I would hear it and I’d laugh because I thought it was funny. But when I
watched the show on a Saturday night with my wife, Joan, she’d say, That was your line, wasn’t it? and
I’d say, I don’t remember. What I do remember is the screaming and fighting—a cocktail party without
the cocktails, everyone yelling lines in and out, people getting very angry at others who were slacking off.
Mel Brooks was the main culprit. We all came in to work at ten o’clock in the morning, but he showed up
at one o’clock. We’d say, That’s it. We’re sick and tired of this. Either Mel comes in at ten o’clock or we
go to Sid and do something about it. At about ten to one, Mel would come in with a straw hat, fling it
across the room, and say, Lindy made it!—and everyone would fall down hysterical. He didn’t need the
eight hours we put in. He needed four hours. He is, maybe, the most uniquely funny man I’ve ever met.
That inspired me. I wanted to be around those people. I’ve fooled around with this idea for a play. I even
found a title for it, “Laughter on the Twenty-third Floor,” because I think the office was on the twenty-
third floor. From that building we looked down on Bendel’s and Bergdorf Goodman and Fifth Avenue,
watching all the pretty girls go by through binoculars. Sometimes we’d set fire to the desk with lighter
fluid. We should have been arrested, all of us.

INTERVIEWER

If you ever get past page twenty-two, how would you deal with Mel and Woody and the others? Would
they appear as themselves?

SIMON

No, no, no! They’d all be fictitious. It would be like the Brighton Beach trilogy, which is
semiautobiographical.

INTERVIEWER

It feels totally autobiographical. I assumed it was.

SIMON

Everyone does. But I’ve told interviewers that if I meant it to be autobiographical I would have called the
character Neil Simon. He’s not Neil. He’s Eugene Jerome. That gives you greater latitude for fiction. It’s
like doing abstract painting. You see your own truth in it but the abstraction is the art.

INTERVIEWER

When did you realize there was a sequel to Brighton Beach Memoirs?

SIMON

It got a middling review from Frank Rich of The New York Times, but he said at the end of it, “One hopes
that there is a chapter two to Brighton Beach.” I thought, he’s asking for a sequel to a play that he doesn’t
seem to like!

INTERVIEWER

Are you saying Frank Rich persuaded you to write Biloxi Blues?

SIMON

No, but I listened to him saying, I’m interested enough to want to know more about this family. Then,
Steven Spielberg, who had gone to see Brighton Beach, got word to me, suggesting the next play should
be about my days in the army. I was already thinking about that and I started to write Biloxi Blues, which
became a play about Eugene’s rites of passage. I discovered something very important in the writing
of Biloxi Blues. Eugene, who keeps a diary, writes in it his belief that Epstein is homosexual. When the
other boys in the barracks read the diary and assume it’s true, Eugene feels terrible guilt. He’s realized the
responsibility of putting something down on paper, because people tend to believe everything they read.

INTERVIEWER

The Counterfeiters ends with the diary André Gide kept while he was writing the book. In it he says he
knows he’s writing well when the dialectic of the scene takes over and the characters seize the scene from
him and he’s become not a writer but a reader. Do you sometimes find that your characters have taken
the play away from you and are off in their own direction?
SIMON

I’ve always felt like a middleman, like the typist. Somebody somewhere else is saying, This is what they
say now. This is what they say next. Very often it is the characters themselves, once they become clearly
defined. When I was working on my first play, Come Blow Your Horn, I was told by fellow writers that
you must outline your play, you must know where you’re going. I wrote a complete, detailed outline from
page one to the end of the play. In the writing of the play, I didn’t get past page fifteen when the
characters started to move away from the outline. I tried to pull them back in, saying, Get back in there.
This is where you belong. I’ve already diagrammed your life. They said, No, no, no. This is where I want
to go. So, I started following them. In the second play, Barefoot in the Park, I outlined the first two acts. I
said, I’ll leave the third act a free-for-all, so I can go where I want. I never got through that outline either.
In The Odd Couple, I outlined the first act. After a while I got tired of doing even that. I said, I want to be
as surprised as anyone else. I had also read a book on playwriting by John van Druten, in which he said,
Don’t outline your play, because then the rest of it will just be work. It should be joy. You should be
discovering things the way the audience discovers them. So, I stopped doing it.

INTERVIEWER

Gide writes about being surprised by the material coming up on the typewriter. He finds himself
laughing, shocked, sometimes dismayed . . .

SIMON

Sometimes I start laughing—and I’ve had moments in this office when I’ve burst into tears. Not that I
thought the audience might do that. The moment had triggered a memory or a feeling that was deeply
hidden. That’s catharsis. It’s one of the main reasons I write the plays. It’s like analysis without going to
the analyst. The play becomes your analysis. The writing of the play is the most enjoyable part of it. It’s
also the most frightening part because you walk into a forest without a knife, without a compass. But if
your instincts are good, if you have a sense of geography, you find that you’re clearing a path and getting
to the right place. If the miracle happens, you come out at the very place you wanted to. But very often
you have to go back to the beginning of the forest and start walking through it again, saying, I went that
way. It was a dead end. You cross out, cross over. You meet new friends along the way, people you never
thought you’d meet. It takes you into a world you hadn’t planned on going to when you started the play.
The play may have started out to be a comedy, and suddenly you get into a place of such depth that it
surprises you. As one critic aptly said, I wrote Brighton Beach Memoirs about the family I wished I’d had
instead of the family I did have. It’s closer to Ah, Wilderness than my reality.

INTERVIEWER

When did you realize that Brighton Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues were part of a trilogy?

SIMON

I thought it seemed odd to leave the Eugene saga finished after two plays. Three is a trilogy—I don’t even
know what two plays are called. So, I decided to write the third one, and the idea came immediately. It
was back to the war theme again, only these were domestic wars. The boys were having guilts and doubts
about leaving home for a career writing comedy. Against this played the war between the parents. I also
brought in the character of the socialist grandfather who was constantly telling the boys, You can’t just
write jokes and make people laugh. Against this came Blanche from the first play, Brighton Beach, trying
to get the grandfather to move to Florida to take care of his aging, ill wife. To me, setting people in
conflict with each other is like what those Chinese jugglers do, spinning one plate, then another, then
another. I wanted to keep as many plates spinning as I could.

INTERVIEWER

What exactly do you mean when you call the Brighton Beach trilogy semiautobiographical?

SIMON
It means the play may be based on incidents that happened in my life—but they’re not written the way
they happened. Broadway Bound comes closest to being really autobiographical. I didn’t pull any
punches with that one. My mother and father were gone when I wrote it, so I did tell about the fights and
what it was like for me as a kid hearing them. I didn’t realize until someone said after the first reading
that the play was really a love letter to my mother! She suffered the most in all of it. She was the one that
was left alone. Her waxing that table didn’t exist in life but it exists symbolically for me. It’s the
abstraction I was talking about.

INTERVIEWER

Speaking of abstraction, there’s something mystifying to audiences—and other writers—about what the
great comedy writers do. From outside, it seems to be as different from what most writers are able to do
as baseball is from ballet. I’m not going to ask anything quite as fatuous as “what is humor?” but
I am asking—is it genetic, is it a mind-set, a quirk? And, most important, can it be learned—or, for that
matter, taught?

SIMON

The answer is complex. First of all, there are various styles and attitudes towards comedy. When I worked
on Your Show of Shows, Larry Gelbart was the wittiest, cleverest man I’d ever met, Mel Brooks the most
outrageous. I never knew what I was. I still don’t know. Maybe I had the best sense of construction of the
group. I only know some aspects of my humor, one of which involves being completely literal. To give
you an example, in Lost in Yonkers, Uncle Louie is trying to explain the heartless grandmother to Arty.
“When she was twelve years old, her old man takes her to a political rally in Berlin. A horse goes down
and crushes Ma’s foot. Nobody ever fixed it. It hurts every day of her life, but I never once seen her take
even an aspirin.” Later, Arty says to his older brother, “I’m afraid of her, Jay. A horse fell on her when
she was a kid, and she hasn’t taken an aspirin yet.” It’s an almost exact repetition of what Louie told him
and this time it gets a huge laugh. That mystifies me. In Prisoner of Second Avenue you knew there were
terrible things tormenting Peter Falk. He sat down on a sofa that had stacks of pillows, like every sofa in
the world, and he took one pillow after the other and started throwing them angrily saying, “You pay
eight hundred for a sofa and you can’t sit on it because you got ugly little pillows shoved up your back!
There is no joke there. Yet, it was an enormous laugh—because the audience identified. That, more or
less, is what is funny to me—saying something that’s instantly identifiable to everybody. People come up
to you after the show and say, I’ve always thought that, but I never knew anyone else thought it. It’s a
shared secret between you and the audience.

INTERVIEWER

You’ve often said that you’ve never consciously written a joke in one of your plays.

SIMON

I try never to think of jokes as jokes. I confess that in the early days, when I came from television, plays
like Come Blow Your Horn would have lines you could lift out that would be funny in themselves. That
to me would be a “joke,” which I would try to remove. In The Odd Couple Oscar had a line about Felix,
“He’s so panicky he wears his seatbelt at a drive-in movie.” That could be a Bob Hope joke. I left it in
because I couldn’t find anything to replace it.

INTERVIEWER

Have you ever found that a producer, director, or actor objected to losing a huge laugh that you were
determined to cut from the play?

SIMON

An actor, perhaps, yes. They’ll say, But that’s my big laugh. I say, But it hurts the scene. It’s very hard to
convince them. Walter Matthau was after me constantly on The Odd Couple, complaining not about one
of his lines, but one of Art Carney’s. He’d say, It’s not a good line. A few days later, I received a letter
from a doctor in Wilmington. It said, Dear Mr. Simon, I loved your play but I find one line really
objectionable. I wish you would take it out. So, I took the line out and said, Walter, I’ve complied with
your wishes. I got a letter from a prominent doctor in Wilmington who didn’t like the line . . . He started
to laugh and then I realized, You son of a bitch, you’re the doctor! And he was. Those quick lines, the
one-liners attributed to me for so many years—I think they come purely out of character, rather than out
of a joke. Walter Kerr once came to my aid by saying “to be or not to be” is a one-liner. If it’s a dramatic
moment no one calls it a one-liner. If it gets a laugh, suddenly it’s a one-liner. I think one of the
complaints of critics is that the people in my plays are funnier than they would be in life, but have you
ever seen Medea? The characters are a lot more dramatic in that than they are in life.

INTERVIEWER

You’ve also said that when you began writing for the theater you decided to try to write comedy the way
dramatists write plays—writing from the characters out, internally, psychologically . . .

SIMON

Yes. What I try to do is make dialogue come purely out of character, so that one character could never say
the lines that belong to another character. If it’s funny, it’s because I’m telling a story about characters in
whom I may find a rich vein of humor. When I started writing plays I was warned by people like Lillian
Hellman, “You do not mix comedy with drama.” But my theory was, if it’s mixed in life, why can’t you
do it in a play? The very first person I showed Come Blow Your Horn to was Herman Shumlin, the
director of Hellman’s The Little Foxes. He said, I like the play, I like the people, but I don’t like the older
brother. I said, What’s wrong with him? He said, Well, it’s a comedy. We have to like everybody. I said,
In life do we have to like everybody? In the most painful scene in Lost in Yonkers, Bella, who is
semiretarded, is trying to tell the family that the boy she wants to marry is also retarded. It’s a poignant
situation and yet the information that slowly comes out—and the way the family is third-degreeing her—
becomes hilarious because it’s mixed with someone else’s pain. I find that what is most poignant is often
most funny.

INTERVIEWER

In the roll-call scene in Biloxi Blues you riff for several pages on one word, one syllable: Ho. It builds and
builds in what I’ve heard you call a “run.”

SIMON

I learned from watching Chaplin films that what’s most funny isn’t a single moment of laughter but the
moments that come on top of it and on top of those. I learned it from the Laurel and Hardy films too. One
of the funniest things I ever saw Laurel and Hardy do was try to undress in the upper berth of a train—
together. It took ten minutes, getting the arms in the wrong sleeves and their feet caught in the net, one
terrible moment leading to another. I thought, there could be no greater satisfaction for me than to do that
to an audience. Maybe Ho also came from sitting in the dark as a kid listening to Jack Benny’s running
gags on the radio. In Barefoot in the Park, when the telephone man comes up five or six flights of stairs,
he arrives completely out of breath. When Paul makes his entrance, he’s completely out of breath. When
the mother makes her entrance, she’s completely out of breath. Some critics have written, You milk that
out-of-breath joke too much. My answer is, You mean because it’s happened three times, when they
come up the fourth time they shouldn’t be out of breath anymore? It’s not a joke, it’s the natural thing.
Like Ho. Those boys are petrified on their first day in the army, confronted by this maniac sergeant.

INTERVIEWER

Do you pace the lines so the laughs don’t cover the dialogue or is that the director’s job? Do you try to set
up a rhythm in the writing that will allow for the audience’s response?

SIMON
You don’t know where the laughs are until you get in front of an audience. Most of the biggest laughs
I’ve ever had I never knew were big laughs. Mike Nichols used to say to me, Take out all the little laughs
because they hurt the big ones. Sometimes the little laughs aren’t even meant to be laughs. I mean them to
further the play, the plot, the character, the story. They’re written unwittingly . . . strange word to pick. I
cut them and the laugh pops up somewhere else.

INTERVIEWER

When did you first realize you were funny?

SIMON

It started very early in my life—eight, nine, ten years old—being funny around the other kids. You single
out one kid on your block or in the school who understands what you’re saying. He’s the only one who
laughs. The other kids only laugh when someone tells them a joke—two guys got on a truck . . . I’ve
never done that in my life. I don’t like telling jokes. I don’t like to hear someone say to me, Tell him that
funny thing you said the other day. It’s repeating it. I have no more joy in it. Once it’s said, for me it’s
over. The same is true once it’s written—I have no more interest in it. I’ve expelled whatever it is I
needed to exorcise, whether it’s humorous or painful. Generally, painful. Maybe the humor is to cover the
pain up or maybe it’s a way to share the experience with someone.

INTERVIEWER

Has psychoanalysis influenced your work?

SIMON

Yes. Generally I’ve gone into analysis when my life was in turmoil. But I found after a while I was going
when it wasn’t in turmoil. I was going to get a college education in human behavior. I was talking not
only about myself; I was trying to understand my wife, my brother, my children, my family, anybody—
including the analyst. I can’t put everything in the plays down to pure chance. I want them to reveal what
makes people tick. I tend to analyze almost everything. I don’t think it started because I went through
analysis. I’m just naturally that curious. The good mechanic knows how to take a car apart; I love to take
the human mind apart and see how it works. Behavior is absolutely the most interesting thing I can write
about. You put that behavior in conflict and you’re in business.

INTERVIEWER

Would you describe your writing process? Since you don’t use an outline, do you ever know how a play
will end?

SIMON

Sometimes I think I do—but it doesn’t mean that’s how the play will end. Very often you find that you’ve
written past the end and you say, Wait a minute, it ended here. When I started to write Plaza Suite it was
going to be a full three-act play. The first act was about a wife who rents the same suite she and her
husband honeymooned in at the Plaza Hotel twenty-three years ago. In the course of the act the wife finds
out that the husband is having an affair with his secretary and at the end of the act the husband walks out
the door as champagne and hors d’oeuvres arrive. The waiter asks, Is he coming back? and the wife says,
Funny you should ask that. I wrote that and said to myself, That’s the end of the play, I don’t want
to know if he’s coming back. That’s what made me write three one-act plays for Plaza Suite. I
don’t like to know where the play is going to end. I purposely won’t think of the ending because I’m
afraid if I know, even subliminally, it’ll sneak into the script and the audience will know where the play is
going. As a matter of fact, I never know where the play is going in the second act. When Broadway
Bound was completed, I listened to the first reading and thought, There’s not a moment in this entire play
where I see the mother happy. She’s a miserable woman. I want to know why she’s miserable. The
answer was planted in the beginning of the play: the mother kept talking about how no one believed she
once danced with George Raft. I thought, the boy should ask her to talk about George Raft and as she
does, she’ll reveal everything in her past.

INTERVIEWER

The scene ends with the now-famous moment of the boy dancing with the mother the way Raft did—if he
did.

SIMON

Yes. People have said, It’s so organic, you had to have known you were writing to that all the time. But
I didn’t know it when I sat down to write the play. I had an interesting problem when I was
writing Rumors. I started off with just a basic premise: I wanted to do an elegant farce. I wrote it right up
to the last two pages of the play, the denouement in which everything has to be explained—and I didn’t
know what it was! I said to myself, Today’s the day I have to write the explanation. All right, just think it
out. I couldn’t think it out. So I said, Well then, go sentence by sentence. I couldn’t write it sentence by
sentence. I said, Go word by word. The man sits down and tells the police the story. He starts off with, It
was six o’clock. That much I could write. I kept going until everything made sense. That method takes
either insanity or egocentricity—or a great deal of confidence. It’s like building a bridge over water
without knowing if there’s land on the other side. But I do have confidence that when I get to the end of
the play, I will have gotten so deeply into the characters and the situation I’ll find the resolution.

INTERVIEWER

So you never write backwards from a climactic event to the incidents and scenes at the beginning of the
play that will take you to it?

SIMON

Never. The linkages are done by instinct. Sometimes I’ll write something and say, Right now this doesn’t
mean very much but I have a hunch that later on in the play it will mean something. The thing I always do
is play back on things I set up without any intention in the beginning. The foundation of the play is set in
those first fifteen or twenty minutes. Whenever I get in trouble in the second act, I go back to the first act.
The answers always lie there. One of the lines people have most often accused me of working backwards
from is Felix Ungar’s note to Oscar in The Odd Couple. In the second act, Oscar has reeled off the
laundry list of complaints he has about Felix, including “the little letters you leave me.” Now, when Felix
is leaving one of those notes, telling Oscar they’re all out of cornflakes, I said to myself, How would he
sign it? I know he’d do something that would annoy Oscar. So I signed it “Mr. Ungar.” Then I tried
“Felix Ungar.” Then I tried “F.U.” and it was as if a bomb had exploded in the room. When Oscar says,
“It took me three hours to figure out that F.U. was Felix Ungar,” it always gets this huge laugh.

INTERVIEWER

Felix Unger also appears in Come Blow Your Horn. I wanted to ask why you used the name twice.

SIMON

This will give you an indication of how little I thought my career would amount to. I thought The Odd
Couple would probably be the end of my career, so it wouldn’t make any difference that I had used Felix
Ungar in Come Blow Your Horn. It was a name that seemed to denote the prissiness of Felix, the perfect
contrast to the name of Oscar. Oscar may not sound like a strong name, but it did to me—maybe because
of the k sound in it.

INTERVIEWER

So you subscribe to the k-theory expressed by the comedians in The Sunshine Boys—k is funny.
SIMON

Oh, I do. Not only that, k cuts through the theater. You say a k-word, and they can hear it.

INTERVIEWER

Let’s talk about the mechanics of writing, starting with where you write.

SIMON

I have this office. There are four or five rooms in it and no one is here but me. No secretary, no one, and
I’ve never once in the many years that I’ve come here ever felt lonely or even alone. I come in and the
room is filled with—as corny as it might sound—these characters I’m writing, who are waiting each day
for me to arrive and give them life. I’ve also written on airplanes, in dentist’s offices, on subways. I think
it’s true for many writers. You blank out whatever is in front of your eyes. That’s why you see writers
staring off into space. They’re not looking at “nothing,” they’re visualizing what they’re thinking. I never
visualize what a play will look like on stage, I visualize what it looks like in life. I visualize being in that
room where the mother is confronting the father.

Casi treinta obras de teatro, todas ellas grandes éxitos, todas traducidas y
estrenadas en todo el mundo, muchas de ellas convertidas en películas. Las obras
de Neil Simon son comedias perfectas, en las que coexiste el humor con la vida. Sus
personajes son rotundos, nunca son puras marionetas al servicio de un chiste o un
gag. Sus conflictos son férreos y nos tienen siempre en vilo. Quizá en el futuro, Neil
Simon, a quien vemos hoy en día como un autor comercial, sea estudiado como el
Moliere del Estados Unidos del siglo XX. Ayer 26 de agosto de 2018 falleció en
Nueva York con 93 años. Recogemos aquí sus palabras en una fascinante entrevista
realizada por The Paris Review, que ha entrevistado a los más grandes escritores
de los siglos XX y XXI

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/1994/neil-simon-the-art-of-theater-
no-10-neil-simon


ENTREVISTADOR
Lillian Hellman dijo una vez que siempre comenzaba a trabajar en una obra de
teatro con algo muy pequeño: una escena o incluso dos líneas vagas de diálogo
cuyo significado era totalmente desconocido para ella. ¿Qué te inicia, qué te hace
pensar que hay una obra allí?

NEIL SIMON
Con tantas obras como he escrito, veintisiete, veintiocho, no puedo recordar un
momento en que me haya dicho: con esto podría hacer una buena obra. Nunca me
siento y escribo retazos de diálogo. Tomo algunas notas sobre quién está en la
obra, los personajes que quiero, dónde tiene lugar y la idea general de la obra. No
hago ningún bosquejo en absoluto. Solo me gusta sumergirme. Comienzo desde la
primera página porque quiero escuchar cómo hablan las personas. ¿Son lo
suficientemente interesantes para mí? ¿Los he captado bien? Voy pieza a pieza,
ladrillo a ladrillo. No sé si tengo una obra de teatro hasta haber alcanzado treinta,
treinta y cinco páginas.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Alguna vez has comenzado a través de una temática?

SIMON
Pienso en obras temáticas pero no creo que las escriba. Nada realmente toma
forma hasta que consigo ser específico con el personaje y el dilema en el que se
encuentra. El dilema es la palabra clave. Siempre es un dilema, no una situación. A
decir verdad, realmente no sé cuál es el tema de la obra hasta que lo he escrito y
los críticos me lo dicen.

ENTREVISTADOR
Cada dramaturgo, cada director, cada actor, habla sobre el conflicto. Se supone que
todo el teatro es un asunto acerca de conflictos. Cuando hablas de dilema, ¿estás
hablando de conflicto?

SIMON
Sí. En Broadway Bound quise mostrar la anatomía de cómo escribir comedias, con
el hermano mayor enseñando a Eugene, como fue el caso de mi hermano Danny
conmigo. Stan sigue pidiendo a Eugene el ingrediente esencial de la comedia y
cuando Eugene no puede contestar, Stan dice: "¡Conflicto!" Cuando pregunta por el
otro ingrediente clave, y Eugene solo puede contestar: "¿Más conflicto?", Stan dice:
"La palabra clave es querer. En cada comedia, incluso en el drama, alguien tiene
que querer algo y quererlo a muerte. Cuando alguien trata de detenerlo, eso es un
conflicto". En el momento en que sé cuáles son los conflictos, la obra ya está escrita
en mi mente. Todo lo que tienes que hacer es dejar que fluyan las palabras. No
tienes que diseñar su desarrollo, ella misma se hace a sí misma. Trabajas de una
manera secuencial. Una cosa sigue a la otra. Pero todo comienza con esa primera
semilla, el conflicto. Como dice Stan, tiene que ser un conflicto muy, muy fuerte, no
uno que les permita a los personajes decir: “¡Abandono esto! Me voy.” Deben
permanecer allí y luchar hasta el final.

ENTREVISTADOR
Dijiste que hasta que no llegas a la página treinta y cinco no sabes si tienes o no
una obra de teatro. ¿Hay momentos en que llegas a la página treinta y cinco y
decides que el conflicto no es lo suficientemente fuerte y la obra desaparece para
morir para siempre en un cajón?

SIMON
Tengo muchísimas más obras en el cajón que las que se han visto en el escenario.
La mayoría de ellas nunca salen del cajón, pero ocasionalmente una lo hace y me
sorprende el tiempo que ha tardado en germinar y florecer. El mejor ejemplo sería
Brighton Beach Memoirs. Escribí las primeras treinta y cinco páginas de la obra y se
las enseñé a mis hijos, Nancy y Ellen, y Marsha, mi esposa en ese momento. La
leyeron y dijeron: “Esto es increíble. Tienes que seguir con eso.” Se lo mostré a mi
productor, Manny Azenberg y a Gordon Davidson, y me dijeron: "Ésta va a ser una
gran obra". Sabía que la obra iba a ser un cambio en mi estilo, que investigaría
profundamente en mí mismo, pero tal vez la presión de las palabras “una gran
obra” me asustó, así que la guardé. Periódicamente, la sacaba y la leía, y no sabía
qué hacer con ella. Después de nueve años la saqué un día, leí las treinta y cinco
páginas, tomé mi bolígrafo y el cuaderno bloc donde escribo y terminé la obra en
seis semanas. Tengo la sensación de que en el fondo de tu mente hay un pequeño
escritor que escribe mientras haces otras cosas, porque no tuve problemas en ese
momento para retomarla. Obviamente, lo que había sucedido en esos años de mi
vida me dejó claro de qué trataba la obra. En algún lugar por detrás de mi cabeza
crecí, maduré. Estaba listo para escribir esa obra. A veces ayuda tener algo de
apoyo. Una vez estaba cenando con Mike Nichols y me preguntó: “¿Qué estás
haciendo?” Dije, estoy trabajando en una obra de teatro sobre dos ex-vodevilistas
que no han trabajado juntos o se han visto en once años y se reúnen para hacer un
Show como los de Ed Sullivan. Él dijo: ”Eso suena maravilloso. Vuelve a ello y
termínalo.” Así que lo hice. Era como si un crítico ya hubiera visto la obra y dijera:
"Me encanta". Pero hay muchas, muchas obras que llegan a cierto punto y no más
allá. Durante años he estado tratando de escribir la obra de lo que nos sucedió a mí
y los siete escritores que escribieron Your Show of Shows de Sid Caesar. Pero nunca
he pasado de la página veintidós porque hay siete conflictos en lugar de un
conflicto principal. No paraba de escribir más y más subtexto y más y más
argumentos secundarios, con esta situación todo eran gracioso. No tenía a alguien
firme para anclarlo. Siempre tengo que encontrar el ancla. Tengo para encontrar el
coro griego en la obra, el personaje que literalmente habla con la audiencia o habla
con la audiencia en cierto sentido. Por ejemplo, Oscar en The Odd Couple es el coro
griego. Él mira, percibe cómo se comporta Felix y lo comenta. Felix luego comenta
lo que es Oscar, pero Oscar es quien nos cuenta de qué se trata la obra. Más
recientemente, en la trilogía de Brighton Beach, yo hablaba literalmente con la
audiencia a través del personaje de Eugene, porque es la única forma en que puedo
expresar el punto de vista del escritor. El escritor tiene pensamientos internos y no
siempre se articulan en el escenario, y quiero que el público pueda entrar en su
cabeza. Es lo que hice en Jake's Women. En el primer preestreno en San Diego, el
público no sabía lo suficiente sobre Jake asi que todo lo que hizo fue reaccionar
ante las mujeres en su vida, que lo estaban molestando tratando de que se abriera.
No sabíamos quién era Jake. Entonces presenté el dispositivo de él hablando con la
audiencia. Así, se convirtió en el personaje más pleno y rico de la obra, porque la
audiencia sabía cosas que nunca pensé que revelaría sobre Jake, y posiblemente
sobre mí mismo.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Retomará la obra sobre los Show of Shows?

SIMON
A menudo pienso en hacerlo. Lo que hizo única esa experiencia fue que casi todos
los escritores involucrados han pasado a hacer cosas realmente importantes:
carreras como las de Mel Brooks. . . Larry Gelbart. . . Woody Allen . . . Joe Stein, que
escribió Fiddler on the Roof. . . Michael Stewart que escribió Hello, Dolly. . . era un
grupo de personas que solo Sid Caesar sabía cómo unir. Tal vez fue un resultado de
prueba y error porque los que no funcionaban se iban cayendo, pero una vez que
nos encontramos todos trabajando juntos fue el momento más descacharrante de
mi vida. También fue uno de los más dolorosos porque luchabas por el
reconocimiento y yo no lo tenía. Fue muy difícil para mí porque era callado y
tímido, así que me senté junto a Carl Reiner y le susurré mis chistes. Él era mi
portavoz, saltaba y decía: “¡Lo tiene! ¡Él lo tiene!” Entonces Carl decía la línea y yo
la escuchaba y me reía porque pensaba que era gracioso. Pero cuando vi el
programa un sábado por la noche con mi esposa, Joan, ella decía: ¨Ésa era tu frase,
¿verdad?” y yo decía, no recuerdo. Lo que sí recuerdo son los gritos y las peleas: un
cóctel sin cócteles, todo el mundo gritaba líneas entrando y saliendo, la gente se
enojaba mucho con los que estaban más tranquilos. Mel Brooks fue el principal
culpable. Entrábamos a trabajar a las diez de la mañana, pero él aparecía a la una
en punto. Nos dijimos, hasta aquí hemos llegado. Estamos hartos y cansados de
esto. O Mel entra a las diez en punto o vamos a Sid y hacemos algo al respecto. A
eso de las una menos diez, Mel entró con un sombrero de paja, lo lanzó por la
habitación, y dijo, “¡Lindy lo consiguió!” - y todos caímos riendo histéricos. No
necesitaba las ocho horas que nos imponíamos. A él le bastaban cuatro horas. Tal
vez, él es el hombre más divertido que he conocido. A mí me inspiró. Yo quería
estar cerca de esa gente Me he emperrado con esta idea para escribir una obra de
teatro. Incluso encontré un título para ella, Risas en el Piso Veintitrés, porque creo
que la oficina estaba en el piso veintitrés. Desde ese edificio observamos Bendel's,
Bergdorf Goodman y la Quinta Avenida, mirando pasar a todas las chicas bonitas a
través de binoculares. A veces prendíamos fuego al escritorio con un encendedor.
Podíamos haber sido arrestados todos nosotros.


ENTREVISTADOR
Si alguna vez pasas la página veintidós, ¿cómo lidiarías con Mel, Woody y los
demás? ¿Aparecerían como ellos mismos?

SIMON
¡No, no, no! Todos serían ficticios. Sería como la trilogía de Brighton Beach, que es
semiautobiográfica.

ENTREVISTADOR
Sí que se percibe como totalmente autobiográfico. Supuse que lo era.

SIMON
A todo el mundo le ocurre. Pero yo les respondo a los entrevistadores que si quería
que fuera autobiográfica, habría llamado al personaje Neil Simon. Él no es Neil. Él
es Eugene Jerome. Eso te da una mayor libertad para la ficción. Es como hacer
pintura abstracta. Usted en ella lo que usted quiere, pero la abstracción es el arte.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Cuándo se dio cuenta de que habría una secuela de Brighton Beach Memoirs?

SIMON
Tuve una reseña no muy extensa de Frank Rich en el The New York Times, en que
dijo al final, "Uno espera que haya un capítulo dos en Brighton Beach." ¡Pensé que
estaba pidiendo una secuela de una obra de teatro que parecía no gustarle!”

ENTREVISTA
¿Estás diciendo que Frank Rich te persuadió para que escribieras Biloxi Blues?

SIMON
No, pero yo le entendí: “estoy lo suficientemente interesado como para querer
saber más sobre esta familia”. Luego, Steven Spielberg, que había ido a ver
Brighton Beach, me aconsejó sugiriéndome que mi próxima obra debería ser sobre
mis días en el ejército. Estaba dándole vueltas a eso cuando comencé a escribir
Biloxi Blues, que se convirtió en una obra de teatro sobre los ritos de iniciación de
Eugene. Descubrí algo muy importante en la escritura de Biloxi Blues. Eugene, que
lleva un diario, escribe en él su sospecha de que Epstein es homosexual. Cuando los
otros chicos en el barracón leen el diario y dan por hecho que es verdad, Eugene
siente una terrible culpa. Se dio cuenta de la responsabilidad de poner algo en el
papel, porque las personas tienden a creer todo lo que leen.

ENTREVISTADOR
Los monederos falsos terminan con el diario que André Gide llevaba mientras
escribía el libro. En él dice que sabe que está escribiendo bien cuando la dialéctica
de la escena toma el control y los personajes le arrebatan la escena y no se
convierte en escritor sino en lector. ¿Alguna vez descubres que tus personajes te
han quitado la obra y siguen sus propias directrices?

SIMON
Siempre me he sentido como un intermediario, como un mecanógrafo. Alguien en
otro lado está diciendo: “Esto es lo que dicen ahora. Esto es lo que dicen a
continuación.” Muy a menudo son los personajes mismos, una vez que se definen
claramente. Cuando estaba trabajando en mi primera obra, Come Blow Your Horn,
compañeros míos escritores me dijeron que primero debes esbozar la obra, debes
saber a dónde vas. Escribí un esquema completo y detallado desde la primera
página hasta el final de la obra. En la escritura de la obra, al llegar a la página
quince los personajes comenzaron a alejarse del esquema. Traté de volver a
atraerlos, diciendo: “Vuelvan allí. Aquí es donde usted pertenecen. Ya he
diagramado tu vida.” Ellos dijeron: “No, no, no. Aquí es donde quiero ir.” Entonces,
comencé a seguirlos.
En la segunda obra, Barefoot in the Park, describí los primeros dos actos. Dije:
dejaré el tercer acto libre para que pueda ir donde quiera. Nunca supere ese
esquema tampoco.
En The Odd Couple, esbocé el primer acto. Después de un tiempo me cansé de hacer
eso. Dije, quiero estar tan sorprendido por la obra como cualquier otra persona.
También había leído un libro sobre la dramaturgia de John van Druten, en el que
decía: No perfiles tu juego, porque entonces el resto será solo trabajo. Debería ser
placer. Deberías descubrir las cosas de la misma manera en que el público las va a
descubrir.” Entonces, nunca volví a hacerlo.

ENTREVISTADOR
Gide escribe sobre ser sorprendido por el material que aparece en la máquina de
escribir. A veces ríe, se sorprende, a veces se consterna. . .

SIMON
A veces me pongo a reír, y he tenido momentos en este estudio en que he roto a
llorar. No es que pensara que a la audiencia podría ocurrirle lo mismo. El momento
de la escritura había desencadenado un recuerdo o un sentimiento que estaba
profundamente oculto. Eso es catarsis. Es una de las razones principales por las
que escribo las obras. Es como un análisis sin ir al analista. La obra se convierte en
tu análisis. La escritura de la obra es la parte más divertida de la misma. También
es la parte más aterradora porque entras en el bosque sin cuchillo, sin brújula.
Pero si tus instintos están afinados, si tienes un sentido de la orientación,
descubres que está despejando un camino y estás llegando al lugar correcto. Si
ocurre el milagro, sales al lugar que querías. Pero muy a menudo tienes que volver
al comienzo del bosque y empezar a caminar a través de él otra vez, diciendo: "Fue
de esa manera. Aquí fue el callejón sin salida.” Tachas, atajas. Conoces a nuevos
amigos en el camino, personas que nunca pensaste que conocerías. Te lleva a un
mundo al que no habías planeado ir cuando comenzaste la obra. La obra puede
haber comenzado a ser una comedia, y de repente te encuentras en un lugar de tal
profundidad que te sorprende. Como dijo acertadamente un crítico, escribí
Brighton Beach Memoirs sobre la familia que deseaba haber tenido en lugar de la
familia que tenía. Está más cerca de Ah, Wilderness que a mi realidad.


ENTREVISTADOR
¿Cuándo se dio cuenta de que Brighton Beach Memoirs y Biloxi Blues formaban
parte de una trilogía?

SIMON
Pensé que parecía extraño dejar la saga de Eugene tras dos obras. Tres es una
trilogía; ni siquiera sé cómo llamarlo cuando está formado por dos obras. Entonces,
decidí escribir la tercera, y la idea vino inmediatamente. Volví al tema de la guerra
nuevamente, solo que esta vez eran guerras internas. Los muchachos tenían
remordimientos y dudas sobre dejar su hogar para dedicarse a una carrera de
escritor de comedias. Esto provocó unaa guerra entre mis padres. También
introduje el personaje del abuelo socialista que constantemente les decía a los
niños: “Simplemente no se puede hacer chistes y hacer reír a la gente”. Blanche
desde la primera obra, Brighton Beach, tratando de que el abuelo se mudara a
Florida para cuidar a su esposa enferma y que envejecía. Para mí, poner a las
personas en conflicto entre sí es como lo que hacen esos malabaristas chinos,
girando un plato, luego otro, luego otro. Quería mantener el mayor número de
platos girando.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Qué quieres decir exactamente cuando llamas a la trilogía de Brighton Beach
semiautobiográfica?

SIMON
Significa que la obra puede basarse en incidentes que ocurrieron en mi vida, pero
no están escritos de la forma en que sucedió. Broadway Bound es lo más cercano a
lo realmente autobiográfico. No me corté nada en hacerlo. Mi madre y mi padre ya
habían desaparecido cuando lo escribí, así que conté sobre sus peleas y qué fue
para mí cuando era un niño el escucharlas. ¡Hasta que alguien lo observó tras la
primera lectura no me di cuenta que la obra era realmente una carta de amor para
mi madre! Ella fue la que más sufrió. Ella fue la única que se quedó sola. Esta tabula
rasa de su vida no existió para ella, pero existe simbólicamente para mí. Ésa es la
abstracción de la que estaba hablando.

INTERPRETACIÓN
Hablando de abstracción, hay algo desconcertante para el público -y otros
escritores- sobre lo que hacen los grandes escritores de comedias. Desde afuera,
parece ser tan diferente de lo que la mayoría de los escritores son capaces de
hacer, como lo es el béisbol del ballet. No voy a preguntar nada tan fatuo como
"¿qué es el humor?" Pero pregunto: ¿es genético, es una forma de pensar, una
peculiaridad? Y, lo más importante, ¿puede aprenderse o, de hecho, enseñarse?

SIMON
La respuesta es compleja. En primer lugar, hay varios estilos y orientaciones hacia
la comedia. Cuando trabajé en Your Show of Shows, Larry Gelbart era el hombre
más ingenioso e ingenioso que he conocido, Mel Brooks el más escandaloso. Yo
nunca supe lo que era yo. Todavía no lo sé. Quizás tuve mejor idea acerca del grupo
en sí. Solo conozco algunos aspectos de mi humor, uno de los cuales implica ser
completamente literal. Para darte un ejemplo, en Lost in Yonkers, el tío Louie está
tratando de explicarle a Arty lo dura que era su abuela. "Cuando tenía doce años,
su viejo la lleva a una manifestación política en Berlín. Un caballo se cayó y lo
aplastó el pie a Ma. Nadie la curó. A ella le duele todos los días de su vida, pero
nunca la vi tomar una aspirina.” Más tarde, Arty le dice a su hermano mayor:
"Tengo miedo de ella, Jay. Un caballo cayó sobre ella cuando era una niña, y todavía
no ha tomado una aspirina." Es una repetición casi exacta de lo que Louie le contó
pero ahora es algo para echarse a reír. Eso me desconcierta. En Prisoner of Second
Avenue había cosas terribles atormentando a Peter Falk. Se sentó en un sofá que
tenía montones de almohadas, como todos los sofás del mundo, y tomó una
almohada tras otra y comenzó a tirarlas enojado diciendo: "¡Pagas ochocientos por
un sofá y no puedes sentarte en él porque tienes unas horribles almohadas que le
impiden a tu espalda llegar a él!” No hay ningún chiste aquí. Sin embargo,
provocaba risas enormes, porque la audiencia se identificaba con la situación. Eso,
más o menos, es lo que es gracioso para mí, decir algo que sea inmediatamente
identificable para todos. La gente se acerca a ti después del espectáculo y dice,
siempre lo he pensado, pero nunca supe que alguien más lo haya pensado. Es un
secreto compartido entre usted y el público.

ENTREVISTADOR
Usted ha dicho muchas veces que nunca escribió un chiste en ninguna de sus obras
de forma consciente.

SIMON
Nunca quise pensar los chistes como chistes. Confieso que en los primeros días,
cuando venía de la televisión, obras como Come Blow Your Horn tenían líneas que
podías sacar, que serían divertidas en sí mismas. Eso para mí sería un "chiste" que
trataría de eliminar. En The Odd Couple, Oscar tenía una frase sobre Felix: "Tiene
tanto miedo que usa cinturón de seguridad el el autocine". Esa podría ser un chiste
de los de Bob Hope. Lo dejé porque no pude encontrar nada para reemplazarlo.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Alguna vez se encontró con que un productor, director o actor se oponía a perder
la posibilidad de una carcajada por algo que usted estaba decidido a eliminar de la
obra?

SIMON
Un actor, tal vez, sí. Ellos dirán, pero si ese es un gran momento para mío, una gran
carcajada. Yo les digo, pero no es buena para la escena. Es muy difícil convencerlos.
Walter Matthau me perseguía constantemente en The Odd Couple, quejándose no
de una de sus líneas, sino de una de Art Carney. Él decía: “No es una línea buena”.
Unos días más tarde, recibí una carta de un médico en Wilmington. Decía:
“Estimado Sr. Simon, me encantó su obra, pero encuentro una línea realmente
objetable. Desearía que la quitase.” Entonces, tomé la línea y dije: Walter, he
cumplido tus deseos. Recibí una carta de un médico prominente de Wilmington a
quien no le gustaba la línea... Él se hechó a reír y luego me di cuenta de que:
“pedazo de hijo de puta, ¡tú eres el médico! Y él lo era.
Esas líneas rápidas, de una sola línea, que me atribuen durante tantos años, creo
que son simplemente expresión del personaje, que no son “chistes” buscados.
Walter Kerr una vez vino en mi ayuda diciendo que "ser o no ser" es una frase
única. Si se trata de un momento dramático, nadie lo llama una sola línea. Pero si
provoca la risa, es línea rápida. Creo que una de las quejas de los críticos es que las
personas en mis obras son más divertidas de lo que serían en la vida, pero ¿alguna
vez has visto a Medea? Los personajes son mucho más dramáticos aquí de lo que
son en la vida.

ENTREVISTADOR
También has dicho que cuando comenzaste a escribir para el teatro, decidiste
intentar escribir comedias del mismo modo que los dramaturgos escriben obras de
teatro, escribiendo de los personajes desde dentro, psicológicamente.

SIMON
Sí. Lo que trato de hacer es hacer que el diálogo nazca del mismo personaje, de
modo que un personaje nunca pueda decir las líneas que pertenecen a otro
personaje. Si es divertido, es porque estoy contando una historia sobre personajes
en los que puedo encontrar una rica veta de humor. Cuando comencé a escribir
obras, personas como Lillian Hellman me advirtieron: "No mezcles la comedia con
el drama". Pero mi teoría era que, si se mezcla en la vida, ¿por qué no puedes
hacerlo en una obra de teatro? La primera persona a la que enseñé Come Blow Your
Horn fue a Herman Shumlin, el director de The Little Foxes de Hellman. Dijo: “Me
gusta la obra, me gustan los personajes, pero no me gusta el hermano mayor.” Yo
dije: “¿Qué pasa con él?” Él dijo: “Bueno, es una comedia. Nos tienen que gustar
todos los personajes.” Dije: “¿en la vida nos tienen que gustar toda la gente?” En la
escena más dolorosa de Lost in Yonkers, Bella, que es un poco disminuída, intenta
decirle a la familia que el chico con el que quiere casarse también es disminuído. Es
una situación conmovedora y, sin embargo, la información que sale lentamente -y
la forma en que la familia la tiene en tercer grado- se vuelve hilarante porque se
mezcla con el dolor de otra persona. Encuentro que lo que es más conmovedor es a
menudo lo más gracioso.

ENTREVISTADOR
En la escena de la llamada de respuesta en Biloxi Blues, usted reitera varias páginas
una palabra, una sílaba: Ho. Construye y construye en lo que he escuchado llamar
un "run".

SIMON
Aprendí viendo las películas de Chaplin que lo más gracioso no es un momento
único de risa, sino que los momentos se amontonen unos encima de otros.
También lo aprendí de las películas de Laurel y Hardy. Una de las cosas más
divertidas que vi hacer a Laurel y Hardy fue desnudarse en la litera superior de un
tren juntos. Les lleva diez minutos el sacar los brazos de las mangas equivocadas y
los pies de la red en que están atrapados, un momento terrible que lleva a otro.
Pensé que no podría haber una mayor satisfacción para mí que conseguir hacer
eso con mi público. Quizás Ho también proviene de sentarme en la oscuridad de un
niño escuchando los gags de Jack Benny en la radio. En Barefoot in the Park,
cuando el telefonista sube cinco o seis tramos de escaleras, él llega completamente
sin aliento. Cuando Paul hace su entrada, él está completamente sin aliento.
Cuando la madre hace su entrada, ella está completamente sin aliento. Algunos
críticos escribieron: "Abusas demasiado de esa broma del sin aliento". Mi
respuesta es: ¿te refieres a que ha sucedido tres veces, cuando aparece por cuarta
vez no deberían estar sin aliento? No es una broma, es lo natural. Como Ho. Esos
muchachos están petrificados en su primer día en el ejército, confrontados por este
sargento maníaco.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Dosificas las líneas para que las risas no cubran el diálogo o ese es el trabajo del
director? ¿Tratas de establecer un ritmo en la escritura que permita la respuesta
de la audiencia?

SIMON
No sabes dónde están las risas hasta que te pones delante de una audiencia. La
mayoría de las carcajadas más grandes que he tenido nunca supe buscarlas. Mike
Nichols solía decirme: corta las carcajadas pequeñas porque hacen de menos a las
grandes. A veces, las risas ni siquiera quieren ser risas. Para mí son momentos de
construcción de la obra, la trama, el personaje, la historia. Están escritas como
risas involuntariamente. . . la cual es una palabra extraña para escritor. Pero si las
corto, la risa aparece en otro lugar.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Cuándo te diste cuenta de que eras gracioso?

SIMON
Comenzó muy temprano en mi vida –con ocho, nueve, diez años- siendo gracioso
con los otros niños. Escoges a un niño en tu vecindad o en la escuela que entiende
lo que estás diciendo. Él es el único que se ríe. Los otros niños solo se ríen cuando
alguien les cuenta una broma: dos tipos subieron a un camión... Nunca he hecho
eso en mi vida. No me gusta contar chistes. No me gusta escuchar que alguien me
diga, dile esa cosa graciosa que dijiste el otro día. Lo está repitiendo. No me siento
feliz con eso. Una vez que se ha dicho, para mí se ha acabado. Lo mismo es cierto
una vez que está escrito, no tengo más interés en ello. He expulsado todo lo que
necesitaba exorcizar, ya sea humorístico o doloroso. En general, doloroso. Tal vez
el humor es algo para cubrir el dolor o tal vez sea una forma de compartir la
experiencia con alguien.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Ha influido el psicoanálisis en su trabajo?

SIMON
Sí. Generalmente me he sometido a análisis cuando mi vida estaba en crisis. Pero
descubrí que después de un tiempo iba cuando no estaba en crisis. Iba a obtener
una educación universitaria sobre el comportamiento humano. Estaba hablando
no solo de mí mismo; Intentaba entender a mi esposa, a mi hermano, a mis hijos, a
mi familia, a cualquiera, incluido el analista.
No puedo poner todo en las obras por pura casualidad. Quiero que revelen lo que
hace actuar a la gente. Tiendo a analizar casi todo. No creo que esto sea
consecuencia de que yo haya pasado por el análisis. Soy por naturaleza así de
curioso. El buen mecánico sabe cómo desmontar un automóvil; a mí me encanta
abrir la mente humana y ver cómo funciona. Absolutamente, el comportamiento es
lo más interesante sobre lo que puedo escribir. Pones ese comportamiento en
conflicto y ya estás en el ajo.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Describirías tu proceso de escritura? Ya que no usas esquemas, ¿alguna vez sabes
cómo terminará una obra de teatro?

SIMON
A veces creo que sí, pero eso no significa que la obra termine así al final. Muy a
menudo te das cuenta de que has escrito más allá del final y dices, espera un
minuto, termina aquí. Cuando comencé a escribir Plaza Suite iba a ser una obra
completa de tres actos. El primer acto fue sobre una esposa que alquila la misma
habitación donde ella y su esposo pasaron su luna de miel en el Hotel Plaza hace
veintitrés años. En el curso del acto, la esposa descubre que el marido está
teniendo una aventura amorosa con su secretaria y, al final del acto, el marido sale
por la puerta cuando llegan la champaña y los entremeses. El camarero pregunta:
“¿Volverá?” y la esposa dice: “Es gracioso que me preguntes eso”. Escribí eso y me
dije: ese es el final de la obra, no quiero saber si volverá. Eso es lo que me hizo
escribir tres obras de un acto para Plaza Suite. No me gustaba saber dónde
terminaría la obra. No pensaré en el final a propósito porque me temo que si lo sé,
incluso subliminalmente, se colará en el guión y la audiencia sabrá a dónde va la
obra. De hecho, nunca sé a dónde va la obra en el segundo acto. Cuando se
completó Broadway Bound, escuché la primera lectura y pensé: No hay un
momento en toda esta obra en la que vea feliz a la madre. Ella es una pobre mujer.
Quiero saber por qué ella es tan pobre mujer. La respuesta se plantea al comienzo
de la obra: la madre hablaba una y otra vez de cómo nadie creía que alguna vez ella
había bailado con George Raft. Pensé, el niño debería pedirle que hablara sobre
George Raft y, cuando lo haga, ella revelará todo su pasado.

ENTREVISTADOR
La escena termina con el ahora famoso momento en que el niño baila con la madre
tal como lo hizo Raft, si es que éste alguna vez bailó con él.

SIMONY
Sí. La gente ha dicho, es tan orgánico, que tenías muy en cuenta que escribiste todo
el tiempo para llegar a ese momento. Pero no lo sabía cuando me senté a escribir la
obra. Tuve un problema interesante cuando escribía Rumors. Empecé con una
premisa básica: quería hacer una farsa elegante. Lo escribí hasta las últimas dos
páginas de la obra, el desenlace en el que todo tiene que ser explicado, ¡y no sabía
qué había pasado! Me dije: "Hoy tengo que escribir la explicación. Está bien, solo
debo pensar en eso”. Pues era incapaz de pensarlo. Entonces me dije: "Bueno,
entonces, ve frase a frase". No pude escribirla frase a frase. Me dije: “Ve palabra por
palabra. El hombre se sienta y le cuenta a la policía la historia. Él comienza a
soltarlo todo, eran las seis en punto.” Eso lo podía escribir. Seguí adelante hasta
que todo tuvo sentido. Ese método requiere locura o egocentrismo, o una gran
cantidad de confianza. Es como construir un puente sobre el agua sin saber si hay
tierra en el otro lado. Pero tengo la confianza de que cuando llegue al final de la
obra, me habré metido tanto en los personajes y la situación en la que encontraré
la resolución.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Así que nunca escribe pensando desde el fin, desde el clímax hacia los incidentes y
escenas del comienzo de la obra que llevarán a perecipitar éste?

SIMON
Nunca. Los interrelaciones aparecen por instinto. A veces escribo algo y digo:
ahora mismo esto no significa mucho, pero tengo la corazonada de que más
adelante en la obra significará algo. Lo que siempre hago es recuperar cosas que
situé sin ninguna intención al principio. La base de la obra se establece en los
primeros quince o veinte minutos. Cada vez que me meto en problemas en el
segundo acto, vuelvo al primer acto. Las respuestas siempre están ahí. Una de las
líneas de las que la gente más veces me ha acusado de trabajar hacia atrás es la
nota de Felix Ungar a Oscar en The Odd Couple. En el segundo acto, Oscar se ha
desprendido de la larga lista de quejas que tiene sobre Félix, incluidas "las
pequeñas cartas que me dejas". Ahora, cuando Félix está dejando una de esas
notas, diciéndole a Oscar que ya no tienen copos de maíz, me dije a mí mismo:
¿Cómo lo firmaría? Sé que haría algo que molestaría a Oscar. Entonces lo firmé "Sr.
Ungar.” Luego probé "Félix Ungar ". Luego probé "F.U."y fue como si una bomba
hubiera explotado en la habitación. Cuando Oscar dice: "Me llevó tres horas
descubrir que F.U. fue Felix Ungar”, siempre se provoca la mayor de las carcajadas.

ENTREVISTADOR
Felix Unger también aparece en Come Blow Your Horn. Quería preguntar por qué
usaste el nombre dos veces.

SIMON
Esto te dará un indicio de lo poco que iba a durar mi carrera. Pensé que The Odd
Couple probablemente sería el final de mi carrera, por lo que no sería importante
que usara Felix Ungar en Come Blow Your Horn. Era un nombre que parecía
denotar la mezquindad de Felix, el contraste perfecto con el nombre de Oscar.
Puede que Oscar no suene como un nombre fuerte, pero a mí sí me lo parecía, tal
vez por el sonido k que hay en él.

ENTREVISTADOR
¿Así que suscribes la teoría k expresada por los comediantes en The Sunshine Boys,
de que la k es graciosa.

SIMON
Oh, lo hago. No solo eso, la k atraviesa el teatro. Dices una palabra en k, y todos la
oyen.

ENTREVISTADOR
Vamos a hablar sobre la mecánica de la escritura, empezando por el lugar donde
escribes.

SIMON
Tengo este estudio. Hay cuatro o cinco habitaciones y nadie está aquí, excepto yo.
Sin secretaria, nadie, y nunca en los últimos años que he venido me he sentido a
solas o solo. Entro y la habitación está llena, por cursi que parezca, de los
personajes que escribo, que esperan cada día que llegue y les dé vida. También
escribí en aviones, en oficinas de dentistas, en subways. Creo que esto les ocurre a
muchos escritores. Cuando escribes todo lo que te rodea está en blanco. Es por eso
que los escritores mirar al espacio. No están mirando "nada", están visualizando lo
que están pensando. Nunca visualizo cómo se verá una obra en el escenario,
visualizo cómo se ve en la vida. Visualizo estar en esa habitación donde la madre se
enfrenta al padre.

NEIL SIMON

Entrevista por The Paris Review, editada y traducida por Raúl Hernández Garrido

Minat Terkait