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CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

This section discusses background of the research, identification of the

problems, formulation of the problems, objectives of the research, scope of

the research, and benefits of the research.

1.1 Background of the Research

It is believed that in every step of our life, the importance of technology is

seen and enjoyed these days. Our life is highly affected by the era of

information technology. In other words, we cannot be separated from the

existence of technology because it plays a very important role. Currently,

most countries implement technology in their economy, business,

information, education and other fields. Education is one example that

implements technology in Primary and Secondary Education, Higher

Education, and Distance Learning. It is necessary to take the benefits of

the technological facilities in developing the educational system.

It is quite clear that English has become a necessity today. It is shown by

the fact that English has become a compulsory subject in every school in

Indonesia. Learners with good command of English can communicate with

other people around the world and find more job opportunities. According

to Nomass (2013, p. 111) learners who learn English as a second

language need further language support in order to develop their

experience and skills. It means that they are in need of using various tools

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which can help them learn the language easily and effectively by using

technology.

English learning achieves a lot of benefits by the help of technology. In the

present time, many software and their applications have been created to

facilitate teaching and learning English. One of the examples is the use of

internet communication tools such as m-learning, e-mail, blogs, and chat.

Learning language by using internet opens up vistas of expansion in the

field through facilitating learners’ engagement in active communication

which in turn "facilitates the development of second language

competence" in Peterson (2005, p. 35) as cited in Amiri (2012, p. 104). It

can be suggested that going through internet is an alternative way to study

English. Moreover, learning and teaching through technology makes the

learning process more attractive to the learners and provide more

interactions.

Nowadays, in this technology driven world Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

opens new ways of teaching in the classroom. Wang (2015) states the

progress of BYOD in schools makes the classrooms fully interactive –

enabling learners to interact with the teacher and learn subjects in new

ways. Caldwell (2007) as cited in Wang (2015, p. 217), the classical way

of providing classroom interaction has been offered through Student

Response Systems (SRS) providing the learners with handheld devices

commonly called “clickers”, “key-pads”, “handsets” or “zappers”. These

devices are like a TV-remote where learners can use their own device to

respond. Wang (2015, p. 217-218) states that the main advantage from

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BYOD in schools is to remove the costs and effort to get special devices,

as well providing interactive classroom tools that provide better user

experiences.

This paper focuses on Kahoot! It is a game-based student response

system (GSRS) that changes a classroom into a game show. Malone’s

theory lists (1980) three categories that make things fun to learn:

Challenge (goals with uncertain outcomes), Fantasy (captivate through

intrinsic or extrinsic fantasy), and Curiosity (sensor curiosity through

graphics and audio and cognitive curiosity). Based on the researcher’s

experience in her internship, learners were so excited to play games even

the class had ended they were still enthusiastic to continue. Learning

through games makes learners so involved and motivated that they really

learn even though they are not aware of it.

Kahoot! consists of multiple choice questions as a quiz, discussion or

survey for any topic, language and ability. The role of teacher is as a game

show host and the learners are the competitors. The teacher’s computer

connected to a large screen or projector that shows questions and

answers, and the learners give their answers as fast and correct as

possible on their own mobile phones. A chart appears when the learners

answer each question. The chart is useful for the teacher to get feedback

on how much the class knows about a topic and explain better the parts

where the learners lack knowledge. At the end of the game a winner is

announced. Game-based learning Kahoot! provides an opportunity to give

benefits for higher level of English learning.

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1.2 Identification of the Problem

The problems of teaching grammar were identified through an observation

that the researcher carried out in Structure class of English Education

Study Program of Bandar Lampung University. Based on the researcher’s

observation, there were some problems that the researcher found in the

teaching and learning process related to the learners’ assumption,

method, and medium used.

The first problem is related to the learners’ assumption. They have an

assumption that learning grammar is difficult. It can be seen that some

learners are unmotivated in participating in the teaching and learning

process. As a result, when the lecturer asked them to do a task, most of

them did not do the task well. Some of them still had difficulties and low

understanding in learning grammar.

The other problem is related to the teaching method that the lecturer used

in teaching and learning process. Teaching grammar in English Education

Study program is mostly dominated with doing tasks in paper assignment

and task completion at home or campus. Therefore, the learners

sometimes feel bored in teaching and learning activities.

The last problem is related to the medium. Medium is one of the factors

that can help the teachers develop their teaching and learning process. It

can also improve learners’ interest in learning English. In reality, the

lecturer rarely used media especially games which can help learners

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enhance their interest in learning grammar. Therefore, the learners often

got bored during the teaching and learning process.

1.3 Formulation of the Problem

Based on the problem above, the problem of this study can be formulated

as follows:

1. How does the application of Kahoot! affect classroom dynamics?

2. How does the application of Kahoot! facilitate the learning process?

1.4 Objectives of the Research

The objectives of the research are:

1. To know how the application of Kahoot! affects classroom

dynamics.

2. To know how the application of Kahoot! facilitates the learning

process.

1.5 Scope of the Research

This scope of the research is limited to be included only the application of

Kahoot! in facilitating classroom dynamics and learning process. The

research focuses on the application of using Kahoot! in English Structure

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class of the first semester learners of English Education Study Program,

Bandar Lampung University.

1.6 The Benefits of the Research

There are some expected benefits to achieve from this research. The

result of this research is expected to give contributions. The benefits of the

research are in the following explanation:

Theoretical Benefit

The result of this research is expected can give a positive influence on the

learning process and also a big contribution to the quality of English

Language Teaching.

1.6.2 Practical Benefits

For learners, the findings of this research are expected to become a

source of information about the way how to facilitate classroom dynamics

and learning process through Kahoot!

For teachers, the findings of this research are expected to be a source of

information about how English teachers are able to use Kahoot! in the

language instruction. Kahoot! is one of the possibly appropriate media to

facilitate teachers in teaching English effectively.

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For researchers, it can be helpful to get the knowledge, experience and

information about the importance of Kahoot! when that is applied in

teaching and learning English as a second language.

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CHAPTER II

LITERATURE REVIEW

This section discusses literature review consisting of some relevant

theories in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), game, game-

based learning, advantages and disadvantages of game-based learning,

related studies, and pre-understanding of the study. The discussion of

each part is presented below.

2.1 Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

2.1.1 Definition of CALL

CALL in language teaching involves the use of computer technology to

help in the process of presenting, reinforcing, and assessing learning

materials that places emphasis on interactive elements (Hashmi, 2016, p.

202). Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) involves the use of

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in learning and

teaching a second or foreign language. It is used to facilitate learning

through teaching materials and is focused on learning rather than

teaching.

Levy (1997) defines CALL as “the search for and study of applications of

the computer in teaching and learning”. Egbert (2005) argues that no

matter the context, learning a language through computers or with the aid

of computers is defined as CALL.

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2.1.2 The Importance of CALL

In this modernized era, almost every aspect of our life is highly affected by

the era of information technology. The development of Information

technology has spread the application of computers in the learning

process, which is known as Computer Assisted Language Learning

(CALL). A computer is a medium to facilitate people in learning, such as

learning a language.

CALL has made its way into the mainstream teaching of L2, nationally and

internationally, and the future of CALL is directly related to language

teaching (Hubbard, 2008). The use of technology has the possibility to

enrich the L2 teaching and learning by keeping the quality of instruction

with a minimum amount of teacher-student contact and not affecting

negatively the learning objectives (Hoopingarner, 2009).

2.2 Game

2.2.1 Definition of game

One useful strategy in learning a foreign language is using games. When

using games in the classroom, it is important for teachers to have a

complete understanding of the definition of games, which usually are

defined as a form of play concerning rules, competition, and an element of

fun. According to Hadfield (1984, p. 4) 'a game is an activity with rules, a

goal and an element of fun’. Moreover, game means 'an activity which is

entertaining and engaging, often challenging, and an activity in which

learners play and usually interact with others' (Wright et al, 2006, p. 1).

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Deesri (2002) also states that in games must be included such factors as:

rules and competition. The main focus of using game in class is to help

learners learn and have fun. She adds relaxation and learning too.

Moreover, games should be characterized by the positive climate. They

cannot be stressful for children yet they are needed to be pleasure and fun

for them. But on the other hand students must learn from games. Games

should be a tool for children to reach a goal that is connected with

improving their language. In her opinion, teachers should use games to

help learners learn and have fun.

2.2.2 Game as a teaching method

Teaching today has changed a lot over the past years. Once it was all

about learners being passive and listening in the classroom, but today

learners are usually much more active in the classroom, and what better

way to be active than by playing games (Steve Sugar, 1998, p. 3).

The national curriculum in foreign languages in Iceland talks about the

importance of keeping teaching methods diverse in order to light and

sustain interest amongst students. Teachers can help sustain diversity in a

variety of ways, for example by using activities that require learners to be

creative in thinking and by emphasizing individual learning and

cooperative learning equally. A more specific way that teachers can use in

order to keep diversity within the classroom is to not be afraid of using

games as a teaching method along with other methods. According to the

national curriculum in Iceland, games can be a good teaching method

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such as role playing games, imitation games, theatrical expression and

problem solving activities are especially fitting for all stages of language

learning in Aðalnámskrá grunnskóla & Erlend mál (2007, p. 12) as cited in

Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir (2010, p. 7).

2.2.3 The Importance of Game

There are six reasons that games deserve a place in the language

classroom (Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir, 2010, p. 7-8). First of all, they are

fun, which is extremely important, because they can help activate learners

who may have been inactive before, due to lack of interest. Keeping

learners active is important because teacher will never be able to actually

teach learners anything unless they can get them to participate in their

own learning process.

Second, games become a big part in helping participants build

relationships, and feel equal. Playing games in the classroom can also

help create a friendly and positive atmosphere among teacher and

learners.

Third, the reason most people want to learn a language is to be able to

use it in real situations. Games can be a very good way to practice this

skill because they can easily be used to reenact various situations from

real life and provide learners with practice in their fluency. Also, by using

games in the classroom the teacher gives the learners a bigger role that

allows them to take more responsibility. Also that allows students to do

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more on their own, and that can very well result in an increase in their

confidence level. (Langran & Purcell, 1994, p. 12-14).

Fourth, language learners need to be emotionally involved, It means that

they need to feel something while they are exposed to the language.

Strong emotions, such as happiness, excitement, amusement and

suspense allow learners to feel positively about their learning situation and

are therefore likely to have a positive effect on language learning.

Fifth, games are good for shy learners and learners with low confidence,

and that applies specifically when playing takes place in smaller groups

because then they get a chance to speak in front of fewer audience

instead of having to express themselves in front of the whole class. Also it

is sometimes easier to open up and forget the shyness when playing a

game because the atmosphere is not as serious and more emphasis is put

on fluency rather than grammatical correctness. (Langran & Purcell, 1994,

p. 12-14).

Sixth, games can be a good strategy when teaching various subjects.

They can be used with students of all ages, and when they are used with

other teaching methods they create diversity which is ideal for school work

in Ingvar Sigurgeirsson (1999, p. 80) as cited Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir

(2010, p. 8).

2.2.4 Game categories

Games that are used in teaching can be divided into categories in many

different ways. One way of dividing educational games is by categorizing

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them into groups depending on their model in Ingvar Sigurgeirsson (1995)

as cited Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir (2010, p. 10) has divided games into

the following categories: games for dividing larger groups into smaller

groups, introduction-games, group games, physical games, scavenger

hunt games, educational games, theoretical expression games, drawing

and coloring games, educational card games, word games, story games

and question games.

The other way of dividing educational games is by categorizing them into

cooperative games and competitive games. Competitive games can be a

useful way to get some students interested and to maintain their focus, On

cooperative games which revolve around working together towards

reaching a specific goal, can be an excellent way to foster the skill of

working with others. In cooperative games the emphasis is not on winning

or losing, and as a result nobody should have to suffer trauma to his or her

self confidence which could lead to better results in the learning process

(Masheder, 1989, p. 1). Educational games can be categorized in many

other ways, for example dividing games into groups depending on which

age group they fit could be convenient, also a division into writing, reading,

speaking, and listening games could be a good idea.

2.3 Game-Based Learning

2.3.1 Definition Game-Based Learning

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In Wikipedia, game-based learning (GBL) is defined as a branch of serious

games that deals with applications that have defined learning outcomes.

Generally they are designed to balance the subject matter with the game

play and the ability of the player to retain and apply discussed subject

matter to the real world. Game based learning concept inspires game

mechanics application to things that are usually not seen as a game. In

fact, it assists educators in persuading or motivating their learners to

perform and understand complex to simple topics with ease in less time.

Game based learning has been proven to be very powerful in engaging

learner’s attention for a longer span of time. Game based learning is not

only about converting things in the real world into games but also using

the characteristics of game mechanics and applying them to the real

world.

For instance, Teed (2004) suggests that there are three elements that

define an activity as a game:

1. Competition: Score-keeping element and/or winning conditions

motivates players and assesses their performance. Sometimes, players

are not necessarily competing against each other. Actually, a lot of games

have players working as a team to overcome obstacles built into the game.

2. Engagement: Learners get so engrossed into the game that they do not

want to stop until the game is over. Researchers term this phenomenon as

"intrinsic motivation" and attribute it to four sources namely; challenge,

curiosity, control and fantasy. (Malone, 1980).

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3. Immediate Rewards: Learners get excited when they receive victory or

points. Sometimes, even simple or analytical feedback motivates them to

play the game once again.

2.3.2 Kahoot!

Kahoot! is a game-based student response system (GSRS). The initial

idea for Kahoot! was to create a platform where the teacher and the

learners in a classroom could interact through a competitive knowledge

game using the existing infrastructure. The motivation was to engage

learners through transforming the classroom into a game show, where the

teacher would be the game show host, and all the learners could compete

by earning points through answering correctly on various questions related

to the current subject being taught. At the end of a game session, a winner

would be announced.

Kahoot! represents a new generation of GSRS that has a main focus on

learner motivation and engagement through gamification. The tool is a

result of the research project Lecture Quiz that started in 2006 (Wang,

Øfsdal et al. 2007), where results from experimentation of early prototypes

showed positive results in terms of increased engagement, motivation and

perceived learning (Wang, Øfsdal et al, 2008, Wu, Wang et al, 2011).

Educational games compared to mainstream entertainment games are

known to suffer from running on very few platforms (usually Windows

PCs), too simplistic, being single player and offline, offering low production

value, and are typically more targeted towards parents, teachers and

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formal learning curriculum than being fun for the students (Kirriemuir &

McFarlane 2004). This is especially true when educational games try to

copy existing game concepts and add some learning on top of it. Kahoot!

was not designed to copy any existing game, but rather to find a game

concept that could fit a classroom setting and that could be alignment with

Tom Malone’s theory of intrinsically motivating instructions in Malone

(1980). Malone’s theory lists three categories that make things fun to

learn:

1. Challenge (goals with uncertain outcomes).

2. Fantasy (captivate through intrinsic or extrinsic fantasy).

3. Curiosity (sensor curiosity through graphics and audio, and cognitive

curiosity).

As the game should be used in the classroom, it was also important to

incorporate a social game play. The result was to develop a game concept

where the fantasy is that the classroom temporarily is changed to a game

show where the teacher is the game host and the learners are the

competitors. The challenge is to answer questions and compete against

other players, and the curiosity is provided through inspiring graphics and

audio, as well as solving a cognitive puzzle. The lack of variety in game

play is compensated by the competitive nature of playing against a whole

class of learners. Learning games are commonly used to review facts

using multiple-choice questions similar to what is done in Kahoot!.

However, such games can also be used to teach skills, judgment,

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behaviors, theories, reasoning, process, procedures, creativity, language,

systems, observation, and communication using various approaches

(Prensky, 2005).

2.4 Advantages and Disadvantages of Kahoot!

2.4.1 Advantages

In addition to quick data and immediate feedback, Kahoot! has many

advantages. The application is web-based and does not need any

downloading. It can be created by anyone, for any subject, and also

appropriate for any age. It is user-friendly that the participants just need

pin to play and can be used without cost. It also integrates various visuals

like videos, music, sound, and photography that the teacher can be

creative with images and videos from the internet which are open sources

for everybody. Kahoot can also help learners participate in quizzes,

discussions, and reviews. The applications allow a broad range of

knowledge management and virtual learning features.

Nixon and Helms (1997, p. 349 - 353) suggest that virtual learning and

distance education is of considerable interest to trainers and educators.

Online learning and virtual classrooms help students learn through

interactive and multimedia presentations, and students to learn by

themselves, rather than being taught (Nixon and Helms, 1997, p.349-353).

The participative process encourages problem solving, critical thinking,

and experiential group exercises, and learners can engage in a learning

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situation. This program is an excellent tool for teachers to use for

differentiated instruction. It also allows teachers the opportunity to assess

the strengths and weaknesses of students based on the results of tests.

2.4.2 Disadvantages

Just like any other program, Kahoot has some limitations. It requires users

to have access to Wi-Fi. If the server is down or too slow, it creates some

problems for learners to log on and they lose connection during the game

and can't get back in. Projector, Screen or Smartboard are also needed to

display this game that can be used by classroom with hardware devices

available.

2.5 Related Studies

To support this research, there are three previous studies related to this

topic. The first research entitled “The Effect of Digitizing and Gamifying

Quizzing in Classrooms” conducted by Alf Inge Wang, Meng Zhu, and

Rune Sætre from Norwegian University of Science and Technology,

Trondheim, Norway. It describes an experiment where the game-based

student response system Kahoot! is compared to a traditional non-

gamified student response system, as well as the usage of paper forms for

formative assessment. The goal of the experiment is to investigate

whether gamified formative assessments improve the students’

engagement, motivation, enjoyment, concentration, and learning. Pre- and

a post-test were used to assess the learning outcome of the lectures and a

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questionnaire was used to get data on the students’ engagement and

motivation. The results show significant improvement in motivation,

engagement, enjoyment, and concentration for the gamified approach.

The second research entitled “The Wear Out Effect of a Game-based

Student Response System” by Alf Inge Wang from Department Norwegian

University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. This study

shows the results from investigating the wear off effect of using the game-

based student response system Kahoot! in classroom teaching. More

specifically, it compares the results from students using Kahoot! for the

first time in a single motivational lecture vs. using Kahoot! in every lecture

in a class for five months. The quasi-experiment focused on how the

students' perception changed in relation to user-friendliness, engagement,

motivation, classroom dynamics, concentration, and perceived learning.

The results show a slight reduction in the student’s motivation and

engagement, but the only statistically significant wear out effect found was

related to classroom dynamics. At large, the game-based student

response system managed to boost students engagement, motivation and

learning after using it repeatedly for five months. The core factor to keep

the students attention after heavy repeated usage was found to be the

competitive nature of Kahoot!.

The third research entitled “A Collaborative Game-Based Learning

Approach to Improve Students’ Learning Performance in Science

Courses” conducted by Han-Yu Sung and Gwo-Jen Hwang, National

Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan. In this study, a

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collaborative game-based learning environment is developed by

integrating a grid-based Mindtool to facilitate the students to share and

organize what they have learned during the game playing process. To

evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an experiment has

been conducted in an elementary school natural science course to

examine the students’ performance in terms of their learning attitudes,

learning motivation, self-efficacy and learning achievements. From the

experimental results, it is found that the Mindtool-integrated collaborative

educational game not only benefits the students in promoting their learning

attitudes and learning motivation, but also improves their learning

achievement and self-efficacy owing to the provision of the knowledge

organizing and sharing facility embedded in the collaborative gaming

environment.

2.6 Pre-understanding

From all of the theories and related studies above, using Kahoot! is

one of the possibly appropriate media in facilitating classroom dynamics

and learners’ learning process. The theory of constructivism may be

relevant to this study because it is reflected in certain types of computer

game. There are three elements making Kahoot fun to learn. The first is

the fantasy that the classroom temporarily changes to a game show. The

teacher is the game host and the learners are the competitors. The second

is the challenge that learners answer questions and compete with other

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players. The third is the curiosity in which it is provided through inspiring

graphics and audio.

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CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY

This section discusses about the methodology that is used to answer the

research objectives. There are research design, phenomenon, population

and sampling, data gathering technique, data analysis technique, and

research procedure.

3.1 Research Design

This is a qualitative research. Qualitative research puts emphasis on the

qualities of entities and on processes and meanings that are not

experimentally examined or measured in terms of quantity, amount,

intensity, or frequency. In qualitative research, the intent was not to

generalize a population but to develop an in-depth exploration of central

phenomenon. Moreover, qualitative research is sites that could help the

researcher to understand certain phenomenon (Cresswell, 2008, p. 206).

Gwyn Mettetal (2003) states that classroom action research is defined as

a method of finding out what works best in the classroom so that it can

improve students’ learning. In this study, classroom action research was

used to facilitate classroom dynamics and learning process.

According to Kemmis and McTaggart (1998, p. 10), there are four

fundamental steps in classroom action research; they are planning, action,

observation, and reflection. It can be seen in figure 3.1

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Figure 3.1 the Classroom Action Research Spiral (Kemmis and McTaggart, 1988)

3.1.1 Plan

Planning is the first step in doing classroom action research. In planning,

the researcher tried to find problems in the classroom and offer solutions.

After finding the problems, the solutions are applied in the action. The

general plan must be flexible enough and adapt to unforeseen effect and

previously unrecognized constraints (Kemmis & McTaggart, 1988, p. 11).

The plan will bring the learners to a better learning. After the researcher

develops the plan, it is expected that the researcher can find what has

already happened in terms of problems, recent methods, the teaching and

learning activities in the classroom, and solution to those problems.

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3.1.2 Action

In the action, the researcher teaches the learners. According to Kemmis

and McTaggart (1988, p. 12), action is guided by planning in the sense

that it looks back to planning for its background. According to Parsons and

Brown (2002), action is a form of investigation designed for use by

teachers to attempt to solve problems and improve professional practices

in their own classrooms. Therefore, whether the learners have good

progress or not can be seen by observation in the classroom.

3.1.3 Observation

This part is different from action, even though observation is conducted

simultaneously with the action. The observation aims at collecting

evidence about the action in order to be able to evaluate it thoroughly

(Kemmis & McTaggart, 1988, p. 12). According to Ellen and Sara (1996),

observation is an essential element in good teaching and program

development.

3.1.4 Reflection

According to Kemis and McTaggart (1988), reflection recalls action as it

has been recorded in observation. The learning last step is expected to

give solution to apply in the second cycle and the next cycle if needed.

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Therefore, by doing this step, the improvement of better learning for

students would be achieved.

3.2 Phenomenon

The study was designed to gain an in-depth understanding about the

application of game-based learning that adopt Kahoot! for teaching and

learning purposes and to determine if adoption affected classroom

dynamics and learning process.

3.3 Population and Sampling

The population of this research was English Education Study Program

learners of the first semester taking Structure I. They have been studying

English for at least than 6 years, from Junior High Schools until Senior

High Schools. This quite long duration of their English study in the high

schools gave them some understanding of basic structure and vocabulary.

3.4 Data Collection Technique

The data collection was conducted through observation, interview, and

questionnaire. The data through the observation was conducted to

discover classroom dynamics by using Kahoot! The questionnaires were

filled in by the learners to find out their responses to learn with Kahoot!

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The interviews to some learners were carried out to find out their opinion

about the learning process.

3.5 Data Analysis Technique

There were some steps in analyzing the data. First, the researcher

analyzed the data from the interview to see problems occurring in their

teaching and learning English and also their suggestions for the

improvement of English language in classroom. Second, the researcher

analyzed the observation to know the learners’ response on their English

language learning activities after the implementation of Kahoot! Third, the

researcher analyzed the questionnaires. The researcher read the

questionnaire carefully then continued to calculate the proportional

percentage of each response.

3.6 Research Procedure

There were some steps done to conduct this research. First, the

researcher identified the problems of Structure class of English Education

Study Program. Second, the researcher tried to find the solutions to solve

the problems. Third, the topic of class discussion in the Structure I and

instruments were discussed with teaching the subject to the lecturer.

Fourth, the researcher was conducted to the classroom. Fifth, the data

was collected from the research by teaching and observing certain

materials related the subject. The result of the observation and reflection

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were then analyzed. Finally, its interpretation was presented into this study

to answer the formulation of the problem to provide a better teaching

learning process of a Structure I class.

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CHAPTER IV

RESEARCH FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION

This section discusses about the discussion of the data and other findings

obtained in this research in order to answer the problems formulation.

There are two discussions presented in this section. The first is the

implementation of Kahoot! in Structure I class of English Education Study

Program. The second is the discussion of the effect of Kahoot! in Structure

I class of English Education Study Program based on instruments data of

the research.

4.1 The Implementation of Kahoot!

In the implementation of Kahoot, the researcher presents the result of the

research in two cycles. Every cycle includes plan, action, observation, and

reflection. Before doing the research, the researcher carried out an

observation. The researcher observed the real situation of the Structure

class of English Education Study Program. The researcher conducted

observation and interview to find out the learners’ problem in their learning

activities in the classroom. After knowing the problem, the researcher

identified the problems faced of the learners.

Observing the classroom and interviewing the learners were chosen as the

techniques in order to identify the problems of each cycle. First step was

an observation. It was done by observing learners’ activity in the

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classroom using Kahoot! and also their activities while the researcher was

teaching them. Second step was an interview. It was done by interviewing

the learners informally. The interview aimed to get the opinion of the

learners in the research about the teaching and learning process

happened in the classroom.

The researcher had taught Structure I class in January 2017. The

problems were seen since the researcher taught them. Based on the

observation and interview, there were some problems related to the

learners’ assumption, method, and medium used. The first was related to

the learner’s assumption. They had an assumption that learning grammar

was difficult. Some of them still had difficulties and low understanding in

learning grammar. The second was related to the teaching method that the

lecturer used in the teaching and learning process. The third was related

to the medium used. Teaching grammar in English Education Study

program was mostly dominated with doing tasks in paper assignment at

home or campus. It could be seen from learners’ answers when the

researcher asked them in the interview. Some of them said that they felt

unmotivated to follow the lesson in the classroom. The lecturer also rarely

used media especially games. They were not active and bored during the

teaching and learning process.

According to Malone (1880), there are three categories that make things

fun to learn: challenge, fantasy, curiosity. In this research, online learning

media especially Kahoot! was chosen because it was considered as fun,

interesting, and enjoyable. The researcher as the teacher prepared the

29
learning design with the lecturer for every class meeting. After the

researcher formulated the action to solve the problems in the teaching and

learning process faced by the first semester learners of English Education

Study Program, the researcher implemented it. The implementation of

action was done in two cycles: cycle I and cycle II. There were plan,

action, observation, and reflection. In this research, plan was designed

before implementing the action. Then, the researcher had action to apply

the plan that had been designed. When implementing the action, the

researcher also observed the progress of the learners through Kahoot! It

included their result and activities from the given task. Their responses

could be a consideration for the researcher in order to reflect the progress

of English teaching and learning process using Kahoot!

The implementation was conducted in January, 2017. There were 20

learners joining the teaching learning process. There were four meetings

and each meeting was conducted in 60 minutes. The discussion of the

data would be explained in each part of the cycle containing plan, action,

observation, and reflection.

There were two cycles conducted by the researcher in order to implement

Kahoot! and to observe the class:

4.1.1 Cycle 1

a. Plan

The cycle 1 of plan was done after the identification of the problems. The

implementation of Kahoot! was the solution of the problems. The use of

30
Kahoot! was the learners’ choice or option when they were offered the

technique. The learners considered that Kahoot! was more fun and

comfortable than conventional way of teaching. Therefore, the researcher

used online learning media. It was because all the learners had

smartphones and laptops. The researcher did the followings activities:

1) The researcher explained to the learners that there would be four

meetings.

2) The researcher prepared the teaching and learning materials and

observation sheets.

3) The researcher explained the aims and rules of using Kahoot!

4) The researcher gave the instruction to the learners.

The material of the teaching was WH-Question. The researcher designed

the materials after discussing them with the classroom lecturer. First, the

researcher taught the learners through power-point slides containing

materials related to the topic. Before giving the WH-Question quiz, the

learners were given examples of the quiz by using Kahoot! Next, the

researcher explained the rules of Kahoot! and gave instruction to the

learners.

b. Action

The implementation of action was conducted in two meetings. It was

based on the plan. In this step, the researcher started teaching learning

process to get the data. The purpose of cycle 1 was to measure and to get

information how far the learners know and master the materials by the

31
implementation of Kahoot! At the beginning of the meeting, first, the

researcher greeted the learners. Second, she took the learners’

attendance. Then, she told the learners the materials to be discussed and

the importance of the learning materials. The next was the main activities.

The researcher explained the materials WH-Question. Most of them knew

about WH-Question.

The researcher began to explain the materials by using power-point slides.

She explained that WH-Questions are used to ask information by using

question words: where, when, why, who, whom, what, which, whose, and

how. Then, the researcher gave learners the formula to be used in WH-

Questions. After explaining the materials, she asked learners to give their

confirmation that they have understood about them and offered learners to

ask questions. There were no questions from the learners of WH-

Questions. After that, the researcher implemented Kahoot! The researcher

used laptop and also provided Wi-Fi for the internet connection. Then, the

researcher continued the quiz and gave instruction to the learners.

c. Observation

The observation and the action were implemented at the same time. The

researcher as the teacher conducted the observation to implement the

action. In this step, the researcher observed the class while teaching by

using Kahoot!

When the researcher explained them that they would have online media

for the learning process, they were very happy and enthusiastic. When the

32
they were very curious and happy about Kahoot!, the researcher explained

the rules of it. After the researcher explained what Kahoot! and it function

were, the learners looked curious and asked some questions while they

opened the application with their own smartphones.

Before doing WH-Question quiz of Kahoot! the researcher gave instruction

to the learners by using Spongebob quiz but still about WH-Question. The

learners were very active and the atmosphere in the classroom was

positive where learners felt comfortable and relax to communicate with

other learners and with the researcher. Wright et al (2006, p.1) states that

game means “an activity which is entertaining and engaging, often

challenging, and an activity in which learners play and usually interact with

others”. Nowadays learners are usually much more active in the classroom

and what better way to be active than by playing games (Steve Sugar,

1998, p. 3).

33
Figure 4.1 Giving answers in Kahoot!

After playing with Kahoot!, the researcher asked the learners to do the

task given. The learners did it very well. There were 20 questions with ‘fill

in the blanks’ by using WH-Question. During question and answer session

of the quiz, there were some learners who still had problems because of

the internet connection. Then, the researcher waited until the internet

connection was good. The learners were active to ask questions when the

researcher gave feedback for each question. They also became very

enthusiastic after knowing the result at the end of a Kahoot! session. The

winner’s nickname and points will be shown on the large screen. The

learners seemed very enthusiastic to participate in this activity. It was also

34
seen from their interview answer that they all really enjoyed learning using

Kahoot!

d. Reflection

The implementation of Kahoot! was successful in order to make the

learners more active and enjoy the teaching and learning process.

However, there were still some problems occurred in the classroom. There

were some learners who sat in the back row did not pay attention to the

researcher and some learners who were very enthusiastic that sat in the

front row of the class. They sometimes also lost the internet connection.

Therefore, the researcher found out the alternative way to solve the

problems faced in the cycle 1 to be applied in the cycle 2.

The implementation of Cycle 1 was briefly explained in Figure 4.2

PLAN

1) The reseacher explained to the learners that there would be four

meetings.

2) The researcher prepared the teaching and learning materials and

observation sheets.

3) The researcher explained the aims and rules of using Kahoot!

4) The researcher gave instruction to the learners.

ACTION

1) The researcher explained the materials of WH-Question.

35
2) The researcher provided the formula of WH-Question.

3) The researcher asked learners’ understanding about the materials.

4) The researcher offered learners to ask questions.

5) The researcher gave instruction of using Kahoot! and implemented it to

the learners.

6) The researcher gave the learners a quiz based on the instruction and

example.

OBSERVATION

1) The learners were very happy and enthusiastic to have online learning

media.

2) The learners were very active to try the quiz and ask some questions.

3) The learners felt comfortable and relaxed to communicate with other

learners and with the researcher because of the conducive classroom

atmosphere.

4) Some learners still had problems because of the internet connection

during the implementation of the quiz.

REFLECTION

1) Some learners who sat in the back row did not really pay attention.

2) Some learners who sat in the front row of the class were very

enthusiastic.

3) The learners sometimes lost the internet connection because of the

36
capacity of Wi-Fi.

4) The researcher divided the learners into 3 groups due to limited

capacity connection where 1 group used one smartphone.

4.1.2 Cycle 2

a. Plan

Internet connection was still a problem in the first cycle because all of the

learners used their smartphones because Wi-Fi capacity was limited.

Based on the reflection in the cycle 1, the teacher tried to make interesting

materials using Kahoot! and divided the students into three groups. In this

process, the researcher did the followings activities as she exactly did in

the cycle 1:

1) The researcher prepared the teaching and learning materials and

observation sheets.

2) The researcher explained the aims and rules of using Kahoot!

3) The researcher gave instruction to the learners.

The material was still the continuation of the previous meeting that was

about WH-Question. The researcher gave more complex material and quiz

to learners. The researcher asked the learners to choose the appropriate

questions for the prepared statements as the answers.

37
b. Action

The implementation of action was conducted in two meeting. It was based

on the plan. In this step, the researcher started teaching learning process

to get data. The purpose of cycle 2 was to measure and to get the

information how far the learners know and master about the teaching

materials with Kahoot! At the beginning of the meeting, first, the

researcher greeted the learners. Second, she took the learners’

attendance. Then, she told the learners what materials to be discussed

and the importance of the materials. The next was the main activities. The

researcher explained more about WH-Question for better students’

understanding.

The researcher explained the materials deeply. Then, she gave learners

the formula to be used in WH-Question. After the researcher finished

explaining the materials, she asked the learners to give their confirmation

that they had understood it and offered the learners to ask questions.

Then, the researcher asked some questions to the learners because there

were no questions from them. After that, the researcher divided the

learners into three groups.

c. Observation

The learners did the quiz well because they had experience using it

before. One group only provided one smartphone. They were very

enthusiastic to compete with others. The activity was more active than

before. Each group gave their best performance to be a winner. The

38
learners were more comfortable and confident when they were discussing

with their friends in a group. Based on this activity, it was seen that they

enjoyed the teaching and learning process. During the implementation of

the action, there was cooperation between the researcher and the

learners. The learners wanted to ask questions about the words they did

not know, most of them paid attention to the researcher’s instruction. The

teaching and learning process ran better than the cycle 1.

Figure 4.3 Playing Kahoot!

4) Reflection

In the last meeting, the learners showed some improvements. Most of

them could do the activity well. They were also easier to be controlled than

before because the researcher divided them into three smaller groups.

Based on the questionnaire, the learners enjoyed and enthusiastic to play

Kahoot! in their learning process.

39
The implementation of Cycle 2 was briefly explained in Figure 4.4

PLAN

1) The researcher prepared the teaching and learning materials and

observation sheets.

2) The researcher explained the aims and rules of using Kahoot!

3) The researcher gave instruction to the learners.

ACTION

1) The researcher explained the materials deeply.

2) The researcher provided the formula of WH-Question.

3) The researcher asked some questions to the learners because there

was no question.

4) The researcher divided learners into 3 groups.

5) The researcher gave the learners a quiz based on the instruction and

example.

OBSERVATION

1) The learners did the quiz well because they had an experience of using

it before.

2) The activity was more active than before.

3) Each group gave their best performance to be a winner.

4) The learners were more active to discuss the quiz with their friends in

groups.

40
5) The learners enjoyed the teaching and learning process.

REFLECTION

1) The learners showed some improvement.

2) Most of the learners could do the activity well.

3) The learners were easier to be controlled than before because the

researcher divided them into 3 groups.

4) The learners enjoyed the lesson with Kahoot! and they were

enthusiastic to play it in the learning process.

4.2 The Effects of Using Kahoot! Based on the Instruments

This part presents the discussion on the effect of the application of

Kahoot! for classroom dynamics and the learning process. In this part, the

researcher wanted to show whether the application of Kahoot! could affect

classroom dynamics and facilitate the learning process.

4.2.1 Kahoot! for classroom dynamics

In this part the researcher showed whether Kahoot! affected classroom

dynamics based on the instruments -observation, questionnaire, interview-

used in the research.

41
No Statement Yes No

1 I had learning experience with Kahoot before. 0% 100%

2 I enjoyed the quiz so much. 100% 0%

3 It was fun to compete against others. 100% 0%

4 I was active to answer the quiz. 99% 1%

5 I communicated with other players while


99% 1%
playing the game.

6 I concentrated on the quiz to get correct


99% 1%
answers.

7 I felt stressful because I was afraid that I might


1% 99%
have poor performance in the games.

8 I found it more interesting to learn the lessons


100% 0%
through online competitive games.

9 The explanations and instructions were so


100% 0%
clear.

10 I hope to learn other lessons using Kahoot. 100% 0%

Figure 4.5 Questionnaire Result

Statements two to six in Table 4.1 are related to the classroom dynamics

broken into enjoyment of the quiz in question number 2, enjoyment of

competition in question number 3, participation of the quiz in question

number 4, interaction between learners in question number 5, and

concentration when competing against others in question number 6. When

playing quizzes, 100% of the learners focused on what was going on in

the classroom. The researcher also noticed that the learners started to

42
laugh and give positive comments during the quiz. Based on the

questionnaire, it was clear that Kahoot! affected classroom dynamics. The

effects of using Kahoot! were also supported by the learners statements in

the interview.

Learner 1 : “It is fun that I can defeat my friends to be a winner.”

Learner 2 : “It is challenging! I should focus to answer the question

because the time is limited.”

Learner 3 : “I really enjoy the game because it is not flat.”

They considered that Kahoot! was fun and interesting to play in the

classroom. The atmosphere in the classroom was positive where learners

felt comfortable and relaxed to communicate with other learners and also

with the researcher.

4.2.2 Kahoot! facilitates the learning process

Statements eight to ten in Table 4.1 show that the teaching and learning

process is successful. All learners expected that other subjects could use

Kahoot! in the process. Based on the observation of the classroom, it was

clear that Kahoot! gave significant progress on the learners learning

achievement. The significant progress was also supported by their

statements in the interview.

Learner 1 : “Yes, I’m very enthusiastic to learn grammar. I hope I can

learn by using Kahoot! with you again.”

43
Learner 2 : “It is interesting. I can improve my skills in English.”

Learner 3 : “The quiz is good. It motivates me to learn grammar.”

Kahoot! consists of multiple choice questions as a quiz, discussion or

survey that is used to facilitate learning through teaching materials and is

focused on learning rather than teaching. The materials are not teacher

centered but rather student centered. In the teaching and learning

process, they showed a great enthusiasm about using Kahoot! in the

class. They were very interested and also motivated to study more

grammar by using Kahoot!.

44
CHAPTER V

CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTIONS

This section discusses about the conclusions and suggestions. The

conclusions present the summary of the major findings discussed in the

previous chapter. The suggestions present the ideas for further studies on

the application of Kahoot! in English structure class.

5.1 Conclusions

In this chapter, the researcher would like to restate the problem

formulation before giving the conclusions. The problems are: how does

Kahoot! affect classroom dynamics and how does Kahoot! facilitate the

learning process?

Based on the research done by the researcher, the application of Kahoot!

affected classroom dynamics and learning process in the teaching and

learning activity. Based on the observation in the classroom and interview

of the learners, they followed the procedure of Kahoot! even though some

problems appeared because of the internet connection. When observation

was being carried out, the learners enjoyed their activities using Kahoot!

that created a positive atmosphere in the classroom.

According to Malone’s theory (1980) lists three categories that make

things fun to learn: challenge, fantasy, and curiosity. The result of Kahoot!

was to develop a game concept where the challenge was to answer

questions and compete against other players. The fantasy was the

45
classroom temporarily changed to a game show where the researcher was

the game host and the learners were the competitors. The curiosity was

provided through pictures and audio. It is supported by Wright et al (2006,

p. 1) who stated that game means “an activity which is entertaining and

engaging, often challenging, and an activity in which learners play and

usually interact with others”.

Those all improvement done by the learners are relevant from the theories

used in this research. Therefore, the researcher can conclude that the

application of Kahoot! affects the classroom dynamics and facilitates the

learning process in Structure I class of English Education Study Program,

Bandar Lampung University.

5.2 Suggestions

The suggestion presented in this research consist of three parts. They are

suggestions for learners, teachers, and further researchers.

5.2.1 For Learners

Since the use of Kahoot! seems to be a good way to facilitate the learning

process in language learning, it is suggested for Structure I class learners

of English Education Study Program to have online learning media using

Kahoot! inside or outside the class. Therefore, it can help them to have

better learning in English.

46
5.2.2 For Teachers

Teacher has a big role in improving learners’ development by providing

interesting learning strategy in the teaching and learning process. Teacher

has to have an interesting way to attract learners’ interest in learning

language and to avoid using monotonous technique. Therefore, it is

recommended for the teacher to use Kahoot! in the classroom.

5.2.3 For the Further Researchers

The results of the research were expected to encourage other researchers

to conduct further study related to this study. The researcher recommends

for the further researcher to implement this Kahoot! in other places.

Further researchers also may conduct research on other lessons by using

Kahoot!

47
REFERENCES

48
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Parsons, Rick D., and Kimberlee S. Brown. (2002). Teacher as Reflective
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50
APPENDICES

51
APPENDIX A

OBSERVATION SHEET

52
OBSERVATION SHEET

Meeting: 1.

Material: WH-Question.

Activities Learners’ Responses


 The researcher explained the  The learners were not
materials of WH-Question really enthusiastic to
using Power-point slides. follow the lesson.
 The researcher asked learners  There was no question
to give their confirmation that from them.
they have understood about
the lesson.
 The researcher explained the  The learners seemed
aims and rules of using happy.
Kahoot!
 The researcher asked the  The learners were busy
learners to open Kahoot! on with their smartphone
their smartphone. and asked some
questions.
 The researcher gave  The learners were
instruction of using Kahoot! confused.
 The researcher gave the  The learners were so
learners Spongebob quiz as noisy to answer the
an example of using Kahoot! quiz.
 The learners were very
happy after knowing the
result of the quiz.
 Some learners were still
confused how to play it
on their smartphone.

53
OBSERVATION SHEET

Meeting: 2.

Material: WH-Question.

Activities Learners’ Responses


 The researcher explained the  The learners asked
instruction again of using some questions, such
Kahoot! as:
“How to play it?”
“Can I play alone at
home?”
“Does it always need
internet connection?”
 The researcher gave the  It spent a long time to
learners a quiz about WH- wait the learners joined
Question based on the the quiz.
instruction and example of  The learners were very
using Kahoot! enthusiastic, some of
them moved to the front
row of the class.
 The learners who sat in
the back row did not
really pay attention.
 Most learners left the
quiz because the
internet connection was
low.
 The researcher started the  The learners were
quiz once again. active to try the quiz.
 They communicated
each other.
 Some of them lost the
internet connection and
they seemed tired of it.

54
OBSERVATION SHEET

Meeting: 3.

Material: WH-Question.

Activities Learners’ Responses


 The researcher explained the  The learners paid
materials of WH-Question attention.
deeply.
 The researcher asked some  The learners could
questions to the learners answer the questions.
because there was no
question.
 The researcher divided  The learners seemed
learners into 3 groups. One happy to play Kahoot!
group for one smartphone. in groups.
 The researcher gave a quiz  The learners did not
using Kahoot! about guessing have a problem with the
songs. She provided videos internet connection.
from Youtube.  Each group answered
quickly.
 The learners seemed
very happy after
knowing the winner.

55
OBSERVATION SHEET

Meeting: 4.

Material: WH-Question.

Activities Learners’ Responses


 The researcher gave the  The learners did the
learners a quiz about WH- quiz well.
Question based on the  The activity was more
instruction and example of active than before.
using Kahoot!
 The researcher gave feedback  The learners asked
for each question in the quiz. some questions.
 The researcher gave one more  The learners were more
quiz about WH-Questions but active to discuss the
it was more difficult than quiz with their friends in
before. She also added more groups.
times to answer the quiz.  Each group tried to be a
winner.
 The learners did not
have a problem with the
internet connection.
 The learners enjoyed
the teaching and
learning process.

56
APPENDIX B

INTERVIEW GUIDELINES

57
A. Before Implementing CAR
1. Is it difficult to learn grammar?
2. How does the lecturer teach grammar?
3. How about the way he teaches you? Does he use media?
4. How about the assignment? In a paper or what?
5. Did he ever use games in the teaching and learning process?

58
B. After Implementing CAR

Aspect No Question
1 Do you like learning English by using Kahoot?
Motivation 2 Are you enthusiastic to learn grammar by using
Kahoot?
3 Does Kahoot game motivate you to learn grammar?
4 Do you feel interested with Kahoot through pictures and
videos?
5 What are the activities that make you feel enthusiastic
Activity and motivated?
6 Are you active to answer the questions?
7 Do you find any obstacles?
8 What are the advantages that you get after learning
Implication with Kahoot?
9 What are the disadvantages that you get after learning
with Kahoot?
10 Would you like to see Kahoot put to use in other
subjects?

59
APPENDIX C

TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW

BEFORE IMPLEMENTING CAR

60
Transcript of Interview

The interview with some of Structure I class learners of English


Education Study Program before implementing classroom action
research (January 2017).

Researcher : Good morning everyone. Before we start the


lesson, I want to ask some questions. Could
you please answer it?

All respondents : Sure, Miss.

Respondent A : What do you want to ask, Miss Thea?

Researcher : First, is it difficult to learn grammar?

Some respondents : Yes, Miss.

Researcher : Ok, how does the lecturer teach grammar?

Some respondents : Good, Miss.

Respondent B : I understand when he teaches the lesson.

Respondent C : Nervous, Miss.

Researcher : Why do you feel nervous?

Respondent A : Because she is noisy in the class, Miss.

Researcher : How about the others?

Respondent D : He is not careful sometimes to check the


result of the test.

Researcher : Ok, how about the way he teaches you? Does


he ever use media?

Respondent E : Yes, he uses Power-point.

Respondent B and C : And also whiteboard, Miss.

Respondent F : Books also, Miss.

Researcher : How about the assignment? In a paper or


what?

Respondent G : Paper, Miss.

61
Researcher : Did he ever use games in the teaching and
learning process?

All respondents : No, Miss.

Researcher : Ok, that’s all for the questions. Thank You.

62
APPENDIX D

TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW

AFTER IMPLEMENTING CAR

63
Transcript of Interview

The interview with three of Structure I class learners of English


Education Study Program before implementing classroom action
research (January 2017).

Learner 1

1. Do you like learning English by using Kahoot?

Yes, Miss. I like it from my deepest heart.

2. Are you enthusiastic to learn grammar by using Kahoot?

Yes, I am very enthusiastic to learn grammar. I hope I can learn by


using Kahoot! with you again anytime and anywhere.

3. Does Kahoot game motivate you to learn grammar?

Absolutely, Miss.

4. Do you feel interested with Kahoot through pictures and videos?

Yes, some pictures are funny.

5. What are the activities that make you feel enthusiastic and motivated?

It is fun that I can defeat my friends to be a winner.

6. Are you active to answer the questions?

Yes, I am. But I don’t like Spongebob quiz, you should focus to the
topic.

7. Do you find any obstacles?

No, Miss.

8. What are the advantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

I think it is very good to play game quiz in structure class.

9. What are the disadvantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

I think nothing, Miss.

10. Would you like to see Kahoot put to use in other subjects?
Of course, Miss.

64
Learner 2

1. Do you like learning English by using Kahoot?

Yes, I like it so much.

2. Are you enthusiastic to learn grammar by using Kahoot?

Yes, as you can see that I am so enthusiastic, Miss.

3. Does Kahoot game motivate you to learn grammar?

Yes, Miss.

4. Do you feel interested with Kahoot through pictures and videos?

Yes, they are interesting.

5. What are the activities that make you feel enthusiastic and motivated?
It is challenging! I should focus to answer the question because the
time is limited.
6. Are you active to answer the questions?

Yes, as you can see, Miss. I am very active.

7. Do you find any obstacles?

I miss some questions because the internet connection is not good


sometimes.

8. What are the advantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

It is interesting. I can improve my skills in English.

9. What are the disadvantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

I think there is nothing, Miss.

10. Would you like to see Kahoot put to use in other subjects?
Yeah sure, Miss.

65
Learner 3

1. Do you like learning English by using Kahoot?

Yes, I really enjoy the game because it is not flat.

2. Are you enthusiastic to learn grammar by using Kahoot?

Yes, I am happy Miss.

3. Does Kahoot game motivate you to learn grammar?

Yes, Miss. The quiz is good. It motivates me to learn grammar.

4. Do you feel interested with Kahoot through pictures and videos?

Yes, I do.

5. What are the activities that make you feel enthusiastic and motivated?
My group is the best, Miss. Because we are the winner, Miss.
6. Are you active to answer the questions?

Yes, I am.

7. Do you find any obstacles?

It is difficult for me to answer quickly.

8. What are the advantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

I try to answer the quiz quickly, Miss.

9. What are the disadvantages that you get after learning with Kahoot?

Nothing, I guess, Miss.

10. Would you like to see Kahoot put to use in other subjects?
In reading subject, Miss.

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APPENDIX E

QUESTIONNAIRE

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QUESTIONNAIRE

No Statement Yes No
1 I had learning experience with Kahoot before.
2 I enjoyed the quiz so much.
3 It was fun to compete against others.
4 I was active to answer the quiz.
5 I communicated with other players while
playing the game.
6 I concentrated on the quiz to get correct
answers.
7 I felt stressful because I was afraid that I might
have poor performance in the games.
8 I found it more interesting to learn the lessons
through online competitive games.
9 The explanations and instructions were so
clear.
10 I hope to learn other lessons using Kahoot.

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APPENDIX F

SAMPLE OF TEACHING MATERIALS

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SAMPLE OF TEACHING MATERIALS

70
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SAMPLE OF QUESTIONNAIRE

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