Anda di halaman 1dari 124

INFERRED RESOURCE ESTIMATION OF LITHIUM AND 

POTASSIUM AT THE CAUCHARI AND OLAROZ SALARS, JUJUY 
PROVINCE, ARGENTINA 
 

PREPARED FOR: 

TORONTO, CANADA 

PREPARED BY: 

MARK KING, PH.D., P.GEO 

CANADIAN PROFESSIONAL GEOSCIENTIST REGISTERED WITH 
THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL GEOSCIENTISTS OF NOVA SCOTIA 

GROUNDWATER INSIGHT, INC. 
30 OCEANVIEW DRIVE, HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, B3P 2H3 

FEBRUARY 15th 2010 
 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ABBREVIATIONS ..............................................................................................................................ix 
SUMMARY ......................................................................................................................................xii 
S.1 Terms of Reference ..............................................................................................................xii 
S.2 Property Location, Description and Ownership ...................................................................xii 
S.3 Geology.................................................................................................................................xii 
S.4 Mineralization……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…xiii 
S.5 Exploration Concept and Status ..........................................................................................xiii 
S.6 Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... xiv 
S.7 Recommendations............................................................................................................... xiv 
1‐ INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................... 1 
1.1 Authorization and Purpose.................................................................................................... 1 
1.2 Sources of Information.......................................................................................................... 1 
1.3 Scope of Personal Inspection ................................................................................................ 2 
2‐ RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS ................................................................................................... 5 
3‐ PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION................................................................................... 7 
3.1 Location ................................................................................................................................. 7 
3.2 Property Area ........................................................................................................................ 9 
3.3 Type of Mineral Tenure ....................................................................................................... 12 
3.4 Title ...................................................................................................................................... 12 
3.5 Property Boundaries............................................................................................................ 12 
3.6 Environmental Liabilities ..................................................................................................... 13 
3.7 Permits................................................................................................................................. 13 
4‐ACCESSIBILITY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHY.......... 14 
4.1 Topography.......................................................................................................................... 14 
4.2 Access .................................................................................................................................. 16 
4.3 Population Centres .............................................................................................................. 16 
4.4 Climate................................................................................................................................. 16 
4.5 Infrastructure ...................................................................................................................... 18 

  ‐ i ‐ 
 

5‐ HISTORY .................................................................................................................................... 19 


6‐ GEOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL SETTING............................................................................ 20 
6.1 Regional Structural Features ............................................................................................... 20 
6.2 Regional Geology................................................................................................................. 20 
6.3 Local Geology ...................................................................................................................... 22 
      6.3.1 Carbonate Facies......................................................................................................... 23 
      6.3.2 Borax Facies ................................................................................................................ 23 
      6.3.3 Sulphate Facies ........................................................................................................... 24 
      6.3.4 Clay Facies ................................................................................................................... 26 
      6.3.5 Sodium Chloride Facies............................................................................................... 26 
6.4 Vertical Geological Section.................................................................................................. 27 
      6.4.1 Upper Mixed Sequence............................................................................................... 29 
      6.4.2 Thin Bedded Sequence ............................................................................................... 29 
      6.4.3 Coarse Bedded Sequence ........................................................................................... 30 
6.5 Hydrogeology ...................................................................................................................... 32 
      6.5.1 Surface Water ............................................................................................................. 32 
      6.5.2 Groundwater............................................................................................................... 35 
      6.5.3 Water Balance............................................................................................................. 36 
7‐ DEPOSIT TYPES.......................................................................................................................... 37 
8‐ MINERALIZATION ...................................................................................................................... 39 
9‐ EXPLORATION ........................................................................................................................... 40 
9.1 Overview.............................................................................................................................. 40 
9.2 Surface Sampling Program .................................................................................................. 41 
9.3 Seismic Geophysical Program.............................................................................................. 44 
10‐ DRILLING ................................................................................................................................. 47 
10.1 Reverse Circulation Drilling Program ................................................................................ 47 
10.2 Diamond Drilling Program ................................................................................................. 59 
11‐SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH..................................................................................... 60 
    11.1 Background........................................................................................................................ 60 
11.2 Surface Brine Sampling Methods ...................................................................................... 60 

  ‐ ii ‐ 
 

    11.3 RC Borehole Sampling Methods........................................................................................ 60 
11.4 DD Borehole Sampling Methods ....................................................................................... 61 
12‐SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSES AND SECURITY................................................................. 62 
    12.1 Overview............................................................................................................................ 62 
12.2 Sample Preparation........................................................................................................... 62 
         12.2.1 Surface Brine Sample Preparation............................................................................. 62 
     12.2.2 RC Borehole Brine Sample Preparation ..................................................................... 62 
     12.2.3 DD Borehole Core Sample Preparation ..................................................................... 62 
    12.3 Brine Analysis .................................................................................................................... 63 
      12.3.1 Analytical Methods ................................................................................................... 63 
      12.3.2 Analytical Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) ..................................... 63 
    12.4 Geotechnical Analyses....................................................................................................... 68 
      12.4.1 Overview ................................................................................................................... 68 
      12.4.2  Analytical Methods .................................................................................................. 68 
    12.5 Sample Security ................................................................................................................. 69 
13‐ DATA VERIFICATION................................................................................................................ 70 
    13.1 Overview............................................................................................................................ 70 
13.2 Site Visit ............................................................................................................................. 70 
    13.3 Laboratory QA/QC Results ................................................................................................ 71 
13.4 Brine Composition Trends................................................................................................. 72 
13.5 Technical Competence ...................................................................................................... 72 
14‐ ADJACENT PROPERTIES........................................................................................................... 73 
15‐ MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING ........................................................ 75 
   15.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................ 75 
15.2 Simulated Solar Evaporation Solubility Testing................................................................. 75 
         15.2.1 Experimental Methods .............................................................................................. 75 
     15.2.2 Test Results ................................................................................................................ 77 
     15.2.3 Phase Diagrams.......................................................................................................... 81 
     15.2.4 Discussion and Conclusions ....................................................................................... 82 
16‐ MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATE ............................................................................................. 84 

  ‐ iii ‐ 
 

    16.1 Overview............................................................................................................................ 84 
16.2 Conceptual Geologic Model .............................................................................................. 84 
    16.3 Block Model Construction ................................................................................................. 84 
16.4 Resource Estimate Boundaries.......................................................................................... 87 
16.5 Drainable Porosity ............................................................................................................. 89 
    16.6 Lithium Distribution........................................................................................................... 90 
16.7 Inferred in situ Resource Estimation ................................................................................. 94 
16.8 Cut off Analysis .................................................................................................................. 95 
17‐ OTHER RELEVANT DATA AND INFORMATION ........................................................................ 96 
18‐ INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................... 97 
19‐ RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................................................. 98 
    19.1 Objectives .......................................................................................................................... 98 
    19.2 Hydrogeological Investigations ......................................................................................... 98 
     19.2.1 Resource Definition Drilling ....................................................................................... 98 
     19.2.2 Pumping Tests............................................................................................................ 98 
     19.2.3 Geophysical Surveys ................................................................................................ 100 
     19.2.4 Monitoring Programs............................................................................................... 100 
     19.2.5 Revised Resource Estimate...................................................................................... 100 
     19.2.6 Long‐term Aquifer Response ................................................................................... 100 
19.3 Brine Process Development ............................................................................................ 100 
19.4 Estimated Budget ............................................................................................................ 101 
20‐ REFERENCES.......................................................................................................................... 103 
21‐ DATE AND SIGNATURE PAGE ................................................................................................ 105 
22‐ ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL REPORTS ON DEVELOPMENT 
PROPERTIES AND PRODUCTION PROPERTIES....................................................................... 107 
23‐ ILLUSTRATIONS ..................................................................................................................... 108 

  ‐ iv ‐ 
 

LIST OF TABLES 

3.1 Status of Minera Exar S.A. mineral claims on the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars ................... 10 


8.1 Comparative chemical composition of natural brines (wt %)............................................. 39 
10.1 Brine concentration (mg/L)and density (g/cm3) results from RC Borehole Program ...... 48 
10.2 Average concentrations (g/L) and associated ratios from brine samples from the RC 
Borehole Program ............................................................................................................. 48 
10.3 Results of drainable porosity testing................................................................................. 59 
    12.1 Check Assays (ASL vs Univ. Salta): RMA regression statistics ........................................... 66 
12.2 Summary of geotechnical property analyses .................................................................... 68 
15.1 Concentration (wt%) and density (g/cm3) for the brine from borehole PE‐4 .................. 75 
    15.2 Mass balance in terms of salts, solution and evaporated water ...................................... 77 
15.3 Composition in wt% and properties of the evaporating brine ......................................... 78 
15.4 Chemical composition in wt% and moisture of harvested salts ....................................... 79 
15.5 Mineralization of Salts from Evaporation Test at 30°C (4th Stage) .................................. 80 
15.6 Mineralization of Salts from Solubility Test at 15°C (4th Stage) ....................................... 80 
16.1 Model layer porosity estimates......................................................................................... 89 
16.2 Inferred in situ lithium resource........................................................................................ 94 
16.3 Inferred in situ potassium resource .................................................................................. 95 
17.1 Comparison of selected lithium brine resources .............................................................. 96 
   19.1 Estimated Budget ............................................................................................................. 102 

  ‐ v ‐ 
 

LIST OF FIGURES 

3.1 Location map ......................................................................................................................... 8 
3.2 LAC property claims for the Cauchari ‐ Olaroz Project........................................................ 11 
4.1 Topography map ................................................................................................................. 15 
4.2 Monthly average precipitation for Susques  ....................................................................... 17 
4.3  Monthly average precipitation for Olacapato.................................................................... 17 
6.1  Regional geology in the vicinity of the LAC Project............................................................ 21 
6.2  Local geology of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars................................................................ 25 
6.3  Conceptual section of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars ...................................................... 27 
6.4 Conceptual stratigraphical column of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars............................... 28 
6.5 Cauchari – Olaroz Watershed.............................................................................................. 33 
9.1 Distribution of lithium concentration in surface brine samples ......................................... 42 
9.2 Distribution of potassium concentration in surface brine samples.................................... 43 
9.3 Seismic tomography lines completed during 2009 ............................................................. 45 
9.4 Example seismic tomography results (Line 1)..................................................................... 46 
    10.1 PE‐1 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 50 
10.2 PE‐2 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 51 
10.3 PE‐3 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 52 
10.4 PE‐4 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 53 
10.5 PE‐5 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 54 
10.6 PE‐6 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 55 
10.7 PE‐7 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 56 
10.8 PE‐8 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 57 
10.9 PE‐9 summary geologic log and brine analyses ................................................................ 58 
    12.1 RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for potassium ................................... 66 
12.2 RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for lithium......................................... 67 
12.3 RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for magnesium ................................. 67 
    14.1 Location map of Orocobre claims ..................................................................................... 74 
    15.1 Evaporation path of brine from Cauchari Salar................................................................. 81 

  ‐ vi ‐ 
 

15.2 Evaporation path of brine from Cauchari Salar................................................................. 82 
    16.1 Plan view of the block model extent................................................................................. 86 
16.2 Section showing stratigraphy within the block model ..................................................... 87 
    16.3 Lateral extent of the inferred resource estimation zone.................................................. 88 
16.4 Lateral lithium distribution in the inferred resource estimation zone. ............................ 91 
    16.5 Vertical lithium distributions in the resource estimation zone of the block model…. ..... 92 
    16.6 Drift analysis of the block model along the x‐axis............................................................. 93 
16.7 Drift analysis of the block model along the y‐axis. ........................................................... 93 
    16.8 Drift analysis of the block model along the z‐axis…. ......................................................... 94 
    16.9 Lithium reserve tonnage and grade, as determined by cutoff concentration…............... 95 
    19.1 The 2010 drill hole program.............................................................................................. 99 

  ‐ vii ‐ 
 

LIST OF PHOTOS 

6.1 Boundary between Cauchary and Olaroz Salars ................................................................. 22 


6.2 Carbonate facies (sinter) in the western margin of Cauchari Salar .................................... 23 
6.3 Borax facies in western Cauchari ........................................................................................ 24 
6.4 Clay facies in the Cauchari Salar  ......................................................................................... 26 
6.5 Sodium Chloride facies in the Olaroz Salar ......................................................................... 27 
6.6 Upper Mixed Sequence clay with borax mineralization ..................................................... 29 
6.7 Thin Bedded Sequence showing alternating sand and halite layers................................... 30 
6.8 Sand‐dominant Unit ............................................................................................................ 31 
6.9 Porous Halite in the Coarse Bedded Sequence................................................................... 31 
6.10 Rio Rosario just above the Highway 74 bridge crossing ................................................... 34 
6.11 Rio Ola at Achibarca .......................................................................................................... 34 
6.12 Rio Tocomar 8 km below Alto Tocomar ............................................................................ 35 
9.1 Brine sampling from a shallow pit in Cauchari.................................................................... 41 
9.2 Brine collection from abandoned borax production pit ..................................................... 41 
    11.1 Cyclone with plastic bag .................................................................................................... 61 
11.2 Rock chip tray with dry and wet samples.......................................................................... 61 
    11.3 Collecting the undisturbed sample from sand core.......................................................... 61 
11.4 Collecting undisturbed sample from clay core.................................................................. 61 
12.1 Filtration of brine and clay mixture................................................................................... 63 
12.2 Brine after filtration........................................................................................................... 63 
    15.1 Fiberglass evaporation pan and associated apparatus ..................................................... 76 
 

  ‐ viii ‐ 
 

LIST OF ABREVIATIONS 

% :  percentage  
° C :  temperature in degrees Celcius 
    AAS :  atomic absorption spectometry 
ASTM :  American Society for Testing and Materials 
B :  boron   
b :  width   
B2O3  :  boron oxide  
B5O : borate 
C : carbon 
Ca :  calcium  
CaCO3 :    calcium carbonate 
CBS :   coarse bedded sequence 
Cc :  coefficient of curvature 
CCP :  container capacity package 
Cl :  chloride 
Cl– :  chloride ion 
cm :  centimetre 
CO3  : carbonate 
Cu :  uniformity coefficient 
d50  : median diameter 
DD :  diamond drilling 
DTRC : dual tube reverse circulation 
g/cm3 :  grams per cubic centimetre 
g/L : grams per litre 
GPS :  global positioning system 
H3BO3 :  boric acid 
ha :  hectare 
HCO3  : bicarbonate 

  ‐ ix ‐ 
 

HQ : diamond drilling diameter 
Hz :  hertz 
ICP:  Inductively Coupled Plasma 
JORC : Joint Ore Reserve Committee 
K :  potassium 
K/Li :  potassium to lithium ratio 
K+ :  potassium ion 
kg :  kilogram 
km :  kilometre 
km2   : square kilometre 
L : litre 
L/s :  litre per second 
Li :  lithium 
Li2CO3 : lithium carbonate 
m :  metre 
m/s : metre per second 
masl : metres above sea level 
mg : milligram 
Mg(OH)2  : magnesium hydroxide 
mg/L :  milligrams per litre 
Mg/Li :  magnesium to lithium ratio 
Mg++: magnesium ion 
mm :   millimetre 
mol% :  molar percentage 
Na+:  sodium ion 
NCH :  Chilean standard 
ODEX :  drilling method 
pH : measure of acidity or alkalinity 
PQ :  drilling diameter in diamond drilling 
PVC :  polyvinyl chloride 

  ‐ x ‐ 
 

QA/QC :  quality assurance/quality control 
RC :  reverse circulation 
RMA : reduction to major axis 
rpm :  rotations per minute 
RWRC :  relative water release capacity 
SO4  :  sulphate 
SO4/(Mg +Ca) : molar ratio 
SO4/K :  sulphate to potassium ratio 
SO4/Li :  sulphate to lithium ratio 
SO4/Mg : sulphate to magnesium ratio 
SO4= :  sulphate ion 
TBS :  Thin Bedded Sequence 
TDS: total dissolved solids 
UMS :  Upper Mixed Sequence 
USD : United States dollar 
USDA : United States Department of Agriculture 
UTM :  Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system 
WGS :  World Geodetic System 
wt% :  weight percent 
XRD : x‐ray diffraction 
 

  ‐ xi ‐ 
 

SUMMARY 

S.1 Terms of Reference 

This report (the “Report”) was prepared for Lithium Americas Corp. (the “Company” or “LAC”) to 
document the basis for, and results of, an inferred resource estimate on mineral claims held by the 
Company.  The estimate applies to lithium  and potassium contained in brine underlying the Olaroz 
and Cauchari Salars, two salt lakes in Jujuy Province in northwestern Argentina. 

The format and content of this report is intended to fulfill the requirements of National Instrument 
43‐101 – Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, including Form 43‐101F1 ‐ Technical Report 
and  Companion  Policy  43‐101  CP  –  To  National  Instrument  43‐101  Standards  of  Disclosure  for 
Mineral Projects of the Canadian Securities Administrators (“NI 43‐101”). Report preparation was 
supervised  by  Mark  King  Ph.D.,  P.Geo.,  a  “qualified  person”  (the  “QP”)  who  is  “independent”  of 
LAC, as such terms are defined by NI 43‐101. 

It is the intention of LAC to file this document with the Canadian securities regulatory authorities 
as an NI 43‐101 compliant Technical Report. 

S2. Property Location, Description and Ownership 

The Cauchari and Olaroz Salars are located in the Department of Susques of the Province of Jujuy 
in  northwestern  Argentina,  approximately  250  km  northwest  of  San  Salvador  de  Jujuy,  the 
provincial  capital,  and  100  km  east  of  the  international  border  with  Chile.    Average  ground 
elevation of the salars is 3 950 masl. 

LAC,  through  its  Argentinian  subsidiary  Minera  Exar  S.A.,  has  obtained  legal  title  to  mining  and 
exploration  permits  covering  a  total  of  36  974  ha  over  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  (the 
“Cauchari‐Olaroz Project” or the “Project”).  The Provincial Government of Jujuy approved the LAC 
Environmental Impacts Report for the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project exploration work by Resolution No. 
25/09 on August 26, 2009. 

S.3 Geology 

The Cauchari and Olaroz Salars are “Silver Peak, Nevada” type terrigenous salars.  These deposits 
occur in structural basins in‐filled with sediments differentiated as inter‐bedded units of clays, salt 
(halite),  sands  and  gravels.    They  host  a  lithium‐bearing  aquifer  that  has  developed  during  arid 
climatic periods.  The conceptual geologic model for the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars includes: 

¾ An Upper Mixed Sequence (“UMS”) – This is the surface unit in the salars.  It includes clays, thin 
evaporite facies (sodium chloride, mirabilite, soda ash, etc.), carbonate facies, ulexite facies and 
the coarse clastic sediments from the alluvial cones encroaching on the salars. 

¾ A Thin Bedded Sequence (“TBS”) ‐ This unit is at intermediate depth and is composed of thinly 
bedded clay, silt, sand and evaporite facies (mostly halite and gypsum). This sequence is coarser 
grained than the UMS which is dominated by clay. 

  ‐ xii ‐ 
 

¾ A  Coarse Bedded  Sequence  (“CBS”) –  This  is  the  bottom  salar  unit  and consists  of  thick  inter‐
layered sand and evaporite (mostly halite) beds. 

These  sediment  sequences  are  underlain  by  bedrock  composed  mostly  of  Lower  Ordovician 
turbidites (shale and sandstone) intruded by Late Ordovician granitoids.  Alluvial fans extend onto 
the salars from surrounding higher ground. 

S.4 Mineralization 

The  brines  of  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  have  relatively  high  sulphate  content  and  can  be 
classified  as  “sulphate  type  brine  deposits”.  The  brines  of  Cauchari  are  saturated  in  sodium 
chloride  with  total  dissolved  solids  (“TDS”)  on  the  order  of  27%  (324‐335  g/L)  and  an  average 
density  of  approximately  1.215  g/cm3.  The  other  components  present  in  these  brines,  which 
constitute  a  complex  aqueous  system,  are:  K,  Li,  Mg,  Ca,  SO4,  HCO3,  and  B  as  borates  and  free 
H3BO3.  

S.5 Exploration Concept and Status 

The  following  exploration  programs  were  initiated  in  2009,  to  evaluate  the  lithium  development 
potential of the Project area: 

¾ Surface Brine Program ‐ Brine samples were collected from shallow pits throughout the salars to 
obtain  a  preliminary  indication  of  lithium  occurrence  and  distribution.    A  total  of  55  samples 
were collected for laboratory analyses. 

¾ Seismic Geophysical Program – A seismic survey was conducted to support delineation of basin 
geometry, mapping of basin‐fill sequences, and locating future borehole sites.  A total of 24.7 
km of seismic data have been acquired along seven lines. 

¾ Reverse  Circulation  (“RC”)  Borehole  Program  ‐  Dual  tube  reverse  circulation  drilling  is  being 
conducted to develop vertical profiles of brine chemistry at depth in the salars and to provide 
geological and hydrogeological data.  Nine RC boreholes have been drilled for a total of 1 333 m.  
760 brine samples were collected for laboratory chemical analyses.  

¾ Diamond  Drilling  (“DD”)  Borehole  Program  –  This  program  is  being  conducted  to  collect 
continuous  cores  for  geotechnical  testing  (porosity,  grain  size  and  density)  and  geological 
characterization.    Five  DD  boreholes  have  been  drilled  to  date  for  a  total  of  1  280  m.    113 
undisturbed  samples  have  been  collected  for  geotechnical  analyses.  The  boreholes  were 
completed as observation wells for future brine sampling and monitoring. 

¾ An  inferred  in  situ  resource  estimate  was  prepared,  based  on  the  integration,  analyses  and 
interpretation of results from the above outlined exploration programs.  The following resource 
tonnages are indicated:  

o 926 000 tonnes of lithium metal or 4.9 million tonnes of lithium carbonate; and 

o 7.7 million tonnes of potassium. 

  ‐ xiii ‐ 
 

This  inferred  resource estimate  is  limited  to  the  LAC  claim  areas  in  the  north  central  part  of the 
Cauchari Salar. 

S.6 Conclusions 

The key conclusions from this work are as follows: 

¾ The lithium and potassium resource described in this report occurs in a subsurface brine.  The 
brine is contained within the pore space of salar deposits that have accumulated in a structural 
basin. 

¾ A conceptual geologic model has been developed for the basin which includes three primary 
salar units: the UMS, the TBS, and the CBS.  The CBS is the most vertically extensive unit and 
has  the  highest  porosity.    Consequently,  it  contains  the  majority  of  the  resource.    The  salar 
deposits  are  constrained  on  the  sides  of  the  basin  by  alluvium  and  pediment‐type  deposits, 
known in this report as the Border Facies. 

¾ The bottom boundary of the resource estimate has been constrained to the depth of drilling 
conducted  to  date  by  LAC.    The  existing  boreholes  have  not  encountered  the  bottom  of  the 
basin.  Estimates from individual seismic lines indicate that the basin bottom is between 300 
and 600 m, depending on location.  The depths of the boreholes used in the inferred resource 
estimate range from 176 to 249 m.  Consequently, the resource remains open at depth. 

¾ The  north  and  south  lateral  boundaries  of  the  resource  estimate  (i.e.,  along  the  longitudinal 
axis of the basin) have been constrained to the central cluster of boreholes drilled to date, with 
relatively high concentrations at either end of this zone.  Consequently, some extension of the 
resource in these directions is possible, based on future drilling. 

¾ The high dissolved solids content of the brines is a source of variability in the existing analytical 
results.  Additional analytical QA/QC refinement should be conducted in advance of the next 
level  of  estimation.    On  balance,  however,  it  is  the  opinion  of  the  independent  QP  that  the 
existing brine dataset is acceptable for use in an inferred resource estimate. 

¾ Extensive sampling indicates that the brine has a relatively low magnesium/lithium ratio (lower 
than three, on average), suggesting that it would be amenable to conventional lithium recovery 
processing.    The  brine  is  relatively  high  in  sulphate  which  is  also  advantageous  for  brine 
processing because the amounts of sodium sulphate or soda ash required for calcium removal 
would be relatively low. 

S.7 Recommendations 

Based on the results of the current inferred resource estimate it is recommended to continue the 
investigation  of  the  lithium  development  potential  of  the  Cauchari‐Olaroz  Project.  It  should  be 
noted that the current inferred resource estimate is limited to an area that covers less than half of 
the  LAC  mining  and  exploration  claims  and  is  open  at  depth.  A  detailed  work  program  has  been 
proposed and consists of two main components: 

  ‐ xiv ‐ 
 

¾ Hydrogeological investigations to further refine lithium and potassium resource estimates and 
to evaluate brine extractability and long‐term aquifer hydraulics. 

¾ A  metallurgical  program  to  develop  a  lithium  extraction  process  and  to  carry  out  pilot  scale 
process investigations. 

This work would support the completion of a pre‐feasibility study for the Project during 2011, at an 
estimated cost of approximately USD 29.6 million. 

  ‐ xv ‐ 
 

1 INTRODUCTION 

1.1 Authorization and Purpose 
This report (the “Report”) was prepared for Lithium Americas Corp. (the “Company” or “LAC”) to 
document the basis for, and results of, an inferred resource estimate on mineral claims held by the 
Company.  The estimate applies to lithium contained in brine within the basin of the Olaroz and 
Cauchari Salars, two dry salt lakes in Jujuy Province of northwestern Argentina. 
 
The format and content of this report is intended to fulfill the requirements of National Instrument 
43‐101 – Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects including, Form 43‐101F1 ‐ Technical Report 
and  Companion  Policy  43‐101CP  –  To  National  Instrument  43‐101  Standards  of  Disclosure  for 
Mineral Projects , of the Canadian Securities Administrators (“NI 43‐101”).  Report preparation was 
supervised by Mark King Ph.D., P.Geo., a “qualified person” (a “QP”) who is “independent” of LAC, 
as such terms are defined by NI 43‐101. 

It is the intention of LAC to file this document with Canadian securities regulatory authorities as an 
NI 43‐101 compliant Technical Report. 

1.2 Sources of Information 
The  inferred  resource  estimate  documented  in  this  report  is  based  on  the  following  information 
sources: 
 
¾ A conceptual geologic model for the salar basins, which in turn is based on: 
 
o Expertise in salar geology held by members of the LAC technical team; 
 

o Geologic logging of five diamond drill boreholes drilled by LAC; 
 

o Geologic logging of nine reverse circulation boreholes drilled by LAC; 
 

o A seismic survey conducted by LAC; 
 
¾ Subsurface  distributions  of  lithium  and  other  dissolved  constituents,  delineated  through 
collection and analysis of more than 750 brine samples from reverse circulation boreholes; 
 
¾ Near‐surface  distributions  of  lithium  and  other  dissolved  constituents,  delineated  through 
collection and analysis of 55 brine samples from shallow, hand‐dug pits; and 
 
¾ Formation  porosity  measurements,  obtained  through  the  collection  and  analysis  of  113 
undisturbed core samples from diamond drill boreholes. 
 

  ‐ 1 ‐ 
 

Preliminary  evaluation  of  lithium  brine  processing  considerations  is  also  reported  herein.  
Processing was evaluated through  a laboratory study of brine evaporation and salts solubility  by 
the University of Antofagasta in Chile. 
 
Sources of qualitative information were also important as a background for preparing this report, 
and included the following: 
 
¾ Various technical papers on salar geology and salar brine chemistry; 
 
¾ Evaluation of the Exploration Potential at the Salares de Cauchari and Olaroz, Province of Jujuy, 
Argentina.  Internal report by TRU Group for Lithium Americas Corp. (2009); 

¾ Various maps of the Servicio Geológico Minero Argentino; 
 
¾ Various  discussions  with  LAC  personnel  familiar  with  the  property  and  the  LAC  exploration 
programs; 
 
¾ Detailed discussions with the block model specialist for the Project, regarding the development 
and structure of the model; and 
 
¾ Personal  inspection  visits  by  the  independent  QP  (Mark  King)  to  the  site,  the  field  office  in 
Susques, the logistics office in Jujuy, and the corporate office in Mendoza (all in Argentina). 
 
The QP acknowledges the full and complete cooperation of all LAC personnel and LAC contractors, 
in  assisting  in  the  preparation  of  this  report.    All  site  information  and  data  were  made  readily 
available  and  all  topics  were  open  for  critical  examination  and  discussion.    Site  information  and 
data were stored in an orderly manner that facilitated retrieval. 
 
1.3 Scope of Personal Inspection 
The QP visited the Project site and field office on December 10 and 11, 2009.  Features that were 
inspected and reviewed during a driving and walking tour of the site included the following: 
 
¾ Overall site layout, salar features, and surrounding topography; 
 
¾ An operating drill conducting the ongoing drilling program; 
 
¾ Most previous drilling sites, including cuttings, well completions, brine ponds, and new gravel 
roads constructed to the sites; 
 
¾ One of the shallow pits used for the near‐surface brine sampling program; 
 
¾ Perimeter areas and alluvial fans; 
 
¾ Surface mining operations conducted by others; and 

  ‐ 2 ‐ 
 

 
¾ The  general  location  of  lithium  brine  exploration  work  conducted  by  others,  on  adjacent 
properties in the Olaroz Salar. 
 
Exploration program components inspected and reviewed at the Susques field office included the 
following: 
 
¾ Sampling procedures for brine, rock chips and core; 
 
¾ Sample and core storage facilities; 
 
¾ Sample handling, preparation and security systems; 
 
¾ Example cores and rock chips; 
 
¾ Field data entry and log production procedures; 
 
¾ Interaction with the central data storage technician at the Mendoza corporate office; 
 
¾ All plotted logs and mapping available up to the time of the visit; and 
 
¾ Staff operations, responsibilities and mentoring. 
 
The QP visited, and worked from, the corporate office in Mendoza from January 22 to January 30, 
2010.  Relevant Project features inspected and reviewed at that time included the following: 
 
¾ Hard copies of all analytical data available up to that time; 
 
¾ Project technical papers; 
 
¾ Project environmental and property documentation; 
 
¾ Drafting and administrative support; 
 
¾ Plotted borehole logs and maps; and 
 
¾ Block model construction and development. 
 
Through these personal inspections and additional off‐site interaction with the LAC Project team 
and  Project  dataset,  the  independent  QP  has  gained  a  clear  understanding  of  the  exploration 
program  methods  and  results.    Furthermore,  the  QP  understands  the  manner  in  which  these 
results  support  the  inferred  resource  estimate,  and  the  potential  sources  of  uncertainty  in  the 

  ‐ 3 ‐ 
 

estimate.  In consideration of these sources, it is the opinion of the QP that the inferred resource 
estimate  is  appropriate  and  reasonable  for  this  stage  of  the  Project.    The  rationale  for  this 
conclusion  is  provided  in  appropriate  locations  throughout  this  document,  and  particularly  in 
Section 13. 

  ‐ 4 ‐ 
 

2 RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS 

The preparation of this Report was supervised by the independent QP, Mark King, Ph.D., P. Geo., 
at  the  request  of  LAC.    Dr.  King  is  a  hydrogeologist  with  25  years  experience.    He  has  provided 
senior  technical  direction  and  hands‐on  project  management  on  large  groundwater  projects 
throughout  Canada  and  the  US.    One  of  his  areas  of  expertise  is  groundwater  modelling,  which 
relates closely to the development of the block model used for the inferred resource estimate.  He 
also  specializes  in  field  delineation  and  characterization  of  solute  distributions  in  groundwater, 
which is a primary objective of the LAC Project. 
 
A  wide  range  of  technical  disciplines  were  required  to  address  the  objective  of  estimating  and 
characterizing the lithium resource.  In preparing the Report, these disciplines were led by experts 
in  each  area.    Overall  review  and  verification  of  materials  prepared  by  these  experts  was 
conducted by Dr. King.  It is acknowledged that Dr. King is not an expert in all these disparate fields 
(e.g.,  salar  geology,  lithium  processing).    However,  his  expertise  in  quantitative  aspects  of 
hydrogeology  and  in  the  delineation  of  solutes  in  groundwater  is  an  appropriate  foundation  for 
evaluation of the inferred resource estimate, and information used in its development.  Members 
of the panel of experts, and their various roles in preparing Report materials are as follows: 
 
¾ Eduardo Peralta, Ph.D., Geologist – Expert in salar geology; 
 
¾ Pedro Pavlovic, M.Sc., Chemical Engineer – Expert in mineral and brine processing; Section 15 
(Mineral  Processing)  is  presented  largely  as  prepared  by  Mr.  Pavlovic  since  he  is  a  world‐
renowned expert in this subject area; 
 
¾ Frits  Reidel,  B.  Sc.,  Hydrogeologist  with  23  years  of  experience  –  Expert  in  groundwater 
resource  evaluations,  aquifer  characterization,  and  mining  hydrology;  background  includes 
experience on other brine projects in North and South America; 
 
¾ John Kieley, P.Geo. (Canada) ‐ Project Manager and LAC QP for the Project; geophysicist with 
more than 35 years experience in mineral exploration; 
 
¾ Waldo  Perez  Ph.D.,  P.  Geo.  ‐  CEO  and  President  of  Lithium  Americas  Corp.;  exploration 
geologist. 
 
¾ Danilo Castillo ‐ Specialist in block model construction for resource estimation, with Maptek in 
Chile. 
 
The  methods,  results  and  interpretations  provided  in  this  Report  have  been  developed  by  the 
above  noted  experts.    Subsequent  review  and  evaluation  is  provided  by  the  independent  QP, 
based on background expertise and observations from the Project site and dataset.  In evaluating 
this information, the key issue considered by the independent QP is whether the methods, results 

  ‐ 5 ‐ 
 

and interpretations are appropriate and acceptable to support an inferred resource estimate for 
the lithium brine deposit. 
 
For  the  purpose  of  this  Report,  the  independent  QP  has  relied  on  an  ownership  and  claim  Title 
Opinion provided by the law firm of De Pablos & Associates.  This opinion states that agreements 
with third parties are valid, enforceable and comply with local laws.  The QP has not researched 
title or mineral rights of the Project and expresses no legal opinion as to the ownership status of 
the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project. 
 

  ‐ 6 ‐ 
 

3 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION 

3.1 Location 
 
The Cauchari and Olaroz Salars are located in the Department of Susques in the Province of Jujuy 
in northwestern Argentina.  The salars extend in a north‐south direction from S23 o 18’ to S24 o 05’ 
and in and east‐west direction from W66o  34’ to W66  o 51’. The average elevation of both salars is 
3950 m.  
 
Figure 3.1 shows the location of both salars, approximately 250 km northwest of San Salvador de 
Jujuy,  the  provincial  capital.    The  midpoint  between  the  Olaroz  and  Cauchari  Salars  is  located 
directly on Highway 52, 55 km west of the Town of Susques where the LAC field offices are located.   
The nearest port is Antofagasta (Chile), located 530 km west of the Project. 

  ‐ 7 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 3.1: Location map. 
 

  ‐ 8 ‐ 
 

3.2 Property Area 
 
LAC  has  negotiated,  through  its  Argentinian  subsidiary  Minera  Exar  S.A.,  mining  and  exploration 
permits, and has requested from mining authorities exploration permits covering a total of 48 950 
ha in the Department of Susques, of which 36 974 ha have been granted to date. 
 
Figure  3.2  shows  the  location  of  the  LAC  claims  in  the  Olaroz‐Cauchari  Project.    The  claims  are 
contiguous and cover most of the Cauchari Salar and the eastern portion of the Olaroz Salar.  Table 
3.1  provides  a  summary  overview  of  the  70  properties  acquired  for  the  Project.    The  aggregate 
property  payments  required  by  LAC  under  the  agreements  references  in  Figure  3.2  is  USD 
5,785,000. 
 
Under  LAC’s  usufruct  agreement  with  Grupo  Minero  Los  Boros  S.A.,  LAC  agreed  to  pay  Grupo 
Minero Los Boros S.A. a royalty of USD 300,000 at the beginning of the commercial production and 
a three percent net profit interest on commercial production from the Project. LAC has the option 
to  purchase  such  royalty  by  a  one  time  payment  of  USD  7,000,000.    Under  LAC’s  usufuct 
agreement with Borax Argentina S.A., LAC is required to pay Borax Argentina S.A. an annual royalty 
of USD 200,000 commencing once LAC exercises its usufruct option.   There are no other royalties 
related to the Cauchari‐Olaroz Properties. 
 

  ‐ 9 ‐ 
 

Table 3.1: Status of Minera EXAR S.A mineral claims at Cauchari and Olaroz Salars. 
MINERA EXAR S.A. 
   CLAIM  FILE  CLAIM  REQUESTED  RECEIVED  ABORIGINAL   CONTRACT  
OWNER 
   NAME  NUMBER  TYPE  HA  HA  COMMUNITY  TYPE 
1  ZOILA  341‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  101  OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
2  MASCOTA  394‐B‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  302  MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
3  UNION  336‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  100  MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
4  JULIA  347‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  100  PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
5  SAENZ PEÑA  354‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  100  PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
6  DEMASIA SAENZ PEÑA  354‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  59  PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
7   MONTES DE OCA  340‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  99   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
8   JULIO A. ROCA  444‐P‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
9   ELENA  353‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  301   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
10   EMMA  350‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
11   URUGUAY  89‐N‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
12   UNO  345‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
13   TRES  343‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
14   DOS  344‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
15   CUATRO  352‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
16   CINCO  351‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
17   AVELLANEDA  365‐V‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
18   BUENOS AIRES  122‐D‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
19   MORENO  221‐S‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
20   SARMIENTO  190‐R‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
21   PORVENIR  116‐D‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
22   SAHARA  117‐D‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  300  300   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
23   ALICIA  389‐B‐45  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  99   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
24   SIBERIA  306‐B‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  24  24   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
25   CLARISA  402‐B‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
26   DEMASIA CLARISA  402‐B‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  19  19   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
27  PAULINA  195‐S‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  98  PUESTO SEVICATUA  Usufruct Agreement 
28  INES  220‐S‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  102  PUESTO SEVICATUA  Usufruct Agreement 
29  MARIA ESTHER  259‐M‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100  PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
30  MARIA CENTRAL  43‐E‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100  PUESTO SEVICATUA  Usufruct Agreement 
31   DELIA  42‐D‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  101  MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
32   GRAZIELLA  438‐G‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
33   LINDA  160‐T‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
34   MARIA TERESA  378‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
35   JUANCITO  339‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
36   ARCHIBALD  377‐C‐44  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   MANANTIALES  Usufruct Agreement 
37   SAN NICOLAS  91‐R‐94  Borax Argentina S.A.  MP  100  100   HUANCAR  Usufruct Agreement 
38   NELIDA  56‐C‐95  Electroquimica El Carmen S.A.  MP  100  100   OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
39   MARIA ANGELA  177‐Z‐03  Electroquimica El Carmen S.A.  MP  100  100   OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
40   HEKATON  150‐M‐92  Electroquimica El Carmen S.A.  MP  200  200  HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
41   VICTORIA I  65‐E‐92  Electroquimica El Carmen S.A.  MP  200  200  HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
42  EDUARDO  183‐D‐90  Electroquimica El Carmen S.A.  MP  100  100  OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
43  CAUCHARI ESTE   1149‐L‐09  MINERA EXAR S.A.  MP  5900  980  HUANCAR  Staked 
44   CAUCHARI SUR (1)  1072‐L‐08  MINERA EXAR S.A.  EP  1501     PUESTO SEY  Staked 
45   EDUARDO DANIEL  120‐M‐44  Fundacion Misión de la Paz  MP  100  100   OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
46   JORGE  62‐L‐98  Luis Losi S.A  MP  2352  2352   PUESTO SEY  Usufruct Agreement 
Luis Austin Cekada and 
47   VERANO I  299‐M‐04  MP  2488  2488   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
Camilo Alberto Morales  
48   SAN ANTONIO  72‐M‐99  Grupo Minero Santa Rita S.R.L  MP  2500  2500   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
49   TITO  48‐P‐98  Grupo Minero Santa Rita S.R.L  MP  200  100   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
50  MARIA VICTORIA (2)  121‐M‐03  Grupo Minero Santa Rita S.R.L  MP  1800     OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
51   LUISA  61‐L‐08  Grupo Minero Los Boros S.A  MP  4706  4705   HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
52   ARTURO  60‐L‐98  Grupo Minero Los Boros S.A  MP  5100  5061   HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
53   ANGELINA  59‐L‐98  Grupo Minero Los Boros S.A  MP  2346  2252   HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
54   MIGUEL  381‐M‐05  Mario Moncholi  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
55   CHICO  1231‐M‐09  Mario Moncholi  MP  300  300   OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
56  CHICO 3 (1)  1251‐M‐09  Mario Moncholi  MP  1100     OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
57   CHICO 4 (1)  1252‐M‐09  Mario Moncholi  MP  1500     OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
58   LA YAVEÑA  27‐R‐00  Silvia Rojo  MP  1117  1116   MANANTIALES  Option to Purchase 
59   SULFA 6  70‐R‐98  Silvia Rojo  MP  1759  1683   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
60   SULFA 7  71‐R‐98  Silvia Rojo  MP  1824  1824   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
61   SULFA 8  72‐R‐98  Silvia Rojo  MP  1946  1842   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
62   SULFA 9  67‐R‐98  Silvia Rojo  MP  1570  1570   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
63   CAUCHARI NORTE  349‐R‐06  Silvia Rojo  EP  998  998   MANANTIALES  Option to Purchase 
64   BECERRO DE ORO  264‐M‐44  Silvia Schapiro  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
65   OSIRIS  263‐M‐44  Silvia Schapiro  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
66   ALSINA  48‐H‐44  Silvia Schapiro  MP  100  100   PUESTO SEY  Option to Purchase 
67   MINERVA  37‐V‐02  Sylvia Valente  MP  250  230  OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
68   IRENE  140‐N‐92  Triboro S.A.  MP  200  200   HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Option to Purchase 
69   CHIN CHIN CHULI II  202‐E‐04  Vicente Costa  MP  1000  931  HUANCAR/OLAROZ CHICO  Usufruct Agreement 
70  GRUPO  LA INUNDADA  101‐C‐90  MINERA EXAR S.A.  MP  550  537  PUESTO SEY  Purchase 
   TOTAL            48 950 36 974      
MP: Mining permit; EP: Exploration permit 
Notes: (1) Final permit pending. (2) This property is under legal dispute with Property owner. 

  ‐ 10 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 3.2: LAC property claims at the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project. 

  ‐ 11 ‐ 
 

3.3 Type of Mineral Tenure 
 
There  are  two  types  of  mineral  tenure  in  Argentina:  Mining  Permits  and  Exploration  Permits.  
Mining  Permits  are  licenses  that  allow  the  property  holder  to  exploit  the  property,  providing 
environmental  approval  is  obtained.    Exploration  Permits  are  licenses  that  allow  the  property 
holder to explore the property for a period of time that is proportional to the size of the property 
(5 years per 10 000 ha).  An Exploration Permit can be transformed into a Mining Permit any time 
before the expiry date of the Exploration Permit, by presenting a report and paying canon rent. 
 
LAC  acquired  its  interests  in  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  through  either  direct  staking  or 
concluding straightforward exploration contracts with third party property owners, giving LAC the 
option to make graduated payments over a period of time that varies from 12 months to five years 
depending on the contract.  A final payment would result in one of the following, depending on the 
arrangement with the owner: 
 
¾ Full ownership by LAC; 
 
¾ LAC acquires an option to purchase the property; or 
 
¾ LAC acquires the right to mine the brines from depth through pumping but the vendor retains 
the right to mine borax from the surface (Usufruct Contracts).  
 
LAC can abandon a contract on any mineral property at any time, depending on the results of the 
exploration. 
 
3.4 Title 
 
The LAC claims are recorded in the Provincial Catastro at the Juzgado Administrativo de Minas in 
the provincial capital of San Salvador of Jujuy.  LAC has provided a Title Opinion from the law firm 
of De Pablos & Associates that has been reviewed for the preparation of this report.  This opinion 
states that agreements with third parties are valid, enforceable and comply with local laws. Mining 
concessions have been properly registered and are in “good‐standing”. 
 
3.5 Property Boundaries 
 
The  LAC  claims  follow  the  north‐northeast  trend  of  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars.    Figure  3.2 
shows  that  the  boundaries  of  the  claims  are  irregular  in  shape  (a  reflection  of  the  mineral claim 
law  of  the  Province  of  Jujuy).    While  most  countries  use  UTM  coordinates,  Argentina  has 
developed  its  own  grid  system  in  Gauss  Krueger  Coordinates  with  the  WGS  84  datum.  The 
coordinates  (Gauss  Krueger)  of  the  boundaries  of  each  claim  are recorded  in  an  “expediente”  in 
the claims department of the Jujuy Provincial Ministry of Mines. 
 

  ‐ 12 ‐ 
 

3.6 Environmental Liabilities 
 
LAC complies with local and national regulations and adheres to high international environmental 
guidelines  including  the  Equator  Principles.    A  preliminary  review  of  the  Cauchari‐Olaroz  Project 
suggests that the possibility of significant environmental liabilities is low.  Low population density 
in  the  region  and  distance  from  major  urban  centres  places  the  attention  of  potential  negative 
impact of a brine operation on local flora and fauna.  
 
The  vegetation  in  the  vicinity  of  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  is  typical  of  the  high  desert 
environment, consisting mainly of xerophyte and halophyte bushes.  Other vegetation includes the 
yareta, copa‐copa and tola bushes as well as some grasses.  There is no vegetation on the surfaces 
of the salars.  It therefore appears that the potential development of the Cauchari–Olaroz Project 
into a brine operation will not have any significant impacts on the local flora.  
 
Llamas, guanacos and vicunas are common in the region. The vicuna was traditionally exploited by 
local inhabitants for its meat and wool and also used in special rituals.  Past un‐restricted hunting 
resulted  in  near‐extinction  of  the  vicuna,  which  is  now  protected  under  a  1972  international 
agreement  signed  between  Argentina,  Chile,  Peru  and  Ecuador.    It  appears  that  the  potential 
development  of  the  Cauchari–Olaroz  Project  into  a  brine  operation  will  not  have  any  significant 
impacts on the local fauna.  
 
LAC has prepared an inventory of known archeological sites in the Department of Susques.  This 
inventory shows that the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project is remote from these sites and that therefore any 
impacts are unlikely.   
 
Five  local  indigenous  communities  are  located in  the  vicinity  of  the  Cauchari‐Olaroz  Project  area 
and include: Olaroz Chico, Huancar, Pastos Chicos, Susques and Puesto Sey.  LAC has designed and 
implemented a special communities relations program for long‐term co‐operation.  In turn these 
communities  have  provided  required  approvals  on  the  LAC  Environmental  Impact  Report  (see 
Section 3.7 below).   
 
3.7 Permits 
 
The  Provincial  Government  of  Jujuy  (Direccion  Provincial  de  Mineria  y  Recursos  Energeticos) 
approved  the  LAC  Environmental  Impacts  Report  (the  “EIA”)  for  the  Cauchari‐Olaroz  Project 
exploration work by Resolution No. 25/09 on August 26, 2009.  Subsequent EIA updates have been 
presented  to  accurately  reflect  the  ongoing  exploration  program;  these  updates  do  not  require 
Government approvals.  Additional permits are not required.  LAC has also obtained a license for 
the abstraction of groundwater to meet water supply requirements for the exploration program.  
This  license  was  granted  by  the  provincial  water  authority  (Direccion  Provincial  de  Recursos 
Hidricos) in Jujuy and is in good standing, with all applicable tariffs paid to date. 
 

  ‐ 13 ‐ 
 

4 ACCESSIBILITY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHY 
 
4.1 Topography 
 
Figure 4.1 shows a topography map of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars.  These salars are bounded 
on the west side by mountains that range in elevation from 4 600 m to 4 900 m and on the east 
side by mountains that also rise to an elevation of 4 900 m.  The Cauchari Salar forms an elongated 
northeast‐southwest  trending  depression  extending  55  km  in  a  north‐south  direction  and 
approximately 6 to 10 km in an east‐west direction.  The Olaroz Salar covers an area of 30 km by 
10 to 15 km.  The elevation of the floor of the salars ranges from 3 910 m to 3 950 m. 
 
The vegetation of the salars is typical for the altiplano and is described in Section 3.6.  
 

  ‐ 14 ‐ 
 

 
 
Figure 4.1: Topography.

  ‐ 15 ‐ 
 

4.2 Access 
 
The  main  access  to  the  Olaroz  and  Cauchari  Salars  from  San  Salvador  de  Jujuy  is  via  paved 
National Highways 9 and 52, as shown in Figure 3.1.  The midpoint between the two salars is 
located  directly  on  Highway  52  (Marker  KM  192).  Paso  Jama,  a  national  border  crossing 
between  Chile  and  Argentina  (also  on  Highway  52)  is  100  km  west  of  the  Project.    These 
highways  carry  significant  truck  traffic,  transporting  borate  products  from  various  salars  in 
northern Argentina.  Access to the interior of the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars is possible through 
a  gravel  road,  Highway  70,  which  skirts  the  west  side  of  the  salars  and  is  used  by  borate 
producers. 
 
4.3 Population Centres 
 
Figure 4.1 shows the population centres around the Project area.  The Town of Susques, 45 km 
east  of  the  Olaroz  Salar,  is  the  nearest  population  centre  (Figure  4.1).  Further  east  lies  the 
provincial  capital  of  San  Salvador  de  Jujuy  (not  shown)  and  the  settlement  of  Catua  to  the 
southwest.  All  three  centres  could  provide  labour  for  a  brine  operation.    At  the  Salar  de 
Atacama,  in  Chile,  the  Sociedad  de  Litio  used  the  local  population  of  Peine  for  the  pond  and 
potassium operations and brought in more experienced operators from Antofagasta. A parallel 
situation  for  a  future  operation  at  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  would  have  local  people 
trained to work on the pond system and more qualified personnel brought in from San Salvador 
de  Jujuy  and  Salta.  Buses  would  provide  transport  to  and  from  the  camps  for  operations 
personnel. 
 
4.4 Climate 
 
The Cauchari and Olaroz Salars are within a High Altitude Desert Belt which is characterized by 
extremes of temperature varying from ‐250  C to ‐300 C in the winter and from 150  C to 200  C in 
the  summer  (average:  50  C).  Temperatures  also  vary  widely  between  day  and  night.  
Precipitation comes mainly in the form of rain during the wet season from December through 
March.    Figures  4.2  and  4.3  show  monthly  average  precipitation  records  for  Susques  and 
Olacapato (located on the south side of Cauchari Salar). 
 
Significant  winds  are  encountered  throughout  the  year  that  can  occasionally  result  in  sand 
storms, as is common in many desert regions of the world.  High winds are a positive factor for 
concentrating  brines  in  evaporation  ponds  since  evaporation  rates  are  improved  not  only  by 
high temperature, but also by wind currents that remove humidity above the water surface. 
 
 

  ‐ 16 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 4.2:  Monthly average precipitation for Susques.  (From: Bianchi, et al. 1992.) 

 
 
Figure 4.3:  Monthly average precipitation for Olacapato  (From: Bianchi, et al. 1992.)

  ‐ 17 ‐ 
 

4.5 Infrastructure 
 
The  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  are  situated  favourably  to  the  north  of  the  Inter‐Andes 
Transmission  Line  that  links  the  Argentina  power  grid  to  Chile's  northern  electric  grid.  This 
transmission  line  should  provide  the  necessary  power  to  the  operating  wells,  pond  transfer 
pumps and a chemical plant. The location of a pond system and a potential chemical plant will 
dictate the capital costs of a power line to the operational centre. 
 
Drilling conducted to date in the salars indicates that sufficient fresh groundwater resources are 
available to meet water supply requirements for potential future brine processing facilities. 
 
Demand for surface rights in the region is low.  Acquisition of surface rights for the construction 
of  lithium  processing  facilities  on  the  Cauchari  or  Olaroz  Salars  is  expected  to  be 
straightforward.   

  ‐ 18 ‐ 
 

5 HISTORY 

Historically,  Rio  Tinto  has  mined  borates  on  the  western  side  of  Cauchari,  at  Yacimiento  de 
Borato  El  Porvenir.    Grupo  Minero  Los  Boros  S.A.  mines  a  few  thousand  tonnes  per  year  of 
ulexite  on  the  east  side  of  the  Olaroz  Salar.    No  other  mining  activity  (including  lithium 
exploration  and  production)  has  been  recorded  at  the  properties  comprising  the  Cauchari‐
Olaroz Project. 
 
LAC acquired Mining and Exploration Permits across the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars during 2009 
(see Section 3) and initiated lithium exploration activities over these claims during 2009.  LAC 
has not prepared prior mineral resource or reserves estimates for the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project. 
 
Orocobre  Limited  (“Orocobre”)  owns  mining  claims  in  the  Olaroz  Salar  adjacent  to  the  LAC 
Olaroz  properties.  Orocobre  has  prepared  and  published  an  inferred  lithium  and  potassium 
resource estimate for its project area during 2009 (see Section 14 for further information). 
 

  ‐ 19 ‐ 
 

6 GEOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL SETTING 

6.1 Regional Structural Features 

Figure 6.1 shows that there are two primary structural features in the region.  The first feature 
consists  of  sets  of  high  angle  north‐south  trending  faults  causing  narrow  and  deep  horst  and 
graben basins. These tectonic basins have formed in the Puna plateau through non‐collisional, 
compressional,  Miocene‐age  orogeny  (Helvaci  and  Alonso,  2000).  The  basins  occur 
predominantly  in  the  eastern  and  central  sector  of  the  Puna.    They  have  been  accumulation 
sites for numerous salars, including Olaroz and Cauchari. 

The  basin  system  is  crossed  and  displaced  by  the  second  primary  structural  feature  in  the 
region:  northwest‐southeast  trending  lineaments  (Figure  6.1).  The  El  Toro  Lineament  and  the 
Achibarca  Lineament  occur  in  the  vicinity  of  the  LAC  Project.    The  Cauchari  Basin  (which 
contains  the  Olaroz  and  Cauchari Salars)  is located  north  of  the  El  Toro  Lineament.    Between 
the El Toro and Achibarca Lineaments, the basin is displaced to the southeast and is known as 
the  Centenario  Basin.  South  of  the  Achibarca  Lineament,  the  basin  is  displacement  to  the 
northwest  and  is  known  as  the  Antofalla  Basin.    Collectively,  these  three  displaced  basin 
segments contain a lithium brine mine (Hombre Muerto) and several lithium brine exploration 
projects  (Figure  6.2).  Two  lithium  brine  mines  are  also  located  between  the  same  major 
lineaments,  within  the  Atacama  Basin  located  approximately  150  km  west  of  the  Cauchari 
Basin.  

6.2 Regional Geology  

The regional geology in the vicinity of the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars is shown in Figure 6.1.  The 
basement rock in this area is composed of Lower Ordovician turbidites (shale and sandstone) 
intruded  by  Late  Ordovician  granitoids.    It  is  exposed  to  the  east,  west  and  south  of  the  two 
salars, and generally along the eastern boundary of the Puna Region. 

Elsewhere in the Puna Region, a wide range of rock types uncomformably overlie the basement 
rock.  Throughout  most  of  the  Chilean  and  Argentina‐Chile  border  area  of  the  region,  the 
basement rock is overlain by Tertiary‐Quaternary volcanics, including ignimbritic tuffs covered 
by andesites (6 to 3 millon years) and recent basaltic flows (0.8 ‐ 0.1 millon years) ranging up to 
several tens of metres in thickness.  In some areas, including to the south and east of the two 
salars,  the  basement  rock  is  overlain  by  Cretaceous‐Tertiary  continental  and  marine 
sedimentary rocks such as conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones, as well as tuffs and oolitic 
limestones.  

  ‐ 20 ‐ 
 

The tectonic basins in the local area include the Atacama, Cauchari, Centenario and Antofalla 
Basins,  as  shown  in  Figure  6.1.    They  are  in‐filled  with  unconsolidated  Miocene  sediment 
sequences and intercalated tuffs, and also with evaporites including halite, borates and gypsum 
(Figures  6.1  and  6.2).  Quaternary  alluvial  deposits,  pediment  sediments,  mudflows  and 
occasional saline deposits encroach into the basins from the sides.  

 
Figure 6.1: Regional geology in the vicinity of the LAC Project. (From: Peralta, E; 2009)

  ‐ 21 ‐ 
 

6.3 Local Geology 

Local geology in the vicinity of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars is shown in Figure 6.2.  Subsurface 
deposits  are  laterally  contiguous  between  the  two  salars  and  include  interbedded  clastic  and 
evaporitic rocks of the following five main facies: 

¾ Carbonate; 
 
¾ Borax; 
 
¾ Sulphate; 
 
¾ Clay; and 
 
¾ Sodium chloride. 
 

Each of these are described in the subsections below.  On the surface, the salars are partially 
separated by an alluvial fan formed by the Ola River. The paved road that links Argentina and 
Chile  also  crosses  the  salars  along  this  boundary  (Photo  6.1).    Two  alluvial  fans  are  also 
encroaching on the south end of the Cauchari Salar.  The encroachment of these coarse clastic 
sediments indicates that the recent period is wet relative to much of the previous history of the 
salars.   

Olaroz Salar
Cauchari Salar

 
Photo 6.1: Boundary between Cauchari and Olaroz Salars. 

  ‐ 22 ‐ 
 

6.3.1 Carbonate Facies 

This  unit  outcrops  intermittently  along  the  west  side  of  the  Cauchari  Salar,  and  is  relatively 
scarce  in  Olaroz  (Figure  6.2).  It  comprises  brown  and  buff  clays  inter‐layered  with  dirty 
travertines  or  sands  with  calcareous  cement  produced  by  hydrothermal  activity  (“calcareous 
sinters").    This  unit  tends  to  be  exposed  in  high  relief  areas  (Photo  6.2).  Ulexite 
(NaCaB5O6(OH)6.5H2O)  concretions,  with  or  without  gypsum  (CaSO4.2H2O)  and  mirabilite 
(S2O4.10H2O), are sometimes associated with the carbonate facies. 

 
Photo 6.2: Carbonate facies (sinter) in the western margin of Cauchari Salar. 

6.3.2 Borax Facies 

These  facies  consist  of  black  and  brown  clays  with  borax  mineralization  (Photo  6.3).  In  the 
Cauchari Salar, this unit is exposed in a discontinuous strip along the western edge of the salar, 
stratigraphically below the carbonate facies. In Olaroz, the borax facies occur along the eastern 
border  of  the  salar  and  in  the  central  and  north  area  (Figure  6.2).  When  evaporitic  minerals 
(predominantly ulexite, with local transition to borax at depth) occur in this unit, the proportion 
of clay and silt tends to decrease, to an estimated minimum of 30% to 40%.  The borax minerals 
within this unit have been heavily exploited for many years. 

  ‐ 23 ‐ 
 

Photo 6.3: Borax facies in western Cauchari, Angelina Borax Mine. 

6.3.3 Sulphate Facies 

The  sulphate  facies  are  composed  of  fine  clastic  sediments,  usually  brown  clays  inter‐layered 
with mirabilite (S2O4.10H2O), gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) and soda ash (Na2CO3).  This unit generally 
occurs  below  the  borax  facies.  The  sulphate  facies  are  exposed  in  the  central‐south  area  of 
Cauchari  and  in  the  northern  area  of  Olaroz.  The  sulphate  facies  in  Cauchari  are  significantly 
richer  in  soda  ash  than  those  in  Olaroz,  while  the  latter  tends  to  be  relatively  enriched  in 
mirabilite. 

  ‐ 24 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 6.2: Local Geology of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars (From: Peralta, E; 2009) 

  ‐ 25 ‐ 
 

6.3.4 Clay Facies 

These  facies  occur  across  most  of  the  surface  of  the  Cauchari  Salar  and  isolated  zones  in  the 
southern area of the Olaroz Salar (Photo 6.4).  They are composed of predominantly brown to 
reddish clays (dominantly illite; Cravero 2009a and 2009b) inter‐layered and sometimes mixed 
with thin sand or silt layers. This unit is always impregnated with various evaporites, including 
the following:   

¾ In southern Cauchari ‐ gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) with some glaserite (K3Na(SO4)2);  
 
¾ In south‐central Cauchari ‐ halite (NaCl) and gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O);   
 
¾ In north‐central Cauchari ‐ halite (NaCl); and 
 
¾ In  the  boundary  area  between  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  ‐  ulexite,  sulphates  (predominantly 
mirabilite) and alkaline carbonates (predominantly soda ash). 

Despite  the  large  surface  outcrop  of  the  clay  facies,  drilling  data  indicate  that  they  have  a 
maximum thickness of 30 m and a typical thickness of 10 m or less.  

Photo 6.4: Clay facies in the Cauchari Salar. 

6.3.5 Sodium Chloride Facies 

These facies (Photo 6.5) typically occur at the surface of many salars, and are characterized by a 
polygonal‐cracked  hard  crust,  with  a  composition  dominated  by  halite  (NaCl).  They  are  the 
dominant facies on the surface of the Olaroz Salar, but are almost nonexistent on the surface of 
the Cauchari. The surface occurrence of the sodium chloride facies on the Olaroz Salar is thin 
(between  5  cm  and  25  cm).  Drilling  data  indicate  that  this  unit  also  occurs  at  depth  in  the 
Cauchari Salar and ranges up to several tens of metres in thickness.  The substantial occurrence 
of this unit at depth in the Cauchari indicates that this salar has completed a geological cycle 
and is in the process of being buried by accumulation of clay facies.  

  ‐ 26 ‐ 
 

Photo 6.5: Sodium Chloride facies in the Olaroz Salar. 

6.4 Vertical Geological Section  

A  conceptual  stratigraphic  section  and  column  were  developed  for  the  salars,  based  on  all 
Project  borehole  results  available  to  date.  The  available  borehole  logs,  which  extend  from 
southern Olaroz to central Cauchari, indicate some variability in stratigraphic details between 
locations. They also indicate, however, that some valid and useful stratigraphic generalizations 
can be made. The conceptual section is shown in Figure 6.3 and the column is shown in Figure 
6.4. The vertical zonation of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars can be simplified into three main 
sequences, which are described in the following sections. 

Figure 6.3:    Conceptual  section  of  the  Cauchari  and  Olaroz  Salars  showing  three 
main  sequences:  the  Upper  Mixed  Sequence,  the  Thin  Bedded 
Sequence and the Coarse Bedded Sequence.

  ‐ 27 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 6.4:   Conceptual stratigraphic column of the Cauchari and Olaroz Salars 

  ‐ 28 ‐ 
 

6.4.1 Upper Mixed Sequence  

This  sequence  (Photo  6.6)  occurs  at  the  surface  and  includes  relatively  thin  layers  of  all  the 
facies described in section 6.3, and alluvium. This unit typically ranges in thickness from 20 to 
40 m across the salars, however, geophysical and drilling data indicate that it can range as thick 
as 80 m (in Olaroz) and as thin as 10 m (in northern Cauchari). XRD analysis of the clays in this 
sequence  (Cravero,  2009a  and  2009b)  shows  that  they  are  predominantly  illite  with  minor 
kaolinite,  smectite  and  chlorite.  Glass  shards  and  magnetite  are  also  present,  indicating  the 
volcanic nature of the source rock.  

 
Photo 6.6: Upper Mixed Sequence clay with borax mineralization. 

Drilling and shallow test pit data show that some layers occur in the UMS which are sufficiently 
permeable to be considered aquifers.  However, these layers are relatively thin, ranging up to 
four metres in thickness but typically less than one metre.  These layers are considered to be 
coarser components of the clay facies mixed with sand or silt. 

6.4.2 Thin Bedded Sequence  

This  sequence  (Photo  6.7)  encompasses  thinly  bedded  clay  facies,  evaporite  facies  (mostly 
halite and gypsum), silt, and sand. The individual beds vary in thickness from a few centimetres 
to a few metres. This sequence has a larger component of coarse grain sized material than the 
UMS, which is mostly clay. The evaporite facies are composed mainly of halite and, occasionally 
halite  with  gypsum,  in  layers  ranging  from  of  a  few  centimetres  to  few  metres  in  thickness. 
Drilling  and  geophysical  data  show  that  the  TBS  is  typically  between  50  and  60  m  thick.    It 
ranges  up  to  more  than  250  m  thick  in  Olaroz;  the  maximum  thickness  observed  in  Cauchari 
was 50 m, in the north area of the salar.  

  ‐ 29 ‐ 
 

Sand
Halite
Halite

Photo 6.7: Thin Bedded Sequence showing alternating sand and halite layers. 

Drilling  data  show  that  the  TBS  hosts  permeable  brine‐saturated  units  that  are  continuous 
(several metres thick) separated only by narrow clay units (a few metres thick).  

6.4.3 Coarse Bedded Sequence  

To date, the CBS has been observed only in the Cauchari Salar. It consists of interlayered sand 
and  evaporite  (mostly  halite)  layers,  several  tens  of  metres  thick.  The  upper  level  of  the 
sequence  is  characterized  by  a  thick,  compact,  dry  layer  of  halite  ranging  from  10  to  30  m  in 
thickness, followed by a coarse sandstone layer.  Below these two layers, the sequence includes 
sandy sediments and porous, crackled halite intercalations (Photo 6.8). The two dominant units 
in this sequence have the following characteristics: 

¾ Sand‐dominant Unit:  Contains significant layers from 50 to 100 m thick of slightly cemented 
aeolian (perfectly rounded) sand, alternating with thin layers of halite (Photo 6.8). This unit 
includes  occasional  thin  clay  lenses  (0.2  to  2  m  thick).  The  sandy  material  shows 
homogeneous  grain  size  and  mineralogical  composition  with  well‐rounded  particles  1  to  3 
mm  in  diameter,  which  are  dominated  by  silica  glass,  quartz,  feldspar,  mafic  minerals 
(pyroxene,  biotite  and  amphibole)  and  a  striking  abundance  of  magnetite.    Invariably,  this 
unit  contains  abundant  halite  crystals,  gypsum  and  occasional  borates  (ulexite  and  narrow 
beds  of  tinkal).    This  unit  can  be  considered  an  aquifer  because  of  the  predominance  of 
coarse particle sizes and associated high permeability.  

  ‐ 30 ‐ 
 

Photo 6.8:   Sand‐dominant Unit. Grain size analysis shows that this material is predominantly sand 
with  d50  around  0.21mm;  inspection  under  microscope  and  hand  lens  shows  that  the 
grains are very well rounded quartz, magnetite and mafic minerals. 

¾ Evaporite‐dominant Unit: This unit is composed of halite, sometimes massive, but generally 
forming a sintered sponge of halite crystals, with high permeability and frequent cavities due 
to  crystal  corrosion  (Photo  6.9).  The  evaporite layers  alternate  with  the  sandy  layers,  both 
ranging  from  15  m  to  30  m  in  thickness,  although  a  continuous  100  m  layer  of  halite  was 
observed at one borehole location (DD‐3). This unit occasionally includes thin lenses of clays 
(between  0.25  m  and  4  m).  In  southern  and  central  Cauchari,  carbonate  facies  were  also 
observed in this unit, ranging up to six metres in thickness and with karstic solution caverns 
and holes filled with loose sand.   

Photo 6.9: Porous Halite in the Coarse Bedded Sequence. 

The bottom of the CBS was not reached in the boreholes advanced to date.  Geophysical data 
suggest that this sequence continues to the bottom of the salar, estimated to be between 300 
and 600 m depth, depending on the basin sector. 

  ‐ 31 ‐ 
 

6.5 Hydrogeology 

6.5.1 Surface water 

The  Olaroz‐Cauchari  hydrographic  basin  is  an  elongated  depression  with  a  length  of 
approximately  150  km in  a  north‐south  direction  and  a  width  of  30  to  40  km  in  an  east‐west 
direction.  The basin covers approximately 4 500 km2 as shown in Figure 6.5. 

Surface water inflow along the perimeter of the hydrographic basin occurs primarily from Rios 
El  Rosario,  Ola  and  Tocomar.  Rio  Rosario,  which  is  locally  called  Rio  El  Toro,  originates  in  the 
very northern part of the Olaroz‐Cauchari watershed at an elevation of 4 500 m.  The river flows 
south‐southeast for 55 km past the village of El Toro before it enters into the Olaroz Salar. Flow 
was measured at approximately 200 L/s just above the Highway 74 bridge crossing (some 5 km 
southeast of the village of El Toro) at an elevation of 4 010 m on November 7, 2009 at the end 
of the dry season (Photo 6.10).  Rio Rosario was dry on that same date, at a location some 15 
km further south into Salar de Olaroz, at an elevation of around 3 940 m.  

Rio Ola, which is locally called Rio Lama, originates at an elevation of around 4 500 m just south 
of Cerro Bayo Achibarca and flows east for 20 km. It enters the salars on top of the large alluvial 
fan that separates Olaroz from Cauchari on the western flank of the basin.  In Achibarca where 
Rio Ola flows immediately adjacent to Highway 52, flow was estimated at approximately 5 L/s 
on November 7, 2009 (Photo 6.11). 

  ‐ 32 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 6.5: Cauchari – Olaroz watershed. 

  ‐ 33 ‐ 
 

 
Photo 6.10:  Rio Rosario just above the Highway 74 bridge crossing. 

 
Photo 6.11:  Rio Ola at Achibarca. 

Rio Tocomar, which is locally called Rio Olapacato, originates some 10 km west of Alto Chorillo 
at  an  elevation  of  around  4  360  m.    The  river  flows  west  for  approximately  30  km  before  it 
enters the Cauchari Salar from the southeast.  Flow was measured at 30 L/s at a location eight 
kilometres west of Alto Tocomar at an elevation of 4 210 m on November 6, 2009 (Photo 6.12).  
Rio Tocomar was dry in the villages of Olacapato and Cauchari on that same date. 

  ‐ 34 ‐ 
 

 
Photo 6.12:  Rio Tocomar eight kilometres below Alto Tocomar. 

No  other  surface  water  features  were  observed  along  the  perimeter  of  the  Olaroz‐Cauchari 
watershed during November 2009, at the end of the dry season. 

Surface water also occurs in the central southern part of the Cauchari Salar some 15 km north 
of  the  village  of  Cauchari,  where  a  number  of  springs  discharge  on  the  surface  of  the  salar.  
Discharge  from  these  springs  is  naturally  channeled  into  a  single  stream  and  flows  north  for 
several kilometres.  Flow was measured at approximately 10 L/s on November 8, 2009.   

There is no surface water outflow from the Olaroz‐Cauchari Salars. 

6.5.2 Groundwater  

Groundwater  flow  occurs  primarily  in  the  unconsolidated  and  semi‐consolidated  basin  fill 
sediments of the Olaroz‐Cauchari basin.  Groundwater flow is generally towards the central axis 
of each salar.    The large alluvial fan of the Rio Ola creates a groundwater divide (fresh water) 
between the two salars. 

Groundwater  elevation  measurements  were  carried  out  in  November  and  December  2009 
across  Olaroz  and  Cauchari  in  a  number  of  observation  wells  and  open  boreholes  that  were 
installed as part of the 2009 LAC drilling program. These measurements indicate that confining 
conditions occur over large parts of both salars.  Artesian flow conditions are encountered in at 
least one hole in Olaroz.  Depth to groundwater ranges from zero (ground surface) to about 10 
m across the two salars.  

Groundwater  along  the  edges  of  the  Olaroz‐Cauchari  basin  is  relatively  fresh  as  a  result  of 
recent  recharge.    Salinity  of  the  groundwater  increases  rapidly  towards  the  central  areas  in 
each  salar.    The  location  of  the  fresh  water  /  brine  interface  will  be  defined  during  the  2010 
program through a combination of drilling and geophysical methods. 

  ‐ 35 ‐ 
 

6.5.3 Water balance 

Recharge 

Groundwater recharge takes place as a result of infiltration of precipitation along the margins 
of  the  salar  during  the  wet  season  from  December  through  March  each  year.  Precipitation 
records  for  Olacapata  in  the  southern  part  of  Cauchari  between  1950  and  1990  (Figure  4.3) 
show  that  the  total  rainfall  is  approximately  seven  centimetres  per  year.    It  is  estimated  that 
between 5% and 20% of this rainfall ultimately becomes recharge to groundwater. 

Surface water flow losses observed in Rios Rosario, Ola and Tocomar are partly due to recharge 
to the groundwater system.  

Discharge 

Groundwater  discharge  takes  place  through  evaporation,  evapotranspiration  and  discharge 


from  springs.    Evaporation  takes  place  from  the  central  and  marginal  areas  of  the  salar  and 
evapotranspiration along the margins of salars where vegetation occurs. 

Spring  discharge  is  observed  in  southern  Cauchari  and  was  estimated  at  around  10  L/s  in 
November 2009 at the end of the dry season. 

There are no known groundwater outflows from the Olaroz‐Cauchari basin and to date there is 
no known discharge through groundwater pumping.  

  ‐ 36 ‐ 
 

7 DEPOSIT TYPES 

The Cauchari and Olaroz Salars are classified as “Silver Peak, Nevada” type terrigenous salars.   
Silver  Peak,  Nevada  in  the  USA  was  the  first  lithium‐bearing  brine  deposit  in  the  world  to  be 
exploited.    These  deposits  are  characterized  by  restricted  basins  within  deep  structural 
depressions in‐filled with sediments differentiated as inter‐bedded units of clays, salt (halite), 
sands and gravels.   Within these sediments a lithium‐bearing aquifer has developed during arid 
climatic periods. On the surface, they are presently covered by carbonate, borax, sulphate, clay, 
and sodium chloride facies.  Section 6 herein provides a detailed description of the geology of 
the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars. 
 
Cauchari  and  Olaroz  have  relatively  high  sulphate  contents  and  therefore  both  salars  can  be 
further classified as “sulphate type brine deposits”.  Sections 8 and 12 provide detailed further 
discussion of the chemistry of Cauchari and Olaroz. 
 

  ‐ 37 ‐ 
 

8 MINERALIZATION 
The brines from Cauchari are solutions saturated in sodium chloride with total dissolved solids 
(TDS) on the order of 27% (324 to 335 g/L) and an average density of about 1.215 g/cm3. The 
other  components  present  in  these  brines,  which  constitute  a  complex  aqueous  system  and 
exist also in brines of other salars in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, are the following: K, Li, Mg, Ca, 
SO4, HCO3, and B as borates and free H3BO3.  

As  in  other  natural  brines  in  the  region,  such  as  those  of  the  Salar  de  Atacama  and  Salar  del 
Hombre Muerto, the higher content of the ions Cl–, SO4=, K+, Mg++, Na+ at Cauchari, compared 
with the other primary ions (Ca, Li, B) allows a simplification for the study of crystallization of 
salts  during  evaporation.  The  known  phase  diagram  (Janecke  projection)  of  the  aqueous 
quinary system (Na+, K+, Mg++, SO4=, Cl–) at 25°C and saturated in sodium chloride (equilibrium 
data from the technical literature) can be used. However, in order to fit this phase diagram with 
the important presence of lithium in the brines, the Janecke projection of MgLi‐SO4‐K2 in mol % 
is  used.  The  Cauchari  brine  composition  is  represented  in  this  diagram  in  Section  15,  where 
there is also a discussion of results from simulated evaporation performed by the University of 
Antofagasta. 

Table  8.1  shows  a  comparison  of  the  average  Cauchari  brine  composition  with  other  natural 
brines from Silver Peak (USA), Salar de Atacama (Chile), Salar del Hombre Muerto (Argentina), 
Salar de Rincon (Argentina), Zhabuye Salt Lake (Tibet) and Salar de Uyuni (Bolivia). 

  ‐ 38 ‐ 
 

Table 8.1: Comparative chemical composition of natural brines (wt %). 

Salar de  Hombre  Salar de  Salar del  Zhabuye  Salar de 


  Silver Peak 
Atacama  Muerto   Cauchari  Rincon  Salt Lake  Uyuni 
(USA) 
(Chile)  (Argentina) (Argentina) (Argentina) (Tibet)  (Bolivia) 
Na  6.20  7.60  9.79  9.33  9.46  10.81  8.75 

K  0.53  1.85  0.617  0.42  0.656  2.64  0.72 

Li  0.023  0.150  0.062  0.051  0.033  0.097  0.035 

Mg  0.03  0.96  0.085  0.145  0.303  0.001  0.65 

Ca  0.02  0.031  0.053  0.033  0.059  0.007  0.046 

SO4  0.71  1.65  0.853  1.57  1.015  5.24  0.85 

Cl  10.06  16.04  15.80  14.86  16.06  12.16  15.69 

HCO3  n.a.  traces  0.045  0.067  0.030  5.679  0.040 

B  0.008  0.064  0.035  0.112  0.040  0.286  0.02 

Density  n.a.  1.223  1.205  1.215  1.220  1.297  1.211 

Mg/Li  1.43  6.40  1.37  2.84  9.29  0.01  18.6 

K/Li  23.04  12.33  9.95  8.24  20.12  27.21  20.57 

SO4/Li  30.87  11.0  13.76  30.78  31.13  54.02  24.28 

SO4/Mg  23.67  1.72  10.04  10.83  3.35  5240  1.31 

SO4/K  1.34  0.89  1.38  3.74  1.55  1.98  1.18 

  ‐ 39 ‐ 
 

9 EXPLORATION 

9.1 Overview 

The following exploration programs have been conducted to evaluate the lithium development 
potential of the Project area: 

¾ Surface  Brine  Program  ‐  Brine  samples  were  collected  from  shallow  pits  throughout  the 
salars to obtain a preliminary indication of lithium occurrence and distribution. 

¾ Seismic  Geophysical  Program  –  A  seismic  survey  was  conducted  to  support  delineation  of 
basin geometry, mapping of basin‐fill sequences, and locating future borehole sites. 

¾ Reverse  Circulation  (RC)  Borehole  Program  ‐  Dual  tube  reverse  circulation  drilling  is  being 
conducted  to  develop  vertical  profiles  of  brine  chemistry  at  depth  in  the  salars  and  to 
provide geological and hydrogeological data. 

¾ Diamond  Drilling  (DD)  Borehole  Program  –  This  program  is  being  conducted  to  collect 
continuous  cores  for  geotechnical  testing  (porosity,  grain  size  and  density)  and  geological 
characterization.    The  boreholes  were  completed  as  observation  wells  for  future  brine 
sampling and monitoring. 

The RC Borehole Program is described in the following sections: 

¾  10.1 (drilling methods and summary of results); 

¾  11.3 (sample collection and field analysis); 

¾  12.2 (sample preparation); and 

¾  12.3 (laboratory analysis).  

The DD Borehole Program is described in the following sections: 

¾ 10.2 (drilling methods and summary of results); 

¾ 11.4 (field core sampling); 

¾ 12.2 (sample preparation); and 

¾ 12.4 (laboratory geotechnical analysis). 

Methods and results for the Surface Brine and Seismic Geophysical Programs are summarized 
below and additional methodology details on the Surface Brine Program are provided in Section 
11.2. 

  ‐ 40 ‐ 
 

9.2 Surface Brine Program 
A total of 55 surface brine samples were collected from shallow hand‐dug test pits excavated 
throughout the Project site, at the locations shown on Figure 9.1.  The pits ranged from 1.5 to 3 
m in depth and they were left open after completion to allow seepage of brine (Photos 9.1 and 
9.2).  One‐litre brine samples were collected from each pit. Samples of the intersected clay and, 
if present, thin salt layers, were also collected. 

 
Photo 9.1: Brine sampling from a shallow pit on the Cauchari Salar. 

 
Photo 9.2: Brine collection from abandoned borax production pit. 

Surface brine concentration distributions are shown in Figure 9.1 for lithium and Figure 9.2 for 
potassium.    As  shown  in  Figure  9.1  most  of  the  lithium  concentrations  from  throughout  the 
salars  exceeded  200  mg/L.    In  the  central  area  of  Cauchari,  there  is  an  area  where  lithium  is 
elevated  to  greater  than  1  000  mg/L.    Concentrations  below  200  mg/L  occur  primarily  in  the 
south end of Cauchari and in the boundary zone between Olaroz and Cauchari, probably due to 
an influx of fresh surface water associated with the alluvial cones in these areas. 

These  surface  brine  results  were  considered  a  favorable  indication  of  potential  for  significant 
lithium grades at depth in the salars.  The additional exploration programs were initiated on the 
basis of these results. 

  ‐ 41 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 9.1: Distribution of lithium concentration in surface brine samples. 

  ‐ 42 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 9.2:  Distribution of potassium concentration in surface brine samples. 

  ‐ 43 ‐ 
 

9.3 Seismic Geophysical Program 

A high resolution seismic tomography survey was conducted on the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars. 
The  survey  configuration  utilized  a  five‐metre  geophone  separation,  and  a  semi‐logarithmic 
expanding drop‐weight array symmetrical to the central geophone array. The geophone array 
comprised  48  mobile  measurement  sites  utilizing  Geode  Geoelectrics  8  Hz  geophones. 
Symmetrically  surrounding  the  48  geophones  were  accelerated,  150  kg  drop‐weight  sites 
moving away from the geophone array as follows: 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 250, 500, 750, and 
900m. Based on accepted rules of thumb for depth resolution, the outer drop‐weight positions 
would provide sufficient velocity detail to depths on the order of 500 to 600 m.  The survey was 
contracted to Geophysical Exploration Consulting (GEC) of Mendoza, Argentina. 

Measurements were conducted along seven survey lines, as shown on Figure 9.3.  Six lines are 
oriented east‐west, and one line (Line 7) has a north‐south orientation.  A total of 24 700 m of 
seismic  survey  data  were  acquired.    Data  acquisition  took  place  from  early  July  to  mid‐
December of 2009.  These seismic survey data supported the identification of drilling sites for 
the RC and DD Programs in 2009 and will continue to be of use during the 2010 program.  An 
example seismic survey line is shown in Figure 9.4.   

  ‐ 44 ‐ 
 

Figure 9.3: Seismic tomography lines completed during 2009. 

  ‐ 45 ‐ 
 

Figure 9.4:  Example seismic tomography results (Line 1). 

Interpretation of the seismic data indicates that there is good correlation with the three salar 
units (UMS, TBS and CBS), as shown in Figure 6.4.  The CBS is considered the primary lithium‐
bearing aquifer.  The seismic response of this unit generally ranged from 3 000 m/sec to 4 000 
m/sec,  as  correlated  with  stratigraphic  information  from  the  RC  and  DD  Borehole  Programs 
(Section 10).  The response of the generally less permeable units ranged from <500 m/sec to 
3  000  m/sec.    These  seismic  trends  supported  the  development  of  the  geological  conceptual 
model which was used for the inferred resource estimate (Section 16). 

The maximum interpreted depth of salar units in each of the seven seismic lines ranged from 
approximately 300 to 600 m.  None of the boreholes drilled at the site to date (nine for the RC 
Borehole  Program  and  five  for  the  DD  Borehole  Program)  have  reached  the  underlying 
basement, to confirm this depth estimate.  

  ‐ 46 ‐ 
 

10 DRILLING 

10.1 Reverse Circulation Drilling Program 

The objectives of this program are to develop vertical profiles of brine chemistry at depth in the 
salars,  and  to  provide  geological  and  hydrogeological  data.    Major  Drilling  of  Argentina  was 
contracted to carry out the RC drilling using a Schramm T685W rig and support equipment.  The 
holes are drilled using ODEX and open‐hole RC drilling methods at 10‐, 8‐ and 6‐inch diameters.  
No drilling additives are used. 

This program is currently in progress; the boreholes reported herein were completed between 
September  and  December  2009.    Nine  RC  boreholes  (PE‐1  through  PE‐9)  were  completed 
during this period, for total drilling of 1 333 m.  Borehole depths range from 28 m (PE‐1) to 249 
m (PE‐7). 

During  drilling,  chip  and  brine  samples  are collected  from the  cyclone at  one‐metre  intervals.  
Occasionally, lost circulation resulted in the inability to collect samples from some intervals.  A 
total  of  760  brine  samples  were  collected  for  laboratory  chemical  analyses.    For  each  brine 
sample,  field  measurements  are  also  conducted  for  potassium  (by  portable  XRF  analyzer), 
electrical  conductivity,  pH  and  temperature.    Sample  collection,  preparation  and  analytical 
methods are described in Sections 11.3, 12.2 and 12.3, respectively. 

Airlift  flow  measurements  are  conducted  at  six‐metre  intervals  when  circulation  is  adequate.  
Daily static water level measurements are carried out inside the drill string at the start of each 
drilling  shift,  using  a  water  level  tape.    Boreholes  are  completed  with  steel  surface  casing,  a 
surface sanitary cement seal and a lockable cap. 

Average concentrations in the brine samples from the eight RC boreholes drilled in the salars 
are shown in Table 10.1.  Results for PE‐3 are not included in the table because it is considered 
to  be  located  on  the  eastern  margin  of  the  Olaroz  Salar.    It  is  a  flowing  artesian  well  and 
receives fresh water from the adjacent alluvial cone.  The table provides average values for the 
boreholes  in  Cauchari  because  the  majority  of  brine  samples  were  collected  from  this  salar.  
Results  of  geologic  logging  and  brine  analyses  for  boreholes  PE‐1  through  PE‐9  are  shown 
graphically in Figures 10.1 through 10.9, respectively. 

  ‐ 47 ‐ 
 

Table 10.1: Brine concentration (mg/L) and density (g/cm3) results from the RC Borehole Program. 

No. of 
Bore  Na  K  Li  Ca  Mg  Cl  SO4  B  CO3  density
Samples 
Average values for individual RC boreholes in Olaroz Salar 
PE‐1  3  115 600  4 820  456  810  1 230  183 600  6 970  660  430  1.207 
PE‐2  6  113 400  5 820  552  590  1 380  181 900  10 380  840  610  1.211 
PE‐5  180  66 400  3 110  347  1 050  1 040  108 300  10 050  910  803  1.137 
Average values for individual RC Boreholes in Cauchari Salar 
PE‐4  110  105 700  6 720  682  330  2 040  177 900  22 760  940  795  1.220 
PE‐6  114  117 500  6 984  869  376  2 050  186 000  16 770  1 250  870  1.218 
PE‐7  132  117 300  4 230  511  483  1 240  182 700  15 410  1 010  668  1.211 
PE‐8  143  109 000  2 900  414  434  1 680  171 600  20 000  2 780  2 666  1.209 
PE‐9  72  118 200  4 800  614  380  1 860  184 100  20 600  840  621  1.217 
Average of the five Cauchari RC borehole averages 
Cauchari 
113 500  5 127  618  401  1 770  180 500  19 110  1 360  1 124  1.215 
boreholes 
 

Brine  chemistry,  particularly  the  concentration  levels  of  chemical  species  of  commercial 
interest,  such  as  potassium  and  lithium,  and  their  relationship  with  other  components  not 
considered economically attractive, constitutes the most important factor for a natural brine to 
be  competitive  for  extraction  and  processing.    In  order  to  evaluate  the  brine  quality,  it  is 
necessary to know the relationship among the elements of higher commercial interest, such as 
lithium and potassium, with those components that in some respect constitute impurities, such 
as Mg, Ca and SO4. The calculated ratios for the average chemical composition at each RC drill 
hole are presented in Table 10.2. 
Table 10.2:   Average concentrations (g/L) and associated ratios for brine samples from the RC 
Borehole Program. 

Drill  N° of 
K  Li  Ca  Mg  SO4  Mg/Li  K/Li  SO4/Li  SO4/Ca+Mg*
Hole  Samples 
Average values for individual RC Boreholes in Olaroz Salar 
PE‐1  3  4.82  0.46  0.81  1.23  6.97  2.67  10.56 15.28  1.17 
PE‐2  6  5.82  0.55  0.59  1.38  10.38  2.50  10.54 18.79  1.51 
PE‐5  180  3.11  0.35  1.05  1.04  10.05  2.98  8.95  28.95  1.52 
Average values for individual RC Boreholes in Cauchari Salar 
PE‐4  110  6.72  0.68  0.33  2.04  22.76  2.99  9.85  33.40  2.57 
PE‐6  114  7.00  0.87  0.38  2.05  16.77  2.36  8.04  19.30  1.87 
PE‐7  132  4.23  0.51  0.48  1.24  15.41  2.42  8.28  30.15  2.55 
PE‐8  143  2.90  0.41  0.43  1.68  20.00  4.06  7.01  48.30  2.61 
PE‐9  72  4.80  0.61  0.38  1.86  20.60  3.03  7.82  33.55  2.50 
*SO4/Ca+Mg is a molar ratio 

  ‐ 48 ‐ 
 

The  brines  from  Cauchari,  as  well  as  from  the  south  Olaroz  area,  where  the  LAC  claims  are 
located,  have  a  relatively  low  Mg/Li  ratio  (lower  than  three,  on  average).  This  indicates  that 
both  brines  would  be  amenable  to  a  conventional  lithium  recovery  process.    Based  on  the 
relatively  high  sulphate  content,  both  salars  can  be  considered  sulphate‐type  brine  deposits.  
For this classification, PE‐5 has been taken as representative of the south Olaroz area. 

The  molar  ratio  SO4/(Mg+Ca)  is  greater  than  one  for  all  boreholes.    This  is  advantageous  for 
brine processing, since after liming the brine to remove magnesium as Mg(OH)2, the amounts 
of sodium sulphate or soda ash required for Ca removal are substantially reduced because the 
SO4 ion is used to remove Ca as gypsum.  The implications of these results, with regard to brine 
processing, are discussed in detail in Section 15.  
 

  ‐ 49 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 10.1:   PE‐1 summary geologic log and brine analyses; a total of 3 brine samples were collected 
from this borehole. 

  ‐ 50 ‐ 
 

 
 
Figure 10.2:   PE‐2 summary geologic log and brine analyses; a total of 6 brine samples were collected 
from this borehole. 

 
 
 

  ‐ 51 ‐ 
 

 
 
Figure 10.3:   PE‐3  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  62  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

 
 
 

  ‐ 52 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 10.4:   PE‐4  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  111  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

  ‐ 53 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 10.5:   PE‐5  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  180  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

  ‐ 54 ‐ 
 

 
 
Figure 10.6:   PE‐6  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  114  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

 
 

  ‐ 55 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 10.7:   PE‐7  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  132  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

  ‐ 56 ‐ 
 

Figure 10.8:   PE‐8  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  143  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

  ‐ 57 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 10.9:   PE‐9  summary  geologic  log  and  brine  analyses;  a  total  of  72  brine  samples  were 
collected from this borehole. 

  ‐ 58 ‐ 
 

10.2 Diamond Drilling Borehole Program 
The objectives of this program are to collect continuous cores for geotechnical testing (porosity, 
grain size and density) and geological characterization, and to construct observation wells for 
future sampling and monitoring.  Major Drilling Argentina S.A. was contracted to carry out the 
drilling  using  a  Major‐50  rig  and  support  equipment.    The  boreholes  were  drilled  using  triple 
tube PQ and HQ drilling methods. 

This program is currently in progress; the boreholes reported herein were completed between 
October and December 2009.  Five boreholes (DDH‐1 through DDH‐5) were completed during 
this period, for total drilling of 1 280 m.  Borehole depths range from 79 m (DDH‐2) to 322 m 
(DDH‐3). 

During  drilling,  core  is  retrieved  and  stored  in  boxes  for  subsequent  geologic  logging.  
Undisturbed  samples  are  taken  from  the  core  in  PVC  sleeves  (2‐inch  diameter  and  5‐inch 
length) at selected intervals, for laboratory testing of geotechnical parameters including: total 
and  drainable  porosity,  grain  size,  and  particle  density.    A  total  of  113  undisturbed  samples 
have been prepared and shipped to D.B. Stevens & Associates Laboratory for testing.  Sample 
collection, preparation and testing methods are described in Sections 11.4 and 12.2 and 12.4, 
respectively.  Table 10.1 shows the results of the drainable porosity testing carried out on the 
undisturbed samples. 
Table 10.3:  Results of drainable porosity testing. 

Lithology  Number of samples  Avg. Drainable Porosity (%) 

Clay  10  3.2 

Silt  23  12.0 

Sand  49  25.5 

Salt (semi‐consolidated/porous)  25  26.8 

Salt (solid halite core)  6  4.8 

On  completion  of  drilling,  each  borehole  was  converted  to  an  observation  well  through  the 
installation  of  Schedule  80,  2‐inch  diameter,  blank  and  slotted  (1mm)  PVC  casing.    The 
observation wells were completed with steel surface casing, a surface sanitary cement seal and 
lockable cap.  During March 2010, a low flow sampling program will be conducted within these 
wells.    Brine  samples  will  be  collected  from  each  well  (DDH‐1  through  DDH‐5)  at  selected 
intervals, and submitted for laboratory analyses. 

A  systematic  water  level  monitoring  program  has  been  implemented  for  observation  wells 
DDH‐1 through DDH‐5 and for the boreholes drilled for the RC Borehole Program (PE‐1 through 
PE‐9).  Additional water level monitoring and hydraulic testing will be conducted. 

  ‐ 59 ‐ 
 

11 SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH 

11.1 Background 

Sampling  procedures  and  protocols  for  the  Surface  Sampling,  RC  Borehole  and  DD  Borehole 
Programs  were  designed  by  Dr.  Waldo  Perez  P.  Geo,  Frits  Reidel,  B.  Sc.  and  Pedro  Pavlovic, 
Chem. Eng. The various programs were executed under the direct field supervision of Dr. Waldo 
Perez P. Geo. from Project startup (July 2008) to September 2009.  Since that time, all site work 
is conducted under the supervision of the Company QP, John Kieley (P.Geo. from Canada).  

11.2 Surface Brine Sampling Methods 

A total of 55 surface brine samples were collected from shallow hand‐dug test pits excavated 
throughout the Project site, at the locations shown on Figure 9.1.  The pits ranged from 1.5 to 3 
m in depth and were left open after completion to allow entry of brine (Photos 9.1 and 9.2).  
After evacuating the hole several times and allowing the brine to re‐enter, a brine sample was 
collected in a brine‐rinsed, one litre plastic bottle.   The bottle top was sealed with Teflon tape 
and the bottle was tagged with a pre‐numbered ticket.  The coordinates of the sample location 
were measured with a handheld GPS and entered in a log book which was signed by the person 
responsible  for  sample  collection.    Samples  of  the  intersected  clay  and,  if  present,  thin  salt 
layers, were also collected.  Results from the Surface Brine Program are presented in Section 
9.2 

11.3  RC Borehole Sampling Methods 

During  RC  drilling,  rock  chips  and  brine  are  directed  from  the  drill  cyclone  into  a  plastic  bag, 
over  a  one‐metre  drilling  interval.    If  the  output  from  the  cyclone  is  dry  (rock  chips  only),  a 
geologist places a representative sample from the plastic bag into a rock chip tray.  If the output 
is wet (rock chips and brine), it is sieved.  The separated solids are then placed in a rock chip 
tray and the brine is poured from the bottom of the sieve into a plastic bottle.  The brine is then 
field analyzed for the following: 

¾ Potassium – using a Thermo Fisher Scientific Niton portable XRF analyzer; 

¾ pH and temperature ‐ using a Hach HD‐30 pH meter; and 

¾ Conductivity – using a HD‐30 conductivity meter. 

After  the  field  measurements  are  taken,  the  brine  sample  is  split  into  three,  one  litre,  clean, 
plastic  sample  bottles.    The  three  bottles  are  tagged  with  pre‐printed  tag  numbers.    Two 
samples are mixed to form one sample, which is shipped to the Alex Stewart Laboratories S.A. 
(“ASL”) in Mendoza.  One sample is maintained in the LAC Susques office as a backup.  Results 
from the RC Borehole Program are presented in Section 10.1. 

  ‐ 60 ‐ 
 

    

Photo 11.1 (left): Cyclone with plastic bag (dry sample).  
Photo 11.2 (right): rock chip tray with dry and wet samples. 

11.4 DD Borehole Sampling Methods  

During diamond drilling, PQ or HQ diameter cores are collected through a triple tube sampler.  
The cores are taken directly from the triple tube and placed in wooden core boxes for logging 
and undisturbed sample collection.  Undisturbed samples are collected by driving a two inch 
diameter PVC sleeve sampler into the core at selected intervals.  A total of 113 undisturbed 
samples were collected from the cores of DDH‐1 through DDH‐5. 

Undisturbed samples were shipped to D.B. Stephens & Associates Laboratory in the USA for 
analysis of geotechnical parameters, including: total and drainable porosity, grain size, and 
particle density. 

    

Photo 11.3 (left): Collecting an undisturbed sample from sand core.  
Photo 11.4 (right): Collecting an undisturbed sample from clay core. 

  ‐ 61 ‐ 
 

12 SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSES AND SECURITY 

12.1 Overview 

The  surface  brine,  RC  brine,  rock  chip  and  core  samples  were  prepared  on  site  under  the 
supervision of Dr. Waldo Perez (P. Geo. Canada) from Project startup (July 2008) to September 
2009.    Since  that  time,  all  site  work  (including  sample  preparation)  is  conducted  under  the 
supervision of the Company QP, John Kieley (P.Geo. from Canada).  Brine samples are analyzed 
by ASL.  This company is an ISO 9001‐certified laboratory with facilities in Mendoza, Argentina 
and headquarters in England. 

The  University  of  Salta  (“UNSa”)  in  Salta,  Argentina,  is  used  for  analysis  of  duplicate  brine 
samples.    Since  1996,  the  quality  of  UNSa  chemical  analysis  is  periodically  evaluated  through 
inter‐laboratory testing organized by Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Industrial.  The University 
of  Antofagasta  in  Northern  Chile  is  the  third  laboratory  used  for  brine  analyses  and  also  for 
brine  evaporation  tests  (Section  15).    This  laboratory  is  certified  by  Chilean  Standards  (NCH) 
17045 OF 2005.  Additional performance and quality checks are carried out as part of an inter‐
laboratory testing program conducted since 1996. 

D.B.  Stephens  and  Associates  Laboratory  in  Albuquerque,  New  Mexico,  USA  are  used  for  the 
geotechnical  property  analyses  of  the  undisturbed  core  samples  from  the  DD  Borehole 
Program.  D.B. Stephens and Associates is certified by the US Army Corps of Engineers and is a 
contract laboratory for the Geological Society of America.  

12.2 Sample Preparation 

12.2.1 Surface Brine Sample Preparation 

No  additional  preparation  was  required  for  the  surface  brine  samples.  The  samples  were 
collected and shipped to the laboratory. 

12.2.2 RC Borehole Brine Sample Preparation 

Samples  collected  through  the  RC  Borehole  Program  often  contain  high  levels  of  turbidity.    If 
the  silt  and  clay  in  suspension  is  significant  (more  than  one  centimetre  accumulated  at  the 
bottom  of  the  bottle)  then  these  samples  are  filtered  in  the  LAC  Susques  field  office.    The 
filtration is carried out using a standard lab filter, Kitasato flask and a vacuum pump.  

12.2.3 DD Borehole Core Sample Preparation 

Undisturbed  samples  are  collected  by  driving  a  2‐inch  diameter  PVC  sleeve  sampler  into  the 
core at selected intervals.  End caps are tightly fitted on both end of the PVC sample sleeve and 
a unique sample identification tag is attached to each sample.  Plastic foil is wrapped around 
the entire sample sleeve with end caps before placed in boxes for shipping. 

  ‐ 62 ‐ 
 

   

Photo 12.1: Filtration of brine and clay mixture.        Photo 12.2: Brine after filtration. 

12.3 Brine Analysis 

12.3.1 Analytical Methods 

ASL  was  selected  as  the  primary  laboratory  for  assaying  the  RC  Borehole  Program  brine 
samples.    They  also  assayed  duplicate  samples,  blanks  and  reference  standards,  which  were 
inserted  as  blind  control  samples.  In  order  to  provide  a  quick  response,  they  employed 
Inductively Coupled Plasma (“ICP”) as the analytical technique for the primary constituents of 
interest in the brine samples, including: Na, K, Li, Ca, Mg and B.  

For the first six RC boreholes (PE‐1 through PE‐6) sulphate was assayed using the turbidimetric 
method, with checking of 20% of samples using the gravimetric method.  Samples from PE‐7, 
PE‐8 and PE‐9 were analyzed by only the gravimetric technique, which provides more accurate 
results.  The  argentometric  method  was  used  for  assaying  chloride  and  volumetric  analysis 
(acid/base titration) was used for carbonates (alkalinity as CaCO3).  Laboratory measurements 
were conducted for Total Dissolved Solids (“TDS”), density, and pH. 

12.3.2 Analytical Quality Assurance and Quality Control (“QA/QC”) 

The QA/QC procedures adopted for the Project are discussed below, and include the following: 

¾ ASL  conducts  an  internal  check  on overall  analytical  accuracy  for  the primary  parameters, 
using ion balance and the ratio of measured to calculated TDS; 

¾ 10% of samples submitted to ASL are blanks; 

¾ 10%  of  samples  submitted  to  ASL are  reference  standard  control  samples  collected  from  a 
brine pit in the Borax Mine in Cauchari; these are high TDS samples; 

¾ Duplicate samples are composed for 5% of the brine samples, and are submitted to ASL as 
unique samples (blind duplicates); 

¾ Duplicates are composed for 5% of the brine samples, and are analyzed  for Na, K, Li, Ca and 
Mg by ASL using an alternative method (atomic absorption spectrometry (“AAS”)); 

  ‐ 63 ‐ 
 

¾ Duplicates  are  composed  for  5%  of  the  brine  samples,  including  control  samples,  and  are 
submitted to a secondary lab (UNSa) as check samples (external duplicates); and 

¾ Five  selected  samples  were  submitted  for  round  robin  testing  at  eight  different  analytical 
laboratories (in addition to ASL); results were not available for inclusion in this report. 

Results from these QA/QC procedures are discussed below. 

Ion Balance 

The  ion  balance  evaluation  of  overall  analytical  accuracy  is  based  on  a  comparison  of  cations 
and  anions  in  the  sample.    Sums  are  calculated  for  these  two  components  (expressed  in 
milliequivalents  per  litre)  and  the  difference  between  the  two  is  expressed  as  a  percentage.  
Based on the extensive experience of ASL with brines from other salars, and discussions with 
Universidad Nacional San Luis, a maximum difference of 5% was adopted as the acceptability 
criteria  for  the  Project.    Analytical  performance  with  regard  to  the  ion  balance  criteria  is 
summarized  below  for all  RC  boreholes  excluding  PE‐1  and  PE‐2  (minimal  brine  sampling  was 
conducted) and PE‐3 (located on the salar periphery): 

¾ 7% of samples (8 of 110) from PE‐4 exceeded the 5% criteria; this situation was improved in 
subsequent boreholes; 

¾ 5% of samples (9 of 180) from PE‐5 exceeded the 5% criteria; 

¾ No samples (of 114) from PE‐6 exceeded the 5% criteria; 

¾ 2% of samples (2 of 132) from PE‐7 exceeded the 5% criteria; 

¾ 1% of samples (1 of 143) from PE‐8 exceeded the 5% criteria; and 

¾ 1% of samples (1 of 72) from PE‐9 exceeded the 5% criteria. 

ASL  considered  that  the  results  exceeding  the  ion  balance  criteria  were  primarily  due  to  the 
exceptional TDS levels present in the samples.  They note that elevated TDS levels have caused 
imbalances in samples from other brine sites for which they conduct analysis.   

  ‐ 64 ‐ 
 

Measured Versus Calculated TDS 

The  second  overall  evaluation  of  analytical  accuracy  is  based  on  the  ratio  of  measured  to 
calculated TDS. According to Standard Methods (APHA‐AWWA‐WPCF, 1998) this ratio should be 
between 1.2 and 1.0.  Results for the submitted samples ranged from 0.9 to 1.15 indicating that 
many of the samples were below the acceptance criteria.   

Again this discrepancy was attributed to the exceptionally high dissolved solids content of the 
brine. 

Blank samples to ALS 

Lithium was non‐detectable in all 116 submitted blank samples except one. 

Reference Standard Samples to ALS 

Reference  standard  samples  (116)  were  collected  from  a  brine  pit  in  the  Borax  mine  in 
Cauchari, as a means of evaluating the ongoing reproducibility of the analysis.  The results show 
that these samples are even more highly concentrated than the in situ brine, probably due to 
evaporation.    Detected  concentrations  of  lithium  and  other  solutes  were  relatively  constant 
over the duration of the program, with variability both above and below the long‐term mean, 
and no apparent systematic change.  It is noted, however, that ionic balance results for most of 
these samples was significantly higher than 5%. It was suggested by ASL that this is due to the 
extreme dissolved solids content in these samples (up to 35% by weight). 

Duplicates by Alternative Method (AAS) at ALS 

The  analytical  results  obtained  by AAS  for  duplicate  samples  (1  in  20  ordinary  samples)  show 
strong discrepancies: up to 40% in Mg, 30% in Na, 20% in Ca, 16% in Li and 7% in K; generally 
lower values compared with ICP results.  Additional method development work is required for 
the analysis of brine samples by AAS. 

Blind Duplicates to ALS 

The analytical results for 117 blind duplicate samples indicate good reproducibility by the ICP 
analytical method. 

External Duplicates at Secondary Laboratory 

Five percent of brine samples were submitted in duplicate to UNSa although, to date, results 
are only available for 19 samples, due to laboratory turnaround time.  Statistical analysis of the 
19  pairs  of  results  was  conducted  using  Reduction‐to‐Major‐Axis  (“RMA”)  multiple  linear 
regression  for  K,  Li  and  Mg.  StatGraphics  software  was  used  for  this  analysis.    Results  are 
summarized in Table 12.1 and shown graphically in Figures 12.1, 12.2 and 12.3 for K, Li and Mg, 
respectively. 

  ‐ 65 ‐ 
 

Table 12.1: Check Assays (ASL vs. Univ. Salta): RMA regression statistics. 

CAUCHARI‐OLAROZ PROJECT ‐ RMA Statistics (ASL vs. U. Salta) 

Element  R2  Pairs M  Error (m)  B  Error (b)  Bias 

K (mg/L)  0.86369  19  0.97782  0.04944  ‐34.3162  545.193  2.22% 

Li (mg/L)  0.93426  19  1.09238  0.07028  ‐67.039  48.438  9.24% 

Mg (mg/L)  0.843118  19  0.89326  0.09345  193.13  155.882  10.37% 

 
 
The  bias,  which  is  a  measure  of  accuracy  (the  higher  the  bias,  the  lower  the  accuracy),  is 
calculated as Bias (%) = 1 – RMAS where RMAS is the slope (m) of the Reduction‐to‐Major‐Axis 
regression line of the secondary laboratory AAS values (UNSa) versus the primary laboratory ICP 
values (ALS) for each element. 

The  RMA  analysis  results  show  that  the  fitted  model  is  better  for  lithium  (higher  R‐squared 
coefficient) than for potassium and magnesium. However, the bias result for potassium is more 
favourable. 

Plot of Fitted Model

(X 1000,0)
10
Po tassiu m m g /L A lex Stew art

0
0 2 4 6 8 10
(X 1000,0)
Potassium m g/L University Salta

Figure 12.1:  RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for potassium. 

  ‐ 66 ‐ 
 

Plot of Fitted Model

1200

1000

Lithium m g/L A le x S te wa rt
800

600

400

200

0
0 200 400 600 800 1000
Lithium mg/L University of Salta

Figure 12.2:  RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for lithium. 

Plot of Fitted Model

2500
Magnesium m g/L A lex Stewart

2200

1900

1600

1300

1000

700
0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500
Magnesium mg/L University Salta

 
Figure 12.3:  RMA plot for the fitted multiple regression model for magnesium. 

Results  from  the  inter‐laboratory  comparison  indicate  a  reasonable  correlation  between  labs, 
especially  for  Li,  which  tends  to  be  present  at  lower  concentrations  than  the  other  two 
constituents  (K  and  Mg).    Discrepancies  appear  to  become  more  significant  at  higher 
concentrations,  which  is  consistent  with  interference  caused  by  the  exceptional  TDS  of  the 
sample. 

Overall QA/QC Conclusion 

It  is  noted  by  the  independent  QP  that  the  high  dissolved  solids  content  of  the  brines  are  a 
source of analytical variability in the existing results.  This is especially apparent in the results 
for the checks based on ionic balance and measured versus calculated TDS.  These two standard 
aqueous  chemistry  checks  are  typically  used  for  waters  with  less  extreme  TDS  levels.    Their 
applicability  for  the  exceptional  chemistry  of  the  brines  should  be  further  evaluated  and 

  ‐ 67 ‐ 
 

refined.  This is consistent with LAC’s stated objective of identifying and minimizing the sources 
of analytical variability as the Project moves forward. 

On  balance,  however,  it  is  the  opinion  of  the  independent  QP  that  the  existing  QA/QC 
information adequately demonstrates that the brine dataset is acceptable for use in an inferred 
resource estimate.  While some of the basic check criteria (e.g., ion balance, TDS) are exceeded 
for some samples, the degree to which they are exceeded is still considered relatively minor in 
the  context  of  the  inferred  resource  estimate,  and  potential  impact  on  the  final  result.  
However, additional analytical QA/QC refinement should be conducted in advance of the next 
level of estimation. 

12.4 Geotechnical Analyses 

12.4.1 Overview 

D.B.  Stephens  and  Associates  Laboratory  carried  out  selected  geotechnical  analyses  on  113 
undisturbed samples from the geologic cores (DDH‐1 through DDH‐5) as summarized in Table 
12.2.  Results are provided in Section 10.2. 
Table 12.2:  Summary of geotechnical property analyses. 
 
ANALYSIS  ASTM  PROCEDURE 

Dry bulk density  D6836 

Moisture content  D2216, D6836 

Total porosity  D6836 

Specific gravity (fine grained)  D854 

Specific gravity (coarse grained)  C127 

Particle size analyses  D422 

Relative water release capacity  NA 

Container capacity package  NA 
 
 
12.4.2 Analytical Methods 

Specific gravity 

Specific  gravity  testing  was  conducted  for  four  formation  samples  (012714,  012715,  012716, 
and 012743).  Density results for these samples ranged from 2.47 g/cm3 to 2.75 g/cm3. It was 
subsequently  determined  that  these  values  could  be  skewed  due  to  the  high  salt  content.  
Consequently, no attempt was made to apply these measured values to the remaining samples, 
and an assumed particle density of 2.65 g/cm3 was used for all other samples. 

  ‐ 68 ‐ 
 

Drainable porosity 

Drainable porosity tests were carried out on all undisturbed samples through “Relative Water 
Release Capacity (“RWRC”)” or “Container Capacity Package (“CCP”)” analyses.  Both methods 
are  based  on  calculating  changes  in  volumetric  moisture  content  as  samples  (initially  fully 
saturated) drain over a three‐day period, either under the force of gravity (in the CCP method) 
or vacuum suction (in the RWRC method). The drainable porosity is considered to be equal to 
the difference between volumetric moisture contents at the start and finish of the test. 

Particle size analyses 

Particle size analyses were carried out on all undisturbed samples after the drainable porosity 
testing was completed.  Uniformity and curvature coefficients (Cu and Cc) were calculated for 
each sample and samples were classified according to the USDA soil classification system. 

12.5 Sample Security 

There is an established and firm chain of custody procedure for Project sampling, storage and 
shipping.  Samples are taken daily from the drill sites and stored at the Susques field office of 
LAC.    All  brine  samples  are  stored  inside  a  locked  office,  and  all  drill  core  is  stored  inside  a 
locked warehouse adjacent to the office.  Samples are periodically driven in Project vehicles to 
Jujuy approximately three hours from the site.  In Jujuy, the samples are delivered to a courier 
(DHL) for immediate shipment to the appropriate analytical laboratory. 

  ‐ 69 ‐ 
 

13 DATA VERIFICATION 

13.1 Overview 
The independent QP conducted the following forms of data verification: 

¾ Visits to the salar site, the LAC field office, and the LAC corporate office; 

¾ Review of LAC sampling procedures, although it is noted that actual brine sampling was not 
viewed due to the nature of the geologic units encountered by the RC drill at the time of the 
site visit; 

¾ Inspection of original laboratory results forms for the LAC brine dataset; 

¾ Inspection of electronic copies of the LAC brine dataset and comparison with corresponding 
stratigraphic logs; 

¾ Review of LAC field and laboratory QA/QC results;  

¾ Review of publicly available information from an adjacent exploration property (Orocobre)  
in Olaroz Salar; and 

¾ Detailed  and  ongoing  technical  discussion  of  the  Project  with  key  Project  personnel, 
including  the  LAC  field  supervisor  (John  Kieley,  a  P.Geo.  from  Canada);  the  Independent 
Hydrogeologist (Frits Reidel) and the block model construction specialist (Danilo Castillo). 

Independent sampling and chemical analysis were not conducted by the independent QP. 

13.2 Site Visit 

The  QP  visited  the  Project  site  and  field  office  on  December  10  and  11,  2009  and  made  the 
following observations that are relevant to data verification: 

¾ Most  of  the  past  drilling  sites  were  observed,  including  cuttings,  well  completions,  brine 
ponds, and new gravel roads constructed to the sites; 

¾ Sampling  procedures  for  brine,  rock  chips  and  core  were  reviewed  and  are  considered 
appropriate for maintaining data integrity; 

¾ An  active  drilling  site  was  observed,  although  it  is  noted  that  brine  sampling  was  not 
conducted during the visit due to the nature of the salar units through which the RC drill was 
advancing at that time; 

¾ The  sample  storage  facility  and  security  systems  were  observed  and  are  considered 
appropriate; 

¾ Example  cores  were  inspected,  compared  with  compiled  logs,  and  determined  to  be 
consistent; 

  ‐ 70 ‐ 
 

¾ Field  data  entry  and  log  production  procedures  were  observed  and  determined  to  be 
appropriate; 

¾ Interaction  procedures  with  the  central  data  storage  technician  at  the  Mendoza  corporate 
office were reviewed and determined to be appropriate; 

¾ Staff operations, responsibilities and mentoring were observed; it was determined that staff 
were  conducting  tasks  appropriate  to  their  training,  and  that  the  working  environment 
encouraged  scientific  integrity,  diligence,  and  mentoring  through  progressive  levels  of 
responsibility. 

The  QP  visited,  and  worked  from,  the  corporate  office  in  Mendoza  from  January  22  to 
January 30, 2010 and made the following observations that are relevant to data verification: 

¾ Hard  copies  of  all  analytical  data  available  to  that  time  were  reviewed;  spot  comparisons 
were  made  with  plotted  borehole  logs,  maps  and  working  spreadsheets;  accurate 
transcription was confirmed; 

¾ The  derivation  of  the  geologic  conceptual  model  (used  as  input  for  the  block  model)  was 
reviewed in detail and was determined to be a reasonable representation of site conditions; 

¾ The  development  of  the  block  model  and  the  process  for  generating  interim  and  final 
inferred estimate results were reviewed in detail; during the visit, some adjustments were 
made to the block model by the LAC experts which added to the degree of conservatism in 
the estimate. 

13.3 Laboratory QA/QC Results 
An  appropriate  suite  of  QA/QC  checks  were  applied  to  the  brine  analysis,  including:  field 
duplicates,  field  blanks,  field  standards,  inter‐laboratory  comparisons,  inter‐method 
comparison (i.e., between ICP and AAS), and secondary analytical checks (i.e., ion balance and 
TDS  checks).    Results  from  these  checks  indicate  that  the  extreme  TDS  of  the  samples 
contributes  to  analytical  variability  and  that  acceptability  criteria  are  exceeded  for  some 
samples.    The  analytical  laboratory  has  indicated  that,  based  on  their  widespread  experience 
with  salar  brines,  this  issue  is  relatively  common  in  these  highly  concentrated  waters.    The 
experience of the independent QP in the interpretation of aqueous chemistry is consistent with 
this  suggestion,  where  analytical  error  is  often  observed  to  increase  due  to  the  response  of 
analytical equipment to extreme concentrations. 

On  balance,  however,  it  is  the  opinion  of  the  independent  QP  that  the  existing  QA/QC 
information adequately demonstrates that the brine dataset is acceptable for use in an inferred 
resource estimate.  While some of the basic check criteria (e.g., ion balance, TDS) are exceeded 
for some samples, the degree to which they are exceeded is still considered relatively minor in 
the context of the inferred resource estimate, and potential impact on the final result. 

It is further noted that the reproducibility of the brine results is relatively high when compared 
to  results  from  many  solid  phase  mineral  deposits.    In  situ  concentration  trends  in  aqueous 
bodies  tend  to  be  smoothed  by  hydrodynamic  processes  such  as  diffusion,  advection, 

  ‐ 71 ‐ 
 

dispersion  and  density  effects.    Consequently  aqueous  salt  distributions  are  more  readily 
delineated than many solid deposits, which can have a high degree of inherent heterogeneity, 
characterized by large concentrations changes over short distances. 

13.4 Brine Composition Trends 
The  observed  vertical  brine  concentration  trends  from  the  RC  boreholes  are  qualitatively 
consistent with expected natural trends, and provide some overall verification of the dataset.  
Borehole brine concentrations tend to be consistent over vertical distances of several metres.  
When  changes  in  concentration  are  observed,  they  tend  to  occur  gradually  over  several 
successive samples leading ultimately to a peak or low concentration followed by reversal back 
to a baseline level. 

Publicly available information from the Orocobre exploration property located adjacent to LAC 
claims in Olaroz Salar also provides some overall verification of the LAC brine dataset.  On their 
website,  Orocobre  reports  that  through  a  Joint  Ore  Reserve  Committee  (“JORC”)  ‐  compliant 
inferred  resource  estimate,  they  have  identified  a  resource  of  350  million  kL  of  brine  with 
concentrations of  800  mg/L lithium and 6 600 mg/L potassium.  Although information on the 
distribution  of  these  two  constituents  is  not  provided,  it  is  noted  that  the  reported 
concentrations are similar to the high concentration zone defined by LAC in the Cauchari Salar. 

13.5 Technical Competence 
The independent QP has personally met and had detailed technical discussions with most of the 
technical  experts  working  on  the  Project  on  behalf  of  LAC.    These  individuals  are  competent 
professionals,  with  deep  experience  within  their  respective  disciplines.    The  actions  of  these 
experts show that they are committed to developing a technically‐defensible inferred resource 
estimate.  Their interpretations demonstrate a conservative approach in assigning constraints 
on the estimate, which increases the technical strength of the result. 

  ‐ 72 ‐ 
 

14 ADJACENT PROPERTIES 

Orocobre  is  an  Australian  listed  company  that  owns  mineral  properties  on  the  Olaroz  Salar, 
adjacent to some of the LAC claims.  Figure 14.1 shows the location of the Orocobre claims. The 
Orocobre  website  (www.orocobre.com.au)  states  that  a  JORC‐compliant  inferred  resource 
estimate  was  completed  by  Geos  independent  consultants  in  July  2009.    The  stated  inferred 
resource  estimate  for  the  Olaroz  property  is  1.5  million  tonnes  of  lithium  carbonate  and  4.4 
million  tonnes  of  potash.    The  estimate  zone  extends  to  a  depth  of  55  m,  and  the  company 
states that exploration potential exists to a depth of 200 m.  The company states that the brine 
chemistry  is  favourable,  with  low  impurities.  Neither  LAC  nor  the  QP  have  carried  out  an 
independent review of the validity of the Orocobre resource estimates and such information is 
not necessarily indicative of the mineralization on the Cauchari‐Olaroz Project. 
 

  ‐ 73 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 14.1: Location map of Orocobre claims. 

  ‐ 74 ‐ 
 

15 MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING 

15.1 Overview 

Evaporation and solubility tests were conducted to provide information on the crystallized salts 
produced  through  the  different  stages  of  the  evaporation  process,  and  to  provide  a  basis  for 
preliminary evaluation of the lithium recovery process.  Results from these tests are intended 
to  be  representative  of  typical  brine  chemistry  at  the  site,  not  the  entire  range  of  brine 
chemistry.    They  will  be  used  as  input  for  the  design  of  more  rigorous  testing  that  would 
ultimately support the design of an effective overall lithium recovery process. 
 
Simulated  solar  evaporation  tests  were  carried  out  on  brines  from  Cauchari  Salar  by  the 
University  of  Antofagasta.  These  batch‐wise  tests  were  conducted  at  a  constant  temperature 
(30°C)  and  at  laboratory  scale.    Solubility  testing  was  conducted  at  a  temperature  that 
approached  field  conditions  (15°C).    Harvested  crystallized  salts  and  solutions  (liquors) 
recovered from various stages of the 30°C evaporation tests were used in the solubility tests.   
 
Testing  was  conducted  with  approximately  42  L  of  typical  Cauchari  brine,  composed  with 
duplicate samples from borehole PE‐4.  The brine was transported to University of Antofagasta 
in  late  October  2009,  to  be  used  for  this  first  round  of  isothermal  evaporation  test  work.  
Additional testing is planned for a composite sample of typical Olaroz brine from borehole PE‐5. 

15.2  Simulated Solar Evaporation and Solubility Testing 

15.2.1 Experimental Methods  

The brine used in the evaporation test was composed of duplicate samples from PE‐4, located 
in Cauchari Salar.  The samples were collected from depths between 59 and 186 m.  Table 15.1 
provides analytical results for this composite brine from the University of Antofagasta (cations 
by AAS and sulphate by gravimetry) and ASL (cations and B by ICP, sulphate by turbidimetry).  
The results are comparable between the two laboratories, with the largest discrepancies noted 
for sodium, calcium and sulphate. 

Table 15.1:  Concentration (wt%) and density (g/cm3) for the brine from borehole PE‐4. 

Laboratory  Na  K  Li  Ca  Mg  Cl  SO4  B  Density 

Univ. 
10.06  0.50  0.060  0.030  0.160  14.87  2.20  0.078  1.2144 
Antofagasta 

ASL  8.68  0.55  0.056  0.026  0.164  14.48  1.87  0.075  1.2177 

In the evaporation test, 42 L (51 kg) of the PE‐4 brine composite was subjected to isothermal 
evaporation at 30°C. The brine was concentrated over five stages of evaporation, harvesting the 
crystallized salts at every stage.  A fiberglass reinforced plastic pan (75.5 cm diameter, 12.3 cm 

  ‐ 75 ‐ 
 

depth) was used for the first three stages and an acrylic pan (40 cm diameter, 6 cm depth) for 
the last two stages.  Magnesium was used as a tracer through the evaporation stages.  Over the 
test,  magnesium  ranged  from  an  initial  content  by  weight  of  0.16%  to  2.72%  in  the  final 
concentrated brine (less than 1 L). Samples of the solution  and the salts (after filtering) were 
collected from each stage, for chemical analysis and x‐ray diffraction. 

Daily  evaporation  trends  were  simulated  by  varying  the  conditions  to  which  the  evaporation 
pan was exposed.  Daytime conditions were simulated with two heat lamps, an oscillating fan 
and a hair dryer. The brine was stirred with a stainless steel paddle‐type agitator (6‐7 rpm) to 
suspend  the  crystallized  salts.  At  night,  the  heat  sources  were  turned  off,  which  resulted  in 
overnight cooling of the brine by approximately 5°C. The large fibreglass evaporation pan and 
associated apparatus are shown in Photo 15.1. 

Solubility  tests  were  conducted  at  15°C,  which  approaches  conditions  at  the  Cauchari  Salar.  
Tests  were  done  using  crystallized  salts  and  mother  liquor  produced  at  each  stage  of  the 
evaporation test at 30°C.  Closed glass vessels containing mixtures of 100 cm3 of liquor and 20 g 
of salts were set in a rotating stainless steel basket inside a thermostatically‐controlled bath at 
15°C.    Solution  density  was  monitored  until  it  reached  a  constant  value,  which  indicates  that 
liquor  and  salts  have  reached  equilibrium.  The  slurry  was  then  filtered  and  samples  of  both 
liquor and salts were collected for assaying. 

 
Photo 15.1:  Fiberglass evaporation pan and associated apparatus. 

  ‐ 76 ‐ 
 

15.2.2 Test Results 

Table  15.2  shows  a  mass  balance  (crystallized  salts,  solution  and  evaporated  water),  with 
reference to the initial weight of brine for each evaporating stage at 30°C. 

Table 15.2:  Mass balance (g) in terms of salts, solution and evaporated water. 

     
     
Evaporation  Evaporated 
Initial Weight  Salts  Liquor 
  Stage  Water 
1  50 839  8 241.3  22 504.3  20 093.3 
 
2  22 303.5  3 339.7  11 165.2  7 798.5 
  3  10 962.9  1 960.1  4 936.2  4 067.2 

  4  4 725.6  901.9  2 564.5  1 259 


5  2 354.6  521  1 076.4  757.1 
 

Tables 15.3 and 15.4 show brine composition and harvested salts during the five evaporation 
stages.  The  evolution  of  the  density  and  refractive  index  of  the  brine  is  also  indicated. 
Additionally, the moisture of the crystallized salts after harvesting and filtration is included in 
Table 15.3. 

  ‐ 77 ‐ 
 

 
Table 15.3 Composition (wt%) and properties of the evaporating brine. 

 
  1st Stage  2nd Stage  3rd Stage  4th Stage  5th Stage 
  Na  9.61  9.04  6.64  5.95  4.16 

  K  1.36  1.98  4.21  3.67  2.92 

Li  0.14  0.23  0.43  0.50  0.57 


 
Ca  0.020  0.070  0.002  0.002  0.003 
 
Mg  0.34  0.63  1.25  1.67  2.72 
  Cl  14.03  12.53  12.35  12.43  12.961 

  SO4  5.46  8.21  9.92  10.02  9.42 

B4O7  0.17  0.32  0.65  0.34  0.11 


 
H3BO3  0.91  1.67  3.40  2.81  3.32 
 
H2O  67.96  65.32  61.14  62.60  63.816 
 
Anion‐cation balance  ‐0.43  0.02  ‐0.20  ‐0.14  ‐0.02 
  Density (g/cm3 @25° C)  1.23743  1.27302  1.28430  1.31477  1.30292 

  Refractive Index (25°C)  1.3844  1.3881  1.3892  1.3946  1.3978 


Evaporation (%)  40  35  37  27  32 
 
Cumulative evap (%)  40  55  63  65  67 
 

A total of 33 975 grams of water was evaporated in the five stages, which represented 67% of 
the  initial  mass  of  brine  (50  839  g).  The  lithium  concentration  was  increased  from  0.06% 
(original  brine)  up  to  0.57%  after  the  fifth  stage,  although  it  is  noted  that  lithium  started 
precipitating from the third stage, as shown in Table 15.4. 

  ‐ 78 ‐ 
 

 
Table 15.4: Composition (wt%) and moisture of harvested salts. 

 
   1st Stage  2nd Stage  3rd Stage  4th Stage  5th Stage 
  Na  33.81  33.91  31.09  17.14  17.33 

  K  0.18  0.34  0.70  9.63  9.64 

  Li  0.02  0.03  0.20  0.77  0.93 

Ca  0.090  0.070  0.026  0.001  0.01 


 
Mg  0.05  0.10  0.14  1.67  1.62 
   
Cl  52.36  51.82  37.7  27.19  28.17 
  SO4  1.05  1.77  18.68  22.91  23.38 

  B4O7  0.03  0.06  0.09  2.05  1.22 

H3BO3  0.19  0.29  0.44  8.32  5.52 


 
H2O  10.3  11.61  10.3  10.31  12.19 
 
Anion‐cation Bal.  ‐0.89  0.03  ‐1.40  ‐1.2  ‐1.12 
  Moisture (%)  11.17  12.87  8.96  11.18  11.18 
 

For every harvest of salts, the different species that crystallized were estimated by the method 
of  mineralization  of  salts.  This  involves  associating  the  chemical  elements  present  in  the  wet 
salts to the most probable mineralogical species that would be formed during the crystallization 
process.    In  developing  this  estimate,  the  entrainment  of  the  solution  must  be  discounted  to 
determine the percentage of dried salts that have been mineralized in each stage.  

The  University  of  Antofagasta  prepared  12  tabular  evaluations  for  the  mineralization  of 
harvested  salts  (six  tables  for  the  evaporation  stages  at  30°C  and  six  tables  for  the  solubility 
tests at 15°C). In the summary provided herein, one table for each case is presented. Although 
lithium started to precipitate in the third stage, the fourth stage is shown, because it generated 
a  greater  variety  of  crystallized  salts,  including  a  more  abundant  amount  of  lithium  salt.  
Magnesium,  which  was  used  as  a  tracer  in  the  evaporation  test,  showed  variation  in  some 
stages of the solubility test. 

The estimate of salts composition by the mineralization method was compared to the species 
identified by x‐ray diffraction. In most cases, the identified mineral species are similar between 
the two methods, although the amounts differ. 

  ‐ 79 ‐ 
 

Table 15.5: Mineralization of salts from evaporation test at 30°C (4th Stage). 

%  %  %  %  Anion‐
  %Na  %K  %Li  %Ca  %Mg  % Cl  % SO4 
B4O7  H3BO3  H2O   E  Cat Bal 
Wet salts  17.14  9.63  0.77  0.00  1.67  27.20  22.91  2.05  8.32  10.31    ‐1.20 

Solution  5.95  3.67  0.50  0.00  1.67  12.43  10.02  0.34  2.81  62.61    ‐0.14 

Entrainment  0.32  0.19  0.03  0.00  0.09  0.66  0.53  0.02  0.15  3.32  5.3    

Dried salts  16.82  9.44  0.74  0.00  1.58  26.54  22.38  2.03  8.17  6.99  94.70    

Crystallized salts                       
mineral. 
NaCl  16.83          25.96            45.18 
MgSO4.K2SO4.6H2O 
  5.25      1.38    11.90      6.13    26.04 
(1) 
LiKSO4  (2)    4.19  0.74        10.29          16.08 
MgCl2.6H2O.8B2O3  
        0.20  0.59      4.60  0.89    6.63 
(3) 
Moisture, 11.18 %                          
Total  100 
100  100  100    100  100  99    100      
mineralization, %  (*) 
Schoenite  (2) Lithium schoenite  (3) Boracite   (*) Boron expressed as B2O3  

Table 15.6:  Mineralization of salts from solubility test at 15°C (4th Stage) 

     %  %   %   %   %  Anion‐


   %Na   %K   %Li  %Ca  %Mg  % Cl  SO4  B4O7  H3BO3  H2O   E  Cat Bal 

Wet salts  17.23  9.77  0.42  0.01  1.50  22.59  25.36  2.37  9.79  10.96     ‐0.52 

Solution  5.34  3.24  0.58  0.00  1.75  13.34  7.96  0.16  2.13  65.50     ‐0.14 

Entrainment  0.32  0.19  0.03  0.00  0.11  0.80  0.48  0.01  0.13  3.93  6    

Dried salts  16.91  9.58  0.39  0.01  1.40  21.79  24.88  2.36  9.66  7.03  94.00    

Crystallized salts                                  mineral. 

NaCl  14.13              21.79                 38.21 

Na2SO4x3K2SO4  (4)  0.93  4.77              7.81              14.38 

MgSO4xK2SO4x6H2O     1.35        0.42     3.32        1.87     7.40 


MgSO4xNa 2SO4 
X4H2O  (5)  1.84           0.98     7.71        2.89     14.27 

LiKSO4     2.17  0.39           5.33              8.39 

KB5O8x4H2O  (6)     1.22                    6.19  2.25     10.28 


100 
Total mineralize, %  100  99  100     100  100  97     (**)  100       
(4) Glaserite (5) Astrakanite (6) Hydrated potassium borate (*) Boron expressed as B5O   

  ‐ 80 ‐ 
 

From  the  two  tables  above  (specific  case  of  the  4th  stage),  it  is  noted  that  as  a  result  of  the 
reduction  of  the  temperature  to  15°C  in  the  solubility  test,  the  new  species  glaserite  and 
astrakanite  have  been  formed  in  a  selective  crystallization  process.  A  difference  in  types  of 
crystallized salts was also observed in the other stages of evaporation. 

15.2.3 Phase Diagrams 

The  evolving  path  of  the  Cauchari  brine  during  evaporation  was  plotted  on  a  phase  diagram 
(Janecke projection) for the aqueous five component system (Na+, K+, Mg++, SO4=, Cl–) at 25°C.  
Equilibrium data  for  25°C  were  obtained  from  the  technical  literature.   To  plot  this  path,  it  is 
necessary to express the compositions of the original brine and the liquors from the five stages 
as  %  molar.  Another  calculation  has  also  been  included  in  this  analysis,  where  the  lithium 
concentration has been considered equivalent to magnesium and therefore a total equivalent 
magnesium concentration (MgL) is obtained, as follows: 

%MgL = % Mg + 24.305/ (2*6.941)*% Li. 
 

Figure 15.1:   Evaporation  path  of  Cauchari  brine  based  on  evaporation  at  30°C.    Quinary  system  K, 
Na, Mg, Cl, SO4, H2O, saturated in NaCl at 250C. 

In the above Figure 15.1, six points have been plotted, corresponding to the original brine and 
the mother liquors of each stage of evaporation. The paths from A and B indicate the course 
followed  by  the  Cauchari  brines  subjected  to  isothermal  evaporation  (30°C).  The  line  B  takes 
into consideration the content of lithium in the solution, made equivalent to the Mg ion. It can 
be observed that the initial brine is located in the crystallization field of tenardite, although the 
concentrating  brine  is  saturated  in  this  salt  only  in  the  third  stage.    This  is  due  to  the 
representation in the phase diagram at 25°C, which only approximates the actual conditions.  It 
does  not  consider  the  difference  in  temperature  between  the  two  systems  or  the  effect  of 
other components present in the Cauchari brine such as lithium and boron. 

  ‐ 81 ‐ 
 

Figure 15.2:   Evaporation path of Cauchari brine based on evaporation at 15°C.   
Quinary system K, Na, Mg, Cl, SO4, H2O, saturated in NaCl at 250C. 
 
In  Figure  15.2,  six  points  have  been  plotted,  corresponding  to  the  original  brine  and  the 
saturated solutions at 15°C, generated from the mother liquors and crystallized salts from the 
stages of evaporation at 30°C.  The lines starting from A and B indicate the paths that would be 
followed  by  the  Cauchari  brines  subjected  to  an  isothermal  evaporation  at  15°C.  The  line  B 
takes into account the concentration of lithium in the solution, made equivalent to the Mg ion. 
It  can  be  observed  that  at  15°C  the  initial  brine  is  again  located  in  the  crystallization  field  of 
tenardite,  despite  the  fact  that  the  concentrating  brine  reaches  saturation  in  this  salt  in  the 
third  stage.  Once  again,  as  indicated  for  the  previous  phase  diagram  (Figure  15.1),  this 
divergence from observed results is due to the approximation represented in the diagram. 

15.2.4 Discussion and Conclusions 

Composite brine from Cauchari Salar was concentrated in five stages of isothermal evaporation 
at  30°C.  The  brine  was  concentrated  17  times,  undergoing  a  total  cumulative  evaporation  of 
almost 67%. The lithium content in the final liquor reached 0.57% at 30°C, and a slightly higher 
concentration  (0.61%)  at  15°C.    Evaporation  and  solubility  testing  results  are  favourable  and 
indicate that the brine is likely amenable to ordinary processing.  In addition, there would be an 
opportunity to recover potash which is considered a co‐product of the Project. 

The types of crystallized salts were estimated using both the mineralization method and x‐ray 
diffraction.    Results  from  these  two  methods  did  not  always  coincide  but  both  methods 
indicated  that  a  selective  crystallization  of  salts  is  produced  in  accordance  with  the  levels  of 
magnesium and sulphate present in the brine.  Lithium salts start crystallizing in the third stage 
of evaporation, either at 15°C or 30°C.  

  ‐ 82 ‐ 
 

The solubility tests indicate that the crystallization process is more rapid at 15°C than at 30°C. In 
addition,  other  salts  precipitate  such  as  glauberite,  glaserite,  sodium  lithium  sulphate 
hexahydrate  and  astrakanite.  It  can  be  anticipated  that  at  field  temperatures  (typically  lower 
than 15°C) these salts may begin to crystallize in earlier stages of evaporation. 

Phase diagrams were constructed representing Cauchari brine evaporation (Janecke projection) 
in  an  aqueous  five‐component  system  (Na+,  K+,  Mg++,  SO4=,  Cl–)  at  25°C  (available  in  the 
technical literature).  These diagrams show that the path that the Cauchari brine would follow 
during  evaporation  at  15°C,  is  closer  to  the  phase  diagram  prediction,  because  of  the  high 
sulphate content in the brine. 

Correlations  of  the  density  and  refractive  index  variation  against  the  increase  of  Mg 
concentration, as the brine is evaporated, were determined. A better fit was obtained for the 
refractive index. This property could be used to control evaporation in solar ponds. However, 
this may not be possible since the brine should be treated (with liming) at the beginning of the 
evaporation  process  to  remove  the  magnesium  and  also  to  significantly  reduce  the  sulphate 
content, which favors premature crystallization of lithium salts.  

  ‐ 83 ‐ 
 

16 MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATE 

16.1 Overview 

An inferred in situ resource estimate was developed using the Vulcan three‐dimensional block 
modelling  software.    The  software  was  operated  by  Danilo  Castillo,  a  specialist  in  Vulcan  and 
geostatistics  at  Maptek,  in  Santiago,  Chile.    The  modelling  was  supported  by  geological, 
hydrogeological and geochemical data and interpretations provided by the Project experts.  The 
modelling  procedure  and  results  were  reviewed  in  detail  by  the  independent  QP  and  are 
considered valid and appropriate for development of an inferred resource estimate, as defined 
by the CIM and referenced by NI43‐101. 

The modelling was conducted according to the following steps: 

1. A conceptual geological model was developed to define the broad three‐dimensional zone 
of the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars. 

2. The  conceptual  geological  model  was  discretized  into  a  block  model  within  the  Vulcan 
software. 

3. A series of spatial constraints (e.g., claim boundaries, sampling depths, etc.) were applied to 
the broad geological zone, in order to focus the estimate on the relevant parts of the zone. 

4. The  measured  lithium  brine  concentrations  from  the  RC  Borehole  Program  were  used  to 
discretize a three dimensional concentration field within the block model. 

5. The  porosity  data  from  the  DD  Borehole  Program  were  used  to  estimate  representative 
average drainable porosity values to apply within the block model.  

6. The inferred resource estimate was developed for the focused zone. 

7. An  analysis  was  conducted  to  evaluate  the  effect  of  different  grade  cutoff  values  on  the 
estimate. 

Additional detail is provided in the subsections below.  

LAC  has  advised  the  QP  that  it  is  unaware  of  any  environmental,  permitting,  legal,  title, 
taxation, socio‐economic, marketing or political factors,  which are not already described in section 
3  of  this  Report,  that  may  materially  affect  the  mineral  resource  estimate  contained  in  this 
Report. 

16.2 Conceptual Geologic Model 

A conceptual geologic model of the Olaroz and Cauchari Salars is described in Section 6.4, based 
on geological interpretations, logs from the DD and RC programs (Sections 10.1 and 10.2), and 
seismic  data  from  the  geophysical  program  (Section  9.3).    A  map  of  surface  salar  deposits  is 
shown  in  Figure  6.2  and  an  idealized  section  is  shown  in  Figure  6.3.    To  support  the 
development  of  the  three  dimensional  block  model  within  Vulcan,  a  series  of  geological 

  ‐ 84 ‐ 
 

sections were prepared, based on the conceptual geologic model.  These sections delineate the 
three main salar units described in Section 6.4, namely: 

¾ Upper  Mixed  Sequence  –  This  is  the  surface  unit  in  the  salars.    It  includes  clays,  thin 
evaporite facies (sodium chloride, mirabilite, soda ash, etc.), carbonate facies, ulexite facies 
and the coarse clastic sediments from the alluvial cones encroaching on the salar. 

¾ Thin Bedded Sequence ‐ This unit is at intermediate depth and is composed of thinly bedded 
clay,  silt,  sand  and  evaporite  facies  (mostly  halite  and  gypsum).  This  sequence  is  coarser 
grained than the UMS which is dominated by clay. 

¾ Coarse Bedded Sequence – This is the bottom salar unit.  It has not been fully penetrated by 
the  drilling  conducted  to  date  although  the  maximum  penetrated  thickness  is  substantial 
(224  m  at  DD‐4).    The  lower  boundary  of  this  unit  is  based  on  geophysical  interpretation.  
The CBS consists of thick inter‐layered sand and evaporite (mostly halite) beds. 

In addition to the three salar units described above, the Border Sequence was also represented 
in  the  sections.    This  sequence  is  the  inferred  downward  extension  of  alluvial  and  detritic 
material,  along  the  margins  of  the  salar  basin.    Delineation  of  this  unit  is  primarily  based  on 
geological interpretation (Section 6.4).  The Border Sequence is outside the zone used for the 
inferred resource estimate, and often forms the boundary of the zone. 

16.3 Block Model Construction 

A Vulcan block model was developed to represent the conceptual geologic model, based on the 
cross sections.  The lateral extent of the block model is shown in Figure 16.1, and is similar to 
the  footprint  of  the  salars,  except  that  the  block  model  is  truncated  along  the  major  claim 
boundary in the northwest.  The block dimensions and orientation selected for the model are as 
follows: 

¾ x (east‐west) = 250 m; 

¾ y (north‐south) = 250 m; and 

¾ z (vertical) = 15 m.   

The  stratigraphic  representation  in  the  block  model  is  shown  in  Figure  16.2,  for  an  example 
model section.  The general distribution of the three salar units within the model domain is as 
follows: 

¾ UMS – upper unit; ranges from 0 m to 40 m in thickness; 

¾ TBS – intermediate unit; ranges from 0 m to 176 m in thickness; and 

¾ CBS – lower unit; ranges from 0 m to 500 m in thickness.  

  ‐ 85 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 16.1: Plan view of the block model extent. Marker A‐B indicates the section shown in Figure 16.2. 

  ‐ 86 ‐ 
 

Figure 16.2: Section showing stratigraphy within the block model, at the location shown on Figure 16.1 
(Vertical exaggeration 400:1). 

16.4 Resource Estimate Boundaries 

The following series of spatial constraints were imposed within the model domain, to define the 
final shape for the inferred resource estimate as shown in Figure 16.3: 

¾ Claim  boundaries  –  Areas  outside  the  LAC  claims  (Figure  3.2)  were  excluded  from  the 
resource estimate zone. 

¾ Olaroz Salar – Olaroz was not included in the inferred resource estimate due to the extensive 
lateral gap between boreholes PE‐7 and PE‐5 (12.5 km).  

¾ Southern Cauchari Salar – The southern extent of Cauchari was not included in the inferred 
resources estimate due to lack of drilling data.  Borehole PE‐8 defines the southern limit of 
the estimate area. 

¾ Upper boundary – The upper boundary of the model coincides with the water table. 

¾ Lower boundary ‐ The bottom of the resource estimation is defined by the total depth of the 
boreholes within the estimate zone as follows: PE‐7: 249 m, PE‐6: 165 m, PE‐4: 187 m, PE‐9: 
176 m and PE‐8: 194 m. 

¾ Width – The width of the inferred resource estimate area does not exceed 2 000 m. 

  ‐ 87 ‐ 
 

Figure 16.3: Lateral extent of the inferred resource estimation zone. 

  ‐ 88 ‐ 
 

16.5 Drainable Porosity 

The results of the drainable porosity test work are reported in Section 10.3.   These values were 
conservatively applied to the vertical drilling intersections of each lithological unit to calculate 
average drainable porosity values for each model layer (UMS, TBS and CBS).  Table 16.1 shows a 
summary of the porosity model. 
Table 16.1:  Model layer porosity estimates. 

Upper Mixed Sequence (UMS) 

Drainable Porosity   Drilling Intersection  Model Layer Porosity 


Lithology 
%  (m)  % 

Clay  3  138   

Silt  12  15  5 

Sand  20  8   

Salt (solid halite)  5  4   

Thin Bedded Sequence (TBS) 

Drainable Porosity   Drilling Intersection  Model Layer Porosity 


Lithology 
%  (m)  % 

Clay  3  110   

Silt  12  58  11 

Sand  20  165   

Salt (solid halite)  5  111   

Coarse Bedded Sequence (CBS) 

Drainable Porosity   Drilling Intersection  Model Layer Porosity 


Lithology 
%  (m)  % 

Clay  3  123   

Silt  12  65  15 

Sand  20  597   

Salt (solid halite)  5  169   

The result is that the UMS is assigned a drainable porosity of 5%, the TBS a drainable porosity of 
11% and the CBS a drainable porosity of 15%.   

  ‐ 89 ‐ 
 

16.6 Lithium Distribution 

The methods and results of the brine sampling conducted as part of the RC Borehole Program 
were  described  in  Sections  10.1,  11.4  and  12.3.      760  brine  samples  were  collected  from  the 
nine  RC  boreholes  (PE‐1  through  PE‐9)  at  a  target  vertical  interval  of  one  metre.    These  data 
were incorporated into the block model by calculating the average concentration of all samples 
within the 15 m vertical block interval at a given borehole, and assigning that value to the block.  
Concentrations  were  discretized  throughout  the  model  domain  using  an  inverse  distance 
procedure. 

Lateral lithium distribution within an example layer is shown in Figure 16.4 and example vertical 
distributions are shown in Figure 16.5.  The sections in Figure 16.5 demonstrate the relatively 
homogeneous  and  continuous  grade  distributions  at  depth.    Both  figures  illustrate  the 
distribution  of  higher  grades  in  the  northern  section  of  the  estimation  zone  relative  to  the 
southern section. 

Drift  analysis  was  conducted  to  validate  the  block  model  and  the  use  of  the  inverse  distance 
grid  method  for  discretizing  lithium  distributions.    Figures  16.6,  16.7,  and  16.8  show  a 
comparison  between  lithium  values  assigned  by  the  inverse  distance  method  and  values 
assigned by the “nearest neighbour” (“NN”) method.  This comparison indicates that the model 
lithium grades are a reasonable representation of sampled grades. 

  ‐ 90 ‐ 
 

Figure 16.4:  Lateral lithium distribution in the inferred resource estimation zone of the block model, 
at a model elevation of 3 940 masl; model sections A‐B and C‐D are provided in Figure 
16.5.

  ‐ 91 ‐ 
 

 
 

 
Figure 16.5:    Vertical lithium distributions in the resource estimation zone of the block model 
(vertical exaggeration 1: 400; section locations are shown on Figure 16.4). 

  ‐ 92 ‐ 
 

Figure 16.6: Drift analysis of the block model along the x‐axis. 

Figure 16.7: Drift analysis of the block model along the y‐axis. 

  ‐ 93 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 16.8: Drift analysis of the block model along the z‐axis. 

16.7 Inferred In Situ Resource Estimation  

The results of the inferred in situ lithium and potassium resource estimate are summarized in 
Tables 16.2 and 16.3, respectively.  Table 16.2 shows that the combined inferred resource from 
the  three  model  layers  (CBS,  TBS  and  UMS)  is  926  000  tonnes  of  lithium  metal  or  4.9  million 
tonnes of lithium carbonate. 
 

Table 16.2:  Inferred in situ lithium resource. 

AVERAGE 
  CONCENTRATION  MASS CUMULATED 

PRODUCT  Li (mg/L)  Li (tonne)  Li2CO3 (tonne) 

CBS  570  814 000  4 296 000 

TBS  663  85 000  451 000 

UMS  633  27 000  141 000 

TOTAL  584  926 000  4 888 000 

  ‐ 94 ‐ 
 

Table 16.3 shows that the combined inferred potassium resource from the three model layers 
(CBS, TBS and UMS) is 7.7 million tonnes. 
Table 16.3:  Inferred in situ potassium resource. 

AVERAGE 
  MASS CUMULATED  
CONCENTRATION   

PRODUCT  K (mg/L)  K (tonne) 

CBS  4 740  6 764 000 

TBS  5 470  705 000 

UMS  5 420  229 000 

TOTAL  4 860  7 698 000 

16.8 Cut off Analysis 

An  analysis  was  conducted  to  evaluate  the  effect  of  different  grade  cutoff  values  on  the 
inferred  resource  estimate;  results  are  shown  in  Figure  16.9.    This  analysis  shows  that  the 
resource estimate is not sensitive to any cut off below 400 mg/L.   

6.000.000

5.000.000
Li2Co3 (tonnes)

4.000.000

3.000.000

2.000.000

1.000.000

0
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900
Lithium Cutoff (mg/L)

Li2CO3 tonnage

Figure 16.9:  Lithium resource tonnage as determined by cutoff concentration. 

  ‐ 95 ‐ 
 

17‐ OTHER RELEVANT DATA AND INFORMATION 

Table 17.1 shows a comparison of selected lithium brine resources around the world. 

Table 17.1:  Comparison of selected lithium brine resources. 

      In Situ 
Project Location  Company  County  Resources 
Salar de Atacama1  SCL  Chile  500 000 
Salar de Atacama1  Soquimich  Chile  5 000 000 
Xitai1  Qinghai  China  500 000 
Dongtai1  Qinghai  China  1 300 000 
Zabuye1  Zabuye  China  1 530 000 
Uyuni1  Comibol  Bolivia  5 500 000 
Silver Peak1  Rockwood  USA  100 000 
Salar de Hombre 
FMC  Argentina  850 000 
Muerto1 
Salar de Rincon1  Sentiment Group   Argentina  1 403 000 
Salar de Olaroz  Orocobre  Argentina  282 000 
Salar de Cauchari  LAC  Argentina  926 000 
1.  Information from Roskill (2009). 

  ‐ 96 ‐ 
 

18‐INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS 

Drilling, sampling and geophysical work conducted by LAC on claim properties in the Olaroz and 
Cauchari  Salars  have  supported  the  development  of  this  inferred  resource  estimate.    The 
following broad interpretations and conclusions from this work are as follows: 

¾ The  lithium  and  potassium  resource  described  in  this  report  occurs  in  a  subsurface  brine.  
The  brine  is  contained  within  the  pore  space  of  salar  deposits  that  have  accumulated  in  a 
structural basin. 

¾ A conceptual geologic model has been developed for the basin which includes three primary 
salar units: the UMS, the TBS and the CBS.  The CBS is the most vertically extensive unit and 
has a relatively high porosity.  Consequently, it contains the majority of the resource.  The 
salar  deposits  are  constrained  on  the  sides  of  the  basin  by  alluvium  and  pediment‐type 
deposits, known in this report as the Border Facies. 

¾ The bottom boundary of the resource estimate has been constrained to the depth of drilling 
conducted to date by LAC.  The existing boreholes have not encountered the bottom of the 
basin.  Estimates from individual seismic lines indicate that the basin bottom is between 300 
and  600  m,  depending  on  location.    The  depths  of  the  boreholes  used  in  the  inferred 
resource estimate range  from  176  to  249  m.    Consequently,  the  resource  remains open  at 
depth. 

¾ The north and south lateral boundaries of the resource estimate (i.e., along the longitudinal 
axis of the basin) have been constrained to the central cluster of boreholes drilled to date, 
with relatively high concentrations at either end of this zone.  Consequently, some extension 
of the resource in these directions is possible, based on future drilling. 

¾ The  high  dissolved  solids  content  of  the  brines  are  a  source  of  variability  in  the  existing 
analytical results.  Additional analytical QA/QC refinement should be conducted in advance 
of the next level of estimation.  On balance, however, it is the opinion of the independent QP 
that the existing brine dataset is acceptable for use in an inferred resource estimate. 

¾ Extensive  sampling  indicates  that  the  brine  has  a  relatively  low  magnesium/lithium  ratio 
(lower than three, on average), suggesting that it would be amenable to conventional lithium 
recovery processing.  The brine is relatively high in sulphate which is also advantageous for 
brine processing because the amounts of sodium sulphate or soda ash required for calcium 
removal would be relatively low. 

  ‐ 97 ‐ 
 

19 RECOMMENDATIONS 

19.1  Objectives 

Based on the results of the current inferred resource estimate it is recommended to continue 
the  investigation  of  the  lithium  development  potential  of  the  Cauchari‐Olaroz  Project.    This 
recommended program consists of two main components as follows: 

1. A hydrogeological component to further define the resource estimate and to evaluate 
brine extractability and long‐term aquifer hydraulics.  

2. A metallurgical component to develop a brine process flow sheet and to carry out pilot 
scale process investigations. 

Both components will be carried out in parallel to, in part, support the completion of a Project 
pre‐feasibility study during 2011. 

19.2 Hydrogeological Investigations 

19.2.1: Resource Definition Drilling  

Additional  drilling  will  be  required  to  further  define  the  lithium  resource  of  both  salars.    It  is 
recommended that both RC and DD borehole methods are continued.   It is estimated that 35 
to  40  boreholes  are  required  to  define  the  lateral  extent  of  the  lithium  resource  on  the  LAC 
claims  in  both  salars.    Figure  19.1  shows  the  proposed  borehole  locations  for  the  2010 
definition‐drilling  program.  Drilling  depths  are  projected  up  to  350  m.      Brine  samples  for 
laboratory  analysis  will be  collected  at  selected  intervals  during  the RC  drilling.     Undisturbed 
samples  will  be  collected  from  the  core‐drilling  program  for  geotechnical  analyses  including 
drainable porosity.  On completion of drilling the core holes will be converted into observation 
wells for future brine sampling and water level monitoring. 

19.2.2 Pumping Tests  

Based on the results of the resource definition‐drilling program a pumping test program will be 
carried out to investigate brine extractability and dynamic aquifer behavior.  It is proposed that 
3  to  4  test  production  wells  will  be  drilled  and  completed  to  depths  of  up  to  300  m.    The 
location  of  the  test  production  wells  will  be  finalized  after  results  of  the  resource‐drilling 
program  become  available.    A  number  of  nested  piezometers  will  be  drilled  around  each 
production well to carry out water level monitoring at different levels within the aquifer during 
the tests. 

It  is  proposed  that  pumping  tests  will  be  carried  out  in  each  test  production  well.  These 
pumping tests are to be carried out at a constant rate (25 L/s or more) over a period of 30‐days.  
Groundwater  levels  will  be  monitored  at  specified  intervals  before,  during  and  after  each 
pumping test.  Brine samples will be collected periodically during the pumping tests from each 
test well.  It is expected that the test production well drilling and pumping test program will be 
completed by the end of the fourth quarter of 2010. 

  ‐ 98 ‐ 
 

 
Figure 19.1:  The 2010 drill hole program is designed to increase the confidence level from the 
current inferred in situ resource estimate to a measured in situ resource. 

  ‐ 99 ‐ 
 

19.2.3 Geophysical Surveys 

It  is  recommended  that  the  seismic  tomography  surveys  be  continued  to  help  further  define 
aquifer geometry and help correlate the continuity of hydrogeologic units between boreholes.  
Additional east‐west and north‐south profiles are recommended across both salars.   

19.2.4 Monitoring Programs 

It  is  recommended  that  systematic  monitoring  programs  be  implemented  for  meteorology, 
surface  water  flows  and  chemistry,  groundwater  levels  and  chemistry.    A  database  should  be 
developed and maintained for data storage and analysis.  

19.2.5 Revised Resource Estimate  

The  results  of  the  above  programs  will  be  integrated  and  used  to  prepare  a  revised  resource 
estimate for the Project. The aim is to raise the resource confidence level so that a part of the 
inferred resources may be upgraded to indicated or measured in situ resources.  It is estimated 
that a revised resource estimate could be developed by December 2010. 

19.2.6  Long‐term Aquifer Response  

On  completion  of  the  pumping  test  program  a  three‐dimensional,  multi‐density  fluid  flow 
model will be constructed and calibrated.  The purpose of this flow model will be to evaluate 
the  long‐term  behavior  of  the  aquifer  and  lithium  resource  under  pumping  stresses  and  to 
prepare an estimate of lithium recovery.   The model will also be used to make an assessment 
of boundaries and fresh water or barren brine inflows, and to design the layout of a potential 
future production wellfield.   The model will form the basis for the Project pre‐feasibility study 
and assessment of reserves.   

19.3 Brine Process Development  

According  to  the  chemistry  of  the  Cauchari  brine,  its  high  sulphate  content  favours  lithium 
crystallization in a solar evaporation process. This fact was demonstrated in a simulated solar 
evaporation  test  at  30°C  and  solubility  tests  at  15°C,  carried  out  by  the  University  of 
Antofagasta.  The  precipitation  of  a  lithium  salt  might  begin  at  an  earlier  stage  at  the  Project 
site,  where  temperatures  can  be  much  lower  than  15°C,  particularly  at  night.  However,  any 
crystallization  will  be  governed  by  the  phase  chemistry  at  those  conditions.  Pan  evaporation 
test  work  is  the  approach  generally  used  to  study  the  behavior  of  the  brine  under  the  field 
conditions, aimed at outlining a process flowsheet. 

Although  Cauchari  has  an  Mg/Li  ratio  somewhat  higher  than  Silver  Peak  (2.84  vs.  1.43),  the 
similarity of the chemistry of both brines indicates that, as a preliminary step, the conventional 
lithium  recovery  process  can  be  applied.  In  order  to  optimize  the  pan  test  work,  the  brine 
should  be  pre‐treated  at  the  beginning  of  the  solar  evaporation  stages  to  first  remove  the 
magnesium  as  Mg(OH)2  by  liming  and  also  to  get  a  substantial  removal  of  the  sulphate  ion 
through the precipitation of gypsum by reaction with Ca++. The reduction of sulphate content in 

  ‐ 100 ‐ 
 

the  treated  brine,  which  is  accomplished  in  Silver  Peak,  will  be  possible  because  the  average 
molar ratio, SO4/(Mg+Ca), is much higher than one (2.42).   

The treated brine will feed a set of pans, each three metres in diameter and 60 cm deep. Steel 
is the preferred material of construction since it is difficult to accidentally puncture when the 
salts  are  harvested.  The  pans  will be  operated  in  series  and  on  a  semi‐continuous  basis,  with 
brine transferred one to three times per week, depending on the season, once the pans have 
reached  steady  state.  Lithium  and  boron  as  boric  acid  will  be  the  tracers.  Four  pans  are 
estimated  for  the  salt  section  to  reach  potash  saturation  and  three  for  the  muriate  (KCl) 
section,  where  glaserite  and  boron  salts  could  also  crystallize.  One  or  two  additional  pans 
would allow concentrating the brine to produce lithium concentrations of up to 8 000‐10 000 
mg/L. 

The pan test program is scheduled for at least one calendar year starting in late March or early 
April.  Evaporation  test  pans  may  limit  the  rate  of  experimental  progress  because  of  the  time 
required to get brines up to strength. In addition, it is necessary to know the effects of different 
seasons on the evaporation rates.  This period would be used to train staff. 

It is considered that the pan test work would generate sufficient data for the chemical process 
simulation  in  the  solar  evaporation  ponds  and  the  lithium  carbonate  plant.  Therefore,  it  will 
deliver the basic information for undertaking a Project prefeasibility study in 2011.  

The  next  stage  planned  for  process  development  is  to  start  building  the  pilot  plant  and  small 
solar  ponds  by  September  2010  to  test  the  process  at  pilot  scale.  In  addition  to  the  pre‐
treatment  of  the  Cauchari  brine  to  feed  the  ponds,  the  pilot  plant,  which  should  be  under 
operation  by  early  2011,  would  include  the  last  purification  (basically  boron  removal)  of  the 
lithium‐concentrated brine to be used for the lithium carbonate precipitation, by reaction with 
a  solution  of  sodium  carbonate.  This  stage  will  allow  evaluation  of  the  expected  efficiency  of 
the lithium recovery process.  

Regarding a budget, an estimate for the next six months to set up and operate the test pans, 
including  pretreatment  of  brine,  camp,  power  generation,  infrastructure,  advisors  and  the 
establishment of an own‐certified laboratory would be on the order of USD 2.6 million. From 
September 2010, a process simulation, continuation of the pan test work, construction of small 
solar ponds (at least four of one hectare each), erection of the pilot process plant and building, 
recruitment of engineers and consultants, as well as the operation of ponds and pilot plant and 
preparation  of  a  prefeasibility  study  in  2011  would  require  funding  in  the  range  of  USD  12 
million.

19.4 Budget Estimate 

The  estimated  budget  for  completion  of  the  hydrogeological  investigations  and  the 
metallurgical  testing  is  summarized  in  Table  19.1.    The  total  of  these  two  components  is 
approximately USD 29.6 million without taxes. 

  ‐ 101 ‐ 
 

Table 19.1:  Estimated Budget. 

Item  Estimated cost (USD) 

Resource definition drilling:  9 100 000 

Test production well installations:  1 500 000 

Multi level piezometer installations:  2 100 000 

Laboratory analyses (brine and porosity):  1 000 000 

Geophysics:  500 000 

Site supervision and 3D model 
800 000 
development: 

Evaporation test, laboratory, power:  2 600 000 

Pilot process plant, engineering:  12 000 000 

Estimated total:  29 600 000 

  ‐ 102 ‐ 
 

20 REFERENCES 

Referred to in Report 

¾ APHA,  AWWA,  WEF,  (1998),  Standard  methods  for  the  examination  of  water  and 
wastewater. 20th Ed. Washington. 

¾ Biancho, A.R., Yanez, C.E., Las Precipitaciones en el Noroeste Argentina, 20 Edicion INTA‐EEA 
Salta, 1992 

¾ CIM  Standing  Committee  on  Reserve  Definition,  CIM  Definition  Standards‐For  Mineral 
Resources and Mineral Reserves; 2005 

¾ Cravero, F., Informe de Actividades realizadas en el Salar Cauchari‐Olaroz, Minera Exar S.A., 
LAC Internal Report, 2009a 

¾ Cravero, F., Analisis Mineralogico de los Pozos 5 y 6, Salar de Olaroz.  Comparación con los 
Resultados  de  los  Pozos  3  y  4,  Salar  de  Cauchari.,  Minera  Exar  S.A.    LAC  Internal  Report, 
2009b 

¾ Estudio de Abogados De Pablos. Title opinion. Buenos Aires November 13, 2009. 

¾ Helvaci, C., Alonso, R.N.; Borate Deposits of Turkey and Argentina;a summary and geological 
comparison.  Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences Vol 9, pp1‐27, 2000 

¾ Peralta, E and others; Regional geology in the vicinity of the Olaroz‐Cauchari Salars, 2009 

¾ Peralta, E and others: Local geology of the Olaroz – Cauchari Salars, 2009 

¾ Roskill; The Economics of Lithium, 2009 

Background References 

¾ Esteban  Carlos  Luis.  “Estudio  geologic  y  evapofacies  del  salar  Cauchari,  departamento 
Susques, Jujuy”. Universidad Nacional de Salta, Tesis professional, Salta 2005. 

¾ Freeze R.A., Cherry J.A., Groundwater, Prentice‐Hall Inc, 1979. 

¾ Koorevaar P., Menelik G., Dirksen C., Elements of Soil Physics, Elsevier, 1983. 

¾ Kunaz,  I.,  Cauchari  and  Incahuasi  Argentine  Salars  Assessment  and  Development.  Internal 
report by TRU group for Lithium Americas Corp.; 2009. 

¾ Kunaz,  I.,  Evaluation  of  the  Exploration  Potential  at  the  Salares  de  Cauchari  and  Olaroz, 
Province of Jujuy, Argentina.  Internal report by TRU group for Lithium Americas Corp.; 2009. 

¾ Latin  American  Minerals.  “Informe  de  impacto  ambiental,  etapa  de  exploracion  proyecto 
Olaroz – Cauchari”. 2009. 

  ‐ 103 ‐ 
 

¾ Lic.  Echenique  Mónica,  Lic.  Agostino  Gilda,  Lic  Zemplin  Telma.  “Plan  de  relaciones 
comunitarias”. Jujuy 2009. 

¾ Dr. Nicolli Hugo B. “Geoquimica de aguas y salmueras de cuencas evaporaticas de la Puna”. 
Anal. Acad. Nac. Cs. Ex. Fís. Nat. Buenos Aires, Tomo 33, 1981. 

¾ Schalamuk  Isidoro,  Fernandez  Raúl  y  Etcheverry  Ricardo.  “Los  yacimientos  de  minerals  no 
metalíferos y rocas de aplicacion de la region NOA”. Ministeria de Economía, Subsecretaría 
de Minería, Buenos Aires 1983. 

¾ Autor  desconocido.  “Estudio  geologic‐económico,  mina  La  Yaveña,  departamento  de 


Susques de Jujuy”. Jujuy 2000. 

  ‐ 104 ‐ 
 

22 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL REPORTS ON DEVELOPMENT PROPERTIES 
AND PRODUCTION PROPERTIES 

NOT APPLICABLE 

  ‐ 107 ‐ 
 

23 ILLUSTRATIONS 

ILLUSTRATIONS ARE LOCATED WITH THE BODY OF THE TEXT.  SEE THE LIST OF FIGURES AND 
PHOTOS AT THE BEGINNING OF THIS REPORT.

  ‐ 108 ‐