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THE RISE OF NAZISM IN GERMANY AND

ITS IMPACT ON INTERNATIONAL


RELATIONS

Submitted to:
Dr. Avinash Samal, Dept. of Political Science

Submitted by:
Name: Vaibhav Singh Parihar
Roll No. : 168
Section: B
Semester: 5th

Hidayatullah National Law University, Post


Uparwara, Naya Raipur (Chhattisgarh)
DECLARATION

I, the undersigned, Vaibhav Singh Parihar, student of B.A. L.L.B (Hons.), semester 5 hereby

declare that project work presented in this report is my own work and has been carried out

under the supervision of Dr. Avinash Samal, Faculty, Department of Political Science,

Hidayatullah National Law University.

This work has not been previously submitted to any other university for any examination.

Name: Vaibhav Singh Parihar

Roll No.: 168

Section: B

Semester: V

Date: 16-08-2018
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to express my profound gratitude to Dr. Avinash Samal, Faculty, Dept. of

Political Science at Hidayatullah National Law University, Raipur, for giving me this

opportunity to work on this project. This project wouldn’t have been possible without his

help. He had always been there at my side whenever I needed help regarding any

information. He has been my mentor in the truest sense of the term.

I would also like to express my deepest gratitude and appreciation towards college authorities

and library for extending the resources necessary for project.


CONTENTS

1. Introduction………………………………………………………….01
2. Objectives of study…………………………………………………..03
3. Methodology………………………………………………………….03
4. Chapterization………………………………………………………..04
5. …………..05
6. ……………….11
7. …14
8. Conclusion……………………………………………………………..31
9. Bibliography…………………………………………………………...33
Parihar |1

INTRODUCTION

The driving force of the most important changes in this world have been found less in
scientific knowledge animating the masses but rather in a fanaticism dominating them and in
a hysteria which drives them forward. — Adolph Hitler

The most ominous development after World War I and one of the primary causes of World
War II was the rise of Adolph Hitler in Germany. The Treaty of Versailles helped lead to this
in five ways. First, there was the common belief that Germany had been betrayed, since the
Armistice had been signed before allied troops had reached German soil. Germans, looking
for scapegoats, blamed bankers, Catholics, and especially the Jews. Second, the Treaty of
Versailles angered the German people and destabilized Germany both economically and
politically. Third, the Weimar Republic, which succeeded the Kaiser’s monarchy, was
moderate, but weak, and thus let matters get out of hand. Fourth, the German economy's
over-dependence on American loans caused it to collapse with the Stock Market Crash in
1929. Finally, the Depression, especially with the renewed raising of tariffs, created tense
international relations. All these provided the conditions for Hitler to seize power.

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of this study are as follows:

 To find out the how Nazism spread out in Germany.


 To learn in detail about the impact of spread of Nazism created on international
relations.
Parihar |2

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This project work has been carried out following the descriptive analytical approach. It is
largely based on theoretical study of Decentralization in India. At the same time, efforts have
been made to study the Panchayati Raj System, trace their origins, analyse them from a
neutral point of view and look at their implementation. Books & other references as guided
by faculty of Political Science were primarily helpful for the completion of this project.

CHAPTERIZATION

CHAPTER 1: RISE OF NAZISM IN GERMANY

CHAPTER 2: THE IMPACT CREATED ON INTERNATIONAL


RELATIONS

CHAPTER 3: FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOR RISE OF NAZISM

CHAPTER 4: CONCLUSION
Parihar |3

RISE OF NAZISM IN GERMANY

Adolph Hitler was born in 1889 in Braunau, Austria. His early ambition was to be an artist,
but he failed to gain entrance into Vienna's main art academy. Drawing upon strong anti-
Semitic sentiments already in Vienna, Hitler blamed the Jews for conspiring to keep him
out. He got by as an artist for soap and deodorant ads, having few expenses, since he was
neither married, drank alcohol, or smoked. In 1913, having failed to get into the Austrian
army, he crossed into Germany. Then came World War I.

Hitler served in the German army with distinction, was wounded twice (once by poison gas)
and decorated for bravery. Being a loner, he actually enjoyed the war and the comradeship of
the army, since it gave him a sense of belonging. Therefore, he felt especially disappointed
and betrayed when Germany surrendered in November 1918. The Treaty of Versailles the
next year merely added to this bitterness. Not surprisingly, he conveniently blamed the Jews
for Germany's plight.

After the war, Hitler served as a reservist, spying on political parties to make sure they did
not add to the chaos then besetting Germany. One such party was the National Socialist, or
Nazi, Party. This right wing group attracted Hitler with its racist ideas about a master Aryan
race and the so-called "inferior" races, such as the Slavs and especially the Jews who must be
destroyed. Hitler became the Nazis' seventh member and soon afterwards its leader. He also
found a new talent, speech making, which attracted large audiences and funds to the new
party's treasury.

As disturbing as the Nazi ideas were, they were nothing new or original to European
culture. Persecution and hatred of the Jews went back to the Middle Ages where they were
often resented as moneylenders, accused of such things as the execution of Christ and
conspiring with the Devil to cause the Black Death, and subjected to expulsion from their
homelands and at times even massacres. Even such a revered figure as Martin Luther said
the Jews should be deprived of their property and that:
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“...their synagogues or schools be set on fire, that their houses be broken up and
destroyed...and they be put under a roof or stable, like the Gypsies... in misery and captivity
as they incessantly lament and complain to God about us.”

The idea of an Aryan super-race was also rooted in German philosophy, in particular
Freidrich Neitzsche, whose idea of a new superior type of human ("ubermensch") was easily
taken out of context and narrowly applied by the Nazis to the German people:

“A daring and ruler race is building itself up...The aim should be to prepare a transvaluation
of values for a particularly strong kind of man, most highly gifted in intellect & will. This
man and the elite around him will become the 'lords of the earth'” — The Will to Power

Ordinarily, such ideas would have little appeal in normal prosperous times. However,
conditions in Germany after World War I were anything but normal or prosperous. Political
strife rocked the country as extremists from both the right and left. Notably the Communists,
fought for power. Another problem came as the government printed vast amounts of money
to support a strike against occupying French troops trying to force Germany to pay its huge
indemnity. However, Germany's inability to back up its currency led to a wildly uncontrolled
cycle of inflation. As a result, a single turnip would cost 50 million marks and people
literally burned money for fuel, carted it around in wheelbarrows, and shoveled it out of bank
vaults.

Given these conditions, it is hardly surprising that many Germans were drawn to the idea of
themselves as a super-race that had been treacherously betrayed by "inferior" enemies from
within and without. Therefore, membership in the Nazi party grew rapidly in the early 1920s,
prompting Hitler to try to overthrow the government in 1923. His Putsch, as it was called,
was a total disaster, but the resulting trial earned Hitler a good deal of publicity as a national
hero defending German honor against domestic violence and foreign humiliation.