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LEADERSHIP

DEVELOPMENT
Outcomes & Evidence
Progress Inventory*
MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES
Center for Student Leadership Development
Memorial Union
University of Rhode Island

Name: Amelia Vogel


Date Enrolled:
Date of Graduation: 2022

*The Outcomes & Evidence Progress Inventory is the intellectual property of the Center for Student Leadership Development (CSLD) at the University of Rhode
Island and cannot be reproduced in part, or in its entirety, without the written permission of the acting Assistant Director of the CSLD.

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 1


CONTENTS
ABOUT THE MINOR & CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (information included)
 Center for Student Leadership Development Information
 Minor Information
 Developmental Model

ADVISING INFORMATION (students will include own documentation)


 Tracking Sheet / Advising Updates
 Syllabi of Minor Classes (Core and Electives)
 Internship
o Guidelines
o Syllabus
o Mid-term
o Final

OUTCOMES
 Outcomes (Self-Leadership, Interpersonal and Organizational, Leadership Theories, Inclusive Leadership, Critical Thinking)
 Targeted Classes
 Experiences
 Evidence

CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT


Office: Memorial Union Room 210 Phone: (401) 874-2726 Fax: (401) 874-5317

CSLD Mission Statement


To enhance the mission of the University of Rhode Island, The Center for Student Leadership Development aims to:

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 2


• Provide developmental opportunities for all students to become informed, inclusive, effective, and ethical leaders in the global marketplace through the implementation of learner-centered academic, experiential, and
co-curricular programming.
• Engage in research, assessment, and advancement in order to positively impact the expanding field of leadership studies.

CSLD Vision Statement


The URI Center for Student Leadership Development will promote dynamic strengths-based leadership development through multiple delivery methods to prepare students to be competitive in the work place and global
marketplace. The CSLD seeks to progress as innovators for experiential engagement and enriching assessment.

CSLD Values Statement


Grounded in the Social Change Model of Leadership Development (Higher Education Research Institute), Relational Leadership Model (Komives, Lucas, & McMahon), and Servant Leadership (Greenleaf), the URI Center
for Student Leadership Development values:
• Engaged and experiential learning through a constructivist approach
• Inclusion, Social Justice, and Civic Engagement
• Ethical and Value-based Leadership & Relationship Building
• Innovative Assessment and Presentation Models

MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES


At URI, we are among only a handful of colleges and universities across the country that offers a Minor in Leadership Studies and one that is customized for each student. We utilize a cross-disciplinary approach to
leadership education designed to complement your academic studies. All courses utilize a variety of teaching methods but ultimately include some form of experiential learning, practical application, and reflective
learning. Employers, now more than ever, are seeking candidates with exceptional skills in the areas of interpersonal and group management, problem solving, critical thinking and effective communication. We can help
with all of the above.

GENERAL INFORMATION
 Regardless of your major, you can minor in Leadership Studies.
 Requirements may be satisfied by completing 18 or more credits related to leadership and offered by more than one department.
 Twelve (12) of the 18 credits must be at the 200 level of instruction or above. A course grade of “C” or better must be earned in each graded course. At least 12 of the credits must be earned at URI.
 No course may be used to apply to both the major and minor fields of study. Courses in General Education or for other minors may be used for the minor* (*this does not apply to students in the College of
Business). With the exception of internship credit, all courses for the minor must be taken for a grade. The Introductory class must be taken before the internship and the capstone course.
 Application for the minor must be filed in your academic dean’s office no later than the beginning of the final semester or term.
 Approval of the minor does not guarantee that the suggested courses will be available to you on a schedule correlated with your graduation plans nor guarantee space in any required course.
CORE REQUIREMENTS- 9 Credits
Required Element Class options Notes
Introductory Course HDF 190: FLITE Only offered in spring for first-year students
3 credits or
HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues Offered Fall and Spring for sophomores & juniors

Internship HDF 417: Leadership Internship Requires 40 hours/credit with a min. of 80 hours & a max. of 120 hours of documented internship experience for
3 credits or graded credit
Experience through Office of Experiential Learning & Community Engagement
or
Internship Class in Academic Major The only time the major and minor can overlap

Capstone HDF 412: Historical, Multi-ethnic & Alternative Leadership Offered only in the fall with preference given to seniors
3 credits or
COM 402: Leadership & Motivation Offered in the spring and summer with Dr. Leatham
or
BUS 441: Leadership Skills Development Offered in the fall and spring with Dr. Cooper
or
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HPR 411/412: Honors Senior Seminar
Must be in Honors or have GPA of 3.3

Portfolio HDF 492: Leadership Minor Portfolio Taken last spring semester of enrollment (some exceptions)
1 credit

MINOR ELECTIVES-9 credits


*Additional classes may be appropriate and therefore added to the list; see CSLD for the most updated list or bring a class that you think should be an elective
AAF 300: Civil Rights Movement in the US COM 402: Leadership and Motivation (capstone option) HDF 416: Leadership in Organizations
BUS 341: Organizational Behavior COM 407: Political Communication HDF 417: Leadership Minor Internship
BUS 342: Human Resource Management COM 415: The Ethics of Persuasion HDF 437: Law & Families in the U.S.
BUS 441: Leadership & Motivation (capstone option) COM 421: Advanced Interpersonal Communication HDF 450: Introduction to Counseling
BUS 443: Organizational Design & Change COM 422: Communication and Conflict HPR 118: Honors Course in Speech Communications
BUS 448: International Dimensions of Business COM 441: Race, Politics and the Media HPR 203: The Prepared Mind
BUS 449: Entrepreneurship COM 450: Organizational Communication HPR 412: Honors Seminar (capstone option)
COM 100: Communication Fundamentals COM 461/462: Managing Cultural Differences in Organizations MSL 101: Introduction to Military Leadership
COM 202: Public Speaking CSV 302: URI Community Service MSL 201: Leadership & Military History
COM 208: Argumentation and Debate GWS 150: Introduction to Women’s Studies MSL 201: Military Skills and History of Warfare
COM 210: Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Influence GWS 310: Race, Class, Sexuality in Women’s Lives MSL 202: Leadership & Team Building
COM 221: Interpersonal Communication GWS 350: International Women’s Issues MSL 301: Leadership & Management
COM 250: Small Group Communication HDF 190: First‐Year Leaders Inspired to Excellence (FLITE) (introductory PEX 375: Women in Sport ‐ Contemporary Perspectives
COM 302: Advanced Public Speaking course option) PHL 212: Ethics
COM 308: Advanced Argumentation HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues (introductory course option) PSC 304: Introduction to Public Administration
COM 322: Gender & Communication HDF 291: Rose Butler Browne Program Peer Mentoring Program PSC 369: Legislative Process and Public Policy
COM 351: Oral Comm. in Business & the Professions HDF 412: Historical, Multi‐Ethnic, & Alternative Leadership (capstone option) PSC 504: Ethics in Public Administration
COM 361: Intercultural Communication HDF 413: Student Organization Leadership Consulting SOC300/WMS350: Women and Work
COM 383: Rhetorical Theory HDF 414: Leadership for Activism and Social Change THE 221: Stage Management
COM 385: Communication and Social Influence HDF 415: FLITE Peer Leadership THE 341: Theater Management

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BECOMING A POSITIVE LEADER THROUGH DEVELOPMENT & INVOLVEMENT
Wilson, 1998 (URI Memorial Union / Center for Student Leadership Development)
Revised after the publication of Exploring Leadership: for College Students Who Want to Make a Difference by Komives, McMahon and Lucas, 1998.

You need to have your own act together before you can lead others:

2. Lead Yourself

 Time management
 Organization
1. Know Yourself  Self care
 Self discipline
Lead Others  Strengths  Perseverance
 Weaknesses  Develop and maintain family,
 Values PROGRESS
interpersonal, and intimate relationships
 Needs  Academic, social, personal goals and
P  Styles
R objectives
o Learning
O o Teaching
G o Personality P
R o Membership R
E o Leadership O
S G
RE-EVALUATE R
S
former stages E
as you progress S
4. Develop and Refine
Skills S

 Leadership theory and


practice 3. Broaden Your Perspectives…
 Communication Understand others
 Group Development
 Inclusion  Hierarchy of needs
 Citizen Activist Skills PROGRESS  Racial, cultural, gender, sexual orientation,
 Critical Thinking religious, class, ability, etc. diversity and
 Teaching and Programming commonalities
 Power, privilege, oppression, liberation;
individual and institutional discrimination

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OUTCOMES
In this section, you will track your progress toward the outcomes. Each class in the minor targets different outcomes; all of the classes list these outcomes on the
syllabi (the words “goals” or “curriculum areas” may be used instead). In many of our classes, the assignments can serve as your evidence. Periodically, and not
less than at the end of each semester, you should update your outcomes progress. In the “additional experiences” column, name additional classes or experiences
that contributed to you becoming proficient in that outcome. As the semesters pass, you will think of things from recent semesters and semesters further in the past,
or people or jobs, etc. in your past that also influenced your progress on that outcome. Do not let that ambiguity upset you. Reflecting on development is not a linear
process, but it does help to reflect often. In the “descriptive notes” column, share insights about your growth, lack of progress, successes, stumbling blocks, etc. At
the end of each section, you need to include evidence that supports your development toward the outcomes. Copies of papers, grading sheets, evaluation letters—
anything that shows that someone has determined that you have demonstrated proficiency (or not, or are making progress). Make sure to keep electronic copies of
all of your evidence to include in your Portfolio.

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Outcome Category: Self-Leadership
Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
1. Student will demonstrate autonomy and a
minimized need for approval

2. Student will demonstrate personal,


organizational, and academic examples of
self-discipline
3. Student will demonstrate the ability to
manage emotions
4. Student will demonstrate knowledge of Uri 101 Look at book
stress management methods
5. Student will demonstrate the ability to HDF 190 In HDF 190 I experienced a lot of stress at the end of the semester as a lot of work was piled on and
manage stress due around the same time. I tried and managed my stress by focusing on relaxation techniques such
as taking deep breaths to try to relax and to make a list to plan everything out and when to do it.
Making a list of when everything is due helps to calm me down as I am able to have everything written
down and I can see when it’s due and when it needs to be done by. I use this technique in many of my
other classes to organize my schedule and manage my stress, so I don’t become overwhelmed and
freak out. I take a post it notes, and I take everything that I have to do in my classes and list them there
to so I can see what needs to be done and put it on a place on my desk where I can see it. For HDF we
have all the outcomes and evidence due soon as well as the website and 3 three competencies that go
along with due by the end of the class. On top of all of that I have papers that I need to write for my
other classes that are also due around that time so with all the stress that comes from that, listing
everything helps me focus and knock things off one by one.

Picture of the Post it notes that I use


Evidence #1
6. Student will express a personal code of
leadership / membership ethics
7. Student will demonstrate practice of the
personal code of ethics
8. Student will express a personal values HDF 190 In HDF 190 we took a VIA evaluation which showed us what our top 5 values were. I got honesty which
statement (Sources = VIA, values is the act of being truthful to others and love which is when you value the relations you have with others
clarification exercises, etc.) as well as liking to have close ties with others. I also got the value of kindness which when you are nice
to others and enjoy being able to help and perform good deeds to others. My fourth value is
perseverance and this is when someone finishes what they start and have the drive to be able to get
past obstacles that you encounter. The last value is fairness, and this is when you treat everyone the
same regardless of opinions and bias, you give everyone a fair chance. Using my values, I was able to
create a personal values statement about how I want to be able treat everyone I meet the same and
treat them with the same honesty and fairness that I would want to be treated with. I want to use my
values to help lift people up and make them feel better and like they are important.

My VIA strength
Evidence #2
9. Student will demonstrate practice of the
personal values statement
10. Student will demonstrate the ability to LIB 150 In LIB 150 we had an end of the year project that counted as our final and we had to research a topic
lead a project from start to finish (follow- of interest and create a presentation that would then be able to be shared by the class. This was a long
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through) project that stretched over the span of a couple months and had many different elements that needed
to be submitted at different times. I showed that I was able to follow through on the project by never
stopping or giving up, I gave a 100% effort in what I did. I met every deadline for the different written
assignments that were due, and I made sure that I lead the project in the right direction. When
researching I went through different databases and looked up information that could aide me in my
search and in the end, I was able to pull together a presentation. When it came time to present, I had
done all the work and lasted all the months and was able to talk about what I researched and inform
the audience.

Picture of project or rubric


Evidence #3
11. Student will describe goals and objective CCJ 274
statements regarding personal issues,
career issues, and community issues
12. Student will show evidence of goals and
objectives that were planned and
achieved
13. Student will show knowledge of the
“Hierarchy of Needs” theory by Maslow
14. Student will show application of Maslow’s
theory to own life
15. Student will show knowledge of the theory
of Superleadership by Manz & Sims
16. Student will show application of Manz &
Sim’s theory to own life
17. Student will describe StrengthsQuest HDF 190 In HDF 190, we took and evaluation to see what out top strengths were and my top five where
Signature Themes, shadow side of developer, includer, competition, strategic and positivity. Developer is the ability to be able to help
Strengths and/or weaknesses, and people reach their goals and develop them to a point where they can go out and achieve them. It’s to
examples of application (Source = Gallup) be able to help people when needed and lead them in the right direction. I use my developer strength
when I am helping people overcome their fears or help them reach a desired goal; I am there to
support them and push them when needed so they can achieve what they want. My includer strength
is how no one is to feel left out, and everyone feels like they have a part or say in whatever activity or
group that they are in. We want them to feel included and important. In group projects and activities
this strength comes out because I want everyone to feel included and have a part to play. Competition
is my drive to always do well and be the best at something that I can be. It’s my no quit mindset and
how I don’t give up on things that I start and follow through with them. This shows when I am
completing projects or playing sports; I want to be the best that I can be and when I do something that I
feel could’ve been better makes me feel bad and like I didn’t give my all. My strategic skill is my ability
to be able to organize things such as my work load and days and allows me to come up with plans in
the moment and in advance. I use this skill very often because I like to plan out when I have to leave to
get places and what time I should leave to be able to get there by a certain time. It also helps with
projects when trying to plan out what to do and how it’s going to be done. This skill came in handy
during our social change project when we were trying to figure out what we were going to do and how
to accomplish it. My last strength is positivity, and this is my ability to stay upbeat and carry around a
positive attitude to help put others in a good mood and lighten the atmosphere. I try to use this strength
when things are tense between people and lighten up their moods and the room by telling jokes and
being positive and happy.

Gallup strengths
Evidence #4

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18. Student will describe personal leadership
style and/or personality style including
strengths and weaknesses and examples
of application (Sources = Leadership style
inventories, the L.P.I., Type Focus
(MBTI), LAMP, DISC, and other career
inventories, etc.)

Outcome Category: Leadership Theories


Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
19. Student will show knowledge of the
“Authority and Bureaucracy” theory of
leadership Weber
20. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Weber)
21. Student will show knowledge of the
“Scientific Management” theory of
leadership by Taylor
22. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Taylor)
23. Student will show knowledge of the
“Management by Objectives” theory of
leadership by Drucker
24. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Drucker)
25. Student will show knowledge of “Theory
X and Theory Y” theory of leadership by
MacGregor
26. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (MacGregor)
27. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190 we talked about how servant leadership is the need/want to serve others and how servant
“Servant Leadership” theory of leadership leader is a servant first. It is the natural feeling of putting others and their needs before yourself. This
by Greenleaf model was coined by Robert Greenleaf and has 10 characteristics that explain and relate to servant
leadership. The first characteristic is listening, and this is making sure that you listen to what others
think and feel and use that to be able to communicate with them. The second characteristic is empathy,
this is when you’re able to empathize with others and be there to understand and help them when
needed. The third characteristic is healing, this is when you’re able to communicate and bond with a
person as well as help heal them when they are upset or hurt. The fourth one is awareness, and this is
relating to how you must be aware of others and their situations to be able to better help them and
yourself. Persuasion is the fifth characteristic, and this is when you have the ability to convince and
sway others in a certain direction or towards a certain idea. The sixth characteristic is
conceptualization, this is where one helps another person realize and reach their dreams and can push
themselves to think beyond the “day to day realities”. The seventh characteristic is foresight, and this is
when someone is able to see a different outcome to situations by using what they have learned in the
past to help them. The eight one is stewardship, and this is a commitment to serving others and being
someone that others can trust. The ninth characteristic is commitment, and this is being committed to
the growth of others and being able to help them grow and be the best person that they can be. The
final characteristic of the model is building community, and this is when you bring others together and
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help the form the groups and relations/ties that will help shape their lives.

Greenleaf, R. K. (1991). The servant as leader. Indianapolis, IN: Robert K. Greenleaf Center
Evidence #5
28. Student will describe personal application Best Buddies On campus one of my involvements is participating in Best Buddies. I can apply the servant leadership
of the above theory (Greenleaf) model to my role as being a peer buddy. I listen to my best buddy Nicole by hearing what she has to
say and make sure that I am there for her when she needs to talk. We talk at least once a week and
message each other often talking about what’s going on in our lives. I am there for her when she wants
to complain about her problems, and I am someone that she can confide in and talk to when she’s
feeling down. I am able to empathize with Nicole about her problems and understand what she is going
through as well as be there to help her get through her problems. My stewardship shows in my
commitment to being there for Nicole and the goal of best buddies in giving her experiences and
opportunities that she may not have otherwise and making her feel like she is valued. I’m building a
community between Nicole and I as we have formed ties and a relationship that will last as for the rest
of our lives. We became friends and have become able to rely on each other and be there to support
and hang out with one another. My commitment to my friendship to Nicole is shown through the
constant phone calls that we make each to each other and the outings that we have once a month. We
have gone to get dunking donuts as well as gotten Chinese food and falafel. May 1st to celebrate the
end of the school year and to see each other before school ends, we are going out to olive garden to
hang out.

Picture of me out with Nicole


Evidence #6
29. Student will show knowledge of the
“Principle Centered Leadership” theory by
Covey
30. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Covey)
31. Student will show knowledge of the “14
Points / TQM” theory of leadership by
Deming
32. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Deming)
33. Student will show knowledge of the
“Visionary Leadership” (now often cited
as “Transformational Leadership”) theory
by Sashkin
34. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Sashkin)
35. Student will show knowledge of the
“Individuals in Organizations” leadership
theory by Argyris
36. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Argyris)
37. Students will demonstrate knowledge of In HDF 190, I learned how the 4-V model of ethical leadership by Bill Grace is “the framework that
the “4 V’s” theory of leadership by Grace HDF 190 aligns our internal beliefs and values with our external behaviors and actions for the purpose of
(Center for Ethical Leadership) advancing the common good” (Grace). The four V’s in this model are values, virtues, vision, and voice;
additional key elements to this model are service, polis, and renewal. Values is when we understand
and know our core values and how we use our values in the choices that we make. Vision is our ability
to be able to complete actions and services to others without any real plan or idea of what we need to

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do or what it’s going to be. The V virtue is practicing the idea of good and bad and trying to do what is
good or bad to help create and develop our idea of virtue. The last V voice is the way that we use out
voice in showing and explaining our visions and ideas to others. The element service ties into vision
and values and how when we provide services or acts to others our values when showing visions and
ideas are tested and how we can use them in helping others. Polis is the way of how we engage in the
community and politics when we are using our 4 v’s, it’s the way that we are included and interact in
society. Renewal is when we start a new and break away from what we have been doing to create a
fresh start and new way to portray and show our 4 V’s.

Center for Ethical Leadership. (2007). The four –v model. Retrieved from
http://www.ethicalleadership.org/philosophies/ethical-leadership
Evidence #7
38. Student will describe personal application HDF 190 In HDF 190, we made a leadership crest based off of the four V’s model and our values and virtues. My
of the above theory (Grace) values where ones of honest, kindness, love, perseverance, and fairness and that tied into my vision of
treating everyone with kindness and love and giving them a chance to show who they are before I
make opinions. My virtues are both courage and humanity as that is where my values fall into and that
are the act of not being afraid to stand out and try new things and being kind and loving towards others.
Being someone that others can rely on. My voice for the crest is that I want to be able to encourage
others any way I can and be someone that they can talk to and rely on to help them reach their goals.

The crest
Evidence #8
39. Student will show knowledge of the
“Situational Leadership” theory by Hersey
& Blanchard
40. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Hersey & Blanchard)
41. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190, we learned about the Relational Leadership model created by Komives, McMahon and
“Relational Leadership” model by Lucas, is about relationships and is defined as a relational process of people together attempting to
Komives, McMahon & Lucas accomplish change or make a difference to benefit the common good and it has three basic principles
and five different components. The first principle is knowing, you must know yourself, know the
different ways that people are and the way that things can change before you can help others. The
next principle is being, you have to act open, caring, ethical, inclusive and have principles with the
others around you. The last principle is doing, in order to do this, you have to be able to act in a socially
responsible way, as well as being an active member of the community and groups that you are in.
There are five components that help make us this model and on of them is purposeful. Being
purposeful means having a commitment to a person, goal, or activity as well as being able to
collaborate with those around you. You also want to be able to create the positive change that you
want to see and be able to work hard to achieve it. The next component is being inclusive. This is when
someone is understanding to people of race, ethnicity and sex, they don’t leave people out. The third
component is empowering, and this is when every person is empowered no ifs, ands, or buts.
Empowerment has two different dimensions to it, the one where the sense of self claims ownership and
one where it is shared with others. The fourth component of this model is being ethical. This is when a
person is driven by their values and morals when leading and helping others. The last part of the five
components is being process oriented and this is when someone focuses on how the group went about
completing a task and reaching a goal and how involved everyone is.

Komives, S. R. (2013). Exploring leadership: for college students who want to make a difference. Third
edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Evidence #9

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42. Student will describe personal application Best Buddies Relational Leadership is shown in the organization that I am a part of called best buddies, because
of the above theory (Komives et al) they show/portray the five components necessary of the model. Best buddies and the people in it show
inclusiveness through not discriminating or making our best buddies feel bad just because they may be
different and have different ways of processing thing against and have physical or mental disabilities.
One of my strengths is inclusive and this ties into the model because I like to include people in
activities, and I make sure that I always have time to call and hang out with my buddy as well as make
sure she feels like she is wanted and belongs. Best Buddies empowers the buddies and puts them and
their needs first, making sure that they feel welcomed and happy before worrying about themselves.
We help make them feel like included and appreciated as well as giving them the experiences and
friendships that they might not have. Everyone in this group who has a buddy is also purposeful and is
committed to making time for their buddy and making sure they talk to them once a week and meet up
with them once a month. We want to make them feel like they are special and important. The
organization did a campaign to help eliminate the word retarded from people vocabularies because it
hurts the people who are mentally challenged/disabilities because they know what it means. This can
relate to ethics because we go by what we believe is right and wrong and calling someone the word
retard is offensive and mean. So, we set up a booth in the memorial union and told people what our
campaign was about having a commitment to the goal we made. This relates to my values of kindness
and fairness because I believe that you should be kind to people and fair and it isn’t fair to disabled
people and our buddies to get called mean words over things that they don’t have control over. They
should be able to be treated and live like any other person. The organization is process oriented
because the chairs/leaders of the group make sure that we are completing the tasks necessary to be a
peer buddy and complete our goals.

Email about signing up for campaign


Evidence #10
43. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190 we learned about the concept constructivism, coined by John Dewey, and how it is a basic
concept of constructivism theory about how people learn, that is based on observation and scientific study. This model says that
people construct their own thoughts and knowledge of the world through experiences and then
reflecting on those experiences. We use information that we already know to help process the
information that is being learnt; as a result, the new ideas/knowledge can change what we previously
knew or thought to be true. The concept of constructivism says that individuals are the creators of their
own knowledge and how they view it and therefore we must as questions and research more into what
we know and what we want to know. Constructivism can be transferred into the classroom and with
teaching others. It focuses on the big concepts and ideas, giving the whole then going off and
explaining the smaller parts. Constructivism in the classroom wants students to be interested and ask
questions as that’s how they concept says they learn best. Knowledge is seen as a dynamic thing and
changes as our experiences grow.

Educational Broadcasting Corporation. (2004). Constructivism as a paradigm for teaching and learning.
Retrieved from http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index.html
Evidence #11
44. Students will describe personal examples
of implementing constructivism
45. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Experiential Learning Model (Kolb)
46. Student will describe personal application
of the Experiential Learning Model (Kolb)
47. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190 we learned about the social change model and how social change addresses the root of
“Social Change Model of Leadership the problem, is a collaborative effort and never simple. The assumptions of the social change model
Development” by Astin et al are that leadership is socially responsible, it impacts change on behalf of others and is value based. It
is also thought that leadership is a process, not a position and is about collaboration and community
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 12
involvement. In this model there are seven C’s for change, and they are consciousness of self,
congruence, commitment, collaboration, common purpose, controversy with civility and citizenship.
These are factors that help make the model fall into three different categories; individual values, which
are the consciousness of self, congruence and commitment, group values, which are collaboration,
common purpose, and controversy with civility, and finally there is society/community values which is
citizenship. Citizenship is what call for people to see themselves as something bigger than just
themselves and be a larger part of a whole. Collaboration is when people work together, sharing
responsibility and authority when achieving common goals. Common purpose is the act of having
collective goals, vision, and values among a group. The C that is controversy with civility is about how
disagreements and fights are inevitable however, they allow for different opinions to be heard and
brought to light. Consciousness of self is the awareness of your own personal beliefs, values and
attitudes and having an open mind. Congruence is being able to back up what you are talking about
and show that you aren’t all just talk. Finally, commitment, this is where your involvement and
investment of time is shown, you follow through with your action and ideas and don’t give up when
things get hard.

Komives, S.R., Wagner, W., & Associates. (2009). Leadership for a better world: Understanding the
social change model of leadership development. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Evidence #12
48. Student will describe personal application Social Change Project HDF 190 In HDF 190 we had a social change project where a group of people had to go out and complete and
of the above theory (Astin et al) activity that provides social change. My group did a beach clean and we all went out one night and
spent about an hour walking around and picking up trash off the beach. We believed that this was
social change but after learning about the social change model, we found out that just cleaning up the
beach once wasn’t social change. It didn’t address the root of the problem which is people littering or
even farther the plastic that factories use to make the objects that people litter with. We talked about
that if it was really to be social change there wouldn’t be an easy fix and it would have to be something
that we invest a long period of time in to help make that difference. We did a piece of what could lead
to social change and helped bring awareness to the problem when people saw us with bags full of
trash but there is more that needs to be done. While it wasn’t social change in its entirety, we still have
pieces of the model that played a role in our project. We had a common purpose among our group and
that was our goal to go out and clean up the beach. Our consciousness of self was show when we
knew what we believed in and what we were trying to achieve and had an open mind about accepting
new possibilities. If we were to continue with this project or if it had been going on since the beginning
of school, we would have had weekly cleaning trips as well as put up signs and contact people to help
fix the problem. Our group showed our commitment through following through with the dates and times
that were set and made sure that they showed up and did their part in the beach cleanup; which paired
with our collaboration of us all getting together and working together to make the beach a cleaner
place.

Our Powerpoint.
Evidence #13
49. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Leadership Identity Development
Model” by Komives et al
50. Students will describe personal
application of the above theory. (Komives
et al)
51. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
the Strengths-Development Model by
Hulme et al

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 13


52. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Hulme et al)
53. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
behavior theories of leadership from
Michigan and Ohio State
54. Student will describe personal application
of the above theories (Michigan & Ohio
State)
55. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Charismatic leadership
56. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
57. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
contingency approach to leadership by
Fiedler
58. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Fiedler)
59. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Path-Goal theory by House
60. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (House)
61. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leader Member Exchange (LMX) theory
by Dansereau, Graen & Haga; Graen &
Cashman; Graen
62. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Dansereau, Graen &
Haga; Graen & Cashman; Graen)
63. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leadership Substitutes Theory
64. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
65. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Models of leader emergence
66. Student will describe the impact of traits
on leadership emergence and
performance
67. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Chaos approach to leadership by
Wheatley
68. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Wheatley)

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 14


Outcome Category: Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and its Application to Leadership

Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
69. Student will demonstrate how cultural
anthropology / paradigms relate to
leadership
70. Student will describe personal example
of using cultural anthropology /
paradigms as a leader
71. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Cycles of Socialization” (Harro)
theory and its uses in leadership
72. Students will demonstrate personal
application of the “Cycles of
Socialization” (Harro)
73. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Cycles of Liberation” (Harro) theory
and its uses in leadership
74. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the “Cycles of Liberation”
(Harro)
75. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Configuration of Power” (Franklin)
and its relationship to leadership
76. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the “Configuration of
Power” (Franklin)
77. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
racial identity development (Cross &
Fhagen-Smith; Rowe, Bennett &
Atkinson; Ferdman & Gallegos; Kim;
Horse; Renn etc.)
78. Student will demonstrate personal
application of model(s) of racial identity
development above
79. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
models related to gender / identity /
gender identity development (Lev;
Bussey; Bussey & Bandura; Bilodeau;
Gilligan; Belenky et al; etc.)
80. Student will demonstrate personal
application of model(s) of gender identity
above
81. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
additional social identity development
model(s): Sexual ID, Faith & Spirituality,
Disability, Social Class (Dillon et al;
Fowler; Parks; Astin et al; Peek; Smith;
Johnstone; Gibson; Forber-Pratt &
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 15
Aragon; etc.)
82 Student will demonstrate personal
application of additional social identity
development model(s) above
83. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
McIntosh’s theory of privilege and its
relationship to leadership
84. Student will demonstrate personal
application of McIntosh’s theory
85. Student will describe the differences and
similarities of individual and institutional
oppression and relationships to
leadership (Source = Three Dimensional
Matrix of Oppression)
86 Student will demonstrate knowledge of
relevant laws and policies related to
issues of equity and its relationship to
leadership (i.e., Title IX, Affirmative
Action, Protected Classes, etc.)
87. Student will show knowledge of effective
leadership as it relates to change agency
88. Student will describe personal examples
of being a change agent
89 Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Model of Intercultural Sensitivity” by
Bennett and its uses in leadership
90. Students will demonstrate personal
application of the “Model of Intercultural
Sensitivity” by Bennett
91. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the ally Action Continuum by Griffin &
Harro
92 Student will demonstrate personal
application of the Action Continuum by
Griffin & Harro
93. Student will show knowledge of the
Multicultural Organizational Development
Model (Jackson)
94. Student will show personal application of
the Multicultural Organizational
Development Model (Jackson)
95. Student will show knowledge of the
Multicultural Change Intervention Matrix
(Pope)
96. Student will show personal application of
the Multicultural Change Intervention
Matrix
97. Student will create a personal code of
inclusive leadership

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Outcome Category: Critical Thinking

Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
98. Student will show knowledge of principles CCJ 230 In CCJ 230 we talked about fallacies and how they can relate to crime and the different patterns as
of critical thinking and fallacies (logic is well as the reasons behind committing crimes. We talked about how fallacies are mistaken or
used in this minor) unsound arguments that can relate to a situation. In this class we talked about multiple fallacies such
as the innocent youth fallacy, which is where people believe that young kids are innocent and if they
commit a crime it’s because they were corrupted. There was also the cops and courts fallacy, which
stated that having more police is the key to controlling crime; which shows that it is a fallacy because
it has been prevent that police can’t control crime, they help prevent it. We used what we knew about
fallacies and crime that we learned in our CCJ 230 class and applied it to our assignments and
quizzes using critical thinking. There would be scenarios/ situations and we would have to decide
what fallacies went with it and then explain why. This shows critical thinking because it ties our
knowledge of what we learned and applies it to the situation to help decide what fits best. We would
have to provide examples of explanations about what we chose and why it fits with the scenario.

Copy of the notes from CCJ


Evidence #14
99. Student will demonstrate proficiency of CCJ 274 In CCJ 274 we use critical thinking in the essays that we write, having to use what we have learned to
critical thinking decide a result or decision based on a scenario. CCJ 274 is part of the criminal justice major and we
learn about the correction facilities and the job and guidelines that police and correctional officers
abide by. We have essays that we have to complete, and we get a prompt based on something that
has to do with criminal justice system and we need to use what we know and apply it to the prompt to
develop a thorough and complete essay. One of the essays that we had was based off a video of a
cop pulling over someone and arresting them. I had to use what I learned about Miranda rights and
the rules that went into making an arrest. By using all my resources, I was able to go deep into
explanation and thought about what I thought on the topic.

Essay #2
Evidence #15
100. Student will show knowledge of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
101. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
102. Student will show knowledge of at least five
decision making methods
103. Student will describe personal examples of
having used five decision making methods
104. Student will show knowledge of at least five
problem solving / conflict management
methods, as well as understanding the
roots of conflicts
105. Student will describe personal examples of
having used five problem solving / conflict
management
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 17
106. Student will demonstrate the ability
to synthesize multiple knowledge
perspectives (course work), competencies
(communication, writing, information
literacy or mathematical/statistical skills)
and responsibilities (global, diversity &
inclusion or civic knowledge)
107. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
leadership that is used in crisis (i.e., James
& Wooten; Garvin; Covey; Frohman;
Lalonde; Schoenberg; Joni; Braden et al;
etc.)
108. Student will describe examples of
leadership in crisis situations (i.e.,
application of James & Wooten; Garvin;
Covey; Frohman; Lalonde; Schoenberg;
Joni; Braden et al; etc.)

Outcome Category: Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts & Skills

Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
109. Student will demonstrate knowledge of HDF 190 In HDF 190 we learned about active leadership which is the act of showing your active participation in
active listening techniques conversations and that you are taking in what others are saying. The goal of active listening is to
project your interest of the subject as well as maintain the conversation and encourage the speaker to
continue talking by showing that you are paying attention to what they are saying. You want to clarify
what they are saying by stating specific questions that relate back to the speaker’s main ideas and
thoughts. Using phrases such as; can you clarify that and so in other words what you’re saying is…
and wording like that to show that you are listening and that you want to know more about the subject.
You want to be non-committal, neither agreeing or dis agreeing with what is being said, saying things
such as uh huh, I see, and that’s interesting while they are speaking to show your attentiveness. You
summarize what they said and use the main ideas to go off and delve more into the conversation and
feelings of the participants.

Active listening chart


Evidence #16
110. Student will describe examples of using HDF 190 Retreat: Day of Discovery At the HDF 190 retreat, during the Day of Discovery, I practiced active listening and used my skills by
active listening skills showing that I was listening to what people were saying and repeating the question to make sure I
understood it before asking a question relating to that. I took in what people were saying and even if I
didn’t respond to all the question, I made sure that I internalized it and showed I was listening by
nodding my head or having my attention on the person speaking. During the retreat we were put in our
groups and discussed deep and intense topics where our active listening came into play. My group
showed their active listening skills by asking questions such as; how does that make you feel? and
what do you think that you’ve learned from that experience? to help strengthen the conversation and
show they were paying attention. They made sure that their attention was on the person that was
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 18
speaking and showed their active listening by nodding their heads along to what the speaker was
saying.

Paper from the retreat


Evidence #17
111. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
functions of group communication by
Hirokawa
112. Student will describe personal application
of functions of group communication
(Hirokawa)
113. Student will show knowledge of techniques
regarding giving and accepting of feedback
114. Student will describe examples of giving
and accepting feedback.
115. Student will show knowledge of the 7D
coaching model (Knott)
116. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the 7D Model (Knott)
117. Student will show knowledge of elements
of a Crucial Conversation and steps to
maintain dialogue and move to action
(Patterson, McMillian & Switzler)
118. Student will describe examples of
engaging in a Crucial Conversation
119. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
facilitation techniques
120. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
facilitation techniques
121. Student will demonstrate knowledge of de-
briefing techniques
122. Student will demonstrate proficiency of de-
briefing techniques
123. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
framing based on psychology and its use in
group facilitation
124. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
framing based on psychology and its use
in group facilitation
125. Student will demonstrate knowledge the
four frames of organizations, and the
meaning of reframing by Bolman and Deal
126. Student will describe personal application
of organizational analysis using the four
frames of organizations, and breaking the
frame / reframing (Bolman and Deal)
127. Student will show knowledge of organizing
meetings / setting agendas / and leading
meetings
128. Student will describe personal examples of
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 19
organizing meetings / setting agendas /
leading meetings
129. Student will show knowledge of
Parliamentary Procedure
130. Student will show knowledge of techniques
for working with difficult people
131. Student will describe personal examples of
using techniques to work effectively with
difficult people
132. Student will show knowledge of the stages HDF 190 In HDF 190 we learned about Tuckman’s stages of group process and this is the different stages that
of group development (Tuckman/Tuckman group go through from when they form to when they adjourn and what each stage means. The first
& Jensen, Bennis or others) stage of the model is forming, and this is when the group first forms. The members don’t really know
each other and aren’t quite sure what the goal or purpose of the group is yet. They haven’t learned to
trust each other yet and may not be committed to the team. After you start to become adjusted to your
group members the group moves onto the next phase. The second stage is the storming phase, and
this is when arguments and disagreements break out among the members and agendas are displayed.
There is high competition and splinters form within the group. This stage can make or break a group
causing them to either grow stronger or to split up and cease being a group. The third stage that
groups can enter is called norming. Norming is when success occurs, and the team becomes closer
together as well as have more commitment from all members. There is a higher level of trust and there
are no more hidden agendas. The fourth stage of Tuckman’s model is performing, and this is the act of
moving from the “I” mentality to the “we” mentality. The group in this stage has high trust and openness
and they feel motivated and have superior team work. The fifth and final stage of the model is
adjourning, and this is when the group members depart ways after a final assessment. The group
recognizes members for their contributions, and they celebrate their time together.

Tuckman’s Model Sheet


Evidence #18
133. Student will describe personal examples of HDF Peer groups In HDF 190 our peer group went through many of the different stages of Tuckman’s theory. When we
group development in use first came together and were in the forming stage and exhibited characteristics such as we weren’t
(Tuckman/Tuckman & Jensen, Bennis or used to each other and we didn’t have trust in each other or a common goal. We were just starting to
others). get to know each other and become used to hanging around and working with each other. We later on
transitioned into the norming stage where we started gaining trust in each other and were learning
about how to reach towards a common goal. We had significantly more commitment to the group than
we originally did when we first formed and there was a less likely chance of hidden agendas being
formed or shown. Our first show of storming occurred when we were trying to figure out how to
complete our social change project and what we were going to do. We showed signs of slight distrust
and created many arguments among the members of the group as there was a problem in figuring out
a day and time that everyone could do. Storming also came into play in our group development when
we were creating out PowerPoint and presentation as everyone was becoming stressed and had
troubles coming into an agreement of what should be on it and what shouldn’t. Despite the storming
that occurred we feel that it brought us closer together and created a higher form of trust between each
member that helped push us to the performing stage. In our performing stage our group has high trust
in each other and high collaboration and efficiency within the group in completing goals. As we are
closing in on the end of the class, we will be nearing the adjourning stage where we celebrate our time
together and start to separate and go our own ways.

Picture from beach clean-up


Evidence #19
134. Student will show knowledge of group roles
and how they contribute to group dynamics
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 20
(Johnson & Johnson; Benne & Sheats;
Knowles & Knowles; etc.)
135. Student will describe personal examples of
group roles and how they contribute to
group dynamics (Johnson & Johnson;
Benne & Sheats; Knowles & Knowles; etc.)
136. Student will show knowledge of effective
memberships skills in groups
137. Student will describe personal examples of SOC 100, LIB In SOC 100 I learned the importance of membership skills because we have group tests and need to
membership skills in use 150 apply the skills of actively participating and working with group members effectively. My friend Katie in
the class and I are partners for when we had tests in the class. When it came time to complete the test,
we would organize a time that we could get together, and it would work for both of us. We would go to
a lounge and sit down putting all distractions away and discussed what we believed the right answers
where and why we thought the answer was right. No one person did all the work, we both participated
and talked about our opinions and knowledge as well as using the materials that were available to us
such as out notes. It is important in a group that everyone does the work and participates in the
conversation and work. I showed this when I participated and made sure that I didn’t sit back and make
my partner do all the work. In the end because we both participated and gave equal effort; we were
able to get an A on the test. In LIB 150 there was a group project where we had to research a database
and say what the uses of it was. In the beginning of the project we created a group ground rules where
we stated what we expected of each other and what each member needs to do. We showed our
membership skills by making sure that everyone did their work and participated when we split up the
work. Even though we split up what each person was doing we still talked about everything together
and bounced ideas and thoughts off each other. We organized times to meet and set deadlines for our
group to make sure that we got our work done and everyone did their part. At the end of the project
because we worked together and talked about what we did, we were able to give and effective speech
and turn in a detailed and completed project.

LIB group project rubric


Evidence #20
138. Student will show knowledge of the
Challenge and Support theory by Sanford,
and its relationship to organizations
139. Student will describe personal examples of
using the theory of Challenge and Support
(Sanford)
140. Student will show knowledge of the
construction / elements of informative and
persuasive speeches
141. Student will demonstrate proficiency in
informative and persuasive public speaking
142. Student will show knowledge of planning
and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)
143. Student will describe personal examples of
planning and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)
144. Student will show knowledge of preparing
for and effective answers in interviews (as
the interviewee)

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 21


145. Student will describe personal examples of
preparing for and being interviewed
146. Student will show knowledge of effective
collaboration / coalition building (Sources:
Cilente/Komives et al; NCBI; etc.)
147. Student will describe personal examples of
working in collaboratives/coalitions
148. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
techniques to communicate and engage in
difficult dialogues related to diversity and
inclusion.
149. Student will demonstrate proficiency in
communicating and engaging in difficult
dialogues related to diversity and inclusion.
150. Student will describe ways to maintain
accountability in leadership / member
relationships
151. Student will describe personal examples
related to maintaining accountability as a
leader
152. Student will describe ways to build
relationships between leaders and
members
153. Student will describe personal examples of
building relationships with members as a
leader
154. Student will describe how credibility applies
to leadership, as well as the characteristics
and skills of a credible leader
155. Student will describe personal examples of
building, maintaining, and repairing his/her
own credibility as a leader
156. Student will describe ethical standards in
influence
157. Student will describe influence applies to
leadership
158. Student will describe principles of effective
mentoring, as well as problems particular
to the mentoring relationship
159. Student will describe personal examples of
mentoring and being mentored
160. Student will describe principles of effective
peer leadership, as well as problems
particular to peer leadership
161. Student will describe personal examples
related to being a peer leader and being
led by peers

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 22