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Results-Based

Performance
Management
System

MANUAL
for Teachers and School Heads
Your guide to using RPMS Tools for Teachers
from Portfolio preparation to assessment
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National Research
Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
TABLE OF

CONTENTS
Introduction 2

1 The RPMS Tools for Teachers


1.1 Who uses the RPMS Tools?
3
4
1.2 What are the RPMS Tools? 4
1.3 What are the parts of the RPMS Tools? 6

2 Preparation of Documents and Organization of Teacher RPMS Portfolio


2.1 How do you gather and organize documents for your RPMS Portfolio?
13
14
2.2 How do you organize your RPMS Portfolio? 17

The Portfolio Assessment Process 19


3
3 3.1 What is the Portfolio Assessment Process?
3.1.1 Pre-Assessment
20
20
3.1.2 Assessment 24
3.1.2.1 How do you compute the Portfolio Rating? 31
3.1.2.2 How do you assess the Competencies? 39
3.1.3 Post-Assessment 41

4
4 Professional Reflections Through Annotations
4.1 What are annotations?
45
46
4.2 What is the importance of annotations? 47
4.3 What do you annotate? 47
4.4 How do you write annotations? 47

5
5 Effective Coaching and Giving Performance Feedback
5.1 What is coaching?
49
50
5.1.1 What is the difference among coaching, mentoring and counselling? 50
5.1.2 What is the Coaching Model for DepEd? 51
5.1.3 What are the Four (4) Step Processes of Coaching? 53
5.2 What is Performance Feedback? 57
5.2.1 Why do we give feedback? 59
5.2.2 What is the STAR Feedback Model? 60
5.2.3 What are the benefits of the STAR Feedback Model? 61
5.2.4 What is the Feedback Process? 65

6
6 Tools within the RPMS Cycle
6.1 Self-Assessment Tools in the RPMS Cycle
67
68
6.1.1 What are the Self-Assessment Tools-RPMS (SAT-RPMS)? 71
6.1.2 What are the parts of the SAT-RPMS? 72
6.1.3 How do you take the SAT-RPMS? 74
6.1.4 What are the uses of the SAT-RPMS? 76
6.2 Classroom Observation Tools in the RPMS Cycle 78
6.2.1 What are the Classroom Observation Tools-RPMS (COT-RPMS)? 81
6.2.2 What are the COT-RPMS Forms? 85
6.2.3 What are the roles and responsibilities of teachers and observers? 92
6.2.4 What are the processes and protocols in Classroom Observation? 93

7
7 Glossary of Terms/Acronyms 97
8
8 Appendices
Appendix A: Professional Standards for Teachers in the Philippines
103
104
Appendix B: RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers) 135
Appendix C: RPMS Tool for Master Teacher I-IV (Highly Proficient Teachers) 158
Appendix D.1: Individual Performance Commitment and
Review Form (IPCRF) for Teacher I-III 183
Appendix D.2: Individual Performance Commitment and
Review Form (IPCRF) for Master Teacher I-IV 192
Appendix D.3: IPCRF-Part II: Competencies 199
Appendix D.4: Part IV of the IPCRF: Development Plans 200
Appendix E: Mid-year Review Form 201
Appendix F: Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form (PMCF) 202
Appendix G: Self-Assessment Tool for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers) 203
Appendix H: Self-Assessment Tool for Master
Teacher I-IV (Highly Proficient Teachers) 207
Appendix I.1: COT-RPMS for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers) 211
Appendix I.2: COT-RPMS Rating Sheet (Teacher I-III) 223
Appendix I.3: Inter-Observer Agreement Form (Teacher I-III) 224
Appendix J.1: COT-RPMS for Master Teacher I-IV (Highly Proficient Teachers) 225
Appendix J.2: COT-RPMS Rating Sheet (Master Teacher I-IV) 233
Appendix J.3: Inter-Observer Agreement Form (Master Teacher I-IV) 234
Appendix K: COT-RPMS Observation Notes Form 235
Appendix L: Annotation Template 236

9
8 Acknowledgements 237
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

INTRODUCTION

The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

T
EACHERS play a crucial role in improving the quality of the
teaching and learning process. Good teachers are vital to
raising student achievement. Hence, enhancing teacher
quality ranks foremost in the many educational reform
efforts toward quality education.
To complement reform initiatives on teacher quality, the Philippine
Professional Standards for Teachers (PPST) has been developed and nationally
validated. This was signed into policy by Department of Education (DepEd)
Secretary Maria Leonor Briones through DepEd Order No. 42, s. 2017.
The PPST articulates what constitutes teacher quality through well-defined
domains, strands and indicators that provide measures of professional learning,
competent practice and effective engagement across teachers’ career stages.
This document serves as a public statement of professional accountability that
can help teachers reflect on and assess their own practices as they aspire for
personal growth and professional development.
In 2015, the DepEd issued Order No. 2, s. 2015 — “Guidelines on the
Establishment and Implementation of the Results-based Performance
Management System (RPMS) in the Department of Education” following Civil
Service Commission Memorandum Circular No. 06, s. 2012 or the Strategic
Performance Management System (SPMS) to ensure efficient, timely and
quality performance among personnel.
The guidelines explain mechanisms, criteria and processes for performance
target setting, monitoring, evaluation and development planning. Through
the RPMS, the DepEd ensures that work efforts focus towards achieving its
vision, mission, values and strategic priorities toward the delivery of quality
educational services to Filipino learners.
The alignment of the RPMS with the Philippine Professional Standards for
Teachers has led to the development of new results-based assessment tools;
hence, this Manual on RPMS Tools for Teachers.
This Manual provides information and guidance to Teachers and School
Heads in the performance assessment process. For Teachers, the Manual
guides them through the basics in preparing and completing RPMS documents.
It describes the appropriate tools to assess performance and explains the
different assessment phases for teachers. It also introduces the concept of
annotations to guide teachers through critical reflection of their practices for
their continuous improvement.
For School Heads and other Raters, this Manual contains all the information
needed to assess teacher performance. It provides a detailed reference to help
in the understanding of the tools and the different phases of assessment within
the various cycles of RPMS, ensuring that mechanisms are in place to support
teacher performance.
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

THE RPMS TOOLS


FOR TEACHERS

aster
forM

T1-3
RPMS Tool
for Teacher I-III
(Proficient Teachers)

1
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

1.1 Who uses the RPMS Tools?


Raters and Ratees from across career stages use the RPMS Tools for gauging the
quality of teacher performance.

Raters refer to the School Heads (e.g. Principals, Teachers-in-Charge, Head


Teachers), Department Heads and/or Master Teachers who assess teacher
portfolios to gauge teacher performance.

Ratees are the teachers from all career stages, Teacher I-III and Master Teacher
I-IV who submit their portfolios as evidence of their teaching performance.
Senior High School teachers, including those who are in probationary status,
shall use the tools corresponding to their current rank/position, regardless of
the years in service.

1.2 What are the RPMS Tools?


RPMS Tools pertain to the two different teacher performance assessment
instruments, one for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers) and another for Master Teacher
I-IV (Highly Proficient Teachers).

Each tool describes the duties and responsibilities of teachers across career stages;
the Key Result Areas (KRAs) for the realization of those duties and the specific objectives
to attain the KRAs. Each tool also presents in detail the various Means of Verification
(MOV) that serve as proof of the attainment of specific objectives alongside performance
indicators, from outstanding to poor performance, to help both Ratees and Raters in the
assessment process.

1.2.1 RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III


(Proficient Teachers)
This tool is for Teacher I, Teacher II and Teacher III (TI-TIII). They are
General expected to be proficient in their practice and professionally independent
Description in the application of skills vital to the teaching and learning process.
Generally, teachers at this level are expected to:
of the Tool
• display skills in planning, implementing, managing and evaluating
learning programs;
• actively engage in collaborative learning with the professional
community and other stakeholders for mutual growth and
advancement; and
• reflectontheirpracticetocontinuallyconsolidatetheknowledge,
skills and practices of career stage 1 teachers.

4
THE RPMS TOOLS FOR TEACHERS

Figure 1.1. RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III

1.2.2 RPMS Tool for Master Teacher I-IV


(Highly Proficient Teachers)

This tool is for Master Teacher Ito Master Teacher General


IV. They are expected to be at the Highly Proficient
Description
career stage, which means that they consistently
display a high level of performance in their teaching of the Tool
practice. Generally, Master Teacher I-IV are expected
to:

• manifest an in-depth and sophisticated


understanding of the teaching and learning
process;
• have high education-focused situation
cognition, are more adept in problem solving
and optimize opportunities gained from
experience;

5
THE RPMS MANUAL

• provide support and mentoring to colleagues in their


professional development, as well as work collaboratively with
them to enhance the potential for learning and practice of their
colleagues; and
• continually seek to develop their professional knowledge and
practice by reflecting on their own needs and those of their
colleagues and learners.

Figure 1.2. RPMS Tool for Master Teachers I-IV

1.3. What are the parts of the RPMS Tools?


All RPMS Tools contain the following parts:

1.3.1 Job Summary. This part shows the position and the competency profile of
the ratee.

1.3.2 Qualification Standards. This part lists the Civil Service Commission (CSC)
requirements and other preferred requirements for the particular position.

6
THE RPMS TOOLS FOR TEACHERS

1.3.3 Duties and Responsibilities. This section presents all the duties
and responsibilities of the teachers, which vary in complexity or
expectation depending on the teachers’ position or rank.

Duties and Responsibilities


1. Applies mastery of content knowledge and its application across
learning areas
2. Facilitates learning using appropriate and innovative teaching
strategies and classroom management practices
3. Manages an environment conducive to learning
4. Addresses learner diversity
5. Implements and supervises curricular and co-curricular programs to
support learning
6. Monitors and evaluates learners’ progress and undertakes activities
to improve performance
7. Maintains updated records of learners’ progress
8. Counsels and guides learners
9. Works with relevant stakeholders, both internal and external, to
promote learning and improve school performance
10. Undertakes activities towards personal and professional growth
11. Does related work
Figure 1.3. Duties and Responsibilities of Teacher I-III

1.3.4 Key Result Areas. They refer to the general outputs or outcome–
the mandate or the functions of the office and/or the individual
employee. The KRAsare the very reasons why an office and/or a job
exists (D.O. No. 2, s. 2015).

In the context of the RPMS Tools, the KRAs capture the Domains of
the PPST – a document that defines teacher quality in the country.
The KRAs are: (1) Content Knowledge and Pedagogy, (2) Learning
Environmentand Diversity of Learners, (3) Curriculum and Planning,
(4) Assessment and Reporting, and the (5) Plus Factor.

1.3.5 Objectives. They are specific tasks that an office and/or


individual employee needs to do to achieve the KRAs.

In the RPMS Tools, teachers target thirteen (13) objectives to


realize the five (5) KRAs. These objectives are aligned with the
indicators of the Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers
(PPST).

7
THE RPMS MANUAL

Figure 1.4. Key Result Areas of RPMS Tool Teacher I-III

Figure 1.5. Objectives of Master Teacher I-IV

8
THE RPMS TOOLS FOR TEACHERS

1.3.6 Means of Verification (MOV). The MOV column gives Ratees and Raters list
of documents that can prove the teachers’ attainment of objectives. They
have been judiciously selected to show evidence of attainment of objectives.
Teachers gather, select, organize and annotate MOV to help Raters in
assessing teacher performance.

MOV include classroom observation tool (COT) rating sheet and/or inter-
observer agreement form; lesson plans/modified daily lesson logs (DLLs);
instructional materials; formative and summative assessment tools;
compilations of student outputs; certificates of attendance to professional
development activities like graduate studies, seminars, forums, and/or
learning action cells; and evidence showing the conduct of collaborative
activities with parents/colleagues/other stakeholders.

Figure 1.6. MOV (RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III)

1.3.7 Performance Indicators. This part provides the exact quantification


of objectives, which shall serve as the assessment tool that gauges
whether performance is positive or negative (D.O. No. 2 s. 2015).

In the RPMS Tools, the performance indicators provide descriptions


of quality and quantity given five performance levels: 5-Outstanding,
4-Very Satisfactory, 3-Satisfactory, 2-Unsatisfactory, and 1-Poor.
• Outstanding performance means the Ratee has presented all
the MOV listed under number 5.

9
THE RPMS MANUAL

• Very Satisfactory performance means that the Ratee has


presented the required MOV listed under number 4.
• Satisfactory performance means that the Ratee has presented
the required MOV listed under number 3.
• Unsatisfactory performance means that the Ratee has
presented any of the given MOV under number 2.
• Poor performance means that the Ratee has not presented any
of the acceptable MOV.

Figure 1.7. Performance Indi


cators of Teacher I-III

The performance indicators of the RPMS Tools for Teachers operationalize


the performance measures, namely quality, efficiency and timeliness required by
the D.O. No. 2, s. 2015. Figure 1.8 shows the different categories of performance
measures and their operational definition.

10
THE RPMS TOOLS FOR TEACHERS

CATEGORY DEFINITION

The extent to which actual performance compares with targeted performance.


Effectiveness/
The degree to which objectives are achieved and the extent to which targeted
Quality
problems are solved. In management, effectiveness relates to getting the right
things done.

The extent to which time or resources is used for the intended task or purpose.
Measures whether targets are accomplished with a minimum amount of
Efficiency quantity of waste, expense, or unnecessary effort.

In management, efficiency relates to doing the things right.

Measures whether the deliverable was done on time based on the


requirements of the rules and regulations, and/or clients/stakeholders.
Timeliness
Time-related performance indicators evaluate such things as project
completion deadlines, time management skills and other time-sensitive
expectations.

Figure 1.8. Performance Measures (D.O. No. 2, s. 2015)

The performance indicators need not have all three (3) categories. Some
performance may only be rated on quality and efficiency, some on quality
and timeliness and others on efficiency only. Figure 1.9 illustrates how the
performance measures are embedded in the performance indicators of the
RPMS Tools.

11
12

THE RPMS MANUAL


Figure 1.9. Performance Indicators of RPMS Tool for Master Teacher I-IV with QET
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

PREPARATION OF
DOCUMENTS AND ORGANIZATION OF TEACHER

RPMS PORTFOLIO

2
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

2.1 How do you gather and organize documents


for your RPMS Portfolio?
At the beginning of the school year, you start working
to achieve your targets as required by RPMS. You need Things you need:
documents to show that you have done so. The following • Copy of RPMS
steps may guide you in gathering and organizing your RPMS Tool appropriate
documents. to your level
• Five (5) long
1. Review the Results-based Performance Management folders or a
System (RPMS) Tool appropriate to your level. clear book for
five KRAs
Teacher I, Teacher II and Teacher III are expected • Binder clips/
to use the tool for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers). fastener
Master Teacher I, Master Teacher II, Master Teacher • Original
III and Master Teacher IV must use the tool for Master documents
Teacher I-IV (Highly Proficient Teachers). Senior High • Photocopy of
School teachers shall use the tools corresponding to the documents
their current rank/position, regardless of the years in • Tabs
service. • Highlighter/
marker

Figure 2.1. RPMS Tools for Teachers

14
PREPARATION OF DOCUMENTS AND ORGANIZATION OF TEACHER RPMS PORTFOLIO

Figure 2.2. MOV of the RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III

2. Refer to the MOV column for the checklist of the relevant documents needed.

Keep relevant documents as they become available throughout the


year. For example, after your Principal has observed your class and has
given you the COT rating sheet or inter-observer agreement form, keep/
insert the document in the corresponding folder or envelope labeled COT
Rating Sheet.

For easy organization, you may have a folder or envelope to


contain the same kinds of documents.
For example, you have an envelope containing COT rating sheet
and/or inter-observer agreement form and an envelope containing
your lesson plans or modified Daily Lesson Logs (DLLs).
Label the envelope with the name of the document contained in
it for easy retrieval later.

3. Gather documents required by the tool. Label and organize them accordingly.

To prepare your documents in time for the RPMS mid-year review or


year-end assessment of your Portfolio, you need to organize documents
properly and accurately.
In some cases, you gather/keep documents that you may not be able
to use in your Portfolio. Follow these steps to ensure that only the required
documents go into your Portfolio. Remember thatyou may have to go back
and forth in the process.

The MOV collected after Phase 3 on the last week of April, e.g. Brigada
Eskwela documentations, certificates from seminars/workshops,
may be included in your Portfolio for the next rating period.

15
THE RPMS MANUAL

i. Match your documents with the objectives, the performance


indicators and the MOV. You may start from Objective 1.

If you are a Teacher II and you hope to achieve a rating of Very


Satisfactory in Objective 1, you need: (i) 3 classroom observation
tool rating sheets and/or inter-observer agreement forms
showing your knowledge of content and its integration within and
across curriculum teaching areas with a rating of 6; and (ii) another
MOV (e.g. lesson plans/modified DLLs, instructional materials,
performance tasks/test materials, or others – all showing your
knowledge of content and its integration within and across subject
areas) to support each COT rating sheet.

ii. Mark your document(s) with the objective(s) where the


document(s) may be used as MOV. You may use a pencil for this.
This helps you organize your MOV later on based on objectives.

iii. Use markers to highlight the parts of your MOV that satisfy the
requirement of the objectives and the performance indicators.
This facilitates the Rater’s evaluation of your documents.

iv. Reproduce the document(s) that may be used as MOV in


other objectives. Ensure that the copies are clear.

Remember that one document may be used as MOV or evidence


of performance for other objectives. For example, if you are a
Teacher II, your COT rating sheet may contain rating or feedback
about: (i) knowledge of content (Objective 1); (ii) teaching strategies
that develop critical and creative thinking (Objective 3); and (iii)
differentiated, developmentally appropriate learning experiences
(Objective 6).

v. Put together documents that belong to the same objective. You


may bind them together or place them in a folder marked according
to objective.

vi. Insert documents in relevant folders as they become available.

4. Put annotation template/document after the annotated MOV.


Annotations establish a connection between the evidences and the
indicators. This helps the Rater facilitate the review of the RPMS Portfolio.

16
PREPARATION OF DOCUMENTS AND ORGANIZATION OF TEACHER RPMS PORTFOLIO

2.2 How do you organize your RPMS Portfolio?


Now that you have prepared your documents, you are ready to organize your
Portfolio for submission for mid-year review and year-end evaluation. Follow these
steps:
1. Put together MOV of objectives that are under the same
Note the following tips to
Key Result Area (KRA). Ensure that the MOV are arranged
help you produce a well- according to the list specified in the tool. MOV 1 should
prepared document and go first followed by other supporting MOV. You may also
well-organized Portfolio: arrange the MOV based on dates, e.g. from most recent to
oldest COT rating sheet and/or inter-observer agreement
A. Start gathering form.
documents at the
beginning of the 2. Use tabs labeled Objective 1, 2, 3 and so on to separate
school year. MOV under every objective. Arrange objectives in order
(Objective 1, 2, 3 and so on).
B. Follow the steps
in preparing your 3. Use tabs labeled KRA 1, KRA 2, KRA 3 and so on to separate
documents and objectives under each KRA. Arrange KRAs in order (KRA 1,
organizing your
KRA 2, KRA 3 and so on).
Portfolio.

C. Check for the


4. Put together all the MOV either in soft bound, ring bound
completeness of the or using a fastener and a folder following this sequence:
documents needed by KRA 1, Objective 1 and its MOV; Objective 2 and its MOV;
preparing a checklist. Objective 3 and its MOV. Do the same thing for KRA 2
through KRA 5.
D. Reproduce the
documents in clear 5. Prepare a “Table of Contents” in your Portfolio for easy
copies. reference. See Figure 2.3.

E. Have the photocopied 6. Provide a cover page in your Portfolio indicating the
documents in A4,
following: name of your school, name of Principal/Rater
long bond paper
and current school year. See Figure 2.4 on the next page.
or whatever size
available.
7. Prepare a second copy of your Portfolio for submission to
F. Label properly all the your Rater. Affix your signature on top of your name on the
documents for easy cover page of your Portfolio. The Rater will need the original
reference. documents to authenticate the photocopied documents.

G. Submit complete Table of Contents


documents and keep
them intact. KRA1- Content Knowledge and Pedagogy

Objective 1:
H. Keep your Portfolio MOV1: COT on Solving Two-Step Word Problems
simple yet MOV2: Instructional Materials for Solving Two-Step Word Problems
presentable.
Objective 2:
MOV1: COT in Visualization of Multiplication of Fractions
MOV2: LP in Visualization of Multiplication of Fractions

Figure 2.3. Sample table of contents

17
THE RPMS MANUAL

Keep your portfolio simple. Remember that a neat and well-organized


Portfolio facilitates the assessment of your documents.

S.Y. 2016-2017

JUAN DELA CRUZ


Teacher II
JESSAMAE ZAPATA
Principal

Figure 2.4. Appropriately


labelled RPMS Portfolio and
folders (KRA1-KRA5)

18
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

THE PORTFOLIO

ASSESSMENT
PROCESS

3
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

3.1. What is the Portfolio Assessment Process?


Assessing the Teacher Portfolio is one of the most crucial processes in ensuring teacher
quality. The Portfolio assessment process is done across all phases of RPMS.
The Portfolio pre-assessment process, which focuses on Portfolio preparation, happens
in Phase I of the RPMS Process: Performance Planning and Commitment. It ensures that
teachers understand the Key Result Areas (KRAs), the objectives, the performance indicators
in the RPMS tool and the means of verification (MOV) to improve performance. It allows
teachers to select and prepare appropriate documents and attest to their authenticity.
Meanwhile, the Portfolio assessment process is covered in RPMS Phase II (Performance
Monitoring and Coaching) and Phase III (Performance Review and Evaluation). It involves
teacher self-assessment and Rater’s assessment of the Portfolio.
Finally, the Portfoliopost-assessmentprocess thatoccurs in RPMSPhase III (Performance
Review and Evaluation) and Phase IV (Performance Rewarding and Development Planning),
aims to help teachers improve their performance. It focuses on the conduct of teacher and
rater conference on the results of the portfolio assessment process.

See Figure 3.2 on Page 21

3.1.1 Pre-Assessment
Step 1: Review the Philippine
Professional Standards for
Teachers.
Familiarize yourself with the
new set of professional standards
for teachers since it has been
integrated in the RPMS tools.
The set of standards describes
seven Domains of teacher
quality: Content Knowledge and
Pedagogy; Learning Environment;
Diversity of Learners; Curriculum
and Planning; Assessment and
Reporting; Community Linkages
and Professional Engagement; and
Personal Growth and Professional
Development. These Domains are
presented as five KRAs in the RPMS Figure 3.1. A Rater reading the Philippine
Tools for Teachers. Professional Standards for Teachers (PPST)

20
Portfolio Assessment Process

Pre-Assessment Phase Assessment Phase Post-Assessment Phase

(Document/Forms: PPST, (Document/Forms: Techer (Document/Forms: IPCRF and


RPMS Tools, IPCRF, Teacher RPMS Portfolio, appropriate IPCRF-DP
RPMS Portfolio) RPMS Tool and IPCRF

1. Review the Philippine 1. Rate the Portfolio based 1. Discuss with the teacher
Professional Standards for on the MOV presented. his or her performance
Teachers. Rate the teacher’s level data and agree on the
2. Determine the of performance using the ratings.
corresponding tool for the 5-point scale:
teacher/Ratee. 5 - Outstanding 2. Assist the teacher
• RPMS Tool for 4 - Very Satisfactory in preparing the
3 - Satisfactory Development Plans. Mid-year Review Year-end
Teacher I-III
(Proficient Teachers) 2 - Unsatisfactory Evaluation
• RPMS Tool for Master 1- Poor (Documents/
Teacher I-IV (Highly Forms: Teacher (Documents/
Proficient Teachers) 2. Explain your Rating, if RPMS Portfolio, Forms: IPCRF and
3. Guide the teacher/Ratee needed. RPMS Tools, IPCRF IPCRF-DP
in understanding the and PMCF)

THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS


appropriate RPMS Tool and
the Individual Performance
Commitment and Review
Form (IPCRF).
4. Guide the teacers in
preparing documents and
organizing Portfolio.
5. Upon submission of
Portfolio, authenticate
documents
21

Figure 3.2. The Portfolio Assessment Process


THE RPMS MANUAL

Step 2: Determine the corresponding RPMS Tool for the Teacher/Ratee.


At the start of the Portfolio preparation, teachers should identify their RPMS
Tool considering their current position and the general description of their practice
based on the PPST.
Teacher I, Teacher II and Teacher III must use the tool for Teacher I-III. Master
Teacher I, Master Teacher II, Master Teacher III and Master Teacher IV must use the
tool for Master Teachers I-IV.

What is I am
your current a Teacher 1.
position?

Figure 3.3. A Rater determines the corresponding RPMS tool for the Teacher/Ratee

Step 3: Guidethe Rateeinunderstandingtheappropriate RPMS Tooland


the Individual Performance Commitment Review Form (IPCRF). Teachers
need to be clear about the various elements and the language of the tool, so you can
guide them in understanding the following elements:
• objectives to be met per KRA;
• specific performance rating from Outstanding to Poor performance;
• performance indicators per level; and
• MOV to prove the level of performance

Step 4: Advise the Teacher/Ratee to accomplish the IPCRF.


Agree on the performance indicators to be achieved as identified for each
of the individual objectives in the appropriate RPMS tool. See the sample
on page 23.

Step 5: Guide the Teachers in preparing documents and organizing


Portfolio. Refer to Chapter 2 of this Manual.

22
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE COMMITMENT AND REVIEW FORM (IPCRF) – Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers)
Name of Employee: Name of Rater:
Position: Position:
Bureau/Center/Service/Division: Date of Review:
Rating Period:
TO BE FILLED IN DURING PLANNING TO BE FILLED DURING EVALUATION
Performance Indicators Rating Score
Weight
Very Actual
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
QET Satisfactory Poor (1) Results Q E T Ave
KRA (5) (3) (2)
(4)
Basic Content 1. Applied June Quality
Education Knowledge knowledge 2016 –
Services and of content March
Pedagogy within and 2017
across
curriculum
teaching
areas.
Efficiency

22.5%

Timeliness

THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS


OVERALL
RATING FOR
ACCOMPLISH-
MENTS

Figure 3.4. IPCRF Template based on the D.O. No. 2, s. 2015


23
THE RPMS MANUAL

Step 6: Upon submission of


the Teacher Portfolio, authenticate
documents.
Check the photocopies against the original
Figure 3.5. A Rater compares the original documents. Sign each document to attest to its
documents with the duplicates. authenticity.

3.1.2 Assessment

This phase focuses on the actual assessment of the Teacher Portfolio.


At this stage, you will examine the Portfolio against the corresponding
RPMS Tool and the IPCRF.
You will assess the Portfolio twice, first during the mid-year review and
second during the year-end evaluation. In the year-end review, fill out the
column that says “Actual Results” in the IPCRF. See Figure 3.23 on page 34.

Step 1: Rate the Portfolio based on the MOV presented.


Examine the MOV presented by the teacher and rate the teacher’slevel
of performance using the 5-point scale:
5 - Outstanding
4 - Very Satisfactory
3 - Satisfactory
2 - Unsatisfactory
1 - Poor

Forinstance, in Objective 1 for Teacher I-III (Appliedknowledgeofcontent


within and across curriculum teaching areas), the Ratee has targeted a Very
Satisfactory performance (Level 4). To meet the requirements for a Level
4 performance, the Ratee needs to apply knowledge of content and its
integration within and across subject areas as evidently shown in 3 lessons
using MOV 1 (COT rating sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form) with
a rating of 6, each supported by any one (1) of the other given MOV, e.g.,
MOV 4 (Performance tasks/test materials highlighting integration of content
knowledge within and across subject areas).

Ensure that that the quantitative and the qualitative feedback


in the Classroom Observation Tool (COT) are consistent. If
inconsistent, request the Ratee to confer with the observer again.

24
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Embedded in the performance indicators of the RPMS Tools for Teachers are
relevant dimensions of performance measures required by the D.O. No. 2, s. 2015.
Figure 3.6 shows the definition of these performance measures, namely quality/
effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness.

Performance Measures

CATEGORY DEFINITION

The extent to which actual performance compares with targeted


performance.
Effectiveness/
Quality The degree to which objectives are achieved and the extent to which
targeted problems are solved. In management, effectiveness relates to
getting the right things done.

The extent to which time or resources is used for the intended task or
purpose. Measures whether targets are accomplished with a minimum
Efficiency amount of quantity of waste, expense, or unnecessary effort.

In management, efficiency relates to doing the things right.

Measures whether the deliverable was done on time based on the


requirements of the rules and regulations, and/or clients/stakeholders.
Timeliness Time-related performance indicators evaluate such things as project
completion deadlines, time management skills and other time-sensitive
expectations.

Figure 3.6. Performance Measures (D.O. No. 2, s. 2015)

The MOV presented by teachers are rated based on these performance


measures. Figure 3.7 shows the sample IPCRF highlighting quality/effectiveness,
efficiency and timeliness of the performance indicator.

25
26

THE RPMS MANUAL


Figure 3.7. Sample accomplished IPCRF highlighting QET
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Sample School Scenario for Master Teachers

Teacher Grace, a Master Teacher II of Calauag East Central School, submits her
Portfolio for rating. She includes the following MOV under KRA 1 Objective 1:
• Four COT Rating Sheets with a rating of level 7 on effective applications of
content knowledge within and across curriculum teaching areas for 4 lessons.
- COT 1 is supported by 1 DLL used in demonstration teaching highlighting
integration of content knowledge within and across subject areas;
- COT 2 is supported by 1 set of instructional materials developed highlighting
effective application of content knowledge within and across subject areas;
- COT 3 is supported by 1 performance task/test material used in
demonstration teaching across subject areas; and
- COT 4 is supported by results of assessment used in demonstration
teaching highlighting mastery of lessons learned

Teacher Grace receives an average rating of 4.500 (Outstanding) for KRA 1


Objective 1. Why?
Teacher Grace models effective applications of content knowledge within and
across curriculum teaching areas as evidenced by the following:
Acceptable MOV Submitted MOV Remarks
1. Classroom observation tool (COT) 4 COT rating sheets with a rating of Valid
rating sheet and/or inter-observer level 7.
agreement form about effective
applications of content knowledge
within and across curriculum teaching • COT 1 is supported by 1 DLL Valid
areas used in demonstration teaching
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in highlighting integration of
demonstration teaching highlighting knowledge of content within and
integration of content knowledge across subject areas
within and across subject areas • COT 2 is supported by 1 set of Valid
3. Instructional materials developed instructional materials developed
highlighting effective application of highlighting effective application
content knowledge within and across of content knowledge within and
subject areas across subject areas
4. Performance tasks/test material(s) • COT 3 is supported by 1 Valid
used in demonstration teaching performance task/test material
highlighting integration of content used in demonstration teaching
knowledge within and across subject highlighting integration of content
areas knowledge within and across
5. Results of assessment used in subject areas
demonstration teaching highlighting • COT 4 is supported by results of Valid
mastery of lessons learned assessment used in demonstration
6. Others (Please specify and provide teaching highlighting mastery of
annotations) lessons learned

Figure 3.8. A table of sample submitted MOV for Master Teacher I-IV

Therefore, Teacher Grace got a corresponding rating of 4 in the RPMS 5-point scale for
Quality for each submitted COT rating sheet with a rating of 7. Each COT is supported by a
DLL, a set of instructional material used, performance tasks/test materials and results of
assessment. She also got a rating of 5 for Efficiency having submitted the required number of
MOV. The computation is shown below:

Q E T Total Average Weight per Objective Score

4 5 - 9 4.500 7.5% 0.337

Figure 3.9 Sample computation of Teacher Grace’s rating based on the submitted MOV

27
THE RPMS MANUAL

Sample School Scenario for Teacher I-III

For KRA 4 Objective 11, Teacher Adelyn submits a compilation of learner’s


written works with summary of results, a formative assessment tool with Table of
Specifications and frequency of errors, a class record and DLLs showing index of
mastery at the end of two quarters.

Teacher Adelyn gets an average rating of 3.000 (Satisfactory) for KRA 4 Objective 11.
Why?

Teacher Adelyn shows monitoring and evaluation of learner progress and


achievement using learner attainment data by providing the following supporting MOV:
• a compilation of learner’s written works with summary of results;
• a formative assessment tool with Table of Specifications and frequency of
errors;
• a class record; and
• DLLs showing index of mastery All

MOV submitted were gathered across 2 quarters.

Let us now compare the presented MOV to the acceptable MOV in the RPMS Toolfor
Teacher I-III.
Acceptable MOV Submitted MOV Remarks
• Compilation of a learner’s • A compilation of a learner’s written Notvalid because
written work with summary work with summary of results it lacked parent’s
of resultsand with signature signature
of parents • A formative assessmenttool with Not valid because it
• Formative/summative TOS and frequency of errors lacked a list of identified
assessment tools with TOS least mastered skills
and frequencyof errors with • A class record Valid
identified least mastered
skills • A DLL showing index of mastery Valid
• Class records/grading
sheets
• Lesson plans/modified DLLs
showing index of mastery
• Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)

Figure 3.10. A table of sample submitted MOV for Teacher I-III

Therefore, Teacher Adelyn got a rating of 3 (Satisfactory) for Quality as evidenced


by the valid MOV. Although she submitted 4 MOV, only 2 were valid which gave her a
rating of 3 for Efficiency. She submitted these MOV across 2 quarters; hence, she got
a rating of 3 for Timeliness. On average, Teacher Adelyn got a rating of 3.000 for KRA
4 Objective 11.
The computation is shown below:

Q E T Total Average Weight per Objective Score

3 3 3 9 3.000 7.5% 0.225

Figure 3.11. Sample computation of Teacher Adelyn’s rating based on the submitted MOV

28
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

There are instances, however, that Teachers may submit classroom


observation rating sheets that have different ratings.
For example, a Teacher III may submit 4 COT rating sheets: COT 1 with
a rating of 7; COT 2 with a rating of 6; COT 3 and 4 with a rating of 5.
To get the rating for Quality, the following steps must be done:
• Identify the corresponding rating in the RPMS 5-point scale for
each COT rating. Refer to Table 3.12 for the mapping of COT
Rating for Proficient Teachers and Highly Proficient Teachers
and the RPMS 5-point scale.
COT Rating COT Rating
RPMS 5-point scale
(Proficient Teachers) (Highly Proficient Teachers)
7 8 5 (Outstanding)
6 7 4 (Very Satisfactory)
5 6 3 (Satisfactory)
4 5 2 (Unsatisfactory)
3 4 1 (Poor)
Figure 3.12. Mapping of COT rating and the RPMS 5-point scale

In this case, Teacher III, got the following rating:


COT Rating (Proficient
COT Rating Sheet RPMS 5-point scale
Teachers)
COT Rating Sheet 1 7 5
COT Rating Sheet 2 6 4
COT Rating Sheet 3 5 3
COT Rating Sheet 4 5 3
Figure 3.13. Sample mapping of COT rating and the RPMS 5-point scale

• Get the average of the total RPMS rating. The average rating will
be your rating for Quality. In Teacher III’s case, the average is
3.75, as show in the table below.
COT Rating
COT Rating Sheet RPMS 5-point scale
(Highly Proficient Teachers)
COT Rating Sheet 1 7 5

COT Rating Sheet 2 6 4


COT Rating Sheet 3 5 3
COT Rating Sheet 4 5 3
Total 15
Average 3.75
Figure 3.14. Sample computation of the average of the mapped COT rating
to the RPMS 5-point scale
• Determine the final rating for Quality by referring to the Table
3.15. Teacher III got an average of 3.75 and his or her final rating
for Quality is 4 (Very Satisfactory):
RANGE RPMS 5-point Rating Scale
4.500 – 5.000 5 (Outstanding)
3.500 – 4.499 4 (Very Satisfactory)
2.500 – 3.499 3 (Satisfactory)
1.500 – 2.499 2 (Unsatisfactory)
below 1.499 1 (Poor)
Figure 3.15. Adjectival Rating Equivalences

29
THE RPMS MANUAL

Step 2: Explain your Rating, if needed.

To help the Ratees enrich their Portfolios, provide reasons for your rating and
suggest strategies in improving the quality of the Portfolios.
A sample feedback on a Teacher Portfolio appears below.

Sample Feedback of a Principal


Good! Lessons presented in Araling Panlipunan, Edukasyon sa Pagpapakatao
and MTB emphasized the integration of other subjects and content areas.
The attached COT further proves the integration. The modified DLL also
shows the teacher’s creativity in designing tasks and visual aids.
However, integration becomes more effective if the students are able to apply
the concepts to their real life experiences, so you can add other activities where
they will use the concepts in their everyday experiences.
In so doing, you can actually meet the requirements for the higher performance
level.
Keep up the good work!

Figure 3.16. Sample feedback of a Rater

Hi! Here’s your I am glad to


portfolio. Let’s hear about
tal about your your
performance comments,
rating. Ma’am.

Figure 3.17. A rater provides feedback on the Teacher’s Portfolio

30
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

3.1.2.1 How do you compute the Portfolio Rating?


A sample computation for the Rater’s rating at the end of the school year is
presented below.

Each objective shall be assigned 7.5% weight, which means each KRA will
have an equal weight of 22.5%. The Plus Factor KRA, which consists of only
one objective, will be assigned 10% weight.

Weight Numerical Step 1. Under


Weight per Ratings
KRA per Objectives
Objective
Score the column
KRA Q E T Ave
Numerical
Objective 1 7.5% 5 5 -
Ratings, write
1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5% 5 5 -
Objective 3 7.5% 5 5 -
your ratings
Objective 4 7.5% 4 4 -
for QET. The
2 22.5% Objective 5 7.5% 4 4 - table in Figure
Objective 6 7.5% 3 3 - 3.18 indicates
Objective 7 7.5% 4 4 - the Weight
3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5% 3 3 - per KRA and
Objective 9 7.5% 4 4 - Objective.
Objective 10 7.5% 4 4 -
4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5% 5 5 5
Objective 12 7.5% 5 5 5
5 10% Objective 13 10% 4 4 -
Figure 3.18. Sample
Final Rating
Computation Table
Adjectival Rating
with QET Ratings

Weight Numerical Step 2. Get


Weight per Ratings
KRA per Objectives
Objective
Score the average.
KRA Q E T Ave
Objective 1 7.5% 5 5 - 5
1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5% 5 5 - 5
Objective 3 7.5% 5 5 - 5
Objective 4 7.5% 4 4 - 4
2 22.5% Objective 5 7.5% 4 4 - 4
Objective 6 7.5% 3 3 - 3
Objective 7 7.5% 4 4 - 4
3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5% 3 3 - 3
Objective 9 7.5% 4 4 - 4
Objective 10 7.5% 4 4 - 4
4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5% 5 5 5 5
Objective 12 7.5% 5 5 5 5
5 10% Objective 13 10% 4 4 - 4 Figure 3.19. Sample
Final Rating
Computation Table
the Average of the
Adjectival Rating
QET Ratings

31
THE RPMS MANUAL

Step 3. Multiply Numerical


Weight Ratings
the Weight KRA per Objectives Weight per Score
KRA Objective
per Objective Q E T Ave

with the QET Objective 1 7.5% 5 5 - 5 0.375

average to fill 1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5% 5 5 - 5 0.375


Objective 3 0.375
in the SCORE 7.5% 5 5 - 5
Objective 4 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
column. The Objective 5 0.300
2 22.5% 7.5% 4 4 - 4
scores shall Objective 6 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225
be in three (3) Objective 7 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
decimal places. 3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225
Objective 9 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
Objective 10 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375
Objective 12 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375
5 10% Objective 13 10% 4 4 - 4 0.400
Figure 3.20. Sample Final Rating
Computation Table with
Adjectival Rating
Computed Scores

Weight per Objective x Average Rating = Score

Step 4. Add Weight Numerical


Weight per Ratings
all the scores KRA per Objectives
Objective
Score
KRA Q E T Ave
to compute
Objective 1 0.375
for the Final 7.5% 5 5 - 5
1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5% 5 5 - 5 0.375
Rating, which is Objective 3 7.5% 5 5 - 5 0.375
also in three (3) Objective 4 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
decimal places. 2 22.5% Objective 5 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
Objective 6 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225
Objective 7 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225
Objective 9 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
Objective 10 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375
Objective 12 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375

Figure 3.21. Sample 5 10% Objective 13 10% 4 4 - 4 0.400


Computation Table with Final Rating 4.225
Final Rating Adjectival Rating

Sum of all the Scores = Final Rating

Step 5. Determine Adjectival Rating Equivalences


the adjectival RANGE ADJECTIVAL RATING
rating equivalent 4.500 – 5.000 Outstanding
of your final rating 3.500 – 4.499 Very Satisfactory
by refering to the 2.500 – 3.499 Satisfactory
table in Figure 1.500 – 2.499 Unsatisfactory
3.22. below 1.499 Poor
Figure 3.22. Adjectival Rating Equivalences

32
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Weight Numerical Step 6. Write the


Weight per
KRA per Objectives
Objective
Ratings Score overall rating for
KRA Q E T Ave
accomplishments
Objective 1 0.375
7.5% 5 5 - 5
in the IPRCF. Affix
1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5% 5 5 - 5 0.375
Objective 3 0.375
signature of the
7.5% 5 5 - 5
Objective 4 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
Rater, Ratee and
2 22.5% Objective 5 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300 the Approving
Objective 6 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225 Authority. See
Objective 7 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300 Figure 3.23.
3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5% 3 3 - 3 0.225
Objective 9 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
Objective 10 7.5% 4 4 - 4 0.300
4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375
Objective 12 7.5% 5 5 5 5 0.375
5 10% Objective 13 10% 4 4 - 4 0.400
Final Rating 4.225
Very
Adjectival Rating
Satisfactory

Figure 3.23. Sample Computation Table with Final Rating and its Equivalent.

You may use the suggested summary sheet below in the computation of
the numerical rating of your RPMS Portfolio. See Figure 3.24 below.

Weight per Weight per Numerical Ratings


KRA Objectives Score
KRA Objective
Q E T Ave
Objective 1 7.5%
KRA 1 22.5% Objective 2 7.5%
Objective 3 7.5%
Objective 4 7.5%
KRA 2 22.5% Objective 5 7.5%
Objective 6 7.5%
Objective 7 7.5%
KRA 3 22.5% Objective 8 7.5%
Objective 9 7.5%
Objective 10 7.5%
KRA 4 22.5% Objective 11 7.5%
Objective 12 7.5%
Plus Objective 13
10% 10%
Factor
Final Rating
Adjectival Rating
Figure 3.24. Suggested Summary Sheet for the computation of Portfolio Rating

33
34

THE RPMS MANUAL


Figure 3.25. Sample accomplished IPCRF with Actual Results
THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS
Figure 3.26.Sample accomplished IPCRF with overall rating for accomplishments
35
THE RPMS MANUAL

Mid-year Review
Mid-year Reviewgivesyouthechancetoconferwiththeteachersforthem
toimproveperformance. Usually, themid-yearreviewisconductedin October
or November. You need to provide suggestions, recommendationsand/or the
most appropriate technical assistance to support teachers in achieving their
targets. Note that the mid-year review is for performance monitoring and
coaching. Thefinalratingdependssolely on theyear-endevaluation.

Step 1: Assess the Teacher Portfolio using the IPCRF and the suggested
Mid-year Review Form (MRF).
See Figure 3.26 on page 38 for the suggested Mid-year Review
Form (MRF). You may write appropriate feedback/reflection notes to
give reasons for your initial ratings.

Step 2: Conduct Mid-year revie conference to discuss your initial ratings


with the Ratees.

Step 3: Discuss with the Ratees their respective performance concerns.

Step 4: Monitor teacher performance and coach them using the


Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form (PMCF) and Mid-year
Review Form (MRF).
ThePMCFshallprovidearecordofsignificantincidents(actualeventsand
behavior in which both positive and negative performances are observed)
such as demonstrated behavior, competence and performance. Create an
enabling environment and intervention to improve teacher performance
and progress towards the accomplishment of objectives.

Refer topages 6-7 of D.O. No. 2, s. 2015.

36
PERFORMANCE MONITORING AND COACHING FORM

CRITICAL INCIDENCE IMPACT ON JOB/ SIGNATURE


DATE OUTPUT
DESCRIPTION ACTION PLAN (RATER/RATEE)
August 6, 2017 Work tasks and schedules to achieve Submitted school forms/reports Serves as role model to
goals as evident in her checklist have ahead of time colleagues/peers
to be prioritized.
September 10, 2017 Logbook of daily incidence in her Logbook served as evidence for Could easily address
classroom is regularly done with a anecdotal records and journals of the learners’ needs
“Reflection” every week. best practices.

October 8, 2017 Quiz notebooks (in all the subjects) Track records of learners’ Least learned
are observed with TOS, test items, performance competencies are
score and item analysis and level of identified and intervention
mastery. needed is applied

THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS


October 8, 2017 The use of ICT as shown during IMs used did not fully capture the Less participation among
classroom observation has to be interest of students learners
enhanced.

Figure 3.27. Sample of accomplished Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form


37
38

THE RPMS MANUAL


SUGGESTED MID-YEAR REVIEW FORM (MRF)
Name of Employee:
Position: Name of Rater:
Bureau/Center/Service/Division: Position:
Rating Period: Date of Review:
Mid-year Review/Rating
Weight Performance Ratee (Teacher) Rater (Principal)
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline MOV Mid-Year Review Results
per KRA Target
Rating Remarks Rating Remarks
Quality

Efficiency

Timeliness

*Please see attached list of


MOV

Rater Ratee Approving Authority

Figure 3.28.Suggested Mid-year Review Form


THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

3.1.2.2 How do you assess the Competencies?


During the RPMS Phase 1, the Rater shall discuss with the Ratee
the competencies required of him or her. The demonstration of these
competencies shall be monitored to effectively plan the interventions
needed for development plans and shall be assessed at the end of the year.
Note that the assessment in the demonstration of competencies shall
not be reflected in the final rating. These competencies are monitored to
inform professional development plans.

Step 1: Discuss with the Ratee the set of competencies.


Discuss with the teacher the set of core behavioral competencies
demonstrated during the performance cycle. The list of competencies can
be found in Part II of Annex F, IPCRF. See p. 29 of D.O. No. 2, s. 2015.

Step 2: Assess the demonstration of competencies.


In the form provided in the Annex F, IPCRF, write the appropriate rating
inside the box for each competency using the 5-point scale shown below:

Scale Definition

5 Role Model
4 Consistently demonstrates
3 Most of the time demonstrates
2 Sometimes demonstrates
1 Rarely demonstrates

Figure 3.29. The DepEd Competencies Scale

5 - If all behavior per competency had been demonstrated


4 - If four behavioral indicators had been demonstrated
3 - If three competency indicators had been demonstrated
2 - If two competency indicators had been demonstrated
1 - If only one (1) behavioral indicator had been demonstrated

See Figure 3.28 for the sample assessment of the core behavioral
competencies.

After rating the Portfolio, determine the overall rating of the actual
accomplishments and results. The Rater and the Ratee should reach an
agreement by signing the IPCRF.

39
40

THE RPMS MANUAL


COMPETENCIES

CORE BEHAVIORAL COMPETENCIES


Self-Management Teamwork
1. Sets personal goals and directions, needs and development. 1. Willingly does his/her share of responsibility.
2. Understands personal actions and behavior that are clear and purposive and takes 2. Promotes collaboration and removes barrier to teamwork and goal accomplishment
into account personal goals and values congruent to that of the organization. across the organization.
3. Displays emotional maturity and enthusiasm for and is challenged by higher goals.
4. Prioritize work tasks and schedules (through Gantt chants, checklists, etc.) to achieve
5 3. Applies negotiation principles in arriving at win-win agreements.
4. Drives consensus and team ownership of decisions.
4
goals. 5. Works constructively and collaboratively with others and across organizations to
5. Sets high quality, challenging, realistic goals for self and others. accomplish organization goals and objectives.

Professionalism and Ethics Service Orientation


1. Demonstrate the values and behavior enshrined in the Norms and Conduct and Ethical 1. Can explain and articulate organizational directions, issues and problems.
Standards for Public Officials and Employees (RA 6713). 2. Takes personal responsibility for dealing with and/or correcting customer service
2. Practice ethical and professional behavior and conduct taking into account the impact of
issues and concerns.
his/her actions and decisions.
3. Maintains a professional image: being trustworthy, regularity of attendance and punctuality, 5 3. Initiates activities that promote advocacy for men and women empowerment.
4. Participates in updating office vision, mission, mandates and strategies based on
5
good grooming and communication.
4. Makes personal sacrifices to meet the organization’s needs. DEPED strategies and directions.
5. Act with a sense of urgency and responsibility to meet the organization’s needs, improve 5. Develops and adopts service improvement program through simplified procedures that
system and help others improve their effectiveness. will further enhance service delivery.

Results Focus Innovation


1. Achieves results with optimal use of time and resources most of the time. 1. Examines the root cause of problems and suggests effective solutions. Foster new
2. Avoids rework, mistakes and wastage through effective work methods by placing ideas, processes and suggests better ways to do things (cost and/or operational
organizational needs before personal needs. efficiency).
3. Delivers error-free outputs most of the time by conforming to standard operating 2. Demonstrates an ability to think “beyond the box”. Continuously focuses on improving
procedures correctly and consistently. Able to produce very satisfactory quality work in personal productivity to create higher value and results.
terms of usefulness/acceptability and completeness with no supervision required.
4. Expresses a desire to do better and may express frustration at waste or inefficiency.
4 3. Promotes a creative climate and inspires co-workers to develop original ideas or 3
solutions.
May focus on new or more precise ways of meeting goals set. 4. Translates creative thinking into tangible changes and solutions that improve the work
5. Makes specific changes in the system or in own work methods to improve unit and organization.
performance. Examples may include doing something better, faster, at a lower cost, more 5. Uses ingenious methods to accomplish responsibilities. Demonstrates resourcefulness
efficiently, or improving quality, customer satisfaction, morale, without setting any specific and the ability to succeed with minimal resources.
goal.

5 – Role model; 4 – Consistently demonstrates; 3 – Most of the time demonstrates; 2 – Sometimes demonstrate; 1 – Rarely demonstrate

Figure 3.30.Sample Assessment of the Core Behavioral Competencies


THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

3.1.3 Post-Assessment
The Part IV: Development Plans of the IPCRF (IPCRF-DP) shall be
informed by the results of the self-assessment during Phase 1: Performance
Planning and Commitment. The Rater and the Ratee shall identify and agree
on the strengths and development needs and reflect them in the Part IV:
Development Plans of the IPCRF.
The IPCRF-DP shall be updated during Phase 4: Performance Rewarding
and Development Planning and shall be informed by the actual ratings of the
IPCRF in Phase 3: Performance Review and Evaluation.
After rating the Portfolio, explain accomplishments, corresponding
rewards or possible incentives. Finally, assist Ratees in preparing their Part
IV: Development Plans of the IPCRF for the following year.
As indicated in D.O. No. 2, s. 2015, the following steps shall be applied in
preparing Development Plans:
1. Identify the development needs.
2. Set goals for meeting the development needs.
3. Prepare action plans for meeting the development needs such
as list of learning activities, resources and supports, measure of
successes, among other needs.
4. Implement action plans.
5. Evaluate.

Your Development Plans may have the following components: A)


Teaching Competencies, based on the PPST; and B) Core Behavioral
Competencies, as shown in Figure 3.31.

41
42

THE RPMS MANUAL


PART IV: DEVELOPMENT PLANS OF THE IPCRF (IPCRF-DP)

Action Plan
(Recommended Resources
Strengths Development Needs Timeline Needed
Developmental
Intervention)
A. Teaching Competencies (PPST)
Objective 3, KRA 1 Objective 3, KRA 1 Applying new learning Learning and
To apply a range of teaching To apply a range of teaching from attending courses/ Development
strategies to develop critical strategies to develop critical seminars/workshops/
and creative thinking, as well and creative thinking, as Learning Action Cells Team
as other higher-order thinking well as other higher-order (LAC)/ E-learning
skill thinking skills
Using feedback to try a Year-round Supervisors /
new approach to an old School Heads /
practice
Master
Coaching and mentoring Teachers

Local Funds
B. Core Behavioral Competencies (DepEd)
• Professionalism and Ethics Innovation particularly on • Coaching • Regular HRTD Funds
• Teamwork conceptualizing “Out of the • Incorporate in the coaching
• Service Orientation Box” ideas/approach next in-service • In-
• Results Focus training (INSET) service
the training on training
conceptualization on April
of innovative and and May
ingenious methods
and solutions

Figure 3.31. Sample of accomplished Part IV of the IPCRF: Development Plans.


THE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT PROCESS

The Rater and the Ratee and the Human Resource (HR) shall also ensure
that the action plans and interventions for employee development are
appropriate for the development needs of the Ratee. Below are examples
of developmental activities:

Geographical Seminars/
cross posting workshops

Benchmarking Coaching/
Counseling

Other Formal
Functional
cross posting developmental education/
classes
options

Job enhancement/ Developmental/


redesign lateral career move
Assignment to task
forces/committees/
special projects

Figure 3.32. Examples of developmental activities for teachers

70 - 20 - 10
Remember:
Learning Model
Use appropriate Learn and develop Learn and develop
interventions or activities through Experience Learn and through Structured
develop courses and programs
that have high impact through Others (Formal education)
and results in employee’s
development. 70% 20% 10%

For this purpose, it is


suggested that Principle
of the 70-20-10 Learning
Model shown in Figure 90% Experiential learning
and development
3.33 and Figure 3.34
be used as a guide.
Figure 3.33. Principle of the 70-20-10 Learning Model

43
THE RPMS MANUAL

70-20-10 Learning Model Examples

70 - Learn and 20 - Learn and 10 - Learn and


Develop Through Develop Through Develop Through
Experience Others Structured Courses
and Programs
• Applying new • Seeking informal (Formal Education)
learning in real feedback and work
situations debriefs • Learning through:
• Using feedback to • Seeking advice, - courses
try a new approach asking opinions, - workshops
to an old problem sounding out ideas - seminars
• Trying new work • Requesting - e-learning
and solving coaching from • Applying for
problems within manager/others professional
role • Getting 360° qualifications/
• Having increased feedback accreditation
span of control • Undergoing
• Having increased structured
decision-making mentoring and
• Becoming coaching
champion and/or • Participating in
managing changes Learning Action
Cells (LAC)

Figure 3.34. Examples of the 70-20-10 Learning Model Principle

44
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

PROFESSIONAL REFLECTIONS THROUGH

ANNOTATIONS

4
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Research Center
for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

4.1 What are Annotations?


A teacher’s path towards personal growth and professional development involves
reflection and learning in order to improve practice. One way of doing this is to become
more actively engaged in the process of careful introspection and critical evaluation of
your teaching practice. An essential step towards becoming a more reflective practitioner
is through writing annotations in your professional development portfolios.
Annotations are self-reflections, explanations or presentational mark-ups attached
to documents, artifacts or Means of Verification (MOV) that you submit for the RPMS.
They are important in instances when the evidences or artifacts presented in teacher
portfolios cannot capture the whole
dynamics of the teaching and learning
process. Further, annotations establish
a connection between the evidences and
the Rater; thus, facilitating the review of
the portfolio.

Figure 4.1.
Sample Annotations

46
PROFESSIONAL REFLECTIONS THROUGH ANNOTATIONS

4.2 What is the Importance of Annotations?


Annotations allow you to exercise reflective thinking. They help you describe
your teaching experiences and explain instructional decisions. Annotations are
important because they:

• make your evidence speak on your behalf;


• highlight your professional strengths in teaching;
• help you reflect on your teaching practices that pave the way for
professional advancement;
• describe your intentions, goals and purposes towards career growth;
• present and explain credentials required by the Rater for ranking and
promotion; and
• make it easier for the Rater to rate your performance.

4.3 What do you Annotate?


When writing annotations, you need to present evidences of your best
practices in the various Key Result Areas. The following are possibilities
for annotations:
• documents/artifacts that show your creativity and
resourcefulness in teaching;
• evidence that may fully satisfy the requirements of the
performance indicators but do not clearly demonstrate their link
to the indicators themselves; and
• classroom context that explains your teaching practice and the
realities you face in the classroom/school/community context.

4.4 How do you write Annotations?


Annotations help your Rater understand the story behind the MOV
and be familiar with the documents being reviewed. The following may
help you write annotations for a particular MOV in your RPMS Portfolio:

Step 1. Describe the Means of Verification (MOV)


that you want to annotate.
The following questions may help you describe
the MOV that you want to annotate:
a. What is your MOV about?
b. How does your MOV meet the KRA’s objectives?

Step 2. Reflect on your MOV.


These questions may guide your reflection:
a. How does your MOV meet the objective?
b. What do you wish to highlight in your MOV in relation to the
objective?
c. What classroom contexts explain your practices as reflected
in your MOV?

47
48

THE RPMS MANUAL


Sample Annotation Template for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers)

Description of the MOV


Objectives Means of Verification Annotations
Presented

1. Applied Classroom observation tool (COT) The MOV presented In this lesson, I incorporated
knowledge rating sheet and/or inter-observer was a lesson plan that knowledge of sports,
of content agreement form about knowledge of showed integration of specifically football/soccer
within and content within and across curriculum knowledge and content to my Math lesson. To get
across teaching areas in Physical Education. students interested, I drew
curriculum Lesson plans/modified DLLs developed attention to the sports news
teaching highlighting integration of content about how the Philippine team
areas knowledge within and across subject had been putting up a good
areas fight against more experienced
Instructional materials highlighting teams in Asia, such as Japan
mastery of content and its integration and Korea. To apply Math
in other subject areas concepts, I led the class in
Performance tasks/test material(s) discussing the game scores
highlighting integration of content and other sports statistics. My
knowledge within and across subject students were engaged. I was
areas able to deliver my lesson in
Others (Please specify and provide Math with an interesting focus
annnotations) on sports.

Figure 4.2. Sample Annotation Template for Teacher I-III (Proficient Teachers)
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

EFFECTIVE COACHING
& PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

5.1 What is Coaching?


Coaching is an interactive process where Raters and Ratees aim to
close performance gaps, teach skills, impart knowledge and inculcate
values and desirable work behaviors.

Competencies of an effective coach


The following are necessary competencies of an effective
coach:
• Self-clarity
• Communication
• Critical thinking
• Ability to build relationships and inspire

5.1.1 What is the difference among coaching,


mentoring and counselling?
Coaching is a process thatenables learning and development
to occur and thus, improve performance.

Mentoring is an off-line help by one person to another in


making significant transitions in knowledge, work or thinking.

Counselling is a principled relationship characterized by


the application of one or more psychological theories and a
recognized set of communication skills, modified by experience,
intuition and other interpersonal factors, to clients’ intimate
concerns, problems or aspirations.

How do
you feel I feel that
I need to
about your
improve
progress on...
so far?

Figure 5.1. The coach and the teacher discuss on issues and how they can be addressed

50
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5.1.2 What is the Coaching Model for DepEd?


In DepEd, there are three (3) opportunities to apply coaching.
Below is the coaching model.

Coach
for Maximum
Performance

Coach
for Work
Improvement

Coach
to Strengthen
Skills,
Competencies
Application and Behavior
Opportunities
Figure 5.2. Coaching Model for DepEd

5.1.2.1 Coach for Improvement


Coach for work improvement is applied when performance
gaps are observed and identified.

Performance gaps refer to the difference between an


employee’s current performance and what is required or
expected. These can either be gaps concerning work behavior or
skills. They could be both.

51
THE RPMS MANUAL

Tips in Identifying Performance Gaps


1. Routinely monitor/check employee performance
against stated performance metrics or agreed upon
monthly or quarterly milestones vs. subordinates
annual goals.

2. Analyze the tasks that the employee is not doing well.

3. Identify the causes, behaviors that interfere with


goal accomplishment in controllable/uncontrollable
situations.

4. Try to draw facts from other sources when possible.

5. Avoid premature judgments.

Catch a problem early!

Causes Description

Check work process before looking


Inefficient processes into faults in the people who run
them.

Personal Problems

Demand is too much or too fast-


Work Overload
paced

Jealousy, competition for attention


Relationships Conflict at Work
or for a promotion

Figure 5.3. Possible causes of poor performance

5.1.2.2 Coach for Maximum Performance


Coach for maximum performance is applied to sustain employee’s
high performance and for continuous performance improvement.
It is also an opportunity to develop succession plans and career
development of high-performing and high-potential staff for promotion.

52
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5.1.2.3 Coach to Strengthen Skills,


Competencies and Behavior
This model is applied to strengthen and/or develop new
competencies, skills, and behaviors.
It is also an opportunity to boost morale and confidence
of employees, as well as cultivate/raise the level of
performance.

5.1.3 What are the Four (4) Step Processes


of Coaching?
There are four (4) step processes that the coach and the coachee must
undertake to provide effective coaching.

Observation Discussion &


The rater identifies Agreement
a performance gap Coach and coachee
agree on: (1) problems
or an opportunity to be fixed; and (2) an
to improve. opportunity to move
job performance two
notches higher.

Follow up Active Coaching


Setting follow-up Coach and coachee
sessions to check on create and agree on
the status of the agreed the action plan to
upon action plan. address the gap.

Figure 5.4. Four Step Processes of Coaching

53
THE RPMS MANUAL

Steps in conducting discussion and agreement sessions


Step 1: Opening /Climate Setting/ Establishing Rapport
(achieving a comfort level that encourages openness)
• Thank employee for making time for the meeting.
• Express your hope that you will find the meeting useful.

Step 2: Objective Setting


• Tell employee things he or she is doing right; express sincere
appreciation.
• Tell your reason for calling the meeting with him or her.
• Give feedback on performance deficiency you have observed.
• Listen with empathy, i.e. give an empathic response, paraphrase
what he or she had said, and reflect on his or her feelings.

Step 3: Discussion and Agreement Proper


• Tell what you want him or her to do, how you want it done, and why
(standards of performance).
• If possible, show (model) how it is done.
• Then ask him or her to do it while you observe.
• Give positive feedback and/or correction; offer suggestions.
• Let him or her know you respect his or her ability.
• Agree upon appropriate actions - employee’s and yours.
• Let him or her know you will closely monitor his or her performance.

Step 4: Closing
• Share how you feel about the meeting.
• Ask him or her how he or she feels about the meeting.
• Schedule a follow-up meeting on a specific date.
• Thank him or her and express confidence that he or she can do it.
Assure him or her of your support.
• Shake hands and smile, while maintaining eye contact.

54
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

Why follow-up?
• It provides opportunities to remind employees about goals and the
importance of these goals.

• Periodic checks give you a chance to offer positive feedback about the good
things that employees do.

• These checks can help spot small problems before they become large ones.

Performance monitoring shall be the responsibility of both the Rater and the
Ratee who agree to track and record significant incidents through the use of the
Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form (PMCF) shown in Figure 3.21 on page
37 of this Manual.

Is there a difference between Managing and Coaching?

Managing focuses on... Coaching focuses on...

Telling Exploring

Directing Facilitating

Authority Partnership

Immediate Needs Long-term Improvement


A Specific Outcome Many possible outcomes

Figure 5.5. Difference between managing and coaching

Performance Coaching is not…

• a one-time process
• fault-finding and does not put the employee down
• giving advice and does not involve the coach sharing his or her
personal experience or opinions/beliefs

55
THE RPMS MANUAL

Performance Coaching is...

• Creating the right atmosphere

Mutual Trust
• Develop mutual trust by demonstrating concern for the Coachee’s
well-being and success. Showing empathy, genuine interest,
consultation, providing opportunities for the Coachee to move ahead are
demonstrations of concern.
• Experience in the matter at hand. Trust can be gained when the coach has
a reputation of success in the area.
• Being as good as your word. Trust is built through repeated
demonstration. Do what you say everytime.
• Not disclosing information held in Coachee’s desire for confidentiality

Accountability for Results


• A person who is not held accountable for results will not take coaching
seriously.
• A formal coaching plan makes accountability explicit.

Motivation to Learn and Improve


(workplace motivations that encourage people)
• Mastering an important skill will open the door to advancement.
• An employee sees that improved productivity is reflected in his or her
paycheck.
• A person knows that his or her job is in danger unless he or she learns to do
a particular task better.
• An employee has reached the point where he or she is eager to learn
something new or move on to a more challenging job.

• Practice active listening


Active listening encourages communication and puts other people at
ease. An Active Listener pays attention to the speaker and practices the
following good listening skills:
• Maintain eye contact
• Smile at appropriate moments
• Be sensitive to body language
• Listen first and evaluate later
• Never interrupt except to ask for clarification
• Indicate that you are listening by repeating what was said about critical
points

• Asking the right questions


Asking the right questions will help the Coach to understand the Coachee
and get to the bottom of performance problems.

56
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

Two Forms of Questions:


A. Open-ended
These questions invite participation and idea sharing.
These help the coach to know the Coachee’s feelings, views
and deeper thoughts on the problem, and in turn, help to
formulate better advice.
B. Closed-ended
These questions lead to “YES” or “NO” answers.

Sample of Closed-ended questions:


• To focus the response: “Is the program / plan on
schedule?”
• To confirm what the other person has said: “So, your big
problem is scheduling your time?”

5.2 What is Performance Feedback?


Performance feedback is an ongoing process between an
employee and a manager where information concerning the
performance expected and performance exhibited/demonstrated is
exchanged.

Figure 5.7 shows that effective feedback giving during the


performance cycle results to a successful Performance Appraisal.

Hi! Here’s your I am glad to hear


portfolio. Let’s about your
tal about your comments,
performance
ma’am.
rating.

Figure 5.6. An illustration of a


principal giving a teacher feedback

57
THE RPMS MANUAL

Infographics taken from https://www.cognology.com.au/


(No copyright infringement intended. Strictly for Academic Purposes only)

Figure 5.7. Successful Performance Appraisal resulting from Effective Feedback

58
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5.2.1 Why do we give feedback?


Feedback benefits the manager and employee and the organization. It can:
• build staff competence and confidence to achieve high performance;
• benefit the leader in his or her managerial and leadership functions; and
create a culture of performance excellence.

There are two types of feedback:

Type 1: Reinforce
This type of feedback identifies job-related behavior and performance
that contribute to individual, group and organizational goals. This
encourages the employee to repeat and develop them.

Type 2: Redirect
This type of feedback identifies job related behavior and performance
that do not contribute to individual, group and organizational goals and
helps the employee develop alternative strategies.

When is feedback effective?


Effective feedback should be specific; it tells your employees what
they did or did not accomplish, how they completed their tasks and
how effective their actions are.

Effective feedback is also timely, in order to reinforce positive actions


or provide alternative suggestions early enough that your employee
can adjust and enhance his or her performance.

• You give it early enough to create impact (adjust or enhance


performance)
• It is also important to know when to postpone the giving of
feedback.

Finally, feedback should be balanced, highlighting both the


employee’s strengths and areas for improvement.

59
THE RPMS MANUAL

5.2.2 What is STAR Feedback Model?


For effective feedback-giving performance, the STAR Model is applied.

Figure 5.8. The STAR Feedback Model

S/T – Situation or Task


• Provides context for staff’s action(s)
• Describes specific event, job, or assignment that
triggered or warranted a response

A – Action
• Specific response of staff to the situation or task
• What staff said or did
• Can be multiple actions
• Can also be non-action

R – Result
• What happened due to the staff’s action
• Can be effective or ineffective
• Can be concrete (e.g., report, written feedback from
client, extended processing time, etc.)
• Can be less tangible (e.g., low morale,
misunderstanding, etc.)

60
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5.2.3 What are the benefits of the STAR


Feedback Model?
The STAR Feedback Model:
• helps you focus staff’s attention on behaviors that got them to
their current level of performance;
• can be used to reinforce staff’s good performance, as well as to
facilitate improvement in staff’s performance; and
• can be used to give feedback verbally or in writing.

See Figure 5.9 for a sample Reinforce STAR Feedback of a Principal


to a Teacher that demonstrates a contributing behavior or performance.
For a sample of Redirect STAR Feedback of a Principal to a Teacher that
demonstrates a non-contributing behavior or performance, see Figure
5.10.

The STAR-AR Feedback Model is used for developmental or


performance improvement, where alternative action and result
is described.

STAR - AR

Alternative Action
What could be done better or differently next time?

Alternative Result
What could be the probable result or impact of the
alternative action?

61
THE RPMS MANUAL

Yesterday morning,
I observed that you have
a student that has seemed to
refuse to ac nowledge that
he lac ed the nowledge
and the s ills. Encourage the student
to accept that
In the past, “There is always
his former teachers more to learn” and
did not challenge his “I can listen and explore
composition s ills but always what this teacher
gave him high mar s. has to offer.”

Figure 5.9.
Sample of Reinforce
STAR Feedback
of a Principal to
a Teacher that
demonstrates
a contributing
behavior or
performance

When I as ed the student


Today, you too this afternoon about
the challenge his experience in your class,
and successfully he told me that you are
his first teacher who could
presented the
show him what he needed
subject matter so to now and help him understand
that the student the significance
accepted his s ill of good writing s ills.
level and wor ed to
learn what he needed Good job! You were able to handle
to now. the situation successfully.

62
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

A - While you provided


all of the data I as ed for,
I received it two days
after I requested,
because other
priorities had come up.

“Last wee , I as ed
R - Because the report you to complete
was late, I had to delay
our LAC meeting a documentation
with the division supervisor, of the LAC session.”
and we weren’t able to
complete our report.

A -“The next time you’re faced


with competing priorities,
Figure 5.10. Sample of
feel free to come to me Redirect STAR Feedback
for further directions.” of a Principal to a Teacher
that demonstrates a non-
contributing performance

R - “That way, I’ll now if you’re


having challenges completing
a request and I can help you
prioritize your assignments.”

63
THE RPMS MANUAL

Tips in providing redirect


or developmental feedback
Focus on facts, not the person.
• Choose positively-phrased statements, such as “Forgetting
to do that caused a delay,” rather than saying “You’re
completely disorganized.“

Share your thoughts on alternative approaches while


remembering to seek the other person’s ideas.
• “What do you think would be the best approach next time?”
• “If you do that, what results could we expect?”

Provide your employee with the necessary support in


terms of time, resources or coaching to act on your
feedback.
• “What resources or support would you need to carry this
out?”

64
EFFECTIVE COACHING AND GIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK

5.2.4 What is the Feedback Process?


The following are the processes for providing effective feedback:

Step 1: Preparation
• Self-Assessment. The teacher accomplishes a self-assessment
form and sends a copy to his or her immediate superior.
• Agreeing on the Schedule of the Meeting. The teacher and the
immediate superior agree on the meeting schedule.
• Gathering Data and Preparing Discussion Notes. The teacher
and the immediate superior gather data and note down discussion
points for the meeting. The discussion points can be:
• Performance Objectives
• Critical Indicents/STARs
• Progress or Final Results
• Development Plans

Step 2: Conducting the Meeting


• Opening the Meeting. Greet the teacher and make him or her feel
comfortable. Thank him or her for his or her time. You may engage
in quick, light, small talk.
• Clarifying the Meeting. The immediate supervisor should signal
start of discussion and state the purpose of the meeting.
• Discussion. Go through each ofthe objectives and discuss with the
teacher the extent of accomplishment versus targets. Be prepared
to discuss specific examples of behaviors and performance
outcomes. Listen actively and openly. Take down notes.
• Giving Feedback. Prepare your notes. Be specific and own the
feedback. Engage the teacher in the discussion.

Step 3: Closing the Meeting


• Ask the teacher to share his/her take-aways.
• What were my major achievements?
• What have I done well or am doing well?
• In what key areas could I have done or should I do better?
• How is my overall performance?
• What are my next steps?
• Affirm your trust in the teacher. Thank him or her for his or
her time.

65
THE RPMS MANUAL

Key Principles for Interactions


• Maintain or enhance self-esteem.

• Listen and respond with empathy.

• Ask for help and encourage involvement.

• Share thoughts, feelings, and rationale (to build trust).

• Provide support without removing responsibility (to build


ownership).

Tips in Receiving Feedback (for Teachers)


• Welcome constructive feedback (withhold judgment).
• Clarify and seek understanding (i.e. paraphrase, probe).
• Evaluate based on critical incidents, observations.
• Decide what to do with the feedback.

66
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

TOOLS WITHIN
THE RPMS CYCLE

6
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

The RPMS Cycle


To ensure teacher quality, the Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS)
aligns theperformance targetsandaccomplishments withthe Philippine Professional Standards
for Teachers (PPST). This alignment covers teacher performance for one school year, starting in
May (last week or a week after the opening of classes) and ending in April (first week or a week
after graduation and/or moving up ceremonies).
The RPMS Manual for Teachers and School Heads provides information and guidance to
Teachers and Schoolsintheuse ofdifferenttoolsand forms to assess performance, thedifferent
assessment processes and different developmental activities for teachers as they undergo the
four-stage performance RPMS cycle, namely, Performance Planning and Commitment (Phase
1); Performance Monitoring and Coaching (Phase 2); Performance Review and Evaluation (Phase
3); and Performance Rewarding and Development Planning (Phase 4).
See Figure 6.2 on page 69 for the graphic representation of the phases of the RPMS Cycle,
and the tools and processes within.

6.1 Self-Assessment Tools in the RPMS Cycle


TheSelf-AssessmentToolisacommontoolforassessingteacherperformance. It
can be used as a starting point for informal purposes of self-reflection to clarify
performance expectations and determine which competencies to focus on. It can
also be used to monitor the progression or improvement of teacher competencies
and validate whether the interventions provided are effective. It can guide
discussions about goal-setting and professional development needs.

Performance Monitoring and Coaching

Self- Actual Development


Reflection Performance Planning

Figure 6.1. Self-assessment as a crucial step towards development planning

68
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

I PERFORMANCE PLANNING
AND COMMITMENT

Activity : Discussion / Issuance of


RPMS Tools
Tool(s)/ : IPCRF + SAT + IPCRF-
Form(s) Development Plans
Timeline : May - last week, a week
before the opening of
classes
Output : Development Plans based
on SAT, Signed IPCRF

II
PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE

IV REWARDING AND
DEVELOPMENT
PLANNING
MONITORING AND
COACHING

Teacher
Activity : Mid-year Review and
Activity : Ways Forward Development Assessment
Planning Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +

Quality
i

Tool(s)/ : IPCRF-Development Plans Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans


Form(s) using Performance Monitoring
Timeline : April, 1st Friday & Coaching Form (PMCF)
Output : Reward, Recognition, Timeline : Oct - Nov, End of 1st Semester
IPCRF-DP Output : Agreements based on IPCRF,
IPCRF-Development Plans &
Portfolio

III PERFORMANCE REVIEW


AND EVALUATION
Activity : Year-End Review &
Assessment, Evaluation of
Portfolio & Computation of
Final Rating
Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +
Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans
using Performance Monitoring
& Coaching Form (PMCF)
Timeline : April 1st week - A week after
graduation
Output : IPCRF w/ Computed Final
Rating

Legend:

L&D - Learning and Development RPMS - Results-Based Performance Management System


IPCRF - Individual Performance Commitment & Review Form SAT-RPMS - Self Assessment Tools RPMS
IPCRF-DP - Part IV: Development Plans of the IPCRF TA - Technical Assistance
PMCF - Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form

Figure 6.2. The Tools within the RPMS Cycle

69
THE RPMS MANUAL

I PERFORMANCE PLANNING
AND COMMITMENT

Activity : Discussion / Issuance of


RPMS Tools
Tool(s)/ : IPCRF + SAT + IPCRF-
Form(s) Development Plans
Timeline : May - last week, a week
before the opening of
classes
Output : Development Plans based
on SAT, Signed IPCRF

II
PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE

IV REWARDING AND
DEVELOPMENT
PLANNING
MONITORING AND
COACHING

Teacher
Activity : Mid-year Review and
Activity : Ways Forward Development Assessment
Planning Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +

Quality
i

Tool(s)/ : IPCRF-Development Plans Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans


Form(s) using Performance Monitoring
Timeline : April, 1st Friday & Coaching Form (PMCF)
Output : Reward, Recognition, Timeline : Oct - Nov, End of 1st Semester
IPCRF-DP Output : Agreements based on IPCRF,
IPCRF-Development Plans &
Portfolio

III PERFORMANCE REVIEW


AND EVALUATION
Activity : Year-End Review &
Assessment, Evaluation of
Portfolio & Computation of
Final Rating
Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +
Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans
using Performance Monitoring
& Coaching Form (PMCF)
Timeline : April 1st week - A week after
graduation
Output : IPCRF w/ Computed Final
Rating

Legend:

L&D - Learning and Development RPMS - Results-Based Performance Management System


IPCRF - Individual Performance Commitment & Review Form SAT-RPMS - Self Assessment Tools RPMS
IPCRF-DP - Part IV: Development Plans of the IPCRF TA - Technical Assistance
PMCF - Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form

Figure 6.3. Self-assessment tools in the RPMS Cycle

70
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

The teachers should assess their own performance prior to the beginning
of the year (Performance Planning and Commitment) and reflect on their
performance throughout the RPMS Cycle. The results of this self-assessment
will guide the teachers and the principal on which RPMS indicators the teachers
must improve on and the areas where they need coaching and mentoring.

6.1.1 What are the Self-Assessment


Tools-RPMS (SAT-RPMS)?

The Self-Assessment Tools-RPMS (SAT-RPMS) comprises two


different self-assessment questionnaires within the RPMS designed
for Teacher I-III and Master Teacher I-IV to reflect on the different
performance indicators that relate to their professional work. It is
meant to support teacher performance and professional development.
There are two SAT-RPMS: 1) SAT-RPMS for Teacher I-III; and 2) SAT-
RPMS for Master Teacher I-IV.
Teacher I, Teacher II and Teacher III shall use the SAT-RPMS for Teacher
I-III while Master Teacher I, Master Teacher II, Master Teacher III and Master
Teacher IV shall use the SAT-RPMS for Master I-IV.
There are 13 objectives in the SAT-RPMS, including the Plus Factor.
These objectives are aligned with the objectives listed in the RPMS Tools.

Figure 6.4. Self-Assessment Tools-RPMS

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THE RPMS MANUAL

6.1.2. What are the parts of the SAT-RPMS?


The SAT-RPMS has the following parts:

1. Cover Page. This page introduces the SAT-RPMS, its


purposes and parts. It also provides instructions on how to
accomplish the SAT-RPMS. See Figure 6.4.

2. Demographic Profile. This part collects the teacher’s


demographic information, such as age, sex, rank or position,
highest degree obtained, among others.

Figure 6.5. Part I: Demographic Profile of SAT-RPMS for Teacher I-III

72
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

3. Objectives. This page contains the 13 objectives ofthe SAT-RPMS.


Using a four-point Likert scale, the teachers will rate themselves in terms
ofhow capable they are in performing each objective and the development
priority they give to each objective.

Figure 6.6. Part II: Performance Indicators of SAT-RPMS for Teacher I-III

73
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.1.3. How do you take the SAT-RPMS?


Step 1: Determine your corresponding SAT-RPMS.
Identify your SAT-RPMS by considering your current
position and general description of your practice based on the
Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers.
If you are a Teacher I, Teacher II or Teacher III, use the tool for
SAT-RPMS for Teacher I-III. If you are a Master Teacher I, Master
Teacher II, Master Teacher III and Master Teacher IV, use the tool
for Master Teacher I-IV. Senior High School teachers shall use
the SAT-RPMS corresponding to their current rank/position,
regardless of the years in service.

Figure 6.7 A graphical representation of a teacher looking at SAT-RPMS

74
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

Step 2: Take the SAT-RPMS appropriate to your position.


Accomplish Part I: Demographic Profile by ticking the item that
describes you.
In Part II: Objectives, shade the circle that corresponds to the
rating you give yourself for each indicator according to the level of
your capability and development priority. You may also write your
comments about the indicators in the box provided at the end of
SAT-RPMS page. See Figure 6.8.

Figure 6.8. Screenshot of the box on the bottom of the SAT-RPMS Page

Step 3: Discuss with your Principal the results of your SAT-


RPMS.
After taking the SAT-RPMS, discuss with your Principal the
Development Plan based the results of your self-assessment.

Figure 6.9
A graphical representation of a teacher (Ratee) and a principal (Rater) discussing
the Development Plan based on the teachers’ SAT-RPMS results

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THE RPMS MANUAL

6.1.4. How do you use the results of


SAT-RPMS?
Step 1: The teacher prepares the Development Plan
based on the results of SAT-RPMS.
The teacher can reflect in the plan as development needs the
objectives that rated “Low” in terms of level of capability, or “High”
or “Very High” in terms of priority for development.
The objectives rated “High” or “Very High” in terms of level of
capability can be reflected as strengths in the Development Plan.
See Figure 6.10 for the sample accomplished Part IV:
Development Plans (IPCRF-DP) based on the SAT-RPMS results.
Follow the steps in Chapter 3, page 41 in preparing for the Part IV:
DP.

Step 2: The teacher discusses the Development Plan


with the Principal.

Step 3: The teacher and the Principal come to an


agreement about the final Development Plan.

The IPCRF-DP shall be updated during Phase 4: Performance Rewarding


and Development Planning and shall be informed by the actual ratings of the
IPCRF in Phase 3: Performance Review and Evaluation.
The resultscan informvarious developmentinterventionsin preparation
for the next school year, such as In-Service Training (INSET) Orientation/
Teacher Induction Program (TIP).
Both the teacher and the Principal may also refer to the Development
Plans in the monitoring and coaching of the teacher’s performance and in
providing the necessary interventions

Note: An electronic system will be given as a


supplemental material. The system supports schools in
analyzing school-wide SAT data of teachers to help plan for
teachers’ professional development.

76
PART IV: DEVELOPMENT PLANS OF THE IPCRF (IPCRF-DP)

Action Plan
(Recommended Resources
Strengths Development Needs Timeline Needed
Developmental
Intervention)
A. Teaching Competencies (PPST)
Objective 3, KRA 1 Objective 3, KRA 1 Applying new learning Learning and
To apply a range of teaching To apply a range of teaching from attending courses/ Development
strategies to develop critical strategies to develop critical seminars/workshops/
and creative thinking, as well and creative thinking, as Learning Action Cells Team
as other higher-order thinking well as other higher-order (LAC)/ E-learning
skill thinking skills
Using feedback to try a Year-round Supervisors /
new approach to an old
practice School Heads /
Master
Coaching and mentoring Teachers

Local Funds
B. Core Behavioral Competencies (DepEd)
• Professionalism and Ethics Innovation particularly on • Coaching • Regular HRTD Funds
• Teamwork conceptualizing “Out of the • Incorporate in the coaching
• Service Orientation Box” ideas/approach next in-service • In-

TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE


• Results Focus training (INSET) service
the training on training
conceptualization on April
of innovative and and May
ingenious methods
and solutions

Figure 6.10.Sample of accomplished Part IV of the IPCRF: Development Plans.


77
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.2 Classroom Observation Tools in the RPMS Cycle


Classroom observation is a process ofproviding feedback to a teacher’s classroom
practice. Feedback given provides quality input for the continuous improvement of
teacher practice and provides opportunities to share ideas and expertise, as well as
promote mentoring and coaching among colleagues. It also encourages teachers
to reflect and develop awareness about their own practice as it provides evidence of
actualteacherperformance, theirstrengthsandareas for developmentandtheimpact
of their practice. Finally, classroom observation aims to visualize classroom practices.
To be more effective, classroom observation must be based on a set of standards,
which can assess teaching quality across a continuum of development (Darling-
Hammond, 2012). The link between what the teachers can do as evidenced by their
classroom performance and the standards against which this performance can be
rated or evaluated is crucial in classroom observation.

Figure 6.11. Classroom Observation Tools and Forms in the RPMS Cycle

78
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

In the RPMS Cycle, teacher’s classroom performance is assessed against the


indicators of the Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers (PPST). The results of
classroom observation are considered non-negotiable means of verification (MOV) of
teacher performance that can prove teacher’s attainment of classroom observable
objectives in the RPMS Tools.

Figure 6.12. Classroom Observation Tools and Forms in the RPMS Cycle

79
THE RPMS MANUAL

I PERFORMANCE PLANNING
AND COMMITMENT

Activity : Discussion / Issuance of


RPMS Tools
Tool(s)/ : IPCRF + SAT + IPCRF-
Form(s) Development Plans
Timeline : May - last week, a week
before the opening of
classes
Output : Development Plans based
on SAT, Signed IPCRF

II
PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE

IV REWARDING AND
DEVELOPMENT
PLANNING
MONITORING AND
COACHING

Teacher
Activity : Mid-year Review and
Activity : Ways Forward Development Assessment
Planning Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +

Quality
i

Tool(s)/ : IPCRF-Development Plans Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans


Form(s) using Performance Monitoring
Timeline : April, 1st Friday & Coaching Form (PMCF)
Output : Reward, Recognition, Timeline : Oct - Nov, End of 1st Semester
IPCRF-DP Output : Agreements based on IPCRF,
IPCRF-Development Plans &
Portfolio

III PERFORMANCE REVIEW


AND EVALUATION
Activity : Year-End Review &
Assessment, Evaluation of
Portfolio & Computation of
Final Rating
Tool(s)/ : RPMS Tools + IPCRF + SAT +
Form(s) IPCRF-Development Plans
using Performance Monitoring
& Coaching Form (PMCF)
Timeline : April 1st week - A week after
graduation
Output : IPCRF w/ Computed Final
Rating

Legend:

L&D - Learning and Development RPMS - Results-Based Performance Management System


IPCRF - Individual Performance Commitment & Review Form SAT-RPMS - Self Assessment Tools RPMS
IPCRF-DP - Part IV: Development Plans of the IPCRF TA - Technical Assistance
PMCF - Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form

Figure 6.13. Classroom Observation Tools in the RPMS Cycle

80
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

6.2.1 What are the Classroom Observation


Tools-RPMS (COT-RPMS)?
There are two (2) Classroom Observation Tools for RPMS (COT-
RPMS), one for Teachers I-III (Proficient) and one for Master Teachers
I-IV (Highly Proficient). The indicators in the tools are the observable
classroom objectives listed in the RPMS tools. The language of
the indicators is from the Proficient career stage in the Philippine
Professional Standards for Teacher (PPST).
COT-RPMS for Teachers I-III has nine (9) indicators, while the COT-
RPMS for Master Teacher I-IV has five (5) indicators.

Figure 6.14. COT-RPMS Rubric Front Page

6.2.1.1 Mapped RPMS Objectives


and COT Indicators

Not all objectives in the RPMS tools are classroom observable. The
tables below show the congruence between the RPMS objectives and COT
indicators.
See Figures 6.15 and 6.16 for the mapped RPMS objectives and COT
indicators.

81
82

THE RPMS MANUAL


RPMS COT
Objective Objectives Indicator Indicators
Number Number
Applied knowledge of content within and across Applies knowledge of content within and across
1 curriculum teaching areas. 1 curriculum teaching areas
Used a range of teaching strategies that enhance Uses a range of teaching strategies that enhance
2 learner achievement in literacy and numeracy skills. 2 learner achievement in literacy and numeracy skills
Applied a range of teaching strategies to develop Applies a range of teaching strategies to develop
3 critical and creative thinking, as well as other 3 critical and creative thinking, as well as other
higher-order thinking skills. higher-order thinking skills
Managed classroom structure to engage learners, Manages classroom structure to engage learners,
individually or in groups, in meaningful exploration, individually or in groups, in meaningful exploration,
4 discovery and hands-on activities within a range of
4 discovery and hands-on activities within a range of
physical learning environments. physical learning environments
Managed learner behavior constructively by Manages learner behavior constructively by
5 applying positive and non-violent discipline to 5 applying positive and non-violent discipline to
ensure learning focused environments. ensure learning-focused environments
Used differentiated, developmentally appropriate Uses differentiated, developmentally appropriate
6 learning experiences to address learners’ gender, 6 learning experiences to address learners' gender,
needs, strengths, interests and experiences. needs, strengths, interests and experiences
Planned, managed and implemented Plans, manages and implements developmentally
developmentally sequenced teaching and learning sequenced teaching and learning processes to
7 processes to meet curriculum requirements and
7 meet curriculum requirements and varied teaching
varied teaching contexts. contexts
Selected, developed, organized and used Selects, develops, organizes, and uses appropriate
8 appropriate teaching and learning resources, 8 teaching and learning resources, including ICT, to
including ICT, to address learning goals. address learning goals
Designed, selected, organized and used diagnostic, Designs, selects, organizes, and uses diagnostic,
10 formative and summative assessment strategies 9 formative and summative assessment strategies
consistent with curriculum requirements. consistent with curriculum requirements

Figure 6.15.Mapped RPMS Objectives and COT Indicator for Teacher I-III
RPMS COT
Objective Objectives Indicator Indicators
Number Number
Modeled effective applications of content Applies knowledge of content within and across
1 knowledge within and across curriculum teaching 1 curriculum teaching areas
areas.
Developed and applied effective teaching Applies a range of teaching strategies to develop
3 strategies to promote critical and creative thinking, 2 critical and creative thinking, as well as other
as well as other higher-order thinking skills. higher-order thinking skills
Worked with colleagues to model and share Manages classroom structure to engage learners,
effective techniques in the management of individually or in groups, in meaningful exploration,
classroom structure to engage learners, individually discovery and hands-on activities within a range of
4 or in groups, in meaningful exploration, discovery
3 physical learning environments
and hands-on activities within a range of physical
learning environments.
Exhibited effective and constructive behavior Manages learner behavior constructively by
management skills by applying positive and non- applying positive and non-violent discipline to
5 violent discipline to ensure learning-focused
4 ensure learning-focused environments
environments.
Developed and applied effective strategies in the Plans, manages and implements developmentally

TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE


planning and management of developmentally sequenced teaching and learning processes to
7 sequenced teaching and learning processes to 5 meet curriculum requirements and varied teaching
meet curriculum requirements and varied teaching contexts
contexts.

Figure 6.16. Mapped RPMS Objectives and COT Indicator for Master Teacher I-IV
83
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.2.1.2 Indicator List


Classroom observation in the RPMS cycle is distributed within the academic year.
The prescribed indicators per observation period are shown in Figures 6.17 and 6.18.

The check mark signifies in the table below that the indicator has to be shown in
the observation period.

COT Observation Period


Indicator THE TEACHER:
No. 1 2 3 4
Applies knowledge of content within and
1 / / / /
across curriculum teaching areas
Uses a range of teaching strategies that
2 enhance learner achievement in literacy and / / / /
numeracy skills
Applies a range of teaching strategies to
3 develop critical and creative thinking, as well / / / /
as other higher-order thinking skills
Manages classroom structure to engage
learners, individually or in groups, in
4 meaningful exploration, discovery and / / / /
hands-on activities within a range of physical
learning environments
Manages learner behavior constructively by
5 applying positive and non-violent discipline / / / /
to ensure learning-focused environments
Uses differentiated, developmentally
appropriate learning experiences to address
6 / x / x
learners’ gender, needs, strengths, interests
and experiences
Plans, manages and implements
developmentally sequenced teaching and
7 / / / /
learning processes to meet curriculum
requirements and varied teaching contexts
Selects, develops, organizes, and uses
8 appropriate teaching and learning resources, x / / /
including ICT, to address learning goals
Designs, selects, organizes, and uses
diagnostic, formative and summative
9 x x x /
assessment strategies consistent with
curriculum requirements

Figure 6.17. Indicator List for Proficient Teachers

84
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

For Highly Proficient level, all indicators are expected to be ob-


served per observation period.

COT Observation Period


Indicator THE TEACHER:
No. 1 2 3 4
Applies knowledge of content within and
1 / / / /
across curriculum teaching areas
Applies a range of teaching strategies to
2 develop critical and creative thinking, as well / / / /
as other higher-order thinking skills
Manages classroom structure to engage
learners, individually or in groups, in
3 meaningful exploration, discovery and / / / /
hands-on activities within a range of physical
learning environments
Manages learner behavior constructively by
4 applying positive and non-violent discipline / / / /
to ensure learning-focused environments
Plans, manages and implements
developmentally sequenced teaching and
5 / / / /
learning processes to meet curriculum
requirements and varied teaching contexts

Figure 6.18. Indicator List for Highly Proficient Teachers

6.2.2 What are the COT-RPMS Forms?


The COT-RPMS are composed of five forms:
• Rubric
• Observation Notes Form
• Rating Sheet
• Inter-Observer Agreement Form

Each form is used at a specific stage in the observation process.

85
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.2.2.1 Rubric
The rubric contains a performance continuum for each career
stage. For Teacher I-III (with Levels 3-7), the expected attained level
is at least Level 6, Consolidating. For Master Teacher I-IV (with Levels
4-8), the expected attained level is at least Level 7, Integrating.

The rubric has the following parts:

1. Rubric Level Summary. This refers to both the name and


description of each level, described according to performance of
teachers in the classroom.

Figure 6.20. Rubric Level Summary for Teacher I-III

Figure 6.21. Rubric Level Summary for Master Teacher I-IV

86
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

2. Indicators. This refers to the specific classroom observable practice


of teachers.

Figure 6.22. The Indicators of COT-RPMS

3. Level Description. This refers to the description of practice for each


level. The description explains the practice expected of teachers in the
classroom.
As teachers progress in their careers, different levels of performance are
expected of them. The development in levels refers to the expectations of
teachers in different career stages: Levels 3-7 for Teacher I-III while Levels
4-8 for Master Teacher I-IV.

Figure 6.23. Level Description

87
THE RPMS MANUAL

4. Clarifications. This refers to definitions or elaborations of some


terms included in the level descriptions.

5. Features of Practice. This refers to specific classroom practices,


which help describe a particular level.

Figure 6.24. Clarifications and Features of Practice

88
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

6.2.2.2 Observation Notes Form

The observer(s) use(s) this form to take note of his or her specific
observations and comments during the classroom observation. This
is the only form the observer(s) will bring and complete during the
observation.

Figure 6.19. Observation Notes Form

89
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.2.2.3 Rating Sheet

This form lists the indicators in the COT-RPMS tool. The


observer(s) use(s) this form to indicate the rating/level attained by
the observed teacher in each indicator.
This form is completed after the observation. Refer to the
Indicator List to check which indicators are expected to be observed
within the observation period.

Figure 6.25. Rating Sheet of the COT-RPMS

Note:
• If possible, a subject expert is expected to rate Indicator 1 (Applies knowledge of content within and
across curriculum content areas).
• Elementary teachers are “generalists,” any observer may rate Indicator 1.
• It is highly recommended that 2-3 observers sit for an observation. However, if challenges like
schedules and availabilty of observers hinder a school to follow this recommendation, one (1)
observer will be enough.

90
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

6.2.2.4 Inter-Observer Agreement Form

Observer(s) use(s) this form. It serves as the final rating form used during the
Inter-Observer Agreement Exercise.
To arrive at an agreed rating, each observer discusses and justifies the
rating(s) given to the observed teacher. The agreed rating is not the average of
the ratings given but the rating agreed upon by all the observers.
In case there is only one observer, i.e. the Principal, his or her rating is the
final rating.

Figure 6.26. Inter-Observer Agreement Form

Note:
• This form is used when there are 2-3 observers.
• The observers meet with the teacher to discuss the results of the observation. This aims to help the teacher
improve his or her performance through constructive feedback.

91
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.2.3 What are the roles and responsibilities of


Teachers and Observers?
6.2.3.1 Teachers are Teacher I-III or Master
Teacher I-IV who will be observed

Teachers are expected to:


1. review the Classroom Observation Rubric appropriate to their
career stage.
2. understand the observation process.
3. prepare for and participate in each step of the observation
process.
4. prepare and provide the lesson plan/modified DLL for the
observation

6.2.3.2 Observers are Principals/


School Heads, Department Heads/
Chairpersons and/or Master Teachers
Observers are expected to:
1. review the observation process and ensure thatall steps are correctly
followed.
2. review and understand the Classroom Observation Rubric and the
differentforms tobe usedat different stage in the observation:
Observation Notes Form, Rating Sheet, and Inter-Observer
Agreement Form (to be used if there are more than one observers).
3. rate the teacherusing the Rating Sheet. Identify the teacher’s
strengths and areas for improvement then make recommendations
for improving performance, as guided by the COT-RPMS rubric.
4. ensure thatthe Classroom Observation Forms (Observation Notes
Form, Rating Sheet, and Inter-Observer Agreement Form) contain
accurate information aboutthe teacherand the class observed.
5. meetwith the teacherafterthe observation to discuss the results of
the observation.

It is highly encouraged that 2-3 observers participate


in the observation.However, if challenges like schedules
and availability of observers hinder a school to follow this
recommendation, one (1) observer will be enough.

92
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

6.2.4 What are the processes and protocols


in Classroom Observation?

6.2.4.1 Pre-Observation
Observer Teacher
1. Reviews the COT-RPMS Rubric 1. Reviews the COT-RPMS
appropriate to the level of the Rubric appropriate to his or
teacher he or she will observe. her position.
• It is highly recommended that 2. Refers to the Indicator List
2-3 observers participate in expected to be observed in
the observation, whenever each quarter/observation
possible. period in order to plan well for
However, if challenges like the observation.
schedules and availabilty of 3. Plans his or her lesson
observers hinder a school to according to the indicators
follow this recommendation, expected for the particular
one (1) observer will be observation period.
enough. 4. Provides the observers with
2. Refers to the list of indicators the lesson plan/DLP/DLL.
expected to be observed in each
observation period.
Note:
If there are multiple observations
within a day, it is recommended that
an observer undertakes no more than
three (3) observations per day.

Figure 6.27. Protocols in Pre-observation process.

6.2.4.2 Actual Observation


Observer Teacher
1. Sits at available chairs. Multiple 1. Delivers the lesson.
observers are expected to sit
apart.
2. Uses the Observation Notes
Form to record comments and
observations on the teacher’s
performance.
3. If there are multiple observers,
avoid engaging in any
discussion with one another.
Showing any feedback on
the teacher’s performance
using facial expression is also
discouraged.
4. Observes the entire class
period.

Figure 6.28. Processes and protocols in the Actual Observation process

93
THE RPMS MANUAL

6.3.4.3 Post-Observation

Observer Teacher
1. Thanks the teacher and leave
the room immediately after
observation.

2. Individual rating
Rates the teacher using the
COT-RPMS Rubric appropriate
to the teacher’s level. Only
those indicators expected to
be observed in an observation
period as specified in the table of
list of indicators, must be given
rating.
• If there are multiple
observers, only the subject
specialist is expected to rate
Indicator 1.
• If there is only one observer,
he or she rates Indicator 1.
• Elementary teachers are
generalists; all observers are
expected to rate Indicator 1.

3. Inter-Observer Agreement
Exercise (in case of multiple
observers)
Meets all other observers to
discuss the individual ratings
given. In case of different ratings,
the observers must resolve the
differences and assign an agreed
rating. The agreed rating is not an
average; it is a final rating based
on reasoned and consensual
judgment.
4. Meets with the teacher to discuss
the results of the observation.

Figure 6.29. Processes and protocols in Post-observation process

94
TOOLS WITHIN THE RPMS CYCLE

OBSERVERS TOOL NEEDED TEACHER


• Review the COT- • Review the COT-
RPMS Rubric RPMS Rubric
PRE-OBSERVATION appropriate for appropriate to his/
the rank of the her rank
teacher to be • Plan the lesson
RUBRIC
observed. • Refer to the
• Refer to the INDICATOR LIST indicator list for
indicator list for the prescribed
the prescribed indicator to plan
indicator to be the lesson
rated
• Arrive at the
designated
classroom a few
minutes before
the observation

• Sit at any available • Delivers the


OBSERVATION

seats in the lesson


classroom
• Multiple observers OBSERVATION
are to sit apart
• Record all NOTES FORM
comments on
the Observation
Notes Form

• Rate the teacher RATING SHEET


POST-OBSERVATION

In case of multiple
observers:
• Discuss the rating INTER-OBSERVER
with the fellow AGREEMENT
observers
FORM
• Decide on the final
rating

Observers and the teacher meet to discuss


the results of the observation. The teacher and observer(s)
affix their signature on the rating.

Figure 6.30. Graphical representation of the Classroom Observation Process

95
THE RPMS MANUAL

> This page is intentionally left blank <

96
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
/ ACRONYMS

7
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

Annotations Self-reflection, explanation, or presentational mark-up attached to/


written on a document, artifact, or Means of Verification (MOV); see
reflection notes.
Artifacts All documents that provide evidence of quality instruction (e.g.
lesson plan, daily lesson log, instructional materials, etc.) which
may be used as means of verifying attainment of Key Result Areas
(KRAs).
Assessment The process of gathering, documenting and organizing in
measurable terms, knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to
determine how much they attain the KRAs .
Process of determining the relevance, worth or value of documents
and evidences.
Assessment Phase Any of the stages in the portfolio assessment process: pre-
assessment phase, assessment phase and post assessment.
Assessment Process A set of procedures or stages in evaluating a portfolio to determine
the merits of its contents.
Authenticate Raters and Ratee affix their signatures to verify, prove or confirm
that a Portfolio document is an original or a genuine copy.
Career Growth Pertains to the developmental progression as teachers develop,
refine their practice, and respond to the complexities of educational
reforms Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers.
Career Stages The different phases in one’s teaching career which starts from
being a Beginning, to Proficient, to Highly Proficient and to
Distinguished teacher.
Checklist A list of documents, artifacts and evidences that must be included
in the portfolio which can help teachers in gathering, selecting and
organizing the MOV in their Portfolio.
Clarifications Definitions or explanations of some terms included in the level
descriptions.
Classroom Context The setting or environment where the teaching-learning process
takes place. It also points to the all the factors which may affect the
teaching-learning process in the classroom.
Classroom Observation A subset of the full Classroom Observation Tool used for RPMS for
Tool – Results- Teachers.
based Performance
Management System
(COT-RPMS)
Content Knowledge Competencies that teachers are expected to master for them to
teach efficiently and effectively.
Competencies Knowledge, skills and values that individuals demonstrate in
achieving one’s results. Competencies shall uphold the DepEd’s
core values. They represent the way individuals define and live the
values. (DepEd Order No. 2, s. 2015, p. 6) .
Demonstration Teaching Showcasing the Master Teachers’ teaching-learning practice either
in their own classrooms which may be attended by their colleagues
or in a formal demonstration festival in school, district or division.

98
GLOSSARY OF TERMS/ACRONYMS

Features of practice Specific classroom practices, which may characterize a particular


level.
Inter-Observer A discussion among observers to arrive at an agreed rating. This
Agreement Exercise occurs during the post-observation process and involves the use of
the Inter-Observer Agreement Form.
Learning Context The teaching/learning situation, environment and all the factors in
which learners learn from instruction.
Level Description Description of practice for each level. The description explains the
features of practice expected of teachers in the classroom.
Mid-year Review The Portfolio assessment process usually conducted in November
or December to identify the areas that a teacher needs to improve
in preparation for the Year-end Assessment.
Objectives The specific tasks that an office and/or individual employee needs
to do to achieve the major final outputs under the key result areas.
(DepEd Order No. 2, s. 2015, p. 2). They also refer to a specific result
that a teacher aims to achieve within a time frame and with available
resources.
Outcomes The results achieved and/or the products developed as a result of
the instructional process.
In the RPMS, outcomes refer to the results of the Teacher
performance of their duties and responsibilities.
Observation A classroom observation; usually 50-60 minutes.
Observation Notes A form used by the observer(s) during the observation.
Observers School Heads, Department Heads/Chairpersons, Master
Teacher/s who conduct the classroom observation for RPMS.
This is provided in DO 2,s 2015.
Performance The action or process of carrying out or accomplishing tasks, duties
and responsibilities.
Performance Data The rating that a teacher garnered from the portfolio assessment.
Performance Indicators An exact quantification of objectives, which shall serve as an
assessment tool that gauges whether a performance is positive or
negative (DepEd Order No. 2, s. 2015).
Portfolio Assessment A process of gauging teacher performance based on verifiable
Process evidence organized in a portfolio. It follows three phases: pre-
assessment, assessment and post-assessment.
Philippine Professional A set of professional standards for teachers
Standards for Teachers that operationalizes teacher quality aspects of the K to 12
reform and elaborates teacher lifelong learning. It contains 37
performance indicators per career stage. It provides an acceptable
common language for professional discussions among teachers
and other concerned stakeholders.
Portfolio Organization It is a systematic arrangement and presentation of documents done
to facilitate the rater’s assessment process.
Post-Assessment Phase Portfolio assessment conducted at the end of the school year.
Post-Observation The concluding phase of the observation process during which
observers assign individual ratings, undertake the inter-observer
agreement exercise and make recommendations to improve a
teacher’s performance.

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Pre-Observation The preliminary phase of the observation process in which


teachers and observers prepare for the observation.
Pre-Observation A form provided to the teacher prior to the observation (maybe
Checklist a day or minutes before observation). The teacher indicates by
checking the indicators he/she planned to be observed.
Professional The continuous process of acquiring new knowledge and skills
Development that relate to teacher’s personal development, profession, job
responsibilities, or work environment.
Ratee The individual teacher who is rated. They are the teachers from
all career stages, Beginning Teachers (Teacher I with 0-3 years in
service), Proficient Teachers (Teacher I-III with more than 3 years
in service) and Master Teachers who submit their portfolios as
evidence of their teaching performance (DepEd Order No. 2, s.
2015, p. 2).
Rater May be the principal, head teacher, master teacher or colleague who
evaluates the documents presented by the teacher.
Reflection Notes The insights or realizations that teachers write as a result of careful
introspection on events, discussions, decisions and/or actions they
make. Reflections notes may be attached to an MOV, written as
marginal notes or appended in the form of journal entries.
Reflective Thinking Critical self-reflection on one’s own teaching-learning process. It
helps develop higher-order thinking skills. For teachers, reflective
thinking aids them in improving their teaching practice because
it allows them to note classroom experiences, critically evaluate
them, relate new knowledge and insights to prior understandings
and apply their insights to improve their teaching practice.
Results-based DepEd-contextualized SPMS. It is an organization-wide
Performance process of ensuring that employees focus work efforts
Management System towards achieving Dep-Ed vision, mission, values, and strategic
(RPMS) priorities. It is also a mechanism to manage, monitor and
measure performance, and identify human resource and
organizational development needs (DepEd Order No. 2, s. 2015,
p. 3).
RPMS Tools Assessment instrument used to ensure quality teacher
performance at different career stages.
Teacher Portfolio Purposeful compilation of documents that display teacher’s
achievements, classroom performance, teaching practices,
students evaluation, actions that are used as evidences for mid-
year and year-end assessment.
Teaching Practice A teacher’s manner or habit on the delivery of instruction.
This includes everything that a teacher does to achieve learning. It
reflects the teachers’ knowledge, skills, values and attitudes as they
perform their duties and responsibilities in teaching.

100
GLOSSARY OF TERMS/ACRONYMS

ACRONYMS
COT Classroom Observation Tools
DLL Daily Lesson Log
IM Instructional Materials
IPCRF Individual Performance Commitment and Review Form
IPPD Individual Plan for Professional Development
KRA Key Result Areas
L&D Learning and Development
MOV Means of Verification
MRF Mid-year Review Form
PMCF Performance Monitoring and Coaching Form
PPST Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers
RPMS Results-based Performance Management System
SAT-RPMS Self-Assessment Tools-RPMS
TA Technical Assistance

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102
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

APPENDICES

8
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
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Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 1
CONTENTS

Table of Contents i

Introduction ii
Role of teachers ii
Professional standards for teachers ii
Teacher quality in the Philippines iii
Career Stages vi

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 1

Glossary of Terms 16

References 19

Acknowledgements 20

The Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers (2017) was


developed through the Research Center for Teacher Quality
(RCTQ) with support from theAustralian Government.

© 2017. Department of Education- Teacher Education Council.

APPENDICES
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INTRODUCTION

Role of teachers

Teachers play a crucial role in nation building. Through quality teachers, the Philippines can develop holistic learners who are steeped in values,
equipped with 21st century skills, and able to propel the country to development and progress. This is in consonance with the Department of Education vision
of producing: “Filipinos who passionately love their country and whose values and competencies enable them to realize their full potential and contribute
meaningfully to building the nation” (DepED Order No. 36, s. 2013).

Evidences show unequivocally that good teachers are vital to raising student achievement, i.e.,uqality learning is contingent upon quality teaching.
Hence, enhancing teacher quality becomes of utmost importance for lon-gterm and sustainable nation building.

The changes brought about by various national and global framework,ssuch as the K to 12 Reform and the ASEAN integration, globalization, and the
changing character of the 21st century learners, necessitate the improvement and adaptability of education, and a call for rethinking of the current teacher
standards.

Professional standards for teachers

The Philippine Government has consistently pursued teacher quality reforms through a number of initiatives. As a framework o
tefacher quality, the
National Competency-Based Teacher Standards(NCBTS) was institutionalized through CHED Memorandum Order No. 52, s. 2007 and DepED Order No. 32, s.
2009. It emerged as part of the implementation of the Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda (BESRA), and was facilitated by drawing on the learning
considerations of programs, such as the Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao (BEAM), the Strengthening Implementation of Visayas Education (STRIVE)
project and the Third Elementary Education Project (TEEP).

The K to 12 Reform (R.A. 10533) in 2013 has changed the landscape of teacher quality requirements in the Philippines. The reform process warrants
an equivalent supportive focus on teacher quality– high quality teachers who are properly equipped and prepared to assume the roles and functions of a K
to 12 teacher.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers ii


The Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers, which is built on NCBTS, complements the reform initiatives on teacher quality from pre-service
education to in-service training. It articulates what constitutes teacher quality in the K to 12 Reform through well-defined Domains, Strands, and Indicators
that provide measures of professional learning, competent practice, and effective engagement. This set of standards makes explicit what teachers should
know, be able to do and value to achieve competence, improved student learning outcomes, and eventually quality education. It is founded on teaching
philosophies of learner-centeredness, lifelong learning, and inclusivity/inclusiveness, among others. The Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers,
therefore, becomes a public statement of professional accountability that can help teachers reflect on and assess their own practices as they aspire for
personal growth and professional development.

Teacher quality in the Philippines

The Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers defines teacher quality in the Philippines. The standards describe the expectations of teachers’
increasing levels of knowledge, practice and professional engagement. At the same time, the standards allow for teachers’ growing understanding, applied
with increasing sophistication across a broader and more complex range of teaching/learning situations.

The following describes the breadth of 7 Domains that are required by teachers to be effective in the 21st century in the Philippines. Quality teachers
in the Philippines:
 recognize the importance of mastery of content knowledge and its interconnectedness within and across curriculum areas, coupled with a sound and
critical understanding of the application of theories and principles of teaching and learning. They apply developmentally appropriate and meaningful
pedagogy grounded on content knowledge and current research. They display proficiency in Mother Tongue, Filipino and English to facilitate the
teaching and learning process, as well as exhibit the needed skills in the use of communication strategies, teaching strategies and technologies to
promote high-quality learning outcomes.
 provide learning environments that are safe, secure, fair and supportive in order to promote learner responsibility and achievement. They create an
environment that is learning-focused and they efficiently manage learner behavior in physical and virtual spaces. They utilize a range of resources
and provide intellectually challenging and stimulating activities to encourage constructive classroom interactions geared towards the attainment of
high standards of learning.
 establish learning environments that are responsive to learner diversity. They respect learners’ diverse characteristics and experiences as inputs to
the planning and design of learning opportunities. They encourage the celebration of diversity in the classroom and the need for teaching practices
that are differentiated to encourage all learners to be successful citizens in a changing local and global environment.

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 interact with the national and local curriculum requirements. They translate curriculum content into learning activities thaarterelevant to learners
and based on the principles of effective teaching and learning. They apply their professional knowdlege to plan and design, individually or in
collaboration with colleagues, wel-lstructured and sequenced lessons that are contextually relevant, responsive to learners’ needs and incorporate a
range of teaching and learning resources. They communicate learinng goals to support learner participation, understanding and achievement.
 apply a variety of assessment tools and strategies in monitoring, evaluating, documenting and reporting learners’ needs, prroegss and achievement.
They use assessment data in a vareity of ways to inform and enhance the teaching and learning process and programs. They provide learners with
the necessary feedback about learning outcomes that informs the reporting cycle and enables teachers to select, organize an udse sound assessment
processes.
 establish school-community partnerships aimed at enriching the learning environment, as well as the community’s engagement in the educative
process. They identify and respond to opportunities that link teaching and learning in the classroom ttohe experiences, interests and aspirations of
the wider school community and other key stakeholders. They understand and fulfill their obligations in upholding professiolneathics, accountability
and transparency to promote professional and harmonious reltaionships with learners, parents, schools and the wider community.
 value personal growth and professional development andexhibit high personal regard for the profession by maintaining qualities that uphold the
dignity of teaching, such as caring attitude, respect and integrity. They value personal and professional reflection and learning to improve their
practice. They assume responsibility for personal growth and professional development for lifelong learning.

The 7 Domains collectively comprise 37 strands that refer to more specific dimensions of teacher practices.

Domain 1, Content Knowledge and Pedagogy, is composed of seven strands:


1. Content knowledge and its application within and across curriculum areas
2. Research-based knowledge and principles of teaching and learning
3. Positive use of ICT
4. Strategies for promoting literacy and numeracy
5. Strategies for developing critical and creative thinking, as well as other higher-order thinking skills
6. Mother Tongue, Filipino and English in teaching and learning
7. Classroom communication strategies

Domain 2, Learning Environment, consists of six strands:


1. Learner safety and security

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers iv


2. Fair learning environment
3. Management of classroom structure and activities
4. Support for learner participation
5. Promotion of purposive learning
6. Management of learner behavior

Domain 3, Diversity of Learners, consists of five strands:


1. Learners’ gender, needs, strengths, interests and experiences
2. Learners’ linguistic, cultural, socio-economic and religious backgrounds
3. Learners with disabilities, giftedness and talents
4. Learners in difficult circumstances
5. Learners from indigenous groups

Domain 4, Curriculum and Planning, includes five strands:


1. Planning and management of teaching and learning processes
2. Learning outcomes aligned with learning competencies
3. Relevance and responsiveness of learning programs
4. Professional collaboration to enrich teaching practice
5. Teaching and learning resources including ICT

Domain 5, Assessment and Reporting, is composed of five strands:


1. Design, selection, organization and utilization of assessment strategies
2. Monitoring and evaluation of learner progress and achievement
3. Feedback to improve learning
4. Communication of learner needs, progress and achievement to key stakeholders
5. Use of assessment data to enhance teaching and learning practices and programs

Domain 6, Community Linkages and Professional Engagement, consists of four strands:


1. Establishment of learning environments that are responsive to community contexts

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2. Engagement of parents and the wider school community in the educative process
3. Professional ethics
4. School policies and procedures

Domain 7, Personal Growth and Professional Development, contains five strands:


1. Philosophy of teaching
2. Dignity of teaching as a profession
3. Professional links with colleagues
4. Professional reflection and learning to improve practice
5. Professional development goals

Career stages

Teacher professional development takes place in a continuum from beginning to exemplary practice. Anchored on the principle of lifelong learning,
the Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers recognizes the significance of a standards framework that articulates developmental progression as
teachers develop, refine their practice and respond to the complexities of educational reforms.

The following statements, which define the work of teachers at different career stages, make explicit the elements of high-quality teaching for the
21st century. They comprise descriptors that have been informed by teachers’ understandings of what is required at each of the four Career Stages. The
descriptors represent a continuum of development within the profession by providing a basis for attracting, preparing, developing and supporting teachers.

Career Stage 1 or Beginning Teachers have gained the qualifications recognized for entry into the teaching profession. They have a strong
understanding of the subjects/areas in which they are trained in terms of content knowledge and pedagogy. They possess the requisite knowledge, skills and
values that support the teaching and learning process. They manage learning programs and have strategies that promote learning based on the learning
needs of their students. They seek advice from experienced colleagues to consolidate their teaching practice.

Career Stage 2 or Proficient Teachers are professionally independent in the application of skills vital to the teaching and learning process. They
provide focused teaching programs that meet curriculum and assessment requirements. They display skills in planning, implementing, and managing learning

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers vi


programs. They actively engage in collaborative learning with the professional community and other stakeholders for mutual growth and advancement. They
are reflective practitioners who continually consolidate the knowledge, skills and practices of Career Stage 1 teachers.

Career Stage 3 or Highly Proficient Teachers consistently display a high level of performance in their teaching practice. They manifest an in-depth
and sophisticated understanding of the teaching and learning process. They have high education-focused situation cognition, are more adept in problem
solving and optimize opportunities gained from experience. Career Stage 3 Teachers work collaboratively with colleagues and provide them support and
mentoring to enhance their learning and practice. They continually seek to develop their professional knowledge and practice by reflecting on their own
needs, and those of their colleagues and students.

Career Stage 4 or Distinguished Teachers embody the highest standard for teaching grounded in global best practices. They exhibit exceptional
capacity to improve their own teaching practice and that of others. They are recognized as leaders in education, contributors to the profession, and initiators
of collaborations and partnerships. They create lifelong impact in the lives of colleagues, students and others. They consistently seek professional
advancement and relevance in pursuit of teaching quality and excellence. They exhibit commitment to inspire the education community and stakeholders for
the improvement of education provision in the Philippines.

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PHILIPPINE PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS FOR TEACHERS
CAREER STAGES
Career Stage 1 Career Stage 2 Career Stage 3 Career Stage 4
Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Beginning Teachershave gained the Proficient Teachers are professionally Highly Proficient Teachers consistently Distinguished Teachers embody the
qualifications recognized for entry into independent in the application of skills display a high level of performance in highest standard for teaching grounded in
the teaching profession. vital to the teaching and learning their teaching practice. global best practices.
process.
They have a strongunderstanding of They manifest an in-depth and They exhibit exceptionalcapacity to
the subjects/areas in which they are They provide focused teaching sophisticated understanding of the improve their own teaching practice and
trained in terms of content knowledge programs that meet curriculum and teaching and learning process. that of others.
and pedagogy. assessment requirements.
They have high education-focused They are recognized as leaders in
They possess the requisite knowledge, They display skills in planning, situation cognition, are more adept in education, contributors to the profession
skills and values that support the implementingand managing learning problem solving and optimize and initiators of collaborations and
teaching and learning process. programs. opportunitiesgained from experience. partnerships.

They manage learning programs and They actively engage in collaborative They provide support and mentoring to They create lifelong impact in the lives of
have strategies that promote learning learning with the professional colleagues in their professional colleagues, students and others.
based on the learning needs of their community and other stakeholdersfor development, as well as work
students. mutual growth and advancement. collaborativelywith them to enhance They consistently seek professional
the learning and practice potential of advancementand relevance in pursuit of
They seek advice from experienced They are reflective practitioners who their colleagues. teaching quality and excellence.
colleagues to consolidate their continually consolidate the
teaching practice. knowledge, skills and practicesof They continually seek to develop their They exhibit commitment to inspire the
Career Stage 1 teachers. professional knowledge and practice by education community and stakeholders
reflecting on their own needs, and those for the improvement of education
of their colleagues and students. provision in the Philippines.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 1


DOMAINS/ STRANDS/ INDICATORS FOR DIFFERENT CAREER STAGES

Domain 1. Content Knowledge and Pedagogy


Domain 1 recognizes the importance of teachers’ mastery of content knowledge and its interconnectedness within and across curriculum areas, coupled with a sound
and critical understanding of the application of theories and principles of teaching and learning. This Domain encompasses teachers’ ability to apply developmentally
appropriate and meaningful pedagogy grounded on content knowledge and current research. It takes into account teachers’ proficiency in Mother Tongue, Filipino and
English in the teaching and learning process, as well as needed skills in the use of communicationstrategies, teaching strategies, and technologies to promote high-
quality learning outcomes.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 1.1 1.1.1 Demonstrate content 1.1.2 Apply knowledge of 1.1.3 Model effective 1.1.4 Model exemplary
Content knowledge and its knowledge and its application content within and across applicationsof content practice to improve
application within and across within and/or across curriculum curriculum teaching areas. knowledge within and across applicationsof content
curriculum areas teaching areas. curriculum teaching areas. knowledge within and across
curriculum teaching areas.
Strand 1.2 1.2.1 Demonstrate an 1.2.2 Use research-based 1.2.3 Collaborate with 1.2.4 Lead colleagues in the
Research-based knowledge and understanding of research- knowledge and principles of colleagues in the conduct and advancementof the art and
principles of teaching and based knowledge and principles teaching and learning to applicationof research to enrich science of teaching, based on
learning of teaching and learning. enhance professionalpractice. knowledge of content and their comprehensive
pedagogy. knowledge of research and
pedagogy.

Strand 1.3 1.3.1 Show skills in the positive 1.3.2 Ensure the positive use of 1.3.3 Promote effective 1.3.4 Mentor colleagues in the
Positive use of ICT use of ICT to facilitate the ICT to facilitate the teaching and strategies in the positive use of implementationof policies to
teaching and learning process. learning process. ICT to facilitate the teaching and ensure the positive use of ICT
learning process. within or beyond the school.

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Strand 1.4 1.4.1 Demonstrate knowledge 1.4.2 Use a range of teaching 1.4.3 Evaluate with colleagues 1.4.4 Model a comprehensive
Strategies for promoting literacy of teaching strategies that strategies that enhance learner the effectiveness of teaching selection of effective teaching
and numeracy promote literacy and numeracy achievement in literacy and strategies that promote learner strategies that promote
skills. numeracy skills. achievement in literacy and learner achievement in literacy
numeracy. and numeracy.
Strand 1.5 1.5.1 Apply teaching strategies 1.5.2 Apply a range of teaching 1.5.3 Develop and apply 1.5.4 Lead colleagues in
Strategies for developing critical that develop critical and strategies to develop critical effective teaching strategies to reviewing, modifying and
and creative thinking, as well as creative thinking, and/or other and creative thinking, as well as promote critical and creative expanding theirrange of
other higher-order thinking skills higher-order thinking skills. other higher-order thinking thinking, as well as other teaching strategies that
skills. higher-order thinking skills. promote critical and creative
thinking, as well as other
higher-order thinking skills.
Strand 1.6 1.6.1 Use Mother Tongue, 1.6.2 Display proficient use of 1.6.3 Model and support 1.6.4 Show exemplary skills in
Mother Tongue, Filipino and Filipino and English to facilitate Mother Tongue, Filipino and colleagues in the proficient use and advocate the use of
English in teaching and learning teaching and learning. English to facilitate teaching of Mother Tongue, Filipino and Mother Tongue, Filipino and
and learning. English to improveteaching and English in teaching and
learning, as well as to develop learning to facilitate learners’
learners’ pride of their language, cognitive and
language, heritage and culture. academic development andto
foster pride of their language,
heritage and culture.

Strand 1.7 1.7.1 Demonstratean 1.7.2 Use effective verbal and 1.7.3 Display a wide range of 1.7.4 Exhibitexemplary
Classroom communication understanding of the range of non-verbal classroom effective verbal and non-verbal practice in the use of effective
strategies verbal and non-verbal communication strategies to classroom communication verbal and non-verbal
classroom communication support learner understanding, strategies to support learner classroom communication
strategies that support learner participation, engagement and understanding, participatoi n, strategies to support learner
understanding, participation, achievement. engagement and achievement. understanding, participation,
engagement and achievement. engagement and achievement
in different learning contexts.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 3


Domain 2. Learning Environment
Domain 2 highlights the role of teachers to provide learning environments that are safe, secure, fair and supportive in order to prom
teolearner responsibility and
achievement. This Domaincenters on creating an environment that is learning-focused and in which teachers efficiently manage learner behavior in physical and virtual
spaces. It highlights the need for teachers toutilize a range of resources and provide intellectually challenging and stimulating activities to encourage constructive
classroom interactionsgeared towards the attainment of high standards of learning.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 2.1 2.1.1 Demonstrate knowledge 2.1.2 Establish safe and secure 2.1.3 Exhibit effective strategies 2.1.4 Apply comprehensive
Learner safety and security of policies, guidelines and learning environments to that ensure safe and secure knowledge of, and act as a
procedures that provide safe enhance learning through the learning environments to resource person for, policies,
and secure learning consistent implementation of enhance learning through the guidelines and procedures that
environments. policies, guidelines and consistent implementation of relate to the implementation
procedures. policies, guidelines and of safe and secure learning
procedures. environments for learners.

Strand 2.2 2.2.1 Demonstrate 2.2.2 Maintain learning 2.2.3 Exhibit effective practices 2.2.4 Advocate and facilitate
Fair learning environment understanding of learning environments that promote to foster learning environments the use of effective practices to
environments that promote fairness, respect and care to that promote fairness, respect foster learning environments
fairness, respect and care to encourage learning. and care to encourage learning. that promote fairness, respect
encourage learning. and care to encourage
learning.
Strand 2.3 2.3.1 Demonstrate knowledge 2.3.2 Manage classroom 2.3.3 Work with colleagues to 2.3.4 Model exemplary
Management of classroom of managing classroom structure to engage learners, model and share effective practices in the management
structure and activities structure that engageslearners, individually or in groups, in techniques in the management of classroom structure and
individually or in groups, in meaningful exploration, of classroom structure to activities, and lead colleagues
meaningful exploration, discovery and hands-on engage learners, individually or at the whole-school level to
discovery and hands-on activities within a range of in groups, in meaningful review and evaluate their
activities within the available physical learning environments. exploration, discovery and practices.
physical learning environments. hands-on activities within a
range of physical learning
environments.

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Strand 2.4 2.4.1 Demonstrate 2.4.2 Maintain supportive 2.4.3 Work with colleagues to 2.4.4 Facilitate processes to
Support forlearner participation understanding of supportive learning environments that share successful strategies that review the effectiveness of the
learning environmentsthat nurture and inspire learners to sustain supportive learning school’s learning environment
nurture and inspire learner participate, cooperate and environmentsthat nurture and to nurture and inspire learner
participation. collaborate in continued inspire learners to participate, participation.
learning. cooperate and collaborate in
continued learning.

Strand 2.5 2.5.1 Demonstrate knowledge 2.5.2 Apply a range of 2.5.3 Model successful 2.5.4 Lead and empower
Promotion of purposive learning of learning environments that successful strategies that strategies and support colleagues in promoting
motivate learners to work maintain learning environments colleagues in promoting learning environments that
productively by assuming that motivate learners to work learning environments that effectively motivate learners to
responsibility for their own productively by assuming effectively motivate learners to achieve quality outcomes by
learning. responsibility for their own work productively by assuming assuming responsibility for
learning. responsibility for their own their own learning.
learning.

Strand 2.6 2.6.1 Demonstrate knowledge 2.6.2 Manage learner behavior 2.6.3 Exhibit effective and 2.6.4 Provide leadership in
Management of learner behavior of positive and non-violent constructively by applying constructive behavior applying a wide range of
discipline in the management of positive and non-violent management skills by applying strategies in the
learner behavior. discipline to ensure learning- positive and non-violent implementation of positive and
focused environments. discipline to ensure learning- non-violent discipline
focused environments. policies/procedures to ensure
learning-focused
environments.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 5


Domain 3. Diversity of Learners
Domain 3 emphasizes the central role of teachers in establishing learning environments that are repsonsive to learner diversity. This Domain underscores the
importance of teachers’knowledge and understanding of, as well as respect for, learners’diverse characteristics and experiences as inputs to the planing and design of
learning opportunities. It encourages the celebration of diversity in classrooms and the need for teaching apcrtices that are differentiated to encourage all learners to be
successful citizens in a changing local and global environment.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 3.1 3.1.1 Demonstrate knowledge 3.1.2 Use differentiated, 3.1.3 Work with colleagues to 3.1.4 Lead colleagues to
Learners’ gender, needs, and understanding of developmentally appropriate share differentiated, evaluate differentiated
strengths, interests and differentiated teaching to suit learning experiences to address developmentally appropriate strategies to enrich teaching
experiences the learners’ gender, needs, learners’ gender, needs, opportunities to address practices that address learners’
strengths, interests and strengths, interests and learners’ differences in gender, differences in gender, needs,
experiences. experiences. needs, strengths,interests and strengths, interests and
experiences. experiences.

Strand 3.2 3.2.1 Implement teaching 3.2.2 Establish a learner- 3.2.3 Exhibit a learner-centered 3.2.4 Model exemplary
Learners’ linguistic, cultural, strategies thatare responsive to centered culture by using culture that promotes success teaching practices that
socio-economic and religious learners’ linguistic, cultural, teaching strategies that respond by using effective teaching recognize and affirm diverse
backgrounds socio-economic and religious to learners’ linguistic, cultural, strategies that respond to linguistic, cultural, socio-
backgrounds. socio-economic and religious learners’ linguistic, cultural, economic and religious
backgrounds. socio-economic and religious backgrounds to promote
backgrounds. learner success.
Strand 3.3 3.3.1 Use strategies responsive 3.3.2 Design, adapt and 3.3.3 Assist colleagues to 3.3.4 Lead colleagues in
Learners with disabilities, to learners with disabilities, implement teaching strategies design, adapt and implement designing, adapting and
giftedness and talents giftedness and talents. that are responsive to learners teaching strategies that are implementing teaching
with disabilities, giftedness and responsive to learnerswith strategies that are responsive
talents. disabilities, giftedness and to learners with disabilities,
talents. giftedness and talents.

APPENDICES
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Strand 3.4 3.4.1 Demonstrate 3.4.2 Plan and deliverteaching 3.4.3 Evaluate with colleagues 3.4.4 Model a range of high
Learners in difficult understanding of the special strategies that are responsive to teaching strategies that are level skills responsive to the
circumstances educational needs of learners in the special educational needs of responsive to the special special educational needs of
difficult circumstances, learners in difficult educational needs of learners in learners in difficult
including: geographic isolation; circumstances, including: difficult circumstances, circumstances, including:
chronic illness; displacement geographic isolation; chronic including: geographic isolation; geographic isolation; chronic
due to armed conflict, urban illness; displacement due to chronic illness; displacement illness; displacement due to
resettlementor disasters; child armed conflict, urban due to armed conflict, urban armed conflict, urban
abuse and child labor practices. resettlementor disasters; child resettlementor disasters; child resettlementor disasters; child
abuse and child labor practices. abuse and child labor practices. abuse and child labor
practices.
Strand 3.5 3.5.1 Demonstrateknowledge 3.5.2 Adapt and use culturally 3.5.3 Develop and apply 3.5.4 Show comprehensive
Learners from indigenous groups of teaching strategies thatare appropriateteaching strategies teaching strategies to address skills in delivering culturally
inclusive of learners from to address the needs of learners effectively the needs of learners appropriateteaching strategies
indigenous groups. from indigenous groups. from indigenous groups. to address effectively the
needs of learners from
indigenous groups.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 7


Domain 4. Curriculum andPlanning
Domain 4 addresses teachers’knowledge of and interaction with the national and local curriculum requirements. ThiD s omain encompasses their ability to translate
curriculum content into learning activities that are relevant to learners and basednothe principles of effective teaching and learning. It expects teachers to apply their
professional knowledgeto plan and design, individually or in collaboration with colleagues, we-lsltructured and sequenced lessons. These lesson sequencesand associated
learning programsshould be contextually relevant, responsive to learners’ needs and inco rporate a range of teaching and learningresources. The Domain expects teachers
to communicate learning goals to support learner participation, understanding and acih e vement.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 4.1 4.1.1 Prepare developmentally 4.1.2 Plan, manage and 4.1.3 Develop and apply 4.1.4 Model exemplary
Planning and management of sequenced teaching and implement developmentally effective strategies in the practice and lead colleagues in
teaching and learning processes learning processes to meet sequenced teaching and planning and management of enhancing current practices in
curriculum requirements. learning processes to meet developmentally sequenced the planning andmanagement
curriculum requirements and teaching and learning processes of developmentally sequenced
varied teaching contexts. to meet curriculum teaching and learning
requirements and varied processes.
teaching contexts.

Strand 4.2 4.2.1 Identify learning outcomes 4.2.2 Set achievable and 4.2.3 Model to colleagues the 4.2.4 Exhibit high-level skills
Learning outcomes aligned with that are aligned with learning appropriate learning outcomes setting of achievable and and lead in setting achievable
learning competencies competencies. that are aligned with learning challenging learning outcomes and challenging learning
competencies. that are aligned with learning outcomes that are aligned with
competencies to cultivate a learning competencies towards
culture of excellence for all the cultivation of a culture of
learners. excellence for all.

APPENDICES
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Strand 4.3 4.3.1 Demonstrate knowledge 4.3.2 Adapt and implement 4.3.3 Work collaboratively with 4.3.4 Provide adviceon the
Relevance and responsiveness of of the implementation of learning programs that ensure colleagues to evaluate the design and implementation of
learning programs relevant and responsive relevance and responsiveness design of learning programs relevant and responsive
learning programs. to the needs of all learners. that develop the knowledge and learning programs that
skills of learners at different develop the knowledge and
ability levels. skills of learnersat different
ability levels.

Strand 4.4 4.4.1 Seek advice concerning 4.4.2 Participate in collegial 4.4.3 Review with colleagues, 4.4.4 Lead colleagues in
Professional collaboration to enrich strategies that can enrich discussions that use teacher and teacher and learner feedback to professional discussions to
teaching practice teaching practice. learner feedback toenrich plan, facilitate, and enrich plan and implement strategies
teaching practice. teaching practice. that enrich teaching practice.

Strand 4.5 4.5.1 Show skills in the 4.5.2 Select, develop, organize 4.5.3 Advise and guide 4.5.4 Model exemplary skills
Teaching and learningresources selection, development and use and use appropriate teaching colleagues in the selection, and lead colleagues in the
including ICT of a variety of teaching and and learning resources, organization, developmentand development and evaluation of
learning resources, including including ICT, to address use of appropriate teaching and teaching and learning
ICT, to address learning goals. learning goals. learning resources, including resources, including ICT, for
ICT, to address specific learning use within and beyond the
goals. school.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 9


Domain 5. Assessment and Reporting
Domain 5 relates to processes associated with a variety of assessment tools and strategies used by teachers in monitoring, evaluatindgo
, cumenting and reporting
learners’ needs, progress and achievement. This Domain concerns theuse of assessment data in a varietyof ways to inform and enhance the teaching andlearning
process and programs.It concerns teachers providinglearners with the necessary feedback about learning outcomes. This feedback informs the reporting cyle and
enables teachers toselect, organize and use sound assessment processes.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 5.1 5.1.1 Demonstrate knowledge 5.1.2 Design, select, organize 5.1.3 Work collaboratively with 5.1.4 Lead initiatives in the
Design, selection, organization of the design, selection, and use diagnostic, formative colleagues to review the design, evaluation of assessment
and utilization of assessment organization and use of and summative assessment selection, organization and use policies and guidelines that
strategies diagnostic, formative and strategies consistent with of a range of effective relate to the design, selection,
summative assessment curriculum requirements. diagnostic, formative and organization and use of
strategies consistent with summative assessment effective diagnostic, formative
curriculum requirements. strategies consistent with and summative assessment
curriculum requirements. strategies consistent with
curriculum requirements.

Strand 5.2 5.2.1 Demonstrate knowledge 5.2.2 Monitor and evaluate 5.2.3 Interpret collaboratively 5.2.4 Provide advice on and
Monitoring and evaluation of of monitoring and evaluation of learner progress and monitoring and evaluation mentor colleagues in the
learner progress and learner progress and achievement using learner strategies of attainment data to effective analysis and use of
achievement achievement using learner attainment data. support learner progress and learner attainmentdata.
attainment data. achievement.

APPENDICES
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122

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Strand 5.3 5.3.1 Demonstrate knowledge 5.3.2 Use strategies for 5.3.3 Use effective strategies for 5.3.4 Exhibit exemplary skills
Feedback to improve learning of providing timely, accurate providing timely, accurate and providing timely, accurate and and lead initiatives to support
and constructive feedback to constructive feedback to constructive feedback to colleagues in applying
improve learner performance. improve learner performance. encourage learners to reflect on strategies that effectively
and improve their own learning. provide timely, accurate and
constructive feedback to
learners to improve learning
achievement.

Strand 5.4 5.4.1 Demonstrate familiarity 5.4.2 Communicate promptly 5.4.3 Apply skills in the effective 5.4.4 Share with colleagues a
Communication of learner with a range of strategies for and clearly the learners’ needs, communication of learner wide range of strategies that
needs, progress and communicating learner needs, progress and achievement to needs, progress and ensure effective
achievement to key stakeholders progress and achievement. key stakeholders, including achievement to key communication of learner
parents/guardians. stakeholders, including needs, progress and
parents/guardians. achievement to key
stakeholders, including
parents/guardians.

Strand 5.5 5.5.1 Demonstrate an 5.5.2 Utilize assessment data to 5.5.3 Work collaboratively with 5.5.4 Lead colleagues to
Use of assessment data to understanding of the role of inform the modification of colleagues to analyze andutilize explore, design and implement
enhance teaching and learning assessment data as feedback in teaching and learning practices assessment data to modify effective practices and
practices and programs teaching and learning practices and programs. practices and programs to programs using information
and programs. further support learner progress derived from assessment data.
and achievement.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 11


Domain 6. Community Linkages and Professional Engagement
Domain 6 affirms the role of teachers in establishing schoo-lcommunity partnerships aimed at enriching the learning environmen,tas well as the community’s
engagement inthe educative process.This Domain expects teachers to identify and respond toopportunities that link teaching and learning in the classroom to the
experiences, interests and aspirations of the wider school community and other key stakeholderIst. concerns the importance of teachers’ understanding and fulfilling
their obligationsin upholding professional ethics, accountability and transparency to promote professional and harmonious retlaionships with learners, parents,schools
and the wider community.

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 6.1 6.1.1 Demonstrate an 6.1.2 Maintain learning 6.1.3 Reflect on and evaluate 6.1.4 Model exemplary practice
Establishment of learning understanding of knowledgeof environments that are learning environments that are and empower colleagues to
environments that are learning environments that are responsive to community responsive to community establish and maintaineffective
responsive to community responsive to community contexts. contexts. learning environments that are
contexts contexts. responsive to community
contexts.

Strand 6.2 6.2.1 Seek advice concerning 6.2.2 Build relationships with 6.2.3 Guide colleagues to 6.2.4 Lead in consolidating
Engagement of parents and the strategies that build parents/guardians and the strengthen relationships with networks that strengthen
wider school community in the relationships with wider school community to parents/guardians and the relationships with
educative process parents/guardians andthe facilitate involvement in the wider school community to parents/guardians and the
wider community. educative process. maximize their involvement in wider school community to
the educative process. maximize their involvement in
the educative process.

Strand 6.3 6.3.1 Demonstrate awareness 6.3.2 Review regularly personal 6.3.3 Discuss with colleagues 6.3.4 Lead colleagues in the
Professional ethics of existing laws and regulations teaching practice using existing teaching and learning practices regular review of existing codes,
that apply to the teaching laws and regulations that apply that apply existing codes, laws laws and regulations that appyl
profession, and become familiar to the teaching profession and and regulationsapplicable to to the teaching profession, and
with the responsibilities the responsibilities specified in the teaching profession,and the the responsibilitiesas specified
specified in the Code of Ethics the Code of Ethics for responsibilitiesspecified in the in the Code of Ethics for
for Professional Teachers. Professional Teachers. Code of Ethics for Professional Professional Teachers.
Teachers.

APPENDICES
Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 12
123
124

THE RPMS MANUAL


Strand 6.4 6.4.1 Demonstrate knowledge 6.4.2 Comply with and 6.4.3 Exhibitcommitment to 6.4.4 Evaluate existing school
School policies and procedures and understandingof school implement school policies and and support teachers in the policies and procedures to
policies and proceduresto procedures consistently to implementation of school make them more responsive to
foster harmonious relationships foster harmonious relationships policies and proceduresto the needs of the learners,
with the wider school with learners, parents, and foster harmonious relationships parents and other stakeholders.
community. other stakeholders. with learners, parents and other
stakeholders.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 13


Domain 7. Personal Growth and Professional Development
Domain 7 focuses on teachers’ personal growth and professional development. It accentuates teachers’ proper and high personraelgard for the profession by
maintaining qualities that uphold the dignity of teachingsuch as caring attitude, respect and integrity. This Domainvalues personal and professionalreflection and
learning to improve practice. Itrecognizes the importance ofteachers assuming responsibility for personalgrowth and professional development for lifelong learnin.g

Strands Beginning Teachers Proficient Teachers Highly Proficient Teachers Distinguished Teachers

Strand 7.1 7.1.1 Articulate a personal 7.1.2 Apply a personal 7.1.3 Manifesta learner- 7.1.4 Model a learner-centered
Philosophy of teaching philosophy of teaching that is philosophy of teaching that is centered teachingphilosophy in teaching philosophy through
learner-centered. learner-centered. various aspects of practice and teaching practices that
support colleagues in enhancing stimulate colleagues to engage
their own learner-centered in further professional learning.
teaching philosophy.
Strand 7.2 7.2.1 Demonstrate behaviors 7.2.2 Adopt practices that 7.2.3 Identify and utilize 7.2.4 Act as a role modeland
Dignity of teaching as a that uphold the dignity of uphold the dignity of teaching personal professional strengths advocate for upholding the
profession teaching as a professionby as a profession byexhibiting to uphold the dignity of dignity of teaching as a
exhibiting qualities such as qualities such ascaring attitude, teaching as a professionto help profession to build a positive
caring attitude, respect and respect and integrity. build a positive teaching and teaching and learning culture
integrity. learning culture within the within and beyond the school.
school.
Strand 7.3 7.3.1 Seek opportunities to 7.3.2 Participate in professional 7.3.3 Contribute actively to 7.3.4 Take a leadership role in
Professional links with establish professional links with networks to share knowledge professional networks within supporting colleagues’
colleagues colleagues. and to enhance practice. and between schools to engagement with professional
improve knowledge and to networks within and across
enhance practice. schools to advance knowledge
and practice in identified areas
of need.
Strand 7.4 7.4.1 Demonstrate an 7.4.2 Develop a personal 7.4.3 Initiate professional 7.4.4. Demonstrate leadership
Professionalreflection and understanding of how professional improvement plan reflections and promote within and across school
learning to improve practice professional reflection and based on reflection of one’s learning opportunities with contexts in critically evaluating
colleagues to improvepractice. practice and setting clearly

APPENDICES
Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 14
125
126

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learning can beused to improve practice and ongoing defined targets for professional
practice. professionallearning. development.
Strand 7.5 7.5.1 Demonstrate motivation 7.5.2 Set professional 7.5.3 Reflect onthe Philippine 7.5.4 Lead reforms in enhancing
Professional development goals to realize professional development goals based on Professional Standards for professional development
development goals based on the Philippine Professional Teachers to plan personal programs based on an in-depth
the Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers. professional development goals knowledge and understanding
Standards for Teachers. and assist colleagues in of the Philippine Professional
planning and achieving their Standards for Teachers.
own goals.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 15


GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Assessment Data Learner data obtained from diagnostic,formative and/or summative assessment practices
Classroom Structure The physical set-up of the learning environment, which generally includes the arrangement of chairs,
tables, and other equipment in the classroom designed to maximize learning
Content Knowledge Competencies that teachers are expected to master for them to teach efficiently and effectively
Culturally-appropriate teaching strategies Teaching strategies that respect cultural differences between and among students and teachers
Curriculum Areas Different learning/subject areas taught and learned in the basic education curriculum
Creative thinking skills Thinking skills thatinvolve exploring ideas, generating possibilities and looking for many right answers
rather than just one.
Critical thinking skills High-level thinking skills such as analysis, evaluation, interpretion, or synthesis of information and
application of creative thought to form an argument, solve a problem, or reach a conclusion.
Developmentally Appropriate Learning Teaching and learning activities and tasks suited to the needs, abilities, skills, and developmental levseolf
Experiences learners
Diagnostic assessment Assessment that gaugeswhat the learner knows prior to instruction. Itcan also identifythe nature of
difficulties and misconceptions that the learner might have, which, if undiagnosed, might affect their
learning of newer concepts. Based on DepEd Order No. 8, s. 2015, there are only two types of classroom
assessment, namely, formative and summative. Formative assessment already covers diagnostic
assessment.
Differentiated Teaching Teaching-learning processes involving a wide variety of texts, tasks, processes and products suited to the
various learning needs of diverse students
Domain Broad conceptualsphere of teaching and learning practices defined by specific strands in the set of
professional standards for teachers
Formative assessment Assesment used to conduct in-process evaluations of student comprehension, learning needs, and
academic progressduring a lesson, unit, or course. Formative assessment help s teachers identify concepts
that students are struggling to understand, skills they are having difficulty acquiring, or learning standard s
they have not yet achieved so that adjustments can be made to lessons, instructional techniques, and
academic support. (Please also refer to DepED Order No. 8, s. 2015, p. 2 on its -3paragraph definition.)
Higher Order Thinking Skills Complex thinking processes which include analysis, evaluatio,nsynthesis, reflection andcreativity.

APPENDICES
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Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 16


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Indicators Concrete, observable and measurable teacher behaviors/practices covered in every strand in the
Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers
Indigenous groups Peoples who have, under claims of ownership since time immemorial, occupied, possessed and utilized
ancestral territories, shared common bonds of language, customs, traditions, and other unique cultural
traits (RA 8371: IPRA)
Learner Attainment Data Evidence oflearning, progress or achievement in learner performance reflected in various assessment
results, portfolios, class records and report cards
Learner interests Student’s personal preferences, likes or dislikes, which must be considered in the teachin-lgearning process.
Learner needs Observable gaps between a learner's present knowledge or competence and the curriculum standards
identified as necessary for the grade level.
Learner strengths Pre-existing knowledge or competence thathelps a learnermeet required standards.
Learning experiences Any interaction, course, program, or other involvemenst in which learning takes place, whether it occurs in
traditional academic settings (schools, classrooms) or nontraditional settings (outsid-o
ef-school locations,
outdoor environments), or whether it includes traditional educational interactions (students learning from
teachers and professors) or nontraditional interactions (students learning through games and interactiv
software applications).

Learning Focused Instructional and assessment strategies that target mean


ingful learning
Learning goals Long-term objectivesthat articulate the specific knowledge, skills, attitudes and values stated as
curriculum competencies thatlearners must develop as a result of the teaching-learning process
Learning Outcomes Products and performance targets through whichlearners demonstrate the knowledge, skills and
attitudes they have learned
Learning Programs Organized and sequenced set of strategies, activities and tasks that effect learning
Learning/Teaching Contexts Teaching/learning situations and all the circumstances in which learners learn from instruction
Local curriculum Educational curriculum content that is informed by and responsive to the “cultural and socioeconomic
realities” (UNESCO, 2012; 31) of localpopulations
Mother tongue The native language or the first language the learner learns as a child
National curriculum Subjects or topics taught in schools as prescribed by the Department of Education

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 17


Non-verbal communication Communication that does notinvolve the use of words, e.g., facial expressions, gestures, and tone of
voice
Non-violent discipline Discipline that avoids the use of punishment such as spanking, verbal abuse and humiliation (see Positive
discipline)
Numeracy and literacy skills Reading, writing, and mathematical skills needed to copein everyday life
Philosophy of teaching A teacher’s views, understandings and conceptualization of teaching and learning
Physical space/physical learning Any area conducive to learningwhich usually includes a safe classroom with appropriate devices for
environment teaching and learning
Positive discipline Non-violent, respectful and diplomatic means of disciplining a learner or managing learner behavior
through dialogue and counseling instead ofpunishment (see Non-violent discipline)
Positive use of ICT Responsible, ethical or appropriate use of ICT to achieve and reinforce learning
Professional collaboration Teachers working together with colleagues and other stakeholders to enrich theteaching-learning
practice
Professional learning Learning that develops professional knowledge and/or practice.
Professional network A connected community of educators. The community may exist online e.g.LinkedIn.
Professional reflection Thoughtful consideration in action (while teaching) and on action (after teaching)
Philippine Professional Standards for Public document that defines teacher qualityin the Philippines through well-defined Domains, Strands,
Teachers and Indicators that providemeasures of professional learning, competent practice, and effective
engagement
Purposive learning Knowledge and skills acquisition designed with a clear purpose, goal or objective in mind
Research-based knowledge Information, knowledge or data acquiredthrough systematic investigation and logical study
School/learning/community context See learning context
Strand Specific dimensions of teacher practice under every domain in thePhilippine Professional Standards for
Teachers
Summative assessment Assessment ofstudent learning, skill acquisition, and academic achievement at the conclusion of a define
instructional period—typically at the end of a project, unit, quarter, semester, program, or school year.
(See DepEd Order No. 8, s. 2015, pp. 2-3 for additional description of summative assessment.)

APPENDICES
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Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 18


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130
Teaching and learning resources Teaching aids and other materials that teachers use to enhance teaching and learnin,gandto assist learners
to meet the expectations for learning as defined by the curricu
lum.

Verbal communication strategies Oral or spoken means of transmitting information and meaning
Virtual space An online environment in which people can interact
Wider school community Internal and external stakeholders, including teachers, schooladministrators, parents, guardians,
community members, local business leaders,local authoritiesand elected officials, among others.

REFERENCES

Commission on Higher Education. (2007). Addendum to CMO 30, Series of 2004 Entitled “Revised Policies anSdtandards for Undergraduate Teacher
Education Curriculum.” CHED Memorandum No. 52, s. 2007.

Department of Education. (2015).Policy Guidelines on Classroom Assessment for the K to 12 Basic Education Program. Department Order No. 8, s. 2015

Department of Education. (2009). National Adoption and Implementation of NCBTS-TSNA and IPPD for Teachers, and Integration of its System Operations in
the Overall Program for Continuing Teacher Capacity Building. Department Order No. 32, s. 2009.

Department of Education. (2013). Our Department of Education Vision, Mission and Core Values (DepEd VMV). Department Order No. 36, s. 2013.

Republic of the Philippines. Congress. Senate. (2013). RA 10533. An Act Enhancing the Philippine Basic Education System by Strengthening Its Curriculum and
Increasing the Number of Years for Basic Education, Appropriating Funds Therefor and for Other Purposes. Philippines.

Republic of the Philippines. Congress. Senate. 1(997). RA 8371. An Act to Recognize, Protect and Promote the Rights of Indigenous Cultural
Communities/Indigenous Peoples, Creating a National Commission on Indigenous Peoples, Establishing Implementing Mechanismsp, pAropriating
Funds Therefor, and for Other Purposes. Philippines.

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 19


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP REFERENCE PANEL *Abelardo B. Medes
Chief Education Program
THE PROJECT TEAM Allen U. Bautista, Ed.D. Ms. Hazel D. Aniceto(Chair) Specialist, Education Assessment
Jennifer E. Lopez Portfolio Manager, Australian Division, Department of
Research Center for Teacher Leana D. S. Patungan Embassy Education
Quality (RCTQ) Chinita A. Tolentino
Amelia A. Biglete, Ph.D. *Clodualdo V. Paiton
Gina O. Gonong, Ph.D. RESEARCH OFFICERS Director IV, Office for Program Technical Specialist, Bureau of
Director and Project Leader and Standards Development Curriculum Development,
Victoria J. Delos Santos Commission on Higher Department of Education
Jennie V. Jocson, Ph.D. Donna Marie B. De Mesa Education
Senior Program Manager Maria Arsenia C. Gomez *Fernando M. Pantino
Ma. Concepcion B. Montenegro Purita B. Bilbao, Ed.D. Senior Education Program
Marilyn U. Balagtas, Ph.D. Favian L. Noche Chairperson, CHED Technical Specialist, Bureau of Secondary
Former Director Marla C. Papango Panel for Teacher Education Education, Department of
Michael Wilson I. Rosero Education
Teresita T. Rungduin, Ph.D. Malvin R. Tabajen Azucena P. Esleta
Senior Program Manager (represented by Ms. Ma. Paz Maria Lourdes D. Pantoja
SUPPORT STAFF Felyn Cruz-Tayag) Director IV, Bureau of Human
SiMERR National Research Director IV, Civil Service Resource and Organization
Centre Michael Jove B. Ablaza Commission Human Resource Development
Roaima Lynn B. Antonio Policies and Standards Office
John Pegg, Ph.D. Richard Jay J. Arias Yolanda B. Quijano, Ph.D.
Director Ranie B. Catimbang Fe A. Hidalgo, Ph.D. Former Undersecretary,
Zhanina U. Custodio President, Foundation for Department of Education
Joy Hardy, Ph.D. Ezra B. de Jesus Upgrading the Standard of
Deputy Director Jonathan B. Erfe Education Chito B. Salazar, Ph.D.
Beverly E. Estocapio President, Philippine Business
Ken Vine, Ph.D. Shiela Marie V. Gimeno Atty. Teresita R. Manzala for Education
Principal Research Adviser Dr. Rachelle B. Lintao (represented by Dr. Paraluman
Cheryl C. Lualhati R. Giron) Ethel Agnes P. Valenzuela, Ed.D.
Greg McPhan, Ph.D. Ian Kenneth D. Magabilin Chairperson, Professional Deputy Director for Programme
Principal Research Manager Rossanna A. Mendiogarin Regulation Commission and Development, SEAMEO
Ryan Anthony A. Olalia Secretariat

APPENDICES
Ma. Luz V. Rantael
Jessa P. Reynoso *Representing the Directors of
Jerreld M. Romulo DepED Bureaus
131

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 20


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Special thanks to: COMMISSION ON HIGHER UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION –
EDUCATION (CHED) - AUSTRALIA CENTRAL OFFICE
AUSTRALIAN EMBASSY – Dr. Rebecca Spence
Manila Dr. Minella C. Alarcon Br. Armin A. Luistro, FSC,
Commissioner Former Secretary
Robyn Biti, Minister Counselor, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Australian Agency for Dr. Maria Cynthia Rose B. (DepEd) Atty. Nepomuceno A. Malaluan,
International Development Bautista, Commissioner Assistant Secretary and Chief of
TEACHER EDUCATION COUNCIL Staff
Felicity Lee, First Secretary PHILIPPINE NORMAL (TEC)
(Development) UNIVERSITY Jesus Lorenzo R. Mateo,
Leonor M. Briones Undersecretary for Planning and
Quintin G. Atienza II Dr. Ester B. Ogena, President Secretary, Department of Field Operations
Romelia I. Neri Education
Dr. Wilma S. Reyes, Vice Ex-officio Chair, TEC Dr. Dina Joana S. Ocampo,
BASIC EDUCATION SECTOR President for Research, Planning Former Undersecretary for
TRANSFORMATION PROGRAM and Quality Assurance Runvi V. Manguerra, Ph.D. Curriculum and Instruction
(BEST) Executive Director II
Marivilla Lydia B. Aggarao Rizalino D. Rivera, Former
Dr. Greg-Ryan Gadsden, Team Emilio F. Aguinaldo Jayson A. Peñafiel Undersecretary for Regional
Leader Gerry C. Areta Education Program Supervisor Operations
Gregorio B. Borines
Dr. Peter Grimes, Senior Josephine M. Calamlam John Arnold S. Siena, Director
Specialist for Teacher Erwin R. Callo IV, National Educators Academy
Development Vic Marie I. Camacho of the Philippines
Shirley N. Cerbo
Krupskaya M. Añonuevo Maribel C. Gerundio DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION-
Dr. Nemah N. Hermosa Glinore S. Morales ARMM
Soledad T. Lecaroz Mary Leigh Ann C. Perez
Dr. Twila G. Punsalan Maria Ruth M. Regalado Atty. Jamar M. Kulayan, Former
Dr. Rita B. Ruscoe Regional Secretary
Joemar D. Sajona
Myla Zenaida C. Torio
Marilou M. Ubiña
Lordinio A. Vergara

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 21


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION- SENIOR OFFICIALS Bervy C. Domingo, EPS, Region II Management and Development
REGIONAL OFFICES Quality Assurance Division Section
Regional Directors/Assistant Dr. Flordeliza A. Alquiza, EPS,
Regional Directors Officer-in-Charge, Quality Dr. Emiliano B. Elnar, Jr., Chief Macrino A. Raymundo, EPS,
Assurance Division, NCR (retired) Education Program Supervisor, Region II
Luz S. Almeda, Ph.D. Region VII Curriculum and
Ramon Fiel G. Abcede Dr. Bernadette J. Atienza, EPS, Learning Management Division Dr. Judith V. Romaguera, Chief
Arturo B. Bayocot, Ph.D. Region III Quality Assurance Education Program Supervisor,
Isabelita M. Borres, Ph.D. Division Dr. Cynthia D. Jacob, Chief, Region IX Human Resource
Estela L. Cariño, Ed.D. Region V Human Resource Development Division
Atty. Shirley O. Chatto Dr. Erlinda A. Atienza, Chief Development Division
Rebecca V. Delapuz, Ph.D. Education Program Supervisor, Laurente A. Samala, EPS, Region
Lorna D. Dino, Ph.D. Region XIII Human Resource Sammy C. Legaspi, Information IV-MIMAROPA Quality
Ellen B. Donato, Ed.D. Development Division Technology Officer I, Region I Assurance Division
May B. Eclar, Ph.D.
Atty. Alberto T. Escobarte Ariel M. Azuelo, Administrative Dr. Leoncio P. Lumaban, Chief Jerry B. Sario, Officer-in-Charge,
Allan G. Farnazo, Ph.D. Officer V, Region IV- Education Supervisor, Region II Region II Human Resource
Malcolm S. Garma, CESO V CALABARZON Public Affairs Unit Quality Assurance Division Development Division
Juliet A. Jeruta, Ph.D.
Gemma M. Ledesma, CESO V Dr. Leonardo C. Canlas, Chief Gertrudes L. Malabanan, EPS, Dr. Susan D. Severino, EPS,
Ponciano A. Menguito. Ed.D. Education Program Supervisor, Region IV-CALABARZON Region VI Human Resource
Rizalino Jose T. Rosales Region III Policy, Planning and Development Division
Gilbert T. Sadsad, Ph.D. Research Division Dr. Joy C. Mangubat, EPS,
Diosdado M. San Antonio, Ph.D. Region X All teachers, principals/school
Ruby Alma C. Torio, Ed.D. Angelina B. Castillo, EPS, Region heads, supervisors,
Beatriz G. Torno, Ph.D. IV-CALABARZON Lorna F. Mapinogos, Chief superintendents, pre-service
Teresita M. Velasco, Ph.D. Education Program Supervisor, teachers, and educators who
Luisa B. Yu, Ph.D. Dr. Jerome A. Chavez, EPS, Region XI Human Resource took part in the development
Region IV-CALABARZON Development Division work

Regan B. Dagadas, EPS II, Region Dr. Luz E. Osmeña, Chief, Region
XII IV-CALABARZON Human
Resource Development Division
Dr. Hja Jaliha Diwallay, Region

APPENDICES
IX Jose Sario E. Poblete, EPS,
Region II Learning Resource
133

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 22


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24 serhacTe orf sarddantS alonessiofPr enippiliPh

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
DepEd Complex
Meralco Ave., Pasig City

TEACHER EDUCATION COUNCIL


Rooms 228-229 Mabini Bldg.,
DepEd Complex, Meralco Ave., Pasig City
(T) 638-61-70
(F) 638-61-72

Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers 24


Appendix B

RPMS Tool for Teacher I-III


(Proficient Teachers)

PCP No. Revision Code: 00


POSITION AND COMPETENCY PROFILE
Department of Education

Position Title Teacher I - III Salary Grade


Parenthetical Title
Office Unit Effectivity Date
Reports to Principal/School Heads Page/s
Position Supervised

JOB SUMMARY

QUALIFICATION STANDARDS
A. CSC Prescribed Qualifications
Education Bachelor of Elementary/Secondary/Early Childhood Education or Bachelor’s degree plus 18 units in Education
Experience None required
Eligibility RA 1080
Trainings None required
B. Preferred Qualifications
Education BSE/BSEEd/College Graduate with Education units (18-21), at least 18 MA units
Experience
Eligibility PBET/LET Passer
Trainings In-service training

APPENDICES
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DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Applies mastery of content knowledge and its application across learning areas
2. Facilitates learning using appropriate and innovative teaching strategies and classroom management practices
3. Manages an environment conducive to learning
4. Addresses learner diversity
5. Implements and supervises curricular and co-curricular programs to support learning
6. Monitors and evaluates learner progress and undertakes activities to improve learner performance
7. Maintains updated records of learners’ progress
8. Counsels and guides learners
9. Works with relevant stakeholders, both internal and external, to promote learning and improve school performance
10. Undertakes activities towards personal and professional growth
11. Does related work
Major Final Outputs Key Result Areas
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV)
(MFOs) (KRAs)
1. Applied knowledge of content 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating sheet
within and across curriculum and/or inter-observer agreement form about
teaching areas. knowledge of content within and across
curriculum teaching areas
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs developed
highlighting integration of content knowledge
within and across subject areas
3. Instructional materials highlighting mastery of
content and its integration in other subject
areas
4. Performance tasks/test material(s) highlighting
integration of content knowledge within and
Content Knowledge and across subject areas
Pedagogy 5. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
2. Used a range of teaching 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
strategies that enhance learner sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
achievement in literacy and about teaching strategies that enhance learner
numeracy skills. achievement in literacy and numeracy skills
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in teaching
highlighting learner-centered strategies that
promote literacy and/or numeracy skills
3. Instructional materials highlighting learner-
centered strategies that promote literacy
and/or numeracy skills
4. Performance tasks/test material(s) used in

APPENDICES
teaching
137
138

THE RPMS MANUAL


5. Results of assessment used in teaching
6. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
3. Applied a range of teaching 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
strategies to develop critical and sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
creative thinking, as well as other about teaching strategies to develop critical
higher-order thinking skills. and creative thinking, as well as other higher-
order thinking skills
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in teaching
highlighting different teaching strategies that
develop critical and creative thinking and/or
other HOTS
3. Instructional materials highlighting different
teaching strategies that develop critical and
creative thinking and/or other HOTS
4. Performance tasks/test material(s) used in
demonstration teaching
5. Results of assessment used in teaching
6. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
4. Managed classroom structure to 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
engage learners, individually or in sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
groups, in meaningful exploration, about managing classroom structure that
discovery and hands-on activities engages learners in various activities
Learning Environment 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs highlighting
and Diversity of Learners within a range of physical learning
environments. various classroom management strategies
that engage learners in activities/tasks in
different physical learning environments
3. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
5. Managed learner behavior Classroom observation tool (COT) rating sheet
constructively by applying positive and/or inter-observer agreement form about
and non-violent discipline to ensure teacher management of learner behavior using
learning-focused environments. the following strategies:
1. Providing motivation
2. Praising the learners/Giving positive feedback
3. Setting house rules/guidelines
4. Ensuring learners’ active participation
5. Allowing learners to express their
ideas/opinions
6. Giving equal opportunities to learners
7. Encouraging learners to ask questions
8. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
6. Used differentiated, 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
developmentally appropriate sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
learning experiences to address about using differentiated, developmentally
learners’ gender, needs, strengths, appropriate learning experiences
interests and experiences. 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs developed
highlighting differentiation in content, product,
process, learning environment or others
according to learners’ gender, needs,
strengths, interests and experiences
3. Instructional materials developed highlighting
differentiation in content, product, process,
learning environment or others according to
learners’ gender, needs, strengths, interests
and experiences
4. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)

APPENDICES
139
140

THE RPMS MANUAL


7. Planned, managed and 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
implemented developmentally sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
sequenced teaching and learning about using developmentally sequenced
processes to meet curriculum teaching and learning process
requirements and varied teaching 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs highlighting
contexts. developmentally sequenced instruction that
meet curriculum goals and varied teaching
contexts
3. Instructional materials used to implement
developmentally sequenced teaching and
learning process to meet curriculum
requirements and varied teaching contexts
4. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
Curriculum and Planning
8. Participated in collegial 1. Personal notes of teachers on
discussions that use teacher and LACs/FGDs/meetings with proof of attendance
learner feedback to enrich teaching 2. Minutes of LAC/FGD sessions on use of
practice. teacher and learner feedback to enrich
teaching practice with proof of attendance
3. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
9. Selected, developed, organized 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating sheet
and used appropriate teaching and and/or inter-observer agreement form about
learning resources, including ICT, to using appropriate teaching and learning
address learning goals. resources, including ICT
Examples:
 Activity sheets/task sheets/work sheets
 PowerPoint presentations
 Video clips
 Module
 SIMs-Strategic Intervention Materials
 Others
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs with appropriate
instructional materials appended
3. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
10. Designed, selected, organized 1. Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
and used diagnostic, formative and sheet and/or inter-observer agreement form
summative assessment strategies about using diagnostic, formative and
Assessment and consistent with curriculum summative assessment strategies
Reporting requirements. 2. Prepared lesson plans/modified DLLs
highlighting appropriate use of formative
assessment strategies
3. Developed diagnostic tests: (a) with TOS
reviewed by superior; (b) with sample
accomplished questionnaire/answer sheets
4. Developed summative tests: (a) with TOS
reviewed by superior; (b) with sample
accomplished questionnaire/answer sheets
5. Developed performance tasks: (a) with rubrics
reviewed by superior; (b) with sample
accomplished rubrics
5. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)

APPENDICES
141
142

THE RPMS MANUAL


11. Monitored and evaluated learner 1. Compilation of a learner’s written work with
progress and achievement using summary of results and with signature of
learner attainment data. parents
2. Formative/summative assessment tools with
TOS and frequency of errors with identified
least mastered skills
3. Class records/grading sheets
4. Lesson plans/modified DLLs showing index of
mastery
5. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
12. Communicated promptly and 1. At least 3 samples of corrected test papers of
clearly the learners’ needs, progress the same 3 learners in the same learning area
and achievement to key with parents’ or guardians’ signature and date
stakeholders, including of receipt
parents/guardians. 2. Minutes of PTA meetings or Parent-Teacher
conferences in all quarters with proof of
parent’s/guardian’s attendance
3. Report cards with parent’s or guardian’s
signature in all quarters supported by minutes
of meeting
4. Communication with parents/guardians using
various modalities
5. Anecdotal record showing entries per quarter
6. Other documents showing learner needs,
progress and achievement submitted to other
stakeholders
13. Performed various related 1. Certificate of Recognition or Participation
works/activities that contribute to the 2. Certificate of Training
teaching-learning process. 3. Certificate of Speakership
4. Committee involvement
5. Advisorship of Co-curricular activities
Plus Factor 6. Book or Journal Authorship/Co-
authorship/Contributorship
7. Coordinatorship/Chairpersonship
8. Coaching and mentoring learners in
competitions
9. Mentoring pre-service/in-service teachers
10. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)

APPENDICES
143
144

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
1. Applied 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Showed Showed Showed Showed No
knowledge of (COT) rating sheet and/or knowledge of knowledge of knowledge of knowledge of acceptable
content within and inter-observer agreement form content and its content and its content and its content and its evidence
across curriculum about knowledge of content integration integration integration integration was shown
teaching areas. within and across curriculum within and within and within and within and
teaching areas across subject across subject across subject across subject
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs areas as shown areas as areas as areas as
developed highlighting in MOV 1 with shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
integration of content a rating of 7 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
knowledge within and across of 6 of 5 of 4
subject areas Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any No
3. Instructional materials least 4 lessons lessons using lessons using 1 of the given acceptable
highlighting mastery of content using MOV 1 MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV evidence
and its integration in other and supported supported by supported by was shown
subject areas by any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
4. Performance tasks/test other given other given other given
material(s) highlighting MOV MOV MOV
integration of content
knowledge within and across
subject areas
5. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)

Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
2. Used a range of 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Facilitated Facilitated Facilitated Facilitated No
teaching strategies (COT) rating sheet and/or using different using different using different using different acceptable
that enhance inter-observer agreement form teaching teaching teaching teaching evidence
learner about teaching strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that was shown
achievement in enhance learner achievement promote promote promote promote
literacy and in literacy and numeracy skills reading, writing reading, writing reading, writing reading, writing
numeracy skills. 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs and/or and/or and/or and/or
used in teaching highlighting numeracy skills numeracy skills numeracy skills numeracy skills
learner-centered strategies as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
that promote literacy and/or MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
numeracy skills rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
3. Instructional materials Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
highlighting learner-centered least 4 learner- learner- learner- learner- acceptable
strategies that promote centered centered centered centered evidence
literacy and/or numeracy skills lessons as lessons as lessons as lesson as was shown
4. Performance tasks/test evidently evidently evidently evidently
material(s) used in teaching shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in any of
5. Results of assessment used in 1 and 1 and 1 and the given MOV
teaching supported by supported by supported by
6. Others (Please specify and any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
provide annotations) other MOV other MOV other MOV
given given given
Timeliness

APPENDICES
145
146

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
3. Applied a range 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Used different Used different Used different Used different No
of teaching (COT) rating sheet and/or teaching teaching teaching teaching acceptable
strategies to inter-observer agreement form strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that evidence
develop critical and about teaching strategies to develop critical develop critical develop critical develop critical was shown
creative thinking, as develop critical and creative and creative and creative and creative and creative
well as other thinking, as well as other thinking and/or thinking and/or thinking and/or thinking and/or
higher-order higher-order thinking skills other HOTS as other HOTS as other HOTS as other HOTS as
thinking skills. 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
used in teaching highlighting 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
different teaching strategies of 7 of 6 of 5 of 4
that develop critical and
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
creative thinking and/or other
least 4 lessons lessons as lessons as lesson as acceptable
HOTS
as evidenced evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidence
3. Instructional materials
by MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV 1 and any 1 of the was shown
highlighting different teaching
supported by supported by supported by given MOV
strategies that develop critical
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
and creative thinking and/or
other given other given other given
other HOTS
MOV MOV MOV
4. Performance tasks/test
material(s) used in
demonstration teaching
5. Results of assessment used in
teaching
6. Others (Please specify and Timeliness
provide annotations)
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
4. Managed 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Used Used Used Used No
classroom structure (COT) rating sheet and/or classroom classroom classroom classroom acceptable
to engage learners, inter-observer agreement form management management management management evidence
individually or in about managing classroom strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that was shown
groups, in structure that engages engage engage engage engage
meaningful learners in various activities learners in learners in learners in learners in
exploration, 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks
discovery and highlighting various as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
hands-on activities classroom management MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
within a range of strategies that engage rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
physical learning learners in activities/tasks in
environm different physical learning Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
ents. environments least 4 lessons lessons lessons lesson acceptable
3. Others (Please specify and supported by supported by supported by supported by evidence
provide annotations) MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV 1 and any of the was shown
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the acceptable
other other other MOV
acceptable acceptable acceptable
MOV MOV MOV

APPENDICES
Timeliness
147
148

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
5. Managed learner Classroom observation tool (COT) Quality Applied teacher Applied Applied teacher Applied teacher No
behavior rating sheet and/or inter-observer management teacher management management acceptable
constructively by agreement form about teacher strategies of management strategies of strategies of evidence
applying positive management of learner behavior learner strategies of learner learner was shown
and non-violent using the following strategies: behavior that learner behavior that behavior that
discipline to ensure 1. Providing motivation promote behavior that promote promote
learning-focused 2. Praising the learners/Giving positive and promote positive and positive and
environments. positive feedback non-violent positive and non-violent non-violent
3. Setting house discipline as non-violent discipline as discipline as
rules/guidelines shown in MOV discipline as shown in MOV shown in MOV
4. Ensuring learners’ active submitted with shown in MOV submitted with submitted with
participation a rating of 7 submitted with a rating of 5 a rating of 4
5. Allowing learners to express a rating of 6
their ideas/opinions Efficiency Submitted at Submitted at Submitted at Submitted any No
6. Giving equal opportunities to least 4 of the least 4 of the least 4 of the 1 of the given acceptable
learners given strategies given given strategies as evidence
7. Encouraging learners to ask as observed in strategies as strategies as observed in was shown
questions at least 4 observed in 3 observed in 2 only 1 lesson
8. Others (Please specify and lessons lessons lessons
provide annotations)

Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
6. Used 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Applied Applied Applied Applied No
differentiated, (COT) rating sheet and/or differentiated differentiated differentiated differentiated acceptable
developmentally inter-observer agreement form teaching teaching teaching teaching evidence
appropriate learning about using differentiated, strategies to strategies to strategies to strategies to shown
experiences to developmentally appropriate address learner address address learner address learner
address learners’ learning experiences diversity as learner diversity as diversity as
gender, needs, 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs shown in MOV diversity as shown in MOV shown in MOV
strengths, interests developed highlighting 1 with a rating shown in MOV 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
and experiences. differentiation in content, of 7 1 with a rating of 5 of 4
product, process, learning of 6
environment or others Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any No
according to learners’ gender, least 4 differentiated differentiated 1 differentiated acceptable
needs, strengths, interests differentiated teaching teaching teaching evidence
and experiences teaching strategies in at strategies in 2 strategy in only shown
3. Instructional materials strategies in at least 2 lessons as 1 lesson as No
developed highlighting least 2 lessons as evidenced by evidently acceptable
differentiation in content, lessons as evidenced by MOV 1 and shown in any 1 evidence
product, process, learning evidenced by MOV 1 and supported by of the was shown
environment or others MOV 1 and supported by any 1 of the acceptable
according to learners’ gender, supported by any 1 of the other MOV
needs, strengths, interests any 1 of the other acceptable
and experiences other acceptable MOV
4. Others (Please specify and acceptable MOV
provide annotations) MOV
Timeliness

APPENDICES
149
150

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
7. Planned, 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Planned and Planned and Planned and Planned and No
managed and (COT) rating sheet and/or implemented implemented implemented implemented acceptable
implemented inter-observer agreement form developmental- developmental- developmental- developmentall evidence
developmentally about using developmentally ly sequenced ly sequenced ly sequenced y sequenced was shown
sequenced teaching sequenced teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and
and learning learning process learning learning learning learning
processes to meet 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs process as process as process as process as
curriculum highlighting developmentally shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
requirements and sequenced instruction that 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
varied teaching meet curriculum goals and of 7 of 6 of 5 of 4
contexts. varied teaching contexts Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
3. Instructional materials used to least 4 developmental- developmental- developmental- acceptable
implement developmentally developmental- ly sequenced ly sequenced ly sequenced evidence
sequenced teaching and ly sequenced teaching and teaching and teaching and was shown
learning process to meet teaching and learning learning learning
curriculum requirements and learning process as process as process as
varied teaching contexts. process as evidently evidently evidently
4. Others (Please specify and evidently shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in any 1
provide annotations) shown in MOV 1 and 1 and of the given
1 and supported by supported by MOV
supported by any 1 of the any 1 of the
any 1 of the other given other given
other given MOV MOV
MOV
Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
8. Participated in 1. Personal notes of teachers on Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
collegial LACs/FGDs/meetings with participated in participated in participated in participated in acceptable
discussions that proof of attendance LACs/FGDs/ LACs/FGDs/ LACs/FGDs/ LAC/FGD/ evidence
use teacher and 2. Minutes of LAC/FGD sessions meetings to meetings to meetings to meeting to was shown
learner feedback to on use of teacher and learner discuss discuss discuss discuss
enrich teaching feedback to enrich teaching teacher/learner teacher/learner teacher/learner teacher/learner
practice. practice with proof of feedback to feedback to feedback to feedback to
attendance enrich enrich enrich enrich
3. Others (Please specify and instruction as instruction as instruction as instruction as
provide annotations) shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
MOV submitted MOV MOV submitted MOV submitted
submitted

Efficiency Participated in Participated in Participated in Participated in No


at least 4 3 LACs/FGDs/ 2 LACs/FGDs/ 1 LAC/FGD/ acceptable
LACs/FGDs/ meetings as meetings as meeting as evidence
meetings as evidently evidently evidently was shown
evidently shown in any 1 shown in any 1 shown in any 1
shown in any 1 of the given of the given of the given
of the given MOV MOV MOV
MOV

APPENDICES
Timeliness
151
152

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
9. Selected, 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Developed and Developed and Developed and Developed and No
developed, (COT) rating sheet and/or used varied used varied used varied used varied acceptable
organized and used inter-observer agreement form teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and evidence
appropriate about using appropriate learning learning learning learning was shown
teaching and teaching and learning resources, resources, resources, resources,
learning resources, resources, including ICT including ICT, including ICT, including ICT, including ICT,
including ICT, to Examples: to address to address to address to address
address learning  Activity sheets/task learning goals learning goals learning goals learning goals
goals. sheets/work sheets as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
 PowerPoint presentations MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
 Video clips rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
 Module Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any No
 SIMs-Strategic Intervention least 4 varied varied teaching varied teaching teaching and acceptable
Materials teaching and and learning and learning learning evidence
 Others learning resources, resources, resource, was shown
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs resources, including ICT, including ICT, including ICT,
with appropriate instructional including ICT, as evidently as evidently as evidently
materials appended as evidently shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in any of
3. Others (Please specify and shown in MOV 1 and 1 and the acceptable
provide annotations) 1 and supported by supported by MOV
supported by any 1 of the any 1 of the
any 1 of the acceptable acceptable
acceptable MOV MOV
MOV
Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
10. Designed, 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Designed, Designed, Designed, Designed, No
selected, organized (COT) rating sheet and/or selected, selected, selected, selected, acceptable
and used inter-observer agreement form organized and organized and organized and organized and evidence
diagnostic, about using diagnostic, used used used used was shown
formative and formative and summative diagnostic, diagnostic, diagnostic, diagnostic,
summative assessment strategies formative and formative and formative and formative and
assessment 2. Prepared lesson summative summative summative summative
strategies plans/modified DLLs assessment assessment assessment assessment
consistent with highlighting appropriate use of strategies strategies strategies strategies
curriculum formative assessment consistent with consistent with consistent with consistent with
requirements. strategies curriculum curriculum curriculum curriculum
3. Developed diagnostic tests: requirements requirements requirements requirements
(a) with TOS reviewed by as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
superior; (b) with sample MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
accomplished rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
questionnaire/answer sheets Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
4. Developed summative tests: least 4 varied varied varied assessment acceptable
(a) with TOS reviewed by assessment assessment assessment tool as evidence
superior; (b) with sample tools as tools as tools as evidently was shown
accomplished evidently evidently evidently shown in any of
questionnaire/answer sheets shown in any 1 shown in any 1 shown in any 1 the acceptable
5. Developed performance tasks: of the of the of the MOV
(a) with rubrics reviewed by acceptable acceptable acceptable
superior; (b) with sample MOV MOV MOV
accomplished rubrics

APPENDICES
6. Others (Please specify and Timeliness
provide annotations)
153
154

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
11. Monitored and 1. Compilation of a learner’s Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
evaluated learner written work with summary of monitored and monitored and monitored and monitored and acceptable
progress and results and with signature of evaluated evaluated evaluated evaluated evidence
achievement using parents learner learner learner learner was shown
learner attainment 2. Formative/summative progress and progress and progress and progress and
data. assessment tools with TOS achievement achievement achievement achievement
and frequency of errors with using learner using learner using learner using learner
identified least mastered skills attainment data attainment attainment data attainment data
3. Class records/grading sheets as shown in the data as shown as shown in the as shown in the
4. Lesson plans/modified DLLs MOV submitted in the MOV MOV submitted MOV submitted
showing index of mastery submitted
5. Others (Please specify and Efficiency Submitted a Submitted a Submitted a Submitted 1 No
provide annotations) combination of combination of combination of acceptable acceptable
at least 4 of the 3 of the 2 of the MOV evidence
acceptable acceptable acceptable was shown
MOV MOV MOV

Timeliness Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No


MOV were MOV were MOV were MOV was acceptable
distributed distributed distributed completed in evidence
across 4 across 3 across 2 only 1 quarter was shown
quarters quarters quarters
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1)
(4)
12. Communicated 1. At least 3 samples of corrected Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely showed No
promptly and clearly test papers of the same 3 showed prompt showed prompt showed prompt prompt and acceptable
the learners’ needs, learners in the same learning and clear and clear and clear clear evidence
progress and area with parents’ or communication communication communication communication was shown
achievement to key guardians’ signature and date of the learners’ of the learners’ of the learners’ of the learners’
stakeholders, of receipt needs, needs, needs, needs,
including 2. Minutes of PTA meetings or progress and progress and progress and progress and
parents/guardians. Parent-Teacher conferences in achievement to achievement to achievement to achievement to
all quarters with proof of key key key key
parents’/guardians’ attendance stakeholders, stakeholders, stakeholders, stakeholders,
3. Report cards with parent’s or including including including including
guardian’s signature in all parents/ parents/ parents/ parents/
quarters supported by minutes guardians as guardians as guardians as guardians as
of meeting shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
4. Communication with parents/ MOV submitted MOV MOV submitted MOV submitted
guardians using various submitted
modalities Efficiency Submitted a Submitted a Submitted a Submitted any No
5. Anecdotal record showing combination of combination of combination of 1 of the given acceptable
entries per quarter at least 4 of the 3 of the 2 of the MOV evidence
6. Other documents showing acceptable acceptable acceptable was shown
learners’ needs, progress and MOV MOV MOV
achievement submitted to
other stakeholders Timeliness Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
MOV were MOV were MOV were MOV was acceptable
distributed distributed distributed completed in evidence

APPENDICES
across 4 across 3 across 2 only 1 quarter was shown
quarters quarters quarters
155
156

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
13. Performed 1. Certificate of Recognition or Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
various related Participation performed performed performed performed acceptable
works/activities that 2. Certificate of Training various related various related various related various related evidence
contribute to the 3. Certificate of Speakership work/activities work/activities work/activities work/activities was shown
teaching-learning 4. Committee involvement that contribute that contribute that contribute that contribute
process. 5. Advisorship of Co-curricular to the teaching to the teaching to the teaching to the teaching
activities learning learning learning learning
6. Book or Journal process as process as process as process as
Authorship/Co- shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
authorship/Contributorship MOV submitted MOV MOV submitted MOV submitted
7. Coordinatorship/Chairpersons submitted
hip Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any No
8. Coaching and mentoring least 4 different different kinds different kinds 1 of the acceptable
learners in competitions kinds of of acceptable of acceptable acceptable evidence
9. Mentoring pre-service/in- acceptable MOV MOV MOV was shown
service teachers MOV
10. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)

Timeliness
This Tool was developed through the Philippine National Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian
Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

APPENDICES
157
158

THE RPMS MANUAL


Appendix C

RPMS Tool for Master Teacher I-IV


(Highly Proficient Teachers)

POSITION AND COMPETENCY PROFILE PCP No. Revision Code: 00

Department of
Education

Position Title Master Teacher I-IV


Salary Grade
Parenthetical Title
Office Unit Effectivity Date
Reports to Page/s
Position
Supervised
JOB SUMMARY

QUALIFICATION STANDARDS
A. CSC Prescribed Qualifications
Education Bachelor of Elementary/Secondary Education or Bachelor’s degree plus 18 units in Education and 18 units for a
Master’s degree in Education or its equivalent (MT-I), Bachelor of Elementary/Secondary Education or
Bachelor’s degree plus 18 professional units in
Education and 24 units for a Master’s degree in Education or its equivalent (MT-II)
Experienc
e
Eligibility RA 1080
Trainings
B. Preferred Qualifications
Education Master’s Degree Graduate
Experienc 3 years in service as Teacher III
e
Eligibility Licensure Examination for Teachers
Trainings Relevant trainings
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Models exemplary practice in the application of content knowledge and pedagogy showing its integration within
and across learning
areas
2. Conducts in-depth studies or action researches on teaching-learning innovations
3. Works with colleagues to create learning-focused environments that promote learner responsibility and
achievement
4. Assists colleagues to implement differentiated teaching strategies that are responsive to learner diversity
5. Leads in the preparation and enrichment of curriculum
6. Initiates programs and projects that can enhance the curriculum and its implementation
7. Leads colleagues in the design, evaluation, interpretation and utilization of different types of assessment tools
for the improvement of the teaching and learning process
8. Updates parents/guardians on learner needs, progress and achievement
9. Strengthens school-community partnerships to enrich engagement of internal and external stakeholders in the
educative process
10. Establishes links with colleagues through attendance and membership in professional organizations for self-
growth and advancement
11. Provides technical assistance through demonstration teaching, mentoring, coaching, class
monitoring and observation, organizing/leading/serving as trainers/facilitators in teacher quality
circles/learning action cells
12. Does related work

APPENDICES
159
160

THE RPMS MANUAL


Major Final Outputs Key Result Areas
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV)
(MFOs) (KRAs)
1. Modeled effective 1. Classroom observation tool (COT)
applications of content rating sheet and/or inter-observer
knowledge within and across agreement form about effective
curriculum teaching areas. applications of content knowledge
within and across curriculum teaching
areas
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in
demonstration teaching highlighting
integration of content knowledge
within and across subject areas
3. Instructional materials developed
highlighting effective application of
content knowledge within and across
Content Knowledge and subject areas
Pedagogy 4. Performance tasks/test material(s)
used in demonstration teaching
highlighting integration of content
knowledge within and across subject
areas
5. Results of assessment used in
demonstration teaching highlighting
mastery of lessons learned
6. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
2. Collaborated with 1. Copy of the research proposal
colleagues in the conduct and focused on enriching knowledge of
application of research to content and pedagogy
enrich knowledge of content 2. Proof of participation and/or
and pedagogy. contribution to a collaborative
research (e.g. e-mail, actual output
submitted, terms of reference, etc.)
3. Certified completed collaborative
research focused on enriching
knowledge of content and
pedagogy
4. Proof of dissemination of research
findings with colleagues
5. Proof of utilization of research findings
6. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
3. Developed and applied 1. Classroom observation tool (COT)
effective teaching strategies to rating sheet and/or inter-observer
promote critical and creative agreement form about using effective
thinking, as well as other teaching strategies to promote critical
higher-order thinking skills. and creative teaching, as well as
other higher-order thinking skills
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in
demonstration teaching highlighting
different teaching strategies that
develop critical and creative thinking
and/or other HOTS
3. Instructional materials highlighting
different teaching strategies that
develop critical and creative
thinking, and/or other HOTS
4. Performance tasks/test material(s)
used in demonstration teaching
5. Results of assessment used
in the demonstration
teaching
6. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
4. Worked with colleagues to 1. Classroom observation tool (COT)
rating sheet and/or inter-observer

APPENDICES
model and share effective
Learning Environment and techniques in the management agreement form about sharing
of classroom structure to effective techniques in the
Diversity of Learners
161

engage learners, individually management of classroom structure


or in groups, in meaningful 2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in
demonstration teaching highlighting
exploration, discovery and
effective classroom management
hands-on activities strategies that engage
162

THE RPMS MANUAL


within a range of physical learners in activities/tasks in different
learning environments. physical learning environments
3. Minutes of LAC highlighting the
sharing on effective classroom
management techniques
4. Instructional materials used in
demonstration teaching
5. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
5. Exhibited effective and Classroom observation tool (COT) rating
constructive behavior sheet and/or inter-observer agreement
management skills by form about effective teacher
applying positive and non- management of learner behavior using
violent discipline to ensure the following strategies:
learning- focused 1. Providing motivation
2. Praising the learners/Giving positive
environments.
feedback
3. Setting house rules/guidelines
4. Ensuring learners’ active participation
5. Allowing learners to
express their
ideas/opinions
6. Giving equal opportunities to learners
7. Encouraging learners to ask questions
8. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
6. Worked with colleagues to 1. Minutes of LAC session/s,
share differentiated, highlighting one’s sharing of
developmentally appropriate strategies on differentiated and
opportunities to address developmentally appropriate
learners’ differences in opportunities to address learners’
gender, needs, strengths, differences
2. Lesson plans/modified DLLs
interests and experiences.
highlighting strategies on
differentiated and
developmentally-appropriate
opportunities to address learners’
differences
3. Corresponding instructional materials
showing differentiated and
developmentally-appropriate
opportunities to address learners’
differences
4. Others (e.g. testimonial, write-up from
colleagues of the lessons/insights
gained from the Master Teacher's
sharing)
7. Developed and applied 1. Classroom observation tool (COT)
effective strategies in the rating sheet and/or inter-observer
planning and management agreement form about using effective
of developmentally strategies in implementing
sequenced teaching and developmentally sequenced teaching
learning processes to meet and learning process
2. Results of learners’ assessment
curriculum requirements
during the actual teaching
and varied teaching 3. Lesson plans/modified DLLs used in
contexts. demonstration teaching highlighting
developmentally sequenced
Curriculum and Planning teaching-learning process
4. Instructional materials showing
effective strategies in
developmentally sequenced
teaching and learning process
5. Performance tasks/test material(s)
used in demonstration teaching
6. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)

APPENDICES
8. Reviewed with colleagues, 1. Implemented LAC/FGD Plan
teacher and learner feedback 2. Minutes of LAC/FGD sessions on use
163

to plan, facilitate and enrich of teacher and learner feedback to


teaching practice. enrich teaching practice with proof of
attendance
3. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
164

THE RPMS MANUAL


9. Advised and guided 1. Teaching and learning resources
colleagues in the selection, developed by colleagues and critiqued
organization, development on their alignment to learning goals
and use of appropriate 2. Lesson plans by colleagues critiqued
teaching and learning in terms of the alignment of the
resources, including ICT, to teaching and learning resources to
the indicated learning goals and
address specific learning
appropriateness to the target
goals.
learners
3. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
10. Worked collaboratively 1. Any proof of collaborative review if the
with colleagues to review the test is designed based on its purpose
design, selection, (e.g. diagnostic, formative and
organization and use of a summative)
range of effective diagnostic, 2. Any proof of collaborative review of
formative and summative the alignment of the test with the
curriculum 2.1.formative test
assessment strategies
attached to a lesson plan
consistent with curriculum
2.2.summative assessment with
requirements. TOS 2.3.diagnostic test with its
Assessment and Reporting TOS
3. Others (Please specify and provide
annotations)
11. Interpreted collaboratively 1. Collaborative interpretation of the
monitoring and evaluation index of mastery obtained from 1
strategies of attainment data class
to support learner progress 2. Collaborative interpretation of item
and achievement. analysis of quarterly examinations
3. Collaborative interpretation of
results of performance
assessment
4. Others (Please specify and
provide annotations)
12. Applied skills in the 1. Sample agreement for learners at
effective communication of risk signed by parents and
learner needs, progress corresponding evidence of
and achievement to key improvement
stakeholders, including 2. Record of dialogue and/or parent-
parents/guardians. teacher conferences and
corresponding evidence of
improvement
3. Anecdotal record communicated to
and signed by the learners and/or
parents with corresponding evidence
of improvement
4. Sample of learners' test results
signed by parents and
corresponding evidence of
improvement
5. Sample of accomplished rubrics given
for performance task and
corresponding evidence of
improvement
6. Attendance sheet/minutes of
parent-teacher conference
7. Signed report cards of students at
risk with corresponding evidence
of improvement
8. Correspondence
notebook/letters/proof of
communication using other modalities
(e.g. e- mail, SMS, etc.) and

APPENDICES
corresponding evidence of
improvement
9. Learners’ performance record
165

10.Others (Please specify and


provide annotations)
Plus Factor 13. Performed various related 1. Served as reliever of classes in the
works/activities that absence of teachers
contribute to the teaching- 2. Served as OIC in the absence of the
learning process. principal
166

THE RPMS MANUAL


3. Represented the principal in
meetings and conferences
4. Observed classes of Teachers I-III
5. Assisted the school selection
committee in the evaluation of
credentials when hiring or promoting
teachers
6. Certificate of Recognition or
Participation
7. Certificate of Training
8. Certificate of Speakership
9. Committee involvement
10. Advisorship of Co-curricular activities
11. Book or Journal
Authorship/Co-
authorship/Contributorshi
p
12. Coordinatorship/Chairpersonship
13. Coaching and mentoring
learners in competitions
14. Mentoring pre-service/in-service
teachers
15. Others (Please specify
and provide annotations)
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
1. Modeled 1. Classroom observation Quality Modeled Modeled Modeled Modeled No
effective tool (COT) rating sheet effective effective effective effective acceptab
applications of and/or inter- observer applications application application applications le
content knowledge agreement form about of content s of content s of of content evidence
within and across effective applications of knowledge knowledge content knowledge was
curriculum teaching content knowledge within within and within and knowledge within and shown
areas. and across curriculum across across within and across
teaching areas curriculum curriculum across curriculum
2. Lesson plans/modified teaching teaching curriculum teaching
DLLs used in areas as areas as teaching areas as
demonstration teaching shown in shown in areas as shown in
highlighting integration of MOV 1 with MOV 1 with shown in MOV 1 with
content knowledge within a rating of 8 a MOV 1 a rating of 5
and across subject areas rating of 7 with a
3. Instructional materials rating of 6
developed highlighting Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted 1 No
effective application of at least 4 3 lessons 2 lessons lesson as acceptab
content knowledge within lessons as as as evidenced le
and across subject areas evidenced evidenced evidenced by MOV 1 evidence
4. Performance tasks/test by MOV 1 by MOV 1 by MOV 1 from was
material(s) used in and from from colleagues shown
demonstration teaching supported colleagues colleagues and
highlighting integration of by any 1 of and and supported
content knowledge within the other supported supported by any 1 of
and across subject areas MOV given by any 1 of by any 1 of the other
5. Results of assessment the other the other MOV given

APPENDICES
used in demonstration MOV given MOV
teaching highlighting given
mastery of lessons Timeliness
167

learned
6. Others (Please
specify and provide
annotations)
168

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
2. Collaborated 1. Copy of the research Quality Conducted, Conducted Conducted Proposed No
with colleagues in proposal focused on completed and action action acceptab
the conduct and enriching knowledge of and completed research research le
application of content and pedagogy disseminate action with with evidence
research to enrich 2. Proof of participation d action research colleagues colleagues was
knowledge of and/or contribution to a research with shown
content and collaborative research with colleagues
pedagogy. (e.g. e-mail, actual colleagues
output submitted, terms
of reference, etc.)
3. Certified completed
collaborative research
focused on enriching Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitte Submitted No
knowledge of content and at least 4 any 3 of the d any 2 any 1 MOV acceptab
pedagogy of the acceptable MOV le
4. Proof of dissemination of given MOV evidence
research findings with MOV was
colleagues shown
5. Proof of utilization of
research findings
6. Others (Please
specify and provide Timeliness Presented Complete Conducte Proposed No
annotations) the d the d the the research acceptab
research research research report within le
report report report the rating evidence
within the within the within the period was
rating rating rating shown
period period period
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
3. Developed and 1. Classroom observation Quality Demonstrat Demonstrat Demonstrat Demonstrat No
applied effective tool (COT) rating sheet ed effective ed effective ed effective ed effective acceptab
teaching and/or inter- observer teaching teaching teaching teaching le
strategies to agreement form about strategies strategies strategies strategies to evidence
promote critical using effective teaching to promote to promote to promote promote was
and creative strategies to promote critical and critical and critical and critical and shown
thinking, as well critical and creative creative creative creative creative
as other higher- teaching, as well as other thinking, as thinking, as thinking, as thinking, as
order thinking higher-order thinking skills well as well as well as well as
skills. 2. Lesson plans/modified other other other other
DLLs used in higher- higher- higher- higher-order
demonstration teaching order order order thinking
highlighting different thinking thinking thinking skills as
teaching strategies that skills as skills as skills as shown in
develop critical and shown in shown in shown in MOV 1 with
creative thinking and/or MOV 1 with MOV 1 with MOV 1 with a rating of 5
other HOTS a a a
3. Instructional materials rating of 8 rating of 7 rating of 6
highlighting different Efficiency Submitted 4 Submitted Submitted Submitted 1 No
teaching strategies that or more 3 lessons 2 lessons lesson as acceptab
develop critical and lessons as as as evidently le
creative thinking and/or evidently evidently evidently shown in evidence
other HOTS shown in shown in shown in MOV 1 and was
4. Performance tasks/test MOV 1 and MOV 1 MOV 1 supported shown
material(s) used in supported and and by any of
demonstration teaching by any 1 of supported supported the other

APPENDICES
5. Results of assessment the other by any 1 by any 1 MOV given
used in the MOV of the of the
demonstration teaching given other other
169

6. Others (Please MOV MOV


given given
specify and provide Timeliness
annotations)
170

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
4. Worked with 1. Classroom observation Quality Modeled Modeled Modeled Modeled No
colleagues to tool (COT) rating sheet and shared and shared and shared and shared acceptab
model and share and/or inter- observer effective effective effective effective le
effective agreement form about classroom classroom classroom classroom evidence
techniques in the sharing effective managemen manageme manageme managemen was
management of techniques in the t strategies nt nt t strategies shown
classroom management of that engage strategies strategies that engage
structure to classroom structure learners in that that learners in
engage learners, 2. Lesson plans/modified activities/ engage engage activities/
individually or in DLLs used in tasks done learners in learners in tasks done
groups, in demonstration teaching in different activities/ activities/ in different
meaningful highlighting effective physical tasks done tasks done physical
exploration, classroom management learning in different in different learning
discovery and strategies that engage environment physical physical environment
hands-on activities learners in activities/tasks s as shown learning learning s as shown
within a range of in different physical in MOV 1 environmen environmen in MOV 1
physical learning learning environments with a ts as ts as with a
environments. 3. Minutes of LAC rating of 8 shown in shown in rating of 5
highlighting the sharing MOV 1 with MOV 1 with
on effective classroom a a
management techniques rating of 7 rating of 6
4. Instructional materials Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
used in demonstration at least 4 3 lessons 2 lessons any 1 of the acceptab
teaching lessons supported supported acceptable le
5. Others (Please supported by MOV 1 by MOV 1 MOV evidence
specify and provide by MOV 1 and any 1 and any 1 was
annotations) and any 1 of the of the shown
of the other other other
acceptable acceptabl acceptabl
MOV e e
MOV MOV
Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
5. Exhibited Classroom observation tool Quality Exhibited Exhibited Exhibited Exhibited No
effective and (COT) rating sheet and/or effective effective effective effective accepta
constructive inter-observer agreement and and and and ble
behavior form about effective teacher constructive constructiv constructiv constructive evidence
management skills management of learner behavior e behavior e behavior behavior shown
by applying behavior using the following manageme managem managem manageme
positive and non- strategies: nt skills by ent skills ent skills nt skills by
violent discipline 1. Providing motivation applying by by applying
to ensure 2. Praising the positive and applying applying positive and
learning- focused learners/Giving non-violent positive positive non-violent
environments. positive feedback discipline to and non- and non- discipline to
3. Setting house ensure violent violent ensure
rules/guidelines learning- discipline discipline learning-
4. Ensuring learners’ focused to ensure to ensure focused
active participation environmen learning- learning- environmen
5. Allowing learners to ts shown in focused focused ts shown in
express their MOV 1 with environme environme MOV 1 with
ideas/opinions a rating nts shown nts shown a rating
6. Giving equal of 8 in MOV 1 in MOV 1 of 5
opportunities to with a with a
learners rating of 7 rating of 6
7. Encouraging learners Efficiency Applied at Applied at Applied at Applied any No
to ask questions least 7 of least 7 of least 7 of of the given accepta
8. Others (Please the given the given the given strategies ble
specify and provide strategies strategies strategies as observed evidence
annotations) as observed as as in only 1 shown

APPENDICES
in at least 4 observed observed lesson
lessons in 3 in 2
lessons lessons
171

Timeliness
172

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
6. Worked with 1. Minutes of LAC session/s, Quality Worked Worked Worked Worked No
colleagues to highlighting one’s sharing with with with with accepta
share of strategies on colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues ble
differentiated, differentiated and at least in in the in the but no evidence
developmentally developmentally- the school department evidence of shown
appropriate appropriate opportunities district/clus level to or grade sharing with
opportunities to to address learners’ ter level to share level to others
address learners’ differences share lesson share
differences in 2. Lesson plans/modified lesson lesson
gender, needs, DLLs highlighting
strengths, strategies on differentiated Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
interests and and developmentally- at least 1 at least 1 at least 1 at least 1 accepta
experiences. appropriate opportunities lesson as lesson as lesson as lesson, as ble
to address learners’ evidently evidently evidently evidenced evidence
differences shown in shown in shown in by either shown
3. Corresponding MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV 2 or 3
instructional materials supported supported supported but no
showing differentiated and by any by any by any evidence of
developmentally acceptable acceptable acceptable sharing
appropriate opportunities MOV MOV MOV with others
to address learners’
differences
4. Others (e.g. testimonial,
write-up from colleagues of
the lessons/insights gained
from the Master Teacher's Timeliness
sharing)
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
7. Developed 1. Classroom observation tool Quality Developed Developed Developed Developed No
and applied (COT) rating sheet and/or and applied and applied and and applied acceptab
effective inter-observer agreement effective effective applied effective le
strategies in the form about using effective strategies strategies effective strategies evidence
planning and strategies in implementing showing showing strategies showing was
management of developmentally sequenced developmen developme showing developmen shown
developmentally teaching and learning tall y- nta lly- developme tall y-
sequenced process sequenced sequenced nta lly- sequenced
teaching and 2. Results of learners’ teaching teaching sequenced teaching
learning assessment during the and learning and teaching and learning
processes to actual teaching process as learning and process as
meet curriculum 3. Lesson plans/modified shown in process as learning shown in
requirements DLLs used in MOV 1 with shown in process as MOV 1 with
and varied demonstration teaching a rating of 8 MOV 1 with shown in a rating of 5
teaching highlighting a rating of 7 MOV 1
contexts. developmentally with a
sequenced teaching- rating of 6
learning process Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
4. Instructional materials at least 4 2-3 lessons 1 lesson as 1 lesson acceptab
showing effective lessons as as evidenced as le
strategies in evidenced evidenced by shown evidenced evidence
developmentally by MOV 1 by MOV 1 in MOV 1 by any 1 of was
sequenced teaching and and 2 and and 2 and and/or the shown
learning process supported supported 2 and acceptable
5. Performance tasks/test by any 1 of by any 1 of supported MOV
material(s) used in the other the other by any 1

APPENDICES
demonstration teaching acceptable acceptable of the
6. Others (Please MOV MOV other
specify and provide acceptabl
173

annotations) e
MOV
Timeliness
174

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
8. Reviewed with 1. Implemented LAC/FGD Plan Quality Consistent Frequently Occasiona Rarely led No
colleagues, 2. Minutes of LAC/FGD ly led led lly led collaborati acceptab
teacher and sessions on use of teacher collaborati collaborative collaborati ve reviews le
learner feedback and learner feedback to ve reviews reviews of ve reviews of teacher evidence
to plan, facilitate enrich teaching practice of teacher teacher and of teacher and was
and enrich with proof of attendance and learner and learner shown
teaching 3. Others (Please learner feedback as learner feedback
practice. specify and provide feedback evidenced feedback as
annotations) as by the MOV as evidenced
evidenced submitted evidenced by the
by the by the MOV
MOV MOV submitted
submitted submitted
Efficiency Submitted 4 Submitted Submitted Submitted 1 No
collaborativ 3 2 collaborative acceptab
e reviews of collaborati collaborati review of le
teacher and ve reviews ve reviews teacher and evidence
learner of teacher of teacher learner was
feedback as and and feedback as shown
evidently learner learner evidently
shown in feedback feedback shown in
MOV 1 and as as any of the
supported evidently evidently acceptable
by any 1 of shown in shown in MOV
the MOV 1 MOV 1
acceptable and and
MOV supported supported
by any 1 by any 1
of the of the
acceptabl acceptabl
e e
MOV MOV
Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
9. Advised and 1. Teaching and learning Quality Consistent Frequently Occasiona Rarely No
guided colleagues resources developed by ly advised advised lly advised advised acceptab
in the selection, colleagues and critiqued colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues le
organization, on their alignment to in the in the in the in the evidence
development and learning goals selection, selection, selection, selection, was
use of appropriate 2. Lesson plans by colleagues organizatio organizatio organizatio organization, shown
teaching and critiqued in terms of the n, n, n, development
learning alignment of the teaching developme developme developme and
resources, and learning resources to nt and nt and nt and appropriate
including ICT, to the indicated learning goals appropriat appropriat appropriat use of
address specific and appropriateness to the e use of e use of e use of teaching and
learning goals. target learners teaching teaching teaching learning
3. Others (Please specify and and and resources as
and provide learning learning learning shown in the
annotations) resources resources resources MOV
as shown as shown as shown submitted
in the in the in the
MOV MOV MOV
submitted submitted submitted
Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
at least 4 3 teaching 2 teaching 1 teaching acceptab
teaching and and and le
and learning learning learning evidence
learning resources resources resource was
resources as as as shown
as evidenced evidenced evidenced

APPENDICES
evidenced by at least by at least by any of
by at least 1 of the 1 of the the
1 of the acceptable acceptable acceptable
175

acceptable MOV MOV MOV


MOV
Timeliness
176

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
10. Worked 1. Any proof of collaborative Quality Consistentl Frequently Occasional Rarely No
collaboratively review if the test is y reviewed reviewed ly reviewed reviewed acceptab
with colleagues to designed based on its collaborativ collaborativ collaborativ collaborative le
review the design, purpose (e.g. diagnostic, ely ely el y ly evidence
selection, formative and summative) assessmen assessmen assessmen assessment was
organization and 2. Any proof of collaborative t tools with t tools with t tools with tools with shown
use of a range of review of the alignment of colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues
effective the test with the as shown as shown as shown as shown in
diagnostic, curriculum in the MOV in the MOV in the MOV the MOV
formative and 2.1. formative test submitted submitted submitted submitted
summative attached to a lesson
assessment plan
strategies 2.2. summative Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted 1 No
consistent with assessment with TOS at least 4 3 2 assessment acceptab
curriculum 2.3. diagnostic test with assessme assessme assessme tool as le
requirements. its TOS nt tools as nt tools as nt tools as evidently evidence
3. Others (Please evidently evidently evidently shown in was
specify and provide shown in shown in shown in any of the shown
annotations) any of the any of the any of the acceptable
acceptable acceptable acceptable MOV
MOV MOV MOV

Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
11. Interpreted 1. Collaborative interpretation Quality Consistentl Frequently Occasiona Rarely No
collaboratively of the index of mastery y collaborate lly collaborated acceptab
monitoring and obtained from 1 class collaborate d with collaborat with le
evaluation 2. Collaborative d with colleagues ed with colleagues evidence
strategies of interpretation of item colleagues in the colleagues in the was
attainment data analysis of quarterly in the interpretatio in the interpretatio shown
to support examinations interpretatio n of interpretati n of
learner progress 3. Collaborative n of assessment on of assessment
and interpretation of results assessment data as assessme data as
achievement. of performance data as shown in nt data as shown in the
assessment shown in the MOV shown in MOV
4. Others (Please the MOV submitted the MOV submitted
specify and provide submitted submitted
annotations)

Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No


at least 2 at least 3 at least 2 any 1 of the acceptab
different of the of the MOV le
types of same kind same kind evidence
MOV of MOV of MOV was
shown

Timeliness

APPENDICES
177
178

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
12. Applied 1. Sample agreement for Quality Consistently Frequently Occasional Rarely No
skills in the learners at risk signed by applied applied ly applied applied skills acceptab
effective parents and corresponding skills in the skills in the skills in the in the le
communication evidence of improvement effective effective effective effective evidence
of learner 2. Record of dialogue and/or communicat communica communic communicati was
needs, parent- teacher ion of tio n of atio n of on of learner shown
progress and conferences and learner learner learner needs and
achievement to corresponding evidence of needs and needs and needs and progress to
key improvement progress to progress to progress to parents/
stakeholders, 3. Anecdotal record parents/ parents/ parents/ guardians
including communicated to and guardians guardians guardians as shown in
parents/guardia signed by the learners as shown in as shown in as shown the MOV
ns. and/or parents with the MOV the MOV in the MOV submitted
corresponding evidence of submitted submitted submitted
improvement
4. Sample of learners’ test
results signed by parents
and corresponding
evidence of improvement
5. Sample of accomplished
rubrics given for
performance task and
corresponding evidence
of improvement
6. Attendance
sheet/minutes of
parent-teacher
conference
7. Signed report cards of
students at risk with
corresponding evidence
of improvement
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
8. Correspondence Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitte Submitted No
notebook/letters/proof of at least 3 any 3 MOV d any 2 any 1 MOV acceptab
communication using other of the MOV le
modalities (e.g. e-mail, acceptabl evidence
SMS, etc.) and e MOV was
corresponding evidence of shown
improvement
9. Learners’ performance
record Others (Please
specify and provide
annotations) Timeliness

APPENDICES
179
180

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
13. Performed 1. Served as reliever of Quality Consistent Frequently Occasiona Rarely No
various related classes in the absence of ly performed lly performed acceptab
works/activities teachers performed special performed special tasks le
that contribute to 2. Served as OIC in the special tasks special and/or evidence
the teaching- absence of the principal tasks and/or tasks assignments was
learning process. 3. Represented the and/or assignme and/or as shown in shown
principal in meetings assignme nts as assignme the MOV
and conferences nts as shown in nts as submitted
4. Observed classes of shown in the MOV shown in
Teachers I- III the MOV submitted the MOV
5. Assisted the school submitted submitted
selection committee in
the evaluation of
credentials when hiring
or promoting teachers
6. Certificate of
Recognition or
Participation
7. Certificate of Training
8. Certificate of Speakership
9. Committee involvement
Performance Indicators
Very
Objectives Means of Verification (MOV) Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
QET Satisfactory
(5) (4) (3) (2) (1)
10. Advisorship of Co- Efficiency Submitted Submitted Submitted Submitted No
curricular activities at least 4 only 3 only 2 any 1 of the acceptab
11. Book or Journal different different different acceptable le
Authorship/Co- kinds of kinds of kinds of MOV evidence
authorship/Contributorshi acceptable acceptable acceptable was
p MOV MOV MOV shown
12. Coordinatorship/chairman
ship
13. Coaching and mentoring
learners in competitions
14. Mentoring pre-
service/in-service
teachers
15. Others (Please
specify and provide
annotations)
Timeliness

APPENDICES
181
182

THE RPMS MANUAL


This Tool was developed through the Philippine National Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support
from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST)
Program.
Appendi x D.1

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE COMMITMENT AND REVIEW FORM (IPCRF) for Teacher I-III
Name of Employee: Name of Rater:
Position: Position:
Bureau/Center/Service/Division: Date of Review:
Rating Period:
TO BE FILLED OUT DURING PLANNING TO BE FILLED OUT DURING EVALUATION

Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Basic 1. Content 1. Applied knowledge Quality Showed Showed Showed Showed No
Education Knowledge and of content within and knowledge of knowledge of knowledge of knowledge of acceptable
Services Pedagogy across curriculum content and its content and its content and its content and its evidence
teaching areas. integration integration integration integration was shown
within and within and within and within and
across subject across subject across subject across subject
areas as shown areas as shown areas as shown areas as shown
in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a
rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4

Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any 1 No


least 4 lessons lessons using lessons using of the given acceptable
using MOV 1 MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV evidence
and supported supported by supported by was shown
by any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
other given other given other given
MOV MOV MOV

Timeliness

Basic 2. Used a range of Quality Facilitated using Facilitated using Facilitated using Facilitated using No
Education teaching strategies different different different different acceptable
Services that enhance learner teaching teaching teaching teaching evidence
achievement in strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that was shown
literacy and numeracy promote promote promote promote
skills. reading, writing reading, writing reading, writing reading, writing
and/or and/or and/or and/or

APPENDICES
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184

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
numeracy skills numeracy skills numeracy skills numeracy skills
as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 learner- learner- learner- learner- acceptable
centered centered centered centered lesson evidence
lessons as lessons as lessons as as evidently was shown
evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown shown in any of
in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and the given MOV
supported by supported by supported by
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
other MOV other MOV other MOV
given given given

Timeliness
Basic 3. Applied a range of Quality Used different Used different Used different Used different No
Education teaching strategies to teaching teaching teaching teaching acceptable
Services develop critical and strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that evidence
creative thinking, as develop critical develop critical develop critical develop critical was shown
well as other higher- and creative and creative and creative and creative
order thinking skills. thinking and/or thinking and/or thinking and/or thinking and/or
other HOTS as other HOTS as other HOTS as other HOTS as
shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
of 7 of 6 of 5 of 4
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 lessons lessons as lessons as lesson as acceptable
as evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidence
MOV 1 and MOV 1 and MOV 1 and any 1 of the was shown
supported by supported by supported by given MOV
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
other given other given other given
MOV MOV MOV
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Timeliness

Basic 2. Learning 4. Managed Quality Used classroom Used classroom Used classroom Used classroom No
Education Environment and classroom structure to management management management management acceptable
Services Diversity of engage learners, strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that evidence
Learners individually or in engage learners engage learners engage learners engage learners was shown
groups, in meaningful in in in in
exploration, discovery activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks
and hands-on as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
activities within a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
range of physical rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
learning
environments. Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 lessons lessons lessons lesson acceptable
supported by supported by supported by supported by evidence
MOV 1 and any MOV 1 and any MOV 1 and any any of the was shown
1 of the other 1 of the other 1 of the other acceptable
acceptable acceptable acceptable MOV
MOV MOV MOV

Timeliness
Basic 5. Managed learner Quality Applied teacher Applied teacher Applied teacher Applied teacher No
Education behavior management management management management acceptable
Services constructively by strategies of strategies of strategies of strategies of evidence
applying positive and learner behavior learner behavior learner behavior learner behavior was shown
non-violent discipline that promote that promote that promote that promote
to ensure learning- positive and positive and positive and positive and
focused non-violent non-violent non-violent non-violent
environments. discipline as discipline as discipline as discipline as
shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
submitted with a submitted with a submitted with a submitted with a
rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted at Submitted at Submitted any 1 No
least 4 of the least 4 of the least 4 of the of the given acceptable
given strategies given strategies given strategies strategies as evidence
as observed in was shown

APPENDICES
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THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
at least 4 as observed in as observed in observed in only
lessons 3 lessons 2 lessons 1 lesson

Timeliness

Basic 6. Used differentiated, Quality Applied Applied Applied Applied No


Education developmentally differentiated differentiated differentiated differentiated acceptable
Services appropriate learning teaching teaching teaching teaching evidence
experiences to strategies to strategies to strategies to strategies to shown
address learners’ address learner address learner address learner address learner
gender, needs, diversity as diversity as diversity as diversity as
shown in MOV
strengths, interests shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
1 with a rating
and experiences. 1 with a rating 1 with a rating of 5 1 with a rating
of 7 of 6 of 4

Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any 1 No


least 4 differentiated differentiated differentiated acceptable
differentiated teaching teaching teaching evidence
teaching strategies in at strategies in 2 strategy in only shown
strategies in at least 2 lessons lessons as 1 lesson as
least 2 lessons as evidenced by evidenced by evidently shown No
MOV 1 and acceptable
as evidenced by MOV 1 and in any 1 of the
supported by evidence
MOV 1 and supported by acceptable
any 1 of the was shown
supported by any 1 of the other MOV
any 1 of the other acceptable
other acceptable MOV
acceptable MOV
MOV

Timeliness
Basic 3. Curriculum 7. Planned, managed Quality Planned and Planned and Planned and Planned and No
Education and Planning and implemented implemented implemented implemented implemented acceptable
Services developmentally developmental- developmental- developmental- developmentally evidence
sequenced teaching ly sequenced ly sequenced ly sequenced sequenced was shown
and learning teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and
processes to meet learning learning learning learning
curriculum process as process as process as process as
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
requirements and shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
varied teaching 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
contexts. of 7 of 6 of 5 of 4

Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No


least 4 developmental- developmental- developmental- acceptable
developmental- ly sequenced ly sequenced ly sequenced evidence
ly sequenced teaching and teaching and teaching and was shown
teaching and learning learning learning
learning process as process as process as
process as evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown
evidently shown in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in any 1 of the
in MOV 1 and supported by supported by given MOV
supported by any 1 of the any 1 of the
any 1 of the other given other given
other given MOV MOV
MOV

Timeliness

8. Participated in Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No


collegial discussions participated in participated in participated in participated in acceptable
that use teacher and LACs/FGDs/ LACs/FGDs/ LACs/FGDs/ LAC/FGD/ evidence
learner feedback to meetings to meeting to was shown
enrich teaching meetings to meetings to discuss discuss
practice. discuss discuss teacher/learner teacher/learner
teacher/learner teacher/learner feedback to feedback to
feedback to feedback to enrich enrich
enrich enrich instruction as instruction as
instruction as instruction as shown in the shown in the
shown in the shown in the MOV submitted MOV submitted
MOV submitted MOV submitted

Efficiency Participated in Participated in 3 Participated in 2 Participated in 1 No


at least 4 LACs/FGDs/ LACs/FGDs/ LAC/FGD/ acceptable
LACs/FGDs/ evidence
meetings as meetings as meeting as was shown
evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown

APPENDICES
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THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
meetings as in any 1 of the in any 1 of the in any 1 of the
evidently shown given MOV given MOV given MOV
in any 1 of the
given MOV

Timeliness
Basic 9. Selected, Quality Developed and Developed and Developed and Developed and No
Education developed, organized used varied used varied used varied used varied acceptable
Services and used appropriate teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and evidence
teaching and learning learning learning learning learning was shown
resources, including resources, resources, resources, resources,
ICT, to address including ICT, to including ICT, to including ICT, to including ICT, to
learning goals. address address address address
learning goals learning goals learning goals learning goals
as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any No
least 4 varied varied teaching varied teaching teaching and acceptable
teaching and and learning and learning learning evidence
learning resources, resources, resource, was shown
resources, including ICT, including ICT, including ICT,
including ICT, as evidently as evidently as evidently
as evidently shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in any of
shown in MOV 1 and supported 1 and supported the acceptable
1 and supported by any 1 of the by any 1 of the MOV
by any 1 of the acceptable acceptable
acceptable MOV MOV
MOV

Timeliness
Basic 4. Assessment 10. Designed, Quality Designed, Designed, Designed, Designed, No
Education and Reporting selected, organized selected, selected, selected, selected, acceptable
Services and used diagnostic, organized and organized and organized and organized and evidence
formative and used diagnostic, used diagnostic, used diagnostic, used diagnostic, was shown
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
summative formative and formative and formative and formative and
assessment summative summative summative summative
strategies consistent assessment assessment assessment assessment
with curriculum strategies strategies strategies strategies
requirements. consistent with consistent with consistent with consistent with
curriculum curriculum curriculum curriculum
requirements as requirements as requirements as requirements as
shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
of 7 of 6 of 5 of 4
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 varied varied varied assessment tool acceptable
assessment assessment assessment as evidently evidence
tools as tools as tools as shown in any of was shown
evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown the acceptable
in any 1 of the in any 1 of the in any 1 of the MOV
acceptable acceptable acceptable
MOV MOV MOV

Timeliness
Basic 11. Monitored and Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
Education evaluated learner monitored and monitored and monitored and monitored and acceptable
Services progress and evaluated evaluated evaluated evaluated evidence
achievement using learner progress learner progress learner progress learner progress was shown
learner attainment and and and and
data. achievement achievement achievement achievement
using learner using learner using learner using learner
attainment data attainment data attainment data attainment data
as shown in the as shown in the as shown in the as shown in the
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
Efficiency Submitted a Submitted a Submitted a Submitted 1 No
combination of combination of combination of acceptable acceptable
at least 4 of the 3 of the 2 of the MOV evidence
acceptable acceptable acceptable was shown
MOV MOV MOV

APPENDICES
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THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Timeliness Submitted MOV Submitted MOV Submitted MOV Submitted MOV No
were distributed were distributed were distributed was completed acceptable
across 4 across 3 across 2 in only 1 quarter evidence
quarters quarters quarters was shown
Basic 12. Communicated Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely showed No
Education promptly and clearly showed prompt showed prompt showed prompt prompt and acceptable
Services the learners’ needs, and clear and clear and clear clear evidence
progress and communication communication communication communication was shown
achievement to key of the learners’ of the learners’ of the learners’ of the learners’
stakeholders, needs, progress needs, progress needs, progress needs, progress
including and
and and and
achievement to
parents/guardians. achievement to achievement to achievement to
key
stakeholders, key key key
including stakeholders, stakeholders, stakeholders,
parents/ including including including
guardians as parents/ parents/ parents/
shown in the guardians as guardians as guardians as
MOV submitted shown in the shown in the shown in the
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
Efficiency Submitted a Submitted a Submitted a Submitted any 1 No
combination of combination of combination of of the given acceptable
at least 4 of the 3 of the 2 of the MOV evidence
acceptable acceptable acceptable was shown
MOV MOV MOV
Timeliness Submitted MOV Submitted MOV Submitted MOV Submitted MOV No
were distributed were distributed were distributed was completed acceptable
across 4 across 3 across 2 in only 1 quarter evidence
quarters quarters quarters was shown
Basic 5. Plus Factor 13. Performed various Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
Education related performed performed performed performed acceptable
Services works/activities that various related various related various related various related evidence
contribute to the work/activities work/activities work/activities work/activities was shown
that contribute that contribute that contribute that contribute
to the teaching to the teaching to the teaching to the teaching
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
teaching-learning learning learning learning learning
process. process as process as process as process as
shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted

Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted any 1 No


least 4 different different kinds different kinds of the acceptable
kinds of of acceptable of acceptable acceptable evidence
acceptable MOV MOV MOV was shown
MOV

Timeliness

RATING FOR
OVERALL
ACCOMPLISH-
MENTS

Rater Ratee Approving Authority

APPENDICES
191
192

THE RPMS MANUAL


Appendix D.2
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE COMMITMENT AND REVIEW FORM (IPCRF) for Master Teacher I-IV
Name of Employee: Name of Rater:
Position: Position:
Bureau/Center/Service/Division: Date of Review:
Rating Period:
TO BE FILLED OUT DURING PLANNING TO BE FILLED OUT DURING EVALUATION

Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Basic 1. Content 1. Modeled effective Quality Modeled Modeled Modeled Modeled No
Education Knowledge and applications of effective effective effective effective acceptable
Services Pedagogy content knowledge applications of applications of applications of applications of evidence
within and across content content content content was shown
curriculum teaching knowledge knowledge knowledge knowledge
areas. within and within and within and within and
across across across across
curriculum curriculum curriculum curriculum
teaching areas teaching areas teaching areas teaching areas
as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in
MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
rating of 8 rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 lessons lessons as lessons as lesson as acceptable
as evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidence
MOV 1 and MOV 1 from MOV 1 from MOV 1 from was shown
supported by colleagues and colleagues and colleagues and
any 1 of the supported by supported by supported by
other MOV any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the
given other MOV other MOV other MOV
given given given
Timeliness
Basic 2. Collaborated with Quality Conducted, Conducted and Conducted Proposed action No
Education colleagues in the completed and completed action research research with acceptable
Services conduct and disseminated action research with colleagues colleagues evidence
with colleagues was shown
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
application of action research
research to enrich with colleagues
knowledge of content Efficiency Submitted at Submitted any 3 Submitted any 2 Submitted any 1 No
and pedagogy. least 4 of the of the MOV MOV acceptable
given MOV acceptable evidence
MOV was shown
Timeliness Presented the Completed the Conducted the Proposed the No
research report research report research report research report acceptable
within the rating within the rating within the rating within the rating evidence
period period period period was shown
Basic 3. Developed and Quality Demonstrated Demonstrated Demonstrated Demonstrated No
Education applied effective effective effective effective effective acceptable
Services teaching strategies to teaching teaching teaching teaching evidence
promote critical and strategies to strategies to strategies to strategies to was shown
creative thinking, as promote critical promote critical promote critical promote critical
well as other higher- and creative and creative and creative and creative
thinking, as well thinking, as well thinking, as well thinking, as well
order thinking skills.
as other higher- as other higher- as other higher- as other higher-
order thinking order thinking order thinking order thinking
skills as shown skills as shown skills as shown skills as shown
in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a in MOV 1 with a
rating of 8 rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5
Efficiency Submitted 4 or Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
more lessons as lessons as lessons as lesson as acceptable
evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown evidence
in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and was shown
supported by supported by supported by supported by
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the any of the other
other MOV other MOV other MOV MOV given
given given given
Timeliness
Basic 2. Learning 4. Worked with Quality Used classroom Used classroom Used classroom Used classroom No
Education Environment and colleagues to model management management management management acceptable
Services Diversity of and share effective strategies that strategies that strategies that strategies that evidence
Learners techniques in the engage learners engage learners engage learners engage learners was shown
management of in in in in
classroom structure to activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks activities/tasks
as shown in as shown in as shown in as shown in

APPENDICES
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194

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
engage learners, MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a MOV 1 with a
individually or in rating of 7 rating of 6 rating of 5 rating of 4
groups, in meaningful
exploration, discovery
and hands-on Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
activities within a least 4 lessons lessons lessons lesson acceptable
range of physical supported by supported by supported by supported by evidence
learning MOV 1 and any MOV 1 and any MOV 1 and any any of the was shown
environments. 1 of the other 1 of the other 1 of the other acceptable
acceptable acceptable acceptable MOV
MOV MOV MOV
Timeliness
Basic 5. Exhibited effective Quality Exhibited Exhibited Exhibited Exhibited No
Education and constructive effective and effective and effective and effective and acceptable
Services behavior constructive constructive constructive constructive evidence
management skills by behavior behavior behavior behavior shown
applying positive and management management management management
non-violent discipline skills by skills by skills by skills by
applying applying applying applying
to ensure learning-
positive and positive and positive and positive and
focused
non-violent non-violent non-violent non-violent
environments. discipline to discipline to discipline to discipline to
ensure learning- ensure learning- ensure learning- ensure learning-
focused focused focused focused
environments environments environments environments
shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
of 8 of 7 of 6 of 5
Efficiency Applied at least Applied at least Applied at least Applied any of No
7 of the given 7 of the given 7 of the given the given acceptable
strategies as strategies as strategies as strategies as evidence
observed in at observed in 3 observed in 2 observed in only shown
least 4 lessons lessons lessons 1 lesson
Timeliness
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Basic 6. Worked with Quality Worked with Worked with Worked with Worked with No
Education colleagues to share colleagues at colleagues in colleagues in colleagues but acceptable
Services differentiated, least in the the school level the department no evidence of evidence
developmentally district/cluster to share lesson or grade level to sharing with shown
appropriate level to share share lesson others
lesson
opportunities to
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted at Submitted at Submitted at No
address learners’
least 1 lesson least 1 lesson least 1 lesson least 1 lesson, acceptable
differences in gender,
as evidently as evidently as evidently as evidenced by evidence
needs, strengths, shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV either MOV 2 or shown
interests and 1 and supported 1 and supported 1 and supported 3 but no
experiences. by any by any by any evidence of
acceptable acceptable acceptable sharing with
MOV MOV MOV others
Timeliness
Basic 3. Curriculum 7. Developed and Quality Developed and Developed and Developed and Developed and No
Education and Planning applied effective applied effective applied effective applied effective applied effective acceptable
Services strategies in the strategies strategies strategies strategies evidence
planning and showing showing showing showing was shown
management of developmentally developmentally developmentally developmentally
developmentally - sequenced - sequenced - sequenced - sequenced
teaching and teaching and teaching and teaching and
sequenced teaching
learning learning learning learning
and learning process as process as process as process as
processes to meet shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV shown in MOV
curriculum 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating 1 with a rating
requirements and of 8 of 7 of 6 of 5
varied teaching Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 2-3 Submitted 1 Submitted 1 No
contexts. least 4 lessons lessons as lesson as lesson as acceptable
as evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidence
MOV 1 and 2 MOV 1 and 2 shown in MOV any 1 of the was shown
and supported and supported 1 and/or 2 and acceptable
by any 1 of the by any 1 of the supported by MOV
other other any 1 of the
acceptable acceptable other
MOV MOV acceptable
MOV
Timeliness

APPENDICES
195
196

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
8. Reviewed with Quality Consistently led Frequently led Occasionally led Rarely led No
colleagues, teacher collaborative collaborative collaborative collaborative acceptable
and learner feedback reviews of reviews of reviews of reviews of evidence
to plan, facilitate and teacher and teacher and teacher and teacher and was shown
enrich teaching learner learner learner learner
practice. feedback as feedback as feedback as feedback as
evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by evidenced by
the MOV the MOV the MOV the MOV
submitted submitted submitted submitted
Efficiency Submitted 4 Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
collaborative collaborative collaborative collaborative acceptable
reviews of reviews of reviews of review of evidence
teacher and teacher and teacher and teacher and was shown
learner learner learner learner
feedback as feedback as feedback as feedback as
evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown evidently shown
in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in MOV 1 and in any of the
supported by supported by supported by acceptable
any 1 of the any 1 of the any 1 of the MOV
acceptable acceptable acceptable
MOV MOV MOV
Timeliness
Basic 9. Advised and guided Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely advised No
Education colleagues in the advised advised advised colleagues in acceptable
Services selection, colleagues in colleagues in colleagues in the selection, evidence
organization, the selection, the selection, the selection, organization, was shown
development and use organization, organization, organization, development
of appropriate development development development and appropriate
teaching and learning and appropriate and appropriate and appropriate use of teaching
use of teaching use of teaching use of teaching and learning
resources, including
and learning and learning and learning resources as
ICT, to address
resources as resources as resources as shown in the
specific learning shown in the shown in the shown in the MOV submitted
goals. MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
least 4 teaching teaching and teaching and teaching and acceptable
and learning learning learning learning evidence
resources as resources as resources as resource as was shown
Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
evidenced by at evidenced by at evidenced by at evidenced by
least 1 of the least 1 of the least 1 of the any of the
acceptable acceptable acceptable acceptable
MOV MOV MOV MOV
Timeliness
Basic 4. Assessment 10. Worked Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely reviewed No
Education and Reporting collaboratively with reviewed reviewed reviewed collaboratively acceptable
Services colleagues to review collaboratively collaboratively collaboratively assessment evidence
the design, selection, assessment assessment assessment tools with was shown
organization and use tools with tools with tools with colleagues as
of a range of effective colleagues as colleagues as colleagues as shown in the
diagnostic, formative shown in the shown in the shown in the MOV submitted
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
and summative
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted 3 Submitted 2 Submitted 1 No
assessment least 4 assessment assessment assessment tool acceptable
strategies consistent assessment tools as tools as as evidently evidence
with curriculum tools as evidently shown evidently shown shown in any of was shown
requirements. evidently shown in any of the in any of the the acceptable
in any of the acceptable acceptable MOV
acceptable MOV MOV
MOV
Timeliness
Basic 11. Interpreted Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
Education collaboratively collaborated collaborated collaborated collaborated acceptable
Services monitoring and with colleagues with colleagues with colleagues with colleagues evidence
evaluation strategies in the in the in the in the was shown
of attainment data to interpretation of interpretation of interpretation of interpretation of
support learner assessment assessment assessment assessment
progress and data as shown data as shown data as shown data as shown
in the MOV in the MOV in the MOV in the MOV
achievement.
submitted submitted submitted submitted
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted at Submitted at Submitted any 1 No
least 2 different least 3 of the least 2 of the of the MOV acceptable
types of MOV same kind of same kind of evidence
MOV MOV was shown
Timeliness
Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely applied No
applied skills in applied skills in applied skills in skills in the acceptable

APPENDICES
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198

THE RPMS MANUAL


Performance Indicators
Weight Rating
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline per Very Actual Results Score
KRA QET Outstanding Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Poor
Satisfactory
(5) (3) (2) (1) Q E T Ave
(4)
Basic 12. Applied skills in the effective the effective the effective effective evidence
Education the effective communication communication communication communication was shown
Services communication of of learner needs of learner needs of learner needs of learner needs
learner needs, and progress to and progress to and progress to and progress to
progress and parents/ parents/ parents/ parents/
achievement to key guardians as guardians as guardians as guardians as
stakeholders, shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
including
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted any 3 Submitted any 2 Submitted any 1 No
parents/guardians. least 3 of the MOV MOV MOV acceptable
acceptable evidence
MOV was shown
Timeliness
Basic 5. Plus Factor 13. Performed various Quality Consistently Frequently Occasionally Rarely No
Education related performed performed performed performed acceptable
Services works/activities that special tasks special tasks special tasks special tasks evidence
contribute to the and/or and/or and/or and/or was shown
teaching-learning assignments as assignments as assignments as assignments as
process. shown in the shown in the shown in the shown in the
MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted MOV submitted
Efficiency Submitted at Submitted only Submitted only Submitted any 1 No
least 4 different 3 different kinds 2 different kinds of the acceptable
kinds of of acceptable of acceptable acceptable evidence
acceptable MOV MOV MOV was shown
MOV
Timeliness
RATING FOR
OVERALL
ACCOMPLISH-
MENTS

Rater Ratee Approving Authority


Appendix D.3
COMPETENCIES

CORE BEHAVIORAL COMPETENCIES

Self-Management Teamwork
1. Sets personal goals and directions, needs and development. 1. Willingly does his/her share of responsibility.
2. Understands personal actions and behavior that are clear and purposive and takes 2. Promotes collaboration and removes barrier to teamwork and goal accomplishment
into account personal goals and values congruent to that of the organization. across the organization.
3. Displays emotional maturity and enthusiasm for and is challenged by higher goals.
4. Prioritize work tasks and schedules (through Gantt chants, checklists, etc.) to achieve
5 3. Applies negotiation principles in arriving at win-win agreements.
4. Drives consensus and team ownership of decisions.
4
goals. 5. Works constructively and collaboratively with others and across organizations to
5. Sets high quality, challenging, realistic goals for self and others. accomplish organization goals and objectives.

Professionalism and Ethics Service Orientation


1. Demonstrate the values and behavior enshrined in the Norms and Conduct and Ethical 1. Can explain and articulate organizational directions, issues and problems.
Standards for Public Officials and Employees (RA 6713). 2. Takes personal responsibility for dealing with and/or correcting customer service
2. Practice ethical and professional behavior and conduct taking into account the impact of
issues and concerns.
his/her actions and decisions.
3. Maintains a professional image: being trustworthy, regularity of attendance and punctuality,
5 3. Initiates activities that promote advocacy for men and women empowerment.
4. Participates in updating office vision, mission, mandates and strategies based on
5
good grooming and communication.
4. Makes personal sacrifices to meet the organization’s needs. DEPED strategies and directions.
5. Act with a sense of urgency and responsibility to meet the organization’s needs, improve 5. Develops and adopts service improvement program through simplified procedures that
system and help others improve their effectiveness. will further enhance service delivery.

Results Focus Innovation


1. Achieves results with optimal use of time and resources most of the time.
1. Examines the root cause of problems and suggests effective solutions. Foster new
2. Avoids rework, mistakes and wastage through effective work methods by placing ideas, processes and suggests better ways to do things (cost and/or operational
organizational needs before personal needs. efficiency).
3. Delivers error-free outputs most of the time by conforming to standard operating 2. Demonstrates an ability to think “beyond the box”. Continuously focuses on improving
procedures correctly and consistently. Able to produce very satisfactory quality work in personal productivity to create higher value and results.
terms of usefulness/acceptability and completeness with no supervision required.
4. Expresses a desire to do better and may express frustration at waste or inefficiency.
4 3. Promotes a creative climate and inspires co-workers to develop original ideas or 3
solutions.
May focus on new or more precise ways of meeting goals set. 4. Translates creative thinking into tangible changes and solutions that improve the work
5. Makes specific changes in the system or in own work methods to improve
unit and organization.
performance. Examples may include doing something better, faster, at a lower cost, more 5. Uses ingenious methods to accomplish responsibilities. Demonstrates resourcefulness
efficiently, or improving quality, customer satisfaction, morale, without setting any specific and the ability to succeed with minimal resources.
goal.

5 – Role model; 4 – Consistently demonstrates; 3 – Most of the time demonstrates; 2 – Sometimes demonstrate; 1 – Rarely demonstrate

OVERALL
COMPETENCY

APPENDICES
RATINGS
199
THE RPMS MANUAL
200

Appendix D.4
Appendix G
PART IV: DEVELOPMENT PLANS

Strengths Development Needs Action Plan Timeline Resources


(Recommended Developmental Needed
Intervention)
A. Functional Competencies

B. Core Behavioral Competencies

Feedback:

RATEE RATER APPROVING


AUTHORITY
Appendix E
SUGGESTED MID-YEAR REVIEW FORM (MRF)
Name of Employee:
Position: Name of Rater:
Bureau/Center/Service/Division: Position:
Rating Period: Date of Review:
Mid-year Review/Rating
Weight Performance Ratee (Teacher) Rater (Principal)
MFOs KRAs Objectives Timeline MOV Mid-Year Review Results
per KRA Target
Rating Remarks Rating Remarks
Quality

Efficiency

Timeliness

*Please see attached list of MOV

APPENDICES
Rater Ratee Approving Authority
201
202

THE RPMS MANUAL


Appendix F

PERFORMANCE MONITORING AND COACHING FORM

IMPACT ON JOB/ACTION SIGNATURE


DATE CRITICAL INCIDENCE DESCRIPTION OUTPUT
PLAN (RATER/RATEE)

.
APPENDICES
Appendix G

203
THE RPMS MANUAL

204
APPENDICES

205
THE RPMS MANUAL

206
APPENDICES
Appendix H

207
THE RPMS MANUAL

208
APPENDICES

209
THE RPMS MANUAL

210
Appendix
Append ix J.1I.1

APPENDICES
211
212

THE RPMS MANUAL


RUBRIC LEVEL SUMMARY

LEVEL LEVEL NAME DESCRIPTION

The teacher demonstrates a limited range of loosely-associated pedagogical aspects of


3 ORGANIZING
the indicator.

The teacher demonstrates a range of associated pedagogical aspects of the indicator


4 DEVELOPING
that sometimes align with the learners’ developmental needs.

The teacher demonstrates a range of associated pedagogical aspects of the indicator


5 APPLYING
that usually align with the learners’ developmental needs.

The teacher uses well-connected pedagogical aspects of the indicator consistently


6 CONSOLIDATING
aligned with student development that supports students to be successful learners.

The teacher uses well-connected pedagogical aspects of the indicator to create an


7 INTEGRATING
environment that addresses individual and group learning goals.
INDICATOR 1 Applies knowledge of content within and across curriculum teaching areas

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher demonstrates The teacher demonstrates The teacher demonstrates The teacher demonstrates The teacher applies high-level
minor content errors either in accurate knowledge of key accurate and in-depth accurate, in-depth and broad knowledge of content and
the presentation of the lesson concepts both in the presentation knowledge of most concepts knowledge of all concepts in pedagogy that creates a
or in responding to learners’ of the lesson and in responding to in the presentation of the the presentation of the lesson conducive learning
questions or comments. The learners’ questions or comments. lesson and in responding to and in responding to learners’ environment that enables an
lesson content displays learners’ questions in a questions in a manner that is in-depth and sophisticated
simple coherence. The lesson content displays manner that attempts to be responsive to learner‘s understanding of the teaching
coherence. responsive to student developmental needs and and learning process to meet
developmental learning promotes learning. individual or group learning
needs. needs within and across
The teacher attempts to make curriculum content areas.
connections across curriculum The teacher makes
content areas if appropriate. The teacher makes connections meaningful connections
across curriculum content areas across curriculum content
if appropriate. areas, if appropriate.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher indicates some 1. The teacher clearly explains 1. The teacher displays 1. The teacher displays 1. The teacher applies
awareness of other ideas of concepts and makes no content comprehensive extensive knowledge of extensive knowledge of
the same discipline that are errors. understanding of the content. content beyond his/her
connected to the lesson but concepts and structure of area of specialization.
does not make solid 2. The content appears to be the disciplines. 2. The teacher cites intra-
connection. accurate and its focus shows and interdisciplinary 2. The teacher motivates
awareness of the ideas and 2. The teacher addresses content relationships. learners to investigate
structure of the discipline. content accurately and the content area to
makes connections across 3. The teacher addresses expand their knowledge
3. The teacher demonstrates disciplines. content accurately and its and satisfy their natural
factual knowledge of subject 3. focus is congruent with the curiosity.
matter and attempts to connect big ideas and/or structure of
content across disciplines. the discipline.

CLARIFICATIONS
KEY CONCEPTS ACCURATE KNOWLEDGE BROAD KNOWLEDGE
SIMPLE COHERENCE
central ideas of the topic or lesson content is free from errors knowledge within and across
a basic logic in the sequence of the
curriculum content areas
lesson with one part linked to the
CURRICULUM CONTENT AREAS IN-DEPTH KNOWLEDGE
next
different learning/subject areas foundational knowledge and finer details HIGH-LEVEL KNOWLEDGE
taught and learned in the basic and within the curriculum content complex content knowledge within

APPENDICES
MINOR CONTENT ERRORS
secondary education curriculum area and across curriculum areas
lesser degree of errors in the content
of the lesson
213
214

THE RPMS MANUAL


Uses a range of teaching strategies that enhance learner achievement in literacy and numeracy
INDICATOR 2
skills

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher uses loosely- The teacher occasionally applies The teacher frequently applies The teacher consistentlyapplies The teacher integrates well-
connected teaching strategies to teaching strategies that address relevant strategies that enhance relevant strategies that enhance connected teaching strategies
address learners’ literacy and/or learners’ literacy and/or numeracy learners’ literacy and/or learners’ literacy and/or that promote individual and
needs. numeracy skills. numeracyskills. group learners’ critical literacy
numeracy needs.
and/or critical numeracy skills.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher defines general 1. In some parts of the lesson, 1. The teacher routinely 1. The teacher employs
1. The teacher uses activities
terms in the lesson but fails the teacher provides activities provides activities to enhance structured activities that
that enhance literacy
to define specific terms which address learners’ learners’ literacy and/or enhance and support
and/or numeracy in almost
needed to develop learners’ literacy and/or numeracy numeracy skills in all aspects learners’ higher level of
all aspects of the lesson.
needs but fails to do so in of the lesson. literacy and/or numeracy
full understanding of literacy
some critical parts of the skills as a significant part
and/or numeracy concepts. lesson where either or both of his/her instruction.
skills are necessary.
Example: The teacher
defines fraction but fails to
define/explain numerator and
denominator.

CLARIFICATIONS

LITERACY SKILLS
skills needed for reading and writing. These may
LOOSELY-CONNECTED TEACHING STRATEGIES OCCASIONALLY
include
teaching approaches which are mismatched in occurs irregularly in the duration of the lesson
awareness of sounds of language, awareness of print
addressing literacy and/or numeracy needs
and the relationship between letters and sounds. Other
FREQUENTLY
skills such as creating knowledge through writing as
CRITICAL LITERACY occurs often times in the duration of the lesson
well as developing media and technology are part of
critically analyzing and evaluating the meaning
literacy skills.
of text as it relates to global issues to inform CONSISTENTLY
a critical stance, response and/or action occurs constantly in the duration of the lesson NUMERACY SKILLS
skills which consist of comprehending and applying
CRITICAL NUMERACY RELEVANT fundamental arithmetic operations like addition,
ability to effectively use mathematical concepts in teaching approaches which are moderately subtraction, multiplication, and division. Numeracy
applying, analyzing, evaluating and creating ideas associated with the learners’ developmental needs to skills may also include the ability to reason with
enhance literacy and/or numeracy skills mathematical concepts like interpreting data, charts,
and diagrams; process information; solve problems and
make decisions based on logical thinking and
reasoning.
Applies a range of teaching strategies to developcritical and creative thinking, as well as other
INDICATOR 3
higher-order thinking skills

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher provided The teacher uses questions and The teacher employs a range of The teacher challenges The teacher provides a broad
straightforward questions and activities that mostly require the targeted follow-up questions learners to justify their thinking range of questions and
activities which lead learners learners to interpret, explain, or and activities that encourage and successfully engages most activities, including those of
through a single path of inquiry. describe ideas learned. learners to explain, learners in the discussion using higher-order that challenge
demonstrate, and use ideas well-directed questions and learners to analyze their thinking
learned. activities. to promote deeper
understanding.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher asks, “Who has 1. The teacher makes some 1. The teacher employs a 1. The teacher challenges 1. Learners compare
an idea about this?” The attempt to engage learners in range of strategies to learners cognitively to and contrast ideas.
usual same learners offer genuine discussion rather ensure that most learners advance high-level thinking
comments. than simple, factual, or rote- are given opportunities to and discourse. 2. Learners synthesize or
type discussion. give opinions to the lesson summarize information
2. Many questions require and to react to the opinions 2. Learners extend the within or across
rote-type responses. The teacher asks, “Can you of others. discussion by inviting disciplines.
please explain this idea?” comments from their
2. The teacher creates a classmates during the
genuine discussion among discussion and challenge
learners, providing adequate one another’s thinking.
time for them to respond; as
well as to step aside when 3. Learners, themselves,
doing so is appropriate. ensure that all voices are
heard in the discussion.

CLARIFICATIONS

HIGHER-ORDER QUESTION
require answers that go beyondsimple information. They are more abstract and require advanced cognitive processes, e.g. giving and justifying opinions.

STRAIGHTFORWARD QUESTIONS
are predictable, not challenging and require answers based on obvious facts

APPENDICES
215
THE RPMS MANUAL
216
Manages classroom structure to engage learners, individually or in groups, in meaningful exploration,
INDICATOR 4
discovery and hands-on activities within a range of physical and learning environments

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher manages The teacher manages classroom The teacher manages The teacher organizes and
The teacher manages
classroom structure and structure and engages the classroom structure and maintains classroom structure
classroom structure and
engages only some learners in majority of the learners in engages all learners in and engages learners,
engages most learners in
discovery or hands-on learning discovery and hands-on learning meaningful exploration, individually or in groups, in
meaningful exploration,
activities within a range of activities within a range of discovery and hands-on meaningful exploration,
discovery and hands-on
physical learning environments. physical learning environments. learning activities within a discovery and hands-on
learning activities within a range
range of physical learning learning activities within a
of physical learning
environments. range of physical learning
environments.
environments.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. Only some learners work 1. The classroom layout is simple 1. The classroom layout and 1. The teacher keeps the 1. The teacher utilizes
productively within the allotted and somewhat suitable for available resources are learning environment free proactive classroom
time, physical space and different learning activities. generally suitable for different from congestion and structure management
resources. learning activities. facilitates activities practices to support flexible
2. Majority of the learners work appropriate within the movement of the learners
productively within the allotted 2. Most learners work physical learning in all learning activities.
time and physical space, productively within the environment.
using the available resources. allotted time, physical space 2. Learners are fully engaged
and resources. 2. All learners work in all activities by utilizing
productively within the optimal space and time,
allotted time, physical space appropriate to their needs.
and resources.

CLARIFICATIONS

PHYSICAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT DISCOVERY LEARNING ACTIVITIES


any area where learning takes place activities that require learners to draw on their past experiences
and existing knowledge to discover facts, relationships, and new
CLASSROOM STRUCTURE
knowledge to be learned
includes the arrangement of chairs, tables, and other equipment

SOME HANDS-ON LEARNING ACTIVITIES


less than half of the learners activities that require physical participation of learners to
construct, consolidate or explain concepts
MAJORITY
more than half of the learners MEANINGFUL EXPLORATION
activities that lead to learners’ full understanding of concepts and
MOST
how they relate to other concepts
almost all, approaching 100% of the learners
Manages learner behavior constructively by applying positive and non
-violent discipline to
INDICATOR 5
ensure learning-focused environments

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher rarely manages The teacher occasionally manages The teacher frequently The teacher consistently The teacher constructively
misbehavior against established misbehavior against established manages misbehavior against manages misbehavior against manages learner behavior by
rules of conduct. rules of conduct and the majority established rules of conduct established rules of conduct applying positive and non-
of the learners follow such rules. and most learners follow such and all learners follow such violent discipline to ensure
rules. rules. learning-focused environment.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. Standards of conduct appear 1. The teacher’s standards of 1. The classroom 1. The teacher responds 1. Learners are actively
to have been established, but conduct are inconsistently management system has appropriately to encouraged to take
learners violate the rules. enforced resulting in some been implemented misbehavior of learners at responsibility for their
interference in learning and appropriately which is all times without any loss of behavior.
2. A prescribed process to some loss of instructional time. responsive to classroom instructional time.
address learner misconduct is and individual needs of 2. Well-established
communicated, but is not 2. Standards of conduct are clear learners. 2. Clear expectations for procedures for learners to
clear and requires repeated to some learners and may learner behavior are self-monitor their own
prompting, which delays or require repeated prompting. 2. The teacher’s standards of evident. Standards of classroom behavior are
disrupts the quality of behavior are consistently conduct are clear to all evident.
learning. 3. Appropriate expectations for reinforced resulting in little learners and with modest
behavior are established, but or no interference with impact on learning.
3. The teacher’s responses to some of these are unclear, or do learning. They are clear to
learners’ behavior are not address the needs of most most learners and require
inconsistent: sometimes learners. little prompting.
harsh, sometimes lenient.

CLARIFICATIONS

ESTABLISHED RULES MOST RARELY


an existing set rules of conduct almost all, approaching 100% of the learners seldom occurs in the duration of the lesson
imposed in the learning environment
OCCASIONALLY CONSISTENTLY
CONSTRUCTIVE occurs irregularly in the duration of the lesson occurs constantly in the duration of the lesson
positive and helpful responses on learners’ behavior

APPENDICES
FREQUENTLY BEHAVIOR
MAJORITY occurs often times in the duration of the lesson manner in which learners act; either positiveor negative
more than half of the learners
217
218

THE RPMS MANUAL


Uses differentiated, developmentally appropriate learning experiences to address learners’
INDICATOR 6
gender, needs, strengths, interests and experiences

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher provides a limited The teacher provides The teacher provides The teacher provides The teacher provides
range of differentiated learning differentiated or developmentally differentiated and differentiated and differentiated and
experiences to address the appropriate learning experiences developmentally appropriate developmentally appropriate developmentally appropriate
learning needs of some to address the learning needs of learning experiences to learning experiences to learning experiences to address
learners. most learners. address the needs of most address the learning needs of the diverse learning
learners. different groups of learners. needs.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher relies on a 1. The teacher makes use of the 1. The teacher makes use of 1. The teacher supports the 1. The teacher provides
single strategy or some learners’ developmental levels developmental levels of learners’ needs through a thoughtful and appropriate
strategies allowing some or ways of learning to address learners in the classroom variety of strategies, instructional adaptation for
learners to achieve the their learning needs. and the different ways they materials, and/or pacing individual learner needs. The
instructional outcomes. learn by providing that make learning adaptation of instruction is
differentiated learning accessible and challenging realistic and effective. Diverse
2. The teacher provides experiences that enable for different groups of learners have opportunities to
activities for all learners but most learners to progress learners. actively engage in various
does not enable most of toward meeting intended learning activities.
them to meet the intended outcomes. 2. The teacher uses
outcomes. differentiated strategies that
motivate and engage
groups of learners at their
cognitive levels, allowing
them to achieve the
learning outcomes.

CLARIFICATIONS

LEARNING NEEDS
learners’ different backgrounds: gender, needs, strengths, interests and experiences

DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES


teaching and learning activities and tasks suited to the needs abilities, skills, and developmental level of learners

DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING EXPERIENCES


teaching and learning activities that are suited to the various learning needs of diverse learners
Plans, manages and implements developmentally sequenced teaching and learning processes t
INDICATOR 7
meet curriculum requirements and varied teaching contexts

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher implements the The teacher implements the The teacher implements the The teacher manages well- The teacher manages well-
lessons but only with some lessons but with inappropriate lessons with appropriate structured lessons with structured lessons with
elements of developmentally elements of developmentally elements of developmentally developmentally emphasis on explicit
sequenced teaching and sequenced teaching and sequenced teaching and connections between previous
sequenced teaching and
learning processes. learning processes. learning processes to meet
learning processes. learning and new concepts and
curriculum requirements
skills.
and varied teaching
contexts.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher does not 1. The teacher’s demonstration of 1. The teacher connects 1. The sequence of activities 1. The progression from the
demonstrate knowledge of pre-requisite outcomes to previous and purposefully scaffolds warm up into the main
understanding of the pre- relationships are inaccurate or future learning. Transitions learners toward achieving activity was thoughtfully
requisite relationships incomplete and transitions between activities are the lesson’s objectives. planned to review same
when planning and between activities are present smooth. basic concepts, followed by
transitions between but may catch learners off guard 2. The sequence of learning the activities that would take
activities are too abrupt. or disrupt the flow of the 2. The lesson sequence activities keeps learners the application of this
sequence. generally kept learners engaged in the content knowledge to the next level
2. The sequence of the engaged and moving from and had a clear sense of of exploration.
lesson demonstrated 2. There may have been a minor one portion to the next in a purpose throughout the
some structure but there missed opportunity or minor reasonable manner. They vast majority of the class
were some problems organizational issue present seemed to understand the time.
with the organization that during the lesson that affected purpose of the lesson and
negatively impacted learning time. what they were to do to
learning. accomplish the purpose.

CLARIFICATIONS

DEVELOPMENTALLY SEQUENCED TEACHINGAND LEARNING PROCESS INCLUDES:


• Lesson objectives expectations for learners at the end of the lesson
• Learner engagement strategies strategies that include activities for individual learners and/or groups

APPENDICES
• Pacing teacher’s appropriate speed or rate inpresenting the lesson
• Sequence order of presenting the lesson and classroom activities
219

MULTIPLE PATHWAYS FOR LEARNING different ways of presenting the lesson and activities suited to variouslearner needs
220

THE RPMS MANUAL


Selects, develops, organizes, and uses appropriate teaching and learning resources, including ICT,
INDICATOR 8
to address learning goals

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher utilizes learning The teacher utilizes learning The teacher utilizes learning The teacher utilizes learning The teacher integrates
resources, including ICT, resources, including ICT, which resources, including ICT, which resources, including ICT, which extensive and multidisciplinary
which are loosely-aligned with are occasionally aligned with the are generally aligned with the are consistently aligned with learning resources, including
the learning goals. learning goals. learning goals. the learning goals. ICT, which are appropriate and
aligned with the learning goals.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. Instructional materials and 1. Instructional materials and 1. Instructional materials and 1. All instructional 1. Instructional materials are
resources are minimally resources are incompletely resources are fairly aligned materials and resources diverse and are consistently
aligned with the learning aligned with the instructional with the instructional are aligned with the aligned with the
goals. purposes. purposes. instructional purposes. instructional purposes.

CLARIFICATIONS

TEACHING AND LEARNING RESOURCES MAY INCLUDE: LOOSELY-ALIGNED


substantially mismatched with the learning goals
• Chalkboard
OCCASIONALLY ALIGNED
• Manila paper or Cartolina sometimes matched with the learning goals

• Printed materials like worksheets, flashcards, activity sheets, etc. GENERALLY ALIGNED
usually matched with the learning goals
• ICT Resources: slides presentation, audio visual, social media, and other
web-based applications CONSISTENTLY ALIGNED
substantially mismatched with the learning goals
• Manipulatives, models, and other tools
EXTENSIVE LEARNING RESOURCES
• ...and others wide range of learning resources

MULTIDISCIPLINARY LEARNING RESOURCES


learning resources which can be used in various subject areas
Designs, selects, organizes, and uses diagnostic, formative and summative assessment strategie
INDICATOR 9
consistent with curriculum requirements

3 4 5 6 7
The teacher provides a The teacher provides a range The teacher provides a range of The teacher provides The teacher integrates
limited range of assessment of assessment strategies but assessment strategies that assessment strategies assessment strategies
strategies but fails to address only some are aligned with address most of the learning consistent with thecurriculum engages learners in self- and
goals.
the learning goals. the learning goals. requirements. peer-assessment.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The assessment procedures 1. The teacher uses a variety of 1. The teacher uses a repertoire 1. The teacher predominantly 1. The teacher uses
focus on task completion assessment strategies which of assessment strategies uses assessment strategies assessment strategies
and/or compliance rather than are partially congruent to the which are aligned with the which are embedded as an which engage learners in
learner achievement of lesson intended learning outcomes. intended learning goals. integral part of the lesson assessment criteria to self-
purpose/ objective. and are aligned with the monitor and reflect on their
2. The teacher uses procedures 2. The teacher uses intended instructional or own progress.
that yield only some evidence of assessment procedures that consistent with the content
learning. draw out evidence of whether standards. 2. Learners frequently assess
learners have learned most their own work and the work
of the intended learning 2. Learners are encouraged to of their peers using
outcomes. assess and monitor the assessment criteria
quality of their own work embedded in the teacher-
against the assessment learners-generated rubrics,
criteria and performance peer reviews, and/or
standards that make active reflection logs.
use of that information in
their learning.

CLARIFICATIONS

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:

DIAGNOSTIC
assessment used to identify each learner’s strengths, weaknesses, knowledge and skills prior to instruction

FORMATIVE

APPENDICES
assessment used to identify the parts of the lesson where learners need improvement,
e.g. recitation, activities and seatworks

SUMMATIVE
221

assessment used to identify learner achievement, e.g. quizzes and tests


222

THE RPMS MANUAL


© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resources and Organizational Development

The Classroom Observation Tool was developed through the Philippine National Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ)
with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program
APPENDICES
Appendix I.2

223
THE RPMS MANUAL
Appendix I.3

224
Appendix J.1
Appendix K.1

APPENDICES
225
THE RPMS MANUAL
226

RUBRIC LEVEL SUMMARY

LEVEL LEVEL NAME DESCRIPTION

The teacher demonstrates a range of associated pedagogical aspects of the


4 DEVELOPING indicator
that sometimes align with the learners’ developmental needs.

The teacher demonstrates a range of associated pedagogical aspects of the indicator


5 APPLYING
that usually align with the learners’ developmental needs.

The teacher uses well-connected pedagogical aspects of the indicator consistently


6 CONSOLIDATING
aligned with student development that supports students to be successful learners.

The teacher uses well-connected pedagogical aspects of the indicator to create an


7 INTEGRATING
environment that addresses individual and group learning goals.

The teacher applies deep knowledge and understanding of the indicator discriminately
8 DISCRIMINATING to contextualize teaching and learning processes within the discipline to meet individual
and group learning goals.
INDICATOR 1 Applies knowledge of content within andacross curriculum teaching areas

4 5 6 7 8
The teacher demonstrates The teacher demonstrates The teacher demonstrates The teacher applies high-level The teacher applies high-level
accurate knowledge of key accurate and in-depth knowledge accurate, in-depth and broad knowledge of content and knowledge of content within
concepts both in the of most concepts in the knowledge of all concepts in the pedagogy that creates a and across curriculum content
presentation of the lesson and presentation of the lesson and in presentation of the lesson and conducive learning environment areas to empower learners to
in responding to learners’ responding to learners’ questions in responding to learners’ that enables an in-depth and acquire and apply successful
questions or comments. questions in a manner that is sophisticated understanding of learning strategies to assist in
in a manner that attempts to
responsive to learner the teaching and learning their development as
The lesson content displays be responsive to learner
developmental needs and processes to meet individual or independent learners.
coherence. developmental learning
promotes learning. group learning needs within
needs.
The teacher attempts to and across curriculum content
The teacher makes
make connections across The teacher makes connections areas.
meaningful connections
curriculum content areas if across curriculum content areas if across curriculum content
appropriate. appropriate. areas, if appropriate.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher clearly 1. The teacher displays 1. The teacher displays 1. The teacher applies 1. The teacher applies extensive
explains concepts and comprehensive understanding extensive knowledge of extensive knowledge of and complex content knowledge
makes no content errors. of the concepts and structure of content. content beyond his/her to support learners in acquiring
the disciplines. area of specialization. successful learning strategies in
2. The content appears to be 2. The teacher cites intra- other areas of the learning.
accurate and its focus 2. The teacher addresses content and interdisciplinary 2. The teacher motivates
shows awareness of the accurately and makes content relationships. learners to investigate the 2. The teacher extends
ideas and structure of the connections across disciplines. content area to expand their knowledge of subject beyond
discipline. 3. The teacher addresses knowledge and satisfy their
content accurately and its content in his/her teaching
natural curiosity. specialty and stimulates
3. The teacher demonstrates focus is congruent with the
factual knowledge of subject big ideas and/or structure of learners’ curiosity beyond the
matter and attempts to connect the discipline. required course work.
content across disciplines.

CLARIFICATIONS

KEY CONCEPTS ACCURATE KNOWLEDGE BROAD KNOWLEDGE


central ideas of the topic or lesson content is free from errors knowledge within and across curriculum content areas

CURRICULUM CONTENT AREAS IN-DEPTH KNOWLEDGE HIGH-LEVEL KNOWLEDGE

APPENDICES
different learning/subject areas taught and learned in foundational knowledge and finer details within complex content knowledge within and across
the basic and secondary education curriculum the curriculum content area curriculum areas
227
228

THE RPMS MANUAL


Applies a range of teaching strategies to develop critical and creative thinking, as well as other
INDICATOR 2
higher-order thinking skills

4 5 6 7 8
The teacher uses questions The teacher employs a range of The teacher challenges learners The teacher provides a broad The teacher provides, at the
and activities that mostly targeted follow-up questions and to justify their thinking and range of questions and appropriate times, a learning
require the learners to activities that encourage learners successfully engages most of activities, including those of environment for higher-order
interpret, explain, or describe to explain, demonstrate, and use them in the discussion using higher-order that challenge thinking skills that enables
ideas learned. learners to analyze their learners to evaluate their
ideas learned. well-directed questions and
activities. thinking to promote deeper thinking and to seek
understanding. constructive feedback from
peers and the teacher.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher makes some 1. The teacher employs a range of 1. The teacher challenges 1. Learners compare and 1. Learners judge or evaluate
attempt to engage learners strategies to ensure that most learners cognitively to contrast ideas. situations, problems, or
in genuine discussion rather learners are given opportunities advance high-level thinking issues.
to give opinions to the lesson 2. Learners synthesize or
than simple, factual, or rote- and discourse.
type discussion. and to react to the opinions of summarize information within
2. Learners extend the or across disciplines. 2. Learners invite comments
others.
2. The teacher asks, “Can you discussion by inviting from their classmates
please explain this idea?” comments from their during discussion and
2. The teacher creates a genuine classmates during the challenge one another’s
discussion among learners, discussion and challenge thinking.
providing adequate time for one another’s thinking.
them to respond; as well as to
step aside when doing so is 3. Learners, themselves,
appropriate. ensure that all voices are
heard in the discussion.

CLARIFICATIONS

HIGHER-ORDER QUESTIONS
require answers that go beyond simple information. They are more abstract and require advanced cognitive processes, e.g. givi ng and justifying
opinions.

STRAIGHTFORWARD QUESTIONS
are predictable, not challenging and require answers based on obvious facts
Manages classroom structure to engage learners, individually or in groups, in meaningful
INDICATOR 3 exploration, discovery and hands-on activities within a range ofphysical and learning
environments

4 5 6 7 8
The teacher manages The teacher manages classroom The teacher manages The teacher organizes and The teacher adapts and
classroom structure and structure and engages most classroom structure and maintains classroom structure adjusts classroom structure
engages the majority of the learners in meaningful exploration, engages all learners in and engages learners, according to learners’ needs
learners in discovery and discovery and hands-on learning meaningful exploration, individually or in groups, in and encourages learners to
hands-on learning activities activities within a range of physical discovery and hands-on meaningful exploration, explore other learning
within a range of physical learning environments. learning activities within a range discovery and hands-on activities that support the
learning environments. of physical learning learning activities within a achievement of learning
environments. range of physical learning goals.
environments.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The classroom layout and 1. The classroom layout and 1. The teacher keeps the 1. The teacher utilizes 1. The teacher modifies
available resources are available resources are learning environment free proactive classroom classroom structure and
simple and somewhat generally suitable for different from congestion and management practices resources effectively in a
suitable for different learning facilitates activities to support flexible manner that acknowledges
learning activities.
appropriate within the movement of the the needs of learners.
activities.
2. Most learners work physical learning learners in all learning
2. Majority of the learners productively within the environment. activities. 2. The teacher facilitates
work productively within the allotted time, physical well-planned learning
allotted time and physical 2. All learners work 2. Learners are fully activities appropriate to
space and resources.
productively within the engaged in all activities individual and group needs
space, using the available
allotted time, physical by utilizing optimal within the available
resources. space and resources. space and time, physical space and
appropriate to their resources.
needs.

CLARIFICATIONS

PHYSICAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT MOST HANDS-ON LEARNING ACTIVITIES


any area where learning takes place almost all, approaching 100% of the learners
activities that require physical participationof learners
to construct, consolidate or explain concepts
CLASSROOM STRUCTURE DISCOVERY LEARNING ACTIVITIES
the physical set-up of the learning environmentwhich activities that learners draw on their pastexperiences MEANINGFUL EXPLORATION
generally includes the arrangement of chairs,tables, and existing knowledge to discoverfacts, relationships,

APPENDICES
activities that lead to learners’ fullunderstanding of
and other equipment and new knowledge to belearned concepts and how theyrelate to other concepts
MAJORITY
more than half of the learners
229
THE RPMS MANUAL
230

Manages learner behavior constructively by applying positive and non-violent discipline to


INDICATOR 4
ensure learning-focused environments

4 5 6 7 8
The teacher occasionally The teacher frequently manages The teacher consistently The teacher constructively The teacher enables learners
manages misbehavior against misbehavior against established manages misbehavior against manages learner behavior by to take control of their own
established rules of conduct and rules of conduct and most learners established rules of conduct applying positive and non- behavior against rules of
the majority of the learners follow such rules. and all learners follow such violent discipline to ensure conduct in which learners are
follow such rules.
rules. learning-focused environment. aware of the impact of their
behavior.
FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher’s standards of 1. The classroom management 1. The teacher responds 1. Learners are actively 1. Standards of conduct are
conduct are inconsistently system has been appropriately to misbehavior encouraged to take clear to all learners.
enforced resulting in some implemented appropriately of learners at all times without responsibility for their Learners respectfully
interference in learning and which is responsive to any loss of instructional time. behavior. intervene with classmates
some loss of instructional classroom and individual at appropriate moments to
time. needs of learners. 2. Clear expectations for 2. Well-established ensure compliance with
learner behavior are procedures for standards of conduct.
2. Standards of conduct are 2. The teacher’s standards of evident. Standards of learners to self-
clear to some learners behavior are consistently conduct are clear to all monitor their own
and may require repeated reinforced resulting in little or no learners and with modest classroom behavior
prompting. interference with learning. They impact on learning. are evident.
3. Appropriate expectations are clear to most learners and
for behavior are require little prompting.
established, but some of
these are unclear, or do
not address the needs of
most learners.

CLARIFICATIONS

ESTABLISHED RULES OCCASIONALLY


an existing set rules of conduct imposed in the learning environment occurs irregularly in the duration of the lesson

CONSTRUCTIVE FREQUENTLY
positive and helpful responses on learners’ behavior occurs often times in the duration of the lesson

MAJORITY CONSISTENTLY
more than half of the learners occurs constantly in the duration of the lesson

MOST BEHAVIOR
almost all, approaching 100% of the learners manner in which learners act; either positive or negative
Plans, manages and implements developmentally sequenced teaching and learning processes to meet
INDICATOR 5
curriculum requirements and varied teaching contexts.

4 5 6 7 8
The teacher implements the The teacher implements the The teacher manages well- The teacher manages well- The teacher reflects an
lessons but with inappropriate lessons with appropriate elements structured lessons with structured lessons with understanding of the
elements of developmentally of developmentally sequenced developmentally sequenced emphasis on explicit prerequisite relationships
teaching and learning processes. teaching and learning connections between previous among the important content,
sequenced teaching and
learning processes. processes to meet curriculum concepts, as well as multiple
learning and new concepts
requirements and varied pathways for learning
and skills.
teaching contexts. depending on learners’ needs.

FEATURES OF PRACTICE
1. The teacher’s demonstration 1. The teacher connects 1. The sequence of activities 1. The progression from the 1. The lesson was structured to
of knowledge of pre-requisite outcomes to previous and purposefully scaffolds warm up into the main take into account or build
relationships are inaccurate future learning. Transitions learners toward achieving activity was thoughtfully prior knowledge of the topic
or incomplete and transitions between activities are smooth. the lesson’s objectives. planned to review same and was well paced with a
between activities are present basic concepts, followed by thoughtfully chosen
but may catch learners off 2. The lesson sequence 2. The sequence of learning the activities that would sequence of learning
guard or disrupt the flow of generally kept learners activities keeps learners take the application of this activities, and the teacher
engaged in the content knowledge to the next level had anticipated the
the sequence. engaged and moving from one
of exploration. pedagogical approaches that
portion to the next in a and had a clear sense of
would be most effective in
2. There may have been a reasonable manner. They purpose throughout the
engaging the learners
minor missed opportunity or seemed to understand the vast majority of the class
throughout the entire class
minor organizational issue purpose of the lesson and time.
period.
present during the lesson what they were to do to
that affected learning time. accomplish the purpose.

CLARIFICATIONS

DEVELOPMENTALLY SEQUENCED TEACHING AND LEARNING PROCESS INCLUDES:


• Lesson objectives expectations for learners at the end of the lesson
• Learner engagement strategies strategies that include activities for individual learners and/or groups

APPENDICES
• Pacing teacher’s appropriate speed or rate in presenting the lesson
• Sequence order of presenting the lesson and classroom activities
231

MULTIPLE PATHWAYS FOR LEARNING different ways of presenting the lesson and activities suited to various learner needs
232

THE RPMS MANUAL


© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resources and Organizational Development

The Classroom Observation Tool was developed through the Philippine National Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ)
with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program
APPENDICES
Appendix J.2

233
THE RPMS MANUAL
Appendix J.3

234
APPENDICES
Appendix K

235
Appendix L

THE RPMS MANUAL


Annotation Template

Description of the MOV


Objectives Means of Verification Annotations
Presented
236
R e s u l t s- B a s ed P e r f o r m a n ce M a n ag e m e n t S y s t e m

Manual for Teachers and School Heads

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

9
The Results-based Performance Management System (RPMS) Manual for Teachers and School Heads was developed through the Philippine National
Research Center for Teacher Quality (RCTQ) with support from the Australian Government through the Basic Education Sector Transformation (BEST) Program.

© Department of Education - Bureau of Human Resource and Organizational Development

Philippine National
RESEARCH CENTER
FOR TEACHER QUALITY
THE RPMS MANUAL

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Bureau of Human Resource National Educators Academy


and Organizational Development (BHROD) of the Philippines (NEAP)

Dir. Maria Lourdes D. Pantoja Dir. John Arnold S. Siena

BUREAU OF HUMAN RESOURCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Cecille A. Anyayahan Earl Ryan A. Losito


Project Development Officer IV Project Development Officer III

Joanna Christina Sta. Isabel Allan Jerome Gutierrez


Ma. Fatima Luzviminda B. Angeles Leonardo G. Bautista, Jr.
Millie Jane T. Fudolig Administrative Assistant II
Erika Marie E. Daza
Michael Joseph P.Cabauatan Reynier B. Cruz
Ruby Chanda J. Crisostomo Cynthia M. Sabando
Project Development Officer III Administrative Support

THE PROJECT TEAM


RPMS MANUAL AND TOOLS

Gina O. Gonong, Ph.D.


Director and Project Leader, RCTQ

John Pegg, Ph.D.


Director, UNE-SiMERR National Research Centre

Ken Vine, Ph.D.


Principal Research Adviser, UNE-SiMERR National Research Centre

Michael Wilson I. Rosero


Favian L. Noche
Senior Research Officers, RCTQ

Alwaleed Alssamani
Web Programmer, UNE-SiMERR National Research Centre

CLASSROOM OBSERVATION TOOL-RPMS

Jennie V. Jocson, Ph.D.


Deputy Director and Project Leader, RCTQ

Ian Kenneth D. Magabilin


Jerreld M. Romulo
Research Officers, RCTQ

RCTQ and UNE-SiMERR TEAM


Joy Hardy, Ph.D.
Deputy Director, UNE-SiMERR National Research Centre

Allan S. Reyes
Senior Program Manager, RCTQ

Marilyn U. Balagtas, Ph.D.


Greg McPhan Ph.D.

238
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

TECHNICAL WORKING GROUPS

RPMS Manuals and Tools COT-RPMS


Allen U. Bautista, Ed.D. Noemi Baysa Orlando I. Guerrero
Chinita A. Tolentino Leticia V. Catris, Ph.D Evangeline F. Golla, Ph.D.
Jennifer E. Lopez Jovita B.De Castro Marion A. Mallorca
Ma. Concepcion B. Montenegro Mel Greg O. Concepcion, Ph.D Ervin L. Oamil, Ph.D.
Marla C. Papango Rosemarievic V.Diaz, Ph.D Diane C. Tomaneng
Mana C. Estakio Atkinson F. Tudlong
Erminda C. Fortes, Ph.D Marilou M. Ubiña

GRAPHIC ARTISTS
Aris L. Solis Dennis A. Santos Raymond S. Bermudez

SUPPORT GROUP
Adelyn R. Bartolome Gerlie C. Lopez
Rene R. Belecina, Ph.D. Reynaldo V. Nanong
Vivian I. Buhain, Ed.D. Sheila Niña Rea-Santes
Ma. Arsenia C. Gomez Grace Urbien-Salvatus
Ma. Victoria C. Hermosisima Bernadette S. Sumagui
Mark Anthony P. Idang Milagros E. Vinluan
Angeline R. Libunao

SUPPORT STAFF
Lizette Anne L. Carpio
Beverly E. Estocapio Guillen M. Nabong
Ruby Ann G. Gantalao Jessa P. Reynoso
Ezra D. de Jesus Webster C. Ferrer
Denesse Marie B. Handumon Cheryl C. Lualhati
Ma. Izella D. Lampos Geroldine P. Tabigne

BASIC EDUCATION SECTOR TRANSFORMATION (BEST)

Peter Grimes, Ph.D. Nemah N. Hermosa, Ph.D.


Senior Teacher Education Specialist Teacher Development Specialist
Twila G. Punsalan, Ph.D. Soledad T.Lecaroz
Pre-service Lead Teacher Development Adviser
Krupskaya Añonuevo Maria Gabrielle Bordado
Project Team Coordinator Raquel B. Cabrieto
Jenelle Pagdanganan
Regina Pasion
Technical Officers
Project Officer

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE


Lea Neri
Senior Program Officer

239
THE RPMS MANUAL

PARTICIPANTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION


OF THE RPMS TOOLS AND MANUAL FOR TEACHERS AND SCHOOL HEADS

Acedera, Lina S. Borbon, Fredesminda A. de Castro, Gracia Frigillana, Cheryl A.


Agunday, Engelbert B. Borromeo, George B. Degamo, Francisco O. Gaffud, Marissa S.
Alesna, Memvie L. Bose, Helen R. De Jesus, Ma. Lea U. Galay, Florpina B.
Alicda, Sandra Lyne G. Bron, Irene B. De La Paz, Norwin C. Galera, Jhon D.
Almario, Irma Y. Buac, Francis J. De Lara, Onuorich T. Gamboa, Ma. Theresa G.
Amaflor Casi Alde Bucad, Daryl C. De Mesa, Amelita P. Gareza, Marina A.
Amit, Arnulfo S. Bugas, Roberta B. De Ocampo, Aivy Rose N. Gilpo, Eden G.
Amoranto, Kaye Anne B. Buladas, Vilma A. De Rojas, Belen G. Gloduve, Perlinita L.
Anacay, Rosalia Bulagao, Maria Aileen E. De Vera, Marissa Gloria, Sorina
Apellido, Ricky B. Bunag, Mary Antonette T. Decena, May Grace Gonzaga, Elena P.
Apuli, Manuel R. Cabarteja, Flora L. Dela Cruz, Jesusa L. Gozum, Alvin G.
Arbinoya, Laine L. Canatuan, Edita M. Delgado, Michelle H. Gutierrez, Joseph V.
Aroco, Lily T. Cabantan, Ida F. Descalsota, Maerwin D. Halina, Dina B.
Avinante, Myrna O. Cabral, Wilfredo E. Desuyo, Pamela Hernandez, Alma L.
Axalan, Marizel V. Cacena, Rommel C. Dimaculangan, Mena O. Honrado, Charisma U.
Ayeras, Nemencia B. Capuno, Maria Amor A. Dime, Emily Hualde, Ma. Cecilia P.
Bacani, William G. Care, Olivia C. Dioko, Rosario Ibanez, Alejandro G.
Bacong, April Abegail C. Cariño, Laila G. Dizon, Charles A. Idang, Mark Anthony
Bagunu, Manolo Y. Carreon, Ma. Teresa S. Dolormente, Helen P.Domingo Iledan, Jude Thaddeus I.
Balan, Emma M. Castro, Gracia M. De C. Bruno Jr. Iya, Abdul-Aziz H.
Balete, Rochelle S. Castro, Ma. Venus Rosario Ecija, Crisanto A. Javier, Katherine O.
Barcelon, Heidi M. Celestial, Karina Angela C. Egipto, Maria Virginia E. Kasilag, Adrian O.
Bargamento, Lisel B. Celo, Marlene R. Enriquez, Janice P. Labasan, Rene Rose M.
Bartolome, Adelyn R. Cepe, Augustines, E. Epley, Ceana Lala, Fatima D.
Basio, Glenne DT. Chavez, Lynie B. Eppie, Christian George Lansangan, Edwina G.
Bautista, Karen Comia, Racquel S. Escalera, Jay L. Lasala, Roselyn T.
Bayagna, Margie M. Consuela, Cecilia R. Estillore, James L. Lastimosa, Cecilia L.
Bayan, Elena P. Corpuz, Melencio L. Estoquia, Leopoldo P. Lazares, Rogelito L.
Bayarcal, Clote B. Cosuco, Melanie M. Evangelista, Bianca Dianne P. Libunao, Angelene R.
Baybay, Kristine B. Cruz, Gina T. Facun, Arlyn B. Libutaque, Ruben C.
Bayubay, Zeresh Anne J. Cuaresma, Ferdinand Felipe, Mario C. Lico, Darwin B.
Bermudez, Leah Cunanan, June D. Felipe, Renato N., Jr Licup, Marvin C.
Berdin, Sinfronia R. Daiz, Esteban S. Ferrer, Hederlyn L. Lim, Shelly B.
Bobadilla, Gloria Dal, Marino O. Fiel, Dexter Jones D. Lipaopao, Lodelin C.
Boquite, Diosdado David, Joseph S. Francisco, Agnes A. Litana, Jeniffer A.

240
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Litilit, Esther K. Morales, Milagros B. Regis, Kerwin M. Taclibon, Julius D.


Lapuz, Novaleta P. Mulitas, Morena L. Remandaban, Ryan A. Tacoy, Leny R.
Larida, Augustus R. Munoz, Amparo M. Remolacio, Mary Joy Tadeo, Sharon O.
Llamas III, Carlos B. Nacino, Natividad V. Reyes, Maxima C. Tamio, Nelia
Lopez, Gerlie C. Nanong, Reynaldo V. Rigor, Juanito L. Traspe, Maricris B.
Lopez, Mary Jane Y. Napoles, Matty B. Ricafort, Tesa Gaila M. Trongco, Felicino C.
Lubi, Cristeta O. Nonan, Jeaneveve P. Roferos, Jay B. Tumambing, Lenie R.
Lubigan, Magdaleno R. Noveno, Myla M. Romen, Marites Upam, Labi Jr. L.
Lucero, Catherine Nuyda, Kristine Joy Rondilla, Aida H. Ustaris, Venus C.
Lumanlan, Amelia Y. Olaivar, Rose Marie S. Rosales, Milagros B. Valledor, Glenn
Maala, Taciana P. Pacleb, Evelyn Rubio, Maria Corazon Valmoria, Margie R.
Macalalad, Delia A. Paclibare, Elvierira O. Rubio, Rafael C. Velasquez, Rosemarie M.
Macaraig, Teresa B. Pacon, Joanna Joy M. Ruelan, Jaime P. Verallo, Jessica T.
Macatangay, Maria Teresa Palmitos, Rhodafel R. Sabado, Cristina R. Vergara, Marites Q.
Macawile, Josephine Pambid, Babylyn Sabbaluca, Marsette D. Verola, Winesa C.
Maderazo, Ricky P. Pangilinan, Dexter E. Salinas, Irene R. Vidal, Maria Angela
Magabo, Conchita L. Paraguison, Mark Anthony S. Samonte, Emyleen C. Villaester, Carlos
Malabanan, Arlene Paraguya, Maricris E. Sanchez, Ma. Liven M. Villanueva, Evelyn P.
Malabanan, Jenneefer T. Patricio, Ma. Rowena A. Sandoval, Kathleen Jane Villanueva, Loida
Maliwat, Fredelma Ellaine T. Pedrezuela, Theo Arsenia S. Santos, Jayson M. Villaroya, Janet
Manalo, Gregorio P. Pendo, Corazon J. Santos, Zita U. Villaruel, Anicia
Manarang, Maricel N. Perez, Gilberto Selgas, Ayren V. Villazor, Ranne Boy E.
Manas, Bianca Perico, Cartesa M. Severino, Susan D. Villenas, Jocelyn
Manipon, Mary Grace B. Pesigan, Fely R. Sillos, Josephine B. Vinluan, Milagros E.
Manlapig, Maria Salome Pineda, Edna L. Silva, Mina B. Yadao, Marlou B.
Maralit, Marian Rae Pingil, Nestor Paul Simene, Regina R. Ygona, Geronimo G.
Marino, Rosita R. Plaza, Teodoro N. Sinson, Carmelita A. Yumul, Lea M.
Mativo, Jeanie L. Pornobi, Joe Mar Levi Sinson, June Hayden R. Zapanta, Leonardo D.
Mercado, Medardo T. Posadas, Corazon R. Soliman, Florinda M. Zara, Glenda S.
Medina, Gina E. Pureza, Abner Solidum, Gilbert D. Zinampan, Jenifer Z.
Mendoza, Sarah Racho, Corazon D. Somera, Charito O.
Menor, Mercuria T. Ramos, Myra T. Somera, Jonathan
Mercado, Jennifer Realo, Gemma A. Suasba, Marissa E.
Mercado, Medardo T. Recile, Merlobenda Y. Sumagui, Bernadette S.
Merle, Juanito Redondo, Marites L. Sunas, Maria Shella

241