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Piano Grade 5

Performance pieces, technical exercises, supporting tests and in-depth


guidance for Rockschool examinations

All accompanying and supporting audio can be downloaded from: www.rslawards.com/downloads

Input the following code when prompted: URBKDQ42X5

For more information, turn to page 5

www.rslawards.com
Acknowledgements

Published by Rockschool Ltd. © 2019


Catalogue Number: RSK200094
ISBN: 978-1-78936-059-2
Initial Release | Errata details can be found at www.rslawards.com/errata

SYLLABUS MUSICIANS
Syllabus designed and written by Jono Harrison Piano and Keyboards: Jono Harrison, Gary Sanctuary,
Syllabus Director: Tim Bennett-Hart Ross Stanley & Tania Ilyashova
Syllabus consultants: Gary Sanctuary, Chris Stanbury, Drums & Percussion: Pete Riley and Richard Brook
Simon Troup and Jennie Troup Bass & Synth Bass: Andy Robertson
Hit Tune arrangements by Jono Harrison and Gary Sanctuary Guitars: Rory Harvey, Nat Martin and Jono Harrison
Supporting Tests written by Jono Harrison, Chris Stanbury, Saxophone: Jonathan Griffiths
Nik Preston and Ash Preston Trombone: Tom George White and Norton York
Syllabus advisors: Tim Bennett-Hart, Brian Ashworth, Trumpet: Nick Mead and John Simpson
Stuart Slater, Peter Huntington, Bruce Darlington, Lead and Backing Vocals: Glen Harvey & Katie Hector
Simon Troup and Jennie Troup Additional Programming: Jono Harrison

PUBLISHING DISTRIBUTION
Proof reading of arrangements by Sharon Kelly, Simon Troup, Exclusive Distributors: Hal Leonard
Jennie Troup and Jono Harrison
Music engraving and book layout by Simon and Jennie Troup of CONTACTING ROCKSCHOOL
Digital Music Art www.rslawards.com
Fact files written and edited by Abbie Thomas Telephone: +44 (0)345 460 4747
Notes written by Roland Perrin Email: info@rslawards.com
Proof reading and copy editing by Gemma Bull, Jono Harrison
and Jennie Troup EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS
Cover design by Philip Millard of Rather Nice Design John Simpson, Norton York
Cover photograph: Vanessa Carlton © Sipa/REX/Shutterstock

AUDIO
Produced by Jono Harrison
Engineered by Jono Harrison, Gary Sanctuary, Tim Bennett-Hart,
Pete Riley, Richard Brook, Rory Harvey and Andy Robertson
Assisted by Paul Pritchard at Abbey Road
Recorded at Dock Street Studios, The Dairy and Abbey Road
Mixed by Patrick Phillips
Mastered by Francis Gorini

Supporting Tests recorded by Chris Stanbury and Jono Harrison


Piano Grade 5

2
Table of Contents

Introductions & Information

1 Title Page
2 Acknowledgements
3 Table of Contents
4 Welcome to Rockschool Piano Grade 5
6 Performance and Technical Guidance

Rockschool Grade Pieces

7 ‘A Thousand Miles’........................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanessa Carlton


15 ‘Teardrop’............................................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massive Attack
21 ‘Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Police
27 ‘Dangerous’........................................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Guetta feat. Sam Martin
33 ‘Life On Mars?’................................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Bowie
39 ‘You’ve Got A Friend In Me’.................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From ‘Toy Story’ (1995)

Technical Exercises

46 Scales, Arpeggios, Chord Voicings & Technical Studies

Supporting Tests

54 Sight Reading
56 Improvisation & Interpretation
58 Ear Tests
59 General Musicianship Questions

Additional Information

60 Entering Rockschool Exams


61 Marking Schemes
62 Copyright Information
63 Piano Notation Explained
64 Rockschool Popular Music Theory
Piano Grade 5

3
Welcome to Rockschool Piano Grade 5

Welcome to Rockschool’s Piano syllabus 2019. This syllabus is designed to support pianists in their progression from
Debut to Grade 8, through an engaging and rigorous pathway covering all the genres, stylistic elements, techniques and
musical skills required for success as a contemporary pianist.

Piano Exams
At each grade you have the option of taking one of two different types of examination:

■■Grade Exam
A Grade Exam is a mixture of music performances, technical work and tests. You are required to prepare three pieces
(two of which may be Free Choice Pieces) and the contents of the Technical Exercise section. This accounts for 75% of
the exam marks. The other 25% consists of: either a Sight Reading or an Improvisation & Interpretation test (10%),
two Ear Tests (10%), and finally you will be asked five General Musicianship Questions (5%). The pass mark is 60%.

■■Performance Certificate
A Performance Certificate is equivalent to a Grade Exam, but in a Performance Certificate you are required to perform
five pieces. A maximum of three of these can be Free Choice Pieces. Each song is marked out of 20 and the pass mark
is 60%.

All elements required to participate in a Rockschool exam can be found in the grade book. These are as follows:

■■Exam Pieces
The 2019 syllabus comprises six ‘hit tune’ arrangements, benchmarked and devised so as to equip contemporary
pianists with industry-relevant skills in any performance environment. These fall into three categories:

Melody & Accompaniment


These arrangements are performed to full band backing tracks, with the piano performing both melody
and accompaniment

Solo Piano Arrangement


These are full solo piano arrangements, performed without backing tracks

Vocal Accompaniment
These arrangements cover the skills required of contemporary pianists in ensemble environments, be they on
the stage or in the studio. The backing tracks feature vocalists, and the piano parts are reflective of what session
pianists would perform live or on mainstream commercial recordings

Each ‘hit tune’ arrangement is preceded by a Fact File, giving surrounding context to the piece and the original
performers/recording artists.

Furthermore, at the end of each arrangement you will find notes giving additional supportive context to get the most
out of the pieces.

■■Technical Exercises
There are either three or four groups of technical exercise, depending on the grade:

Debut–Grade 8:
Group A: Scales
Group B: Arpeggios/Broken Chords
Piano Grade 5

Group C: Chord Voicings

Grades 4–8 only:


Group D: Technical Study

4
■■Supporting Tests
There are three types of unprepared supporting tests in the exam:

1. The first type can be one of two options (this is the candidate’s choice):

Either:
Sight Reading tests, developing the musician’s ability to read and perform previously unseen material;

or:
Improvisation & Interpretation tests, developing the musician’s ability to develop previously unseen
material in a stylistic way and perform improvised passages of melody. The book contains examples of
both types of test – equivalent ‘unseen’ examples will be provided for the examination

2. Ear Tests
Debut–Grade 3: feature Melodic Recall and Chord Recognition
Grades 4–8: feature Melodic Recall and Harmonic Recall

3. General Musicianship Questions (GMQs), which you will be asked by the examiner at the end of each exam

General Information
You will find information on exam procedures, including online examination entry, marking schemes, information on
Free Choice Pieces and improvisation requirements for each grade.

Audio
In addition to the grade book, we have also provided audio in the form of backing tracks (minus piano) and full tracks
(including piano) for all ‘hit tune’ arrangements, technical exercises and supporting tests (where applicable). We have
provided professional performance recordings of all solo piano pieces in the syllabus. This audio can be downloaded from
RSL directly at www.rslawards.com/downloads

You will need to input this code when prompted: URBKDQ42X5

The audio files are supplied in MP3 format. Once downloaded you will be able to play them on any compatible device.

Further Information
You can find further details about Rockschool’s Contemporary Piano syllabus by downloading the syllabus guide from our
website: www.rslawards.com

All candidates should download and read the accompanying syllabus guide when using this grade book.
Piano Grade 5

5
Performance and Technical Guidance

Fingering
Any fingering annotation is given as a guide only.

Interpretation
Notation should be performed exactly as written, except where there are performance indications to ad. lib, improvise,
develop, etc. In these instances, the candidate will be marked on their ability to interpret the music in a stylistically
appropriate way, commensurate with the grade level.

Adaptation
A small degree of adaptation is allowed where, for example, hand stretches do not facilitate the required notated parts.
Marks may be deducted if adaptation results in over-simplification of the notation. If in doubt you can submit any
adaptation enquiries to info@rslawards.com

Articulation & Dynamics


Where articulation and dynamics are marked on the notation, they should be followed. Where it is open to interpretation,
the candidate is free to take their own approach.

Pedalling
The candidate may use the pedal freely at any grade, but it should be applied judiciously as marks may be deducted for any
over usage resulting in an unclear tone. In addition, where pedalling is written into (or out of) the notation, this should
be observed.

Chord Symbols
Most hit tune arrangements have chord symbols written above the notation. This is purely for guidance, and to assist the
candidate and teacher.
Piano Grade 5

6
A Thousand Miles

SONG TITLE: ‘A THOUSAND MILES’


ALBUM: BE NOT NOBODY
RELEASED: 2002 q = 95 Pop
F # add 4

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LABEL: A&M B 5/E

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GENRE: BAROQUE POP/POP ROCK
WRITTEN BY:
PRODUCED BY:
VANESSA CARLTON
RON FAIR/ & # 4 R
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CURTIS SCHWEITZER

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UK CHART PEAK: 6

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‘A Thousand Miles’ was a hit for American singer but felt that some of the music was a little disjointed
songwriter, Vanessa Carlton. The song was released and lacked the emotional pull it should be feeling.

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as the lead single for Carlton’s debut studio album, Although Carlton had turned down many offers

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4 due to their

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and labels in
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commercial success. The track achieved global demands for change, she seemed to take Fair’s advise

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success, reaching the top ten in the UK singles charts on board and the two worked together to create
and topping the Australian chart. Carlton also had something brilliant. Many changes were made to
success with the hit in France, Italy, The Netherlands the original demo of this song, including the change
and Ireland. of name, a shortened piano intro and an orchestral

œ. œ œ œ œ
section. It would seem that Fair was indeed right to
Vanessa Carlton began writing the hit at her make these decisions as ‘A Thousand Miles’ soon

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parent’s house in Philadelphia in the summer of became a household name and it’s popularity was

#
1998, starting with the unforgettable piano riff which spreading worldwide.
famously introduces the song. Meeting a writer’s block
along the way, she found the determination to finish ‘A Thousand Miles’ received three Grammy
it a few months later after receiving positive feedback award nominations, for Record of the Year, Song
on playing it to a record producer. On finishing the [3] of the Year and Best Instrumental Arrangement
song she named it ‘Interlude’, a name that many would Accompanying Vocalist(s). Sadly, these remained
suggest she change and of course eventually became ‘A only nominations and she lost out on all three, with
Thousand Miles’. Norah Jones taking Record of the Year for ‘Don’t
Know Why’. The song proved extremely popular
Carlton worked hard for success, sending demos with US troops at the time of its release and quickly
to producers and labels whenever she could and became the most requested song on radio station
standing firm when offers were made which she felt ‘British Forces Broadcasting Service’.
would jeopardise her sound. Some years down the
# #
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line, having sent out countless demos and turned B/D E
A B 5/E F add 4
Piano Grade 5

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down several offers, one of Carlton’s tapes had found

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its way to head of A&M Records, Ron Fair. Fair

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loved the demo and was keen to work with Carlton,

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Vanessa Carlton
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Piano Grade 5

# œ œ Œ œ. œ œ œ
[7]

Words & Music by Vanessa Carlton

8 © Copyright 2001 Rosasharn Publishing/Songs Of Universal Incorporated.


Universal/MCA Music Limited.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
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Piano Grade 5

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7

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Piano Grade 5

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11
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Piano Grade 5

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12
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#### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ F add œ œ
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Piano Grade 5

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[71]
13
Notes

This song is full of subtle light and shade with quick transitions between melodic and rhythmic ideas. It is important for the
performer to observe the dynamics carefully as this detail helps to shape and emphasise the shifting, restless feel of the song.

The 16th-note phrase found in the opening four bars of the right-hand part is re-visited throughout the song with slight
variations. Students should take time to master this pattern in isolation from the left hand part and at a slower tempo.
Once secure, students should read through the whole arrangement to see where this pattern is repeated, identifying and
comparing the differences. Once secure, these passages should sound light and effortless with a precise delivery.

Bars 5 and 6 should be legato and without any hint of accent or staccato. Both hands should be equally balanced with the
rhythmic pattern carefully observed.

This light and precise approach also applies to section B. As the left and right hand parts alternate in bars 13 to 15, care
should be taken to observe the rests between each phrase, keeping the 16th notes short and un-accented.

The opening six bars of section C builds on the original syncopated groove with both hands repeating the two-beat pattern.
Care should be taken to keep a steady quarter-note pulse and to avoid the music inadvertently speeding up. Although the
volume is mezzo forte at this point, students need to be careful to balance parts appropriately to allow the melody line to be
clearly heard above the accompaniment.

Section D creates a sudden crontrast with the previous section with both a drop in register and volume. Keeping the parts
well balanced and legato, take care not to anticipate the crescendo too early. The subito piano in bar 36 followed by an
immediate shift again back to mezzo forte is a key moment in the song. Students should take time carefully rehearsing this
section with particular attention to these dynamic changes, keeping a steady pulse throughout.

While section F is an almost direct repeat of the previous section B, section G is a pared down version of C and should
be played piano. Maintaining this volume throughout the section will allow the performer dynamic space to create a
contrasting final flourish as the 16th-note melody returns for a final time at forte.
Piano Grade 5

14
Teardrop

SONG TITLE: ‘TEARDROP’


ALBUM: MEZZANINE
RELEASED: 1998
q = 75 Trip Hop
LABEL: VIRGIN

# ## 4 N.C‰ .
GENRE: TRIP HOP/ELECTRONICA

& 4 j œ œ
WRITTEN BY: ROBERT DEL NAJA/

œ œ
ELIZABETH FRASER/

p
GRANTLEY MARSHALL/
ANDREW VOWLES

? # ## 44 ∑
PRODUCED BY: NEIL DAVIDGE/
MASSIVE ATTACK
UK CHART PEAK: 10

# ## ‰ ‰
A su
A sus 4

& j œ œ œ œ
‘Teardrop’ was a top ten hit for British trip hop (a ‘Teardrop’ peaked at number 10 in the UK singles

œ œ
fusion of hip hop and electronica) group, Massive chart and remains their only top ten hit to date.

œ
Attack. The song features on their third studio The song has featured heavily in television and film

P
album, Mezzanine (1998), and was the second song broadcasts, including US hit series’ Prison Break
to be released from said album. Mezzanine topped and House.

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the album charts in the UK, Australia, Ireland

n
and New Zealand, making it the groups most The song has proved a popular cover choice

w
commercially successful release to date. Their fourth amongst musicians, with many having released

n
studio album, 100th Window, also topped the UK their reworkings over the years. Newton Faulkner’s

w
album chart in 2003. 2007 version features a complex acoustic guitar
[3] accompaniment, which features in our 2016 Acoustic
‘Teardrop’ was written by the three founding Guitar syllabus, and made it to number 60 in the
members of Massive Attack (Robert Del Naja, UK singles chart. British band Elbow performed
Grantley Marshall and Andrew Vowles), as well as ‘Teardrop’ for a BBC Radio 1 Live Lounge session in
guest vocalist Elizabeth Fraser (Cocteau Twins). The 2003 and their version proved so popular that they

# ## ‰
idea for the song originally stemmed from a simple decided to include a studio version on their ‘Not a Job’ A
harpsichord riff and grew to become something quite single theA sus 4 year. Last but by no means least,
following

& j œ œ œ œ
unique in sound. Looking for a guest vocalist, Andrew O’Hooley & Tidow were praised for their intricate

œ œ œ
Vowles sent the demo to Madonna, hoping she would adaptation of the track with Guardian music critic
perform the vocal as she had done for their earlier Jude Rogers voting it one of the best tracks of 2012.
collaboration on ‘I Want You’. Unfortunately, Vowles
was outvoted by fellow bandmates Marshall and Del Massive attack have been praised for their original

? # ##
Naja and to Madonna’s dismay the band didn’t choose and exclusive sound and were awarded the ‘Innovation

w
her for guest vocals. Instead, Elizabeth Fraser of in Sound Award’ by Q magazine in 2008. The group
Cocteau Twins was brought in and the result did not have proved particularly successful in Europe and

w
disappoint. Fraser delivers a haunting and emotional have won several awards reflecting this, including
Piano Grade 5

lyrical performance, one which she claims was the MTV Europe Music Award for Best Video with
inspired by the untimely passing of her dear friend [6]‘Teardrop’ and the award for Best Foreign Album for
Jeff Buckley. Mezzanine at the 1998 Fryderyk awards (Poland).

15

# A sus
4
Teardrop
Massive Attack
q = 75 Trip Hop

# # # 4 N.C.
& 4 ‰ j œ œ ‰ j
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
p
? # # # 44 ∑ ∑

# # # A sus
‰ j ‰ ‰
4 A sus 4/G D sus 2

& j j
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
P
? ###
w nw
w w
[3]
nw w

# # # A‰sus ‰ ‰
4 A sus 4/G D sus 2

& j œ j œ j œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ###
w nw w
w nw w
[6]

###
A sus 4 A sus 4/G

& œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œœ œ œ
‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ
J ≈ nœ . Ó
? ###
w nw
[9] w nw

###
D sus 2 A sus 4

j
3

& nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ ˙. œ œ œ œ
nœ œ œ Œ ‰ J œ
? ###
Piano Grade 5

w
w w
w
[11]

Words & Music by Robert Del Naja, Grant Marshall, Andrew Vowles & Elizabeth Fraser

16 © Copyright 1998 Universal/Island Music Limited/Cocteau Twins Limited/Ajs Music Limited.


Universal/Island Music Limited/Sony Music Publishing (UK) Limited.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
###
A sus 4 A sus 4/G

& œ œœ œ œ nœ œ œ . œ œ œœ . œ œ œj œ n œ œ œ œ
‰ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ nœ œ Ó
J
? ###
w nw
[13] w nw

###
D sus 2 A sus 4

j
3

& nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ ˙. œ œ œ œ
nœ œ œ Œ ‰ J œ
? ###
w
w w
w
[15]

###
F maj 7 G

Œ
3

& œ œ œ. œ œ nœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ n œœ œ .
nœ. nœ œ
? ###
nw nw
[17]
nw nw

### A

A sus 4

& œ œ œ œ ˙‰ . œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ
Œ œ œ œ œ
J
? ###
w w
[19] w w

### œ œœ
A sus 4 A sus 4/G

œ œ œ
& ‰ œ œ ˙ œ œ . n œ œ œ œœ œ .

œ nœ œ œ œ
J Ó
F
Piano Grade 5

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#
? ## w
w n ww
[21]
17
### nœ œ œ œ
D sus 2/4
œ œ œ œ œ
A sus 4
œ ˙.
& nœ Œ œ

Œ œ œ Œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ
? # # # n ww
n œ œ ww œ œ
[23]
A sus 4 A sus 4/G

### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ.œ œ nœ œ œ œ
& ≈ œ ≈ œ Ó
≈ nœ œ
Ó
Œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ
#
? ## w œ œ œ œ
w n ww
[25]

### nœ œ œ œ œ ˙.
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
D sus 4 A sus 4

& nœ

Œ œ œ Œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ
? # # # n n ww œ œ ww œ œ
[27]
F maj 7


G

j
3

###
œ. œ œ œ. œ nœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n. œ œ œ
& nœ
≈ œ ≈ 3 Œ

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#
? ## n w
nw n ww
œ œ œ
[29]

# # # Aœ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
F maj 7
œ œ. œ nœ œ œ œ
&
3

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ### w
[31]
w n n ww
G F maj 7

### n œ œ. œ œ ˙.
œ œ œ. Œ n œw œ
&
Piano Grade 5

Œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ
? ### w œ œ œ œ
[33]
nw n n ww
18
### w ˙. œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ
G A F maj 7

‰ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ
& J J
f
Œ œ œ Œ œ œ Œ œ œ
? ### w œ œ œ œ ww œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
[35]
nw n n ww

# # # n ˙˙ gg n ˙˙˙ n ˙˙˙˙ ....


F maj 7
j j
gg ˙
G

& ‰ œ œ œ œ œ n œœ œœ œ œ
J œ œ œ œ œ nœ
P
? ### w
nw nw w
[38]
nw w
###
∑ ‰
G sus 2 A sus 4

& w j œ
nw œ œ œ œ œ œ
p
? ### ∑ ∑ w
[41] w
œœœ
# # # F ‰/ ‰ jœ
G 6/9
Œ ‰ ≈R œœœ œ œ
69 A

& jœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

Œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ### ww œ
nw nw
[44]
nw nw

### n œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙.
F 6/9 G 6/9 A sus 4

. œ
n œ œ œ œ œJ œ
œ œ œ œ
&

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ### n w ww
nw n ww
[47]

# # # A‰sus ‰
4

& j œ j œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
œ œ
Piano Grade 5

? ### w
w w
[50] w w 19
Notes

‘Teardrop’ is a laid back song with an underlying forward driving groove, creating a relaxed yet brooding drama. Space,
relaxation and an insistent groove are the fundamentals of the style.

Before beginning to play the opening eight bars, students should look to bar 9 and internalise the opening melodic phrase.
This will help establish a secure tempo.

At bar 9, the arrangement has a three-part texture. Here, the melody should be projected clearly, while the inner harmony
parts should be kept quieter and legato. In the lowest voice, the bass part should be a little quieter than the melody, but still
provide a sense of solidity.

There is a further challenge in the variety of rhythms contained in the melody, in particular switching from 16th-note
subdivisions to eighth-note triplets. Working to a metronome click or counting out loud, students should isolate the more
challenging rhythmic passages and practise at a slower tempo until secure.

In bars 21 to 37, the performer will need to employ careful use of the pedal to sustain the whole notes while moving the
hand position to play the eighth-note pattern in beats two to four. Students should practise the right-hand spread chord in
bar 38 to get an effortless sounding and even spread of notes downwards.

The tied chord should be held over into bar 41 for its full length before carefully continuing to count through bar 42.
A re-introduction of the motif (bars 43–45) sets up a piano outro (bar 46 to end), which features some melodic ideas drawn
from the motif and the vocal melody. Although at a piano dynamic, these can still be played with expression and shape.

Throughout the piece, pedalling can be applied not just for legato purposes, but for tone. This is an important aspect of the
technique, where light touches at certain points can bring extra sonority to the music as the overtones of the strings resonate.
It may be useful to experiment with this in mind, exploiting the contrast between pedalled and non-pedalled passages.
Piano Grade 5

20
Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic

SONG TITLE: ‘EVERY LITTLE THING


SHE DOES IS MAGIC’
ALBUM: GHOST IN THE MACHINE
RELEASED: 1981 q =155 Pop/Rock

## 4 ‰
LABEL: A&M
G 6/9 A 7sus 4

& 4 j œ
WRITTEN BY: STING
PRODUCED BY: HUGH PADGHAM/

œ œ œ œ œ œœ
STEWART COPELAND/
STING/ANDY SUMMERS
P œ
? # # 44
UK CHART PEAK: 1

w w
w w
## ‰ G 6/9 A 7sus 4

& j œ œ œ œ
‘Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic’ was a global
œ œ œ œ
‘Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic’ has an œ œ œ
hit for British rock band The Police, taken from their incredibly unique sound, with the vocals set back

? ##
fourth studio album Ghost in The Machine. The track from the music, another aspect of the song which

w w
was officially released in the November of 1981, but leads to an interesting story. Having presented the
singer/bassist Sting actually wrote the hit several years band with his original demo, Sting found that they

w w
before this during a songwriting session in 1976. were struggling to recreate the right sound in the
The song could be described as a little ‘lighter’ than studio. After many hours of torment and hundreds
the sound usually associated with The Police, and [5] of disregarded takes the band went on to make an
on looking into this further it’s clear that there is a unusual and brave decision – they recorded over the

##
fascinating story behind the creation of the song. A top of the original demo. Many believe this is how 7

j jœ ‰
sus 4

j
G 6/9 such a unique and recognisable soundAfor
they created

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
When Sting initially wrote the song in 1976 he the song, with Sting’s demo vocal remaining on the

œ œ œ œ . œ
recorded a simple demo to present to the rest of official track.

‰ J J
the band. It was met with low regard by both Andy
Summers (guitar) and Stewart Copeland (drums) Although the song was originally met with
who both felt that it wasn’t the right genre for them, concern from his fellow band members, Sting’s

? ##
but Sting persevered and brought in a session pianist instinct was absolutely correct and ‘Every Little

w w
(Jean Roussel) to perform on the official recording Thing She Does Is Magic’ went on to become a

w
of the track. Summers and Copeland were uneasy worldwide success, topping the singles chart in 6

w
with the addition of piano, but they left the decision countries and making the top 20 in many more.
in Sting’s capable hands and the end result did not Although The Police weren’t widely known for their
[9]
disappoint. It’s said that Roussel recorded as many use of a piano, in this instance the decision was

##
as 12 piano tracks for the hit and the outcome inspired and the result was a fantastically rewarding

j
7 4
was remarkable. Suddenly a band who had never
G /
track to both A sus
6 9listen to and to play.

& œ œ œ
previously used piano on a recording had released a

œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ
piano lead hit.
Piano Grade 5

? ## w
w
21
Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic
The Police

q =155 Pop/Rock
D/C #
## 4 ‰
G 6/9 A 7sus 4 G 6/9/B

& 4 j œ œ œ œœœœ
œ œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœœ œ
P œ œ œœ œ œœœ
? # # 44 w
w w w
w w w w
D/C #
# # G‰/ G 6/9/B
Œ
69 A 7sus 4

& j œ Ó œ œ œ œ
œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Œ
? ## w
w w w
[5]
w w w w
D/C #
## G /
A

& œ œ œ œj œ œj j ‰ Œ j j j ‰ Œ
69 A 7sus 4 G 6/9/B

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ
‰ œJ œ œ œ . J Œ ‰J . J
? ## w w
w w
[9]
w w w w
D/C #
## G / j Œ
Ó
69 A 7sus 4 G 6/9/B

& œ œ œ œ œ
œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Œ
? ## w
w w w
[13]
w w w w
D/C #
## G /
& œ œ œ œj œ œj j j j j j j j ‰ ‰
69 A 7sus 4 G 6/9/B

œ˙ œ œj œj œ œ œ œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
‰ œ. œ œ . . . J J ‰ Œ
? ## w
w w w
[17]
w w w w
##
œœ œ œ œœ Ó œ œœ œ œ
D G A D G A D G A D

& œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œœ œ œ œ œ fl œ
. >
f j
? ## œ
Piano Grade 5

Ó ‰ Œ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ
[21] . fl >
Words & Music by Sting

22 © Copyright 1981 G M Sumner.


EMI Music Publishing Limited.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
% A/C # A/C #
#
B

j œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœj œœ
& # œœœ œ œœœ œœœ œ ‰ œœœ œœœ œœ Œ Œ œ œ œœœ œ
A D A D

œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ
? ## ‰ jÓ ‰ j œ jÓ ‰ j
[25]
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ

A/C #
fi A A/C # Bb
##
To Coda
j
œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ Œ
‰ œœœœ œ ‰ j
A D C/F

& œ ggg n www


œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ n b œœœ ww
w
? ##
jÓ ‰ j œ jÓ bw
œ. œ œ œœœ œ. œ bw
nw
[29]
nw
G 6/9 A 7sus 4 G 6/9/B D/C #

## ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
P
? ## w
w w w
[34]
w w w w

D/C #
# # Gœ/ œ œ œ œ œ
C

œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
J œ
G 6/9/B

œ
69 A 7sus 4

& J J J
? ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
œ
[38]

D/C #
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ
G 6/9 G 6/9/B

œ œ œ. œ œ œ.
A 7sus 4 D sus 4 D

& # œ. J J J œ

? ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
[42]

D/C #
# œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œœ
& # œJ œ œ œ œ œ
G 6/9 G 6/9/B

J J œ J J œ
A 7sus 4 D sus 4 D

J J J J J œ
Piano Grade 5

? ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
[46]
23
D.%. al Coda fi
# œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
& # œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ Ó
G A D G A D G A D

œ œ œœ ‰ œ œ œ
œœ
f >
j
? ## œ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
˙ œ œ œ œ Ó Œ
œ

[50] >
fi Coda
Bb
#
D

j j G mj
& # œœœ œ œœ œœ œœ ‰ b œœj
A C/F 7 A m7

œ œœœ n œœœ œœœ œœœ n œœ ˙˙ œœœ b n œœœ n œœœ


˙˙ œœ .. n œœ bœ ˙ œ
nœ ˙ œ.
F
? ## jÓ bw nw w
[54] œ. œ bw nw w
B b maj 7
## j j # œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
œœ œœ n œœj j
C/F D

& ˙˙ ˙˙˙ œ
œœœ b n œœœ n œœ ˙˙ ‰
œœœ n œœœ J ‰ J
˙ œ n œ b œœ ˙ œ ˙
? ## œ œ ‰ œj ‰ j
w bw n˙. œ œ œ
w bw œ œ
[58]
n˙. œ
Bb œ œ n œ C/F œ œ n œ Aœm
# # œœœ œœœ ... œœœ œœœ nœ œ œ w nœ œ
G m7 7

& J Œ ‰ J ‰ J

b ˙˙ œœ .. n œœ . œ ˙ œ. n œœœœ
? ## nœ ˙˙˙ œœœ .. n b œœœ ˙˙˙ œœœ ... J
œ œ œ œ œ J J
[62] œ

œ œ n œ C/F
## w œ œ ˙ œ . # œœœ œœœ œ œœœ
‰ n Jœ œœ ‰ œœ
G m7 D G A D

& J J J J
˙˙˙ œ . n œœ ˙
˙˙˙
œ.
œœœ ...
? ## ˙ œœœ ... b œœJ n n œœœ ˙˙˙
.
œœœ .. œ œ œ j
J J J œ ‰ œ œ
j
[66]

Bb B b maj 7
n œ œ nC/F nœ œ nœ n œ œ n œA m nœ œ nœ
œœ œ
G m7 7

# # œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
G A

& Œ‰ J Œ‰ J Œ ‰ J J‰ Œ‰ J
Piano Grade 5

? ## œ œ b n ˙˙˙ ... n œœœœ ˙˙˙˙ .... n b œœœœ ˙˙˙˙ œ.


œœœ ... n œœœœ ˙˙˙˙ .... b n œœœœ
‰ J ‰ J J ‰ J
[70]
˙
24
nœ œ nœ nœ œ nœ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
œ œœ
# # Œ ‰ œJ œ œ œ œ
C/F D

& Œ ‰ J Œ ‰ J Œ ‰ J
˙˙ .. n œœ ˙˙
˙ ˙ .
? ## . ‰ n œJœ ˙˙ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
[75]

Bb B b maj 7 √
œ œ œ n œ œ œ n œ ˙ ~~~
œ w œ œ ˙ ~~~~
G m7 7

## ‰ n Jœ ‰ n œJ
E C/F Am

& ~~~
n ˙˙˙ ..
b . nœ .
˙˙˙ .. b œœœœ ˙.
˙˙˙ ...
n œœœœ ˙.
˙˙˙ ... b n œœœœ
? ## ‰ n œœJ n
‰ J ‰ J ‰ J
[79]

œ œ nœ œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ


C/F D

## ‰ n œ œ w œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& J J J J
˙˙˙ .. f

? # # ..
˙ ‰ n œJœ www œ œ œ œ j
œ. œ œ œ œ œ
[83] œ œ.

>œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ B b maj 7


j
œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ˙˙ . œ
C 6/F

## œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ ˙˙ ..
& J J J J ˙ .. ‰ œœ ‰ œœ
˙. J
j b n ˙˙˙ ... nœ .
˙˙˙ .. b œœœœ
? ## œ
œ œ
œ œ. œ œ œ œ ‰ n œJœ n
‰ J
[87]

#
B b maj 7 11
# # ˙˙ .. j
‰ n œœ
G m9 A m11

˙
C/F

˙. œ
‰ œœ ˙˙ .. n˙ ˙ n˙
& ˙. ˙
J
b n œœœœ
˙. w
? # # ˙˙˙ ... nœ ˙˙˙ ... www n n www
‰ œœJ ‰ J
[91]

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& # œ œ œ
D sus 4

œ œ œ œ œ œ w w
Piano Grade 5

P p
? ## œ . j œ. j œ. j
œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙
œ. œ. œ. w w

[95]
25
Notes

The main feeling students need to capture in this arrangement is one of exuberance, reflected in the fast tempo and frequent
use of eighth-note passages.

Students would benefit from listening to the original recording to gain an understanding of how this piano arrangement is
a combination of both the instrument parts and the original vocal melody. This will help to phrase, shape and balance the
parts within the two hands.

The crescendo that begins in bar 21 is important in building the music up to the next section. Students should aim for
a smooth and steady increase of volume from mezzo piano to forte with an accented emphasis on the final eighth note
of bar 23. Note that this note is also articulated with a staccato in both hands to enhance the punchy ending. After
observing two beats of silence, the energy should immediate pick right back up to drive the music forward into the
upbeat chorus at letter B. Students should take care to observe the eighth-note rest on beat 4 in the right hand melody in
bars 25, 27 and 29.

Letter C features the same opening melody with a new arrangement. Students are required to make a clear difference
between the melodic line and left hand accompaniment. The busy left hand part needs to be quieter than the right hand
part, staying even and flowing. Students should practise the hand position shift from the end of bar 41 into 42 and again
from the end of bars 45 into 46 to make sure that they are prepared to move the left hand position down in time for the start
of the following pattern beginning on a low G to avoid arriving late.

Section D features longer sustained and syncopated chords. It is important that the performer keeps a clear pulse throughout
this section to keep the momentum of the music and tempo steady. Note the descending glissando in bar 82. This needs to
be carefully timed so that the performer is ready to play the next musical phrase in bar 83, the effect sounding effortless.
Students may benefit from the playing the right hand part of bars 81 to 84 in isolation as a loop, counting out loud to master
the timing and hand position moves.

The coda has some beautiful contrasting and spacious music. Students should aim for a full, rich tone by ensuring that all
the notes of every chord are fully sounded.
Piano Grade 5

26
Dangerous

SONG TITLE: ‘DANGEROUS’


ALBUM: LISTEN
RELEASED: 2014 q = 92 Synth-Pop/House

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
LABEL: PARLOPHONE

#4 œ
Em
GENRE: SYNTHPOP/HOUSE

& 4
WRITTEN BY: DAVID GUETTA/GIORGIO
TUINFORT/SAM MARTIN/

p
JASON EVIGAN/

#4 w
LINDY ROBBINS

& 4 w
PRODUCED BY: DAVID GUETTA/GIORGIO
TUINFORT/SAM MARTIN/
JASON EVIGAN
UK CHART PEAK: 5

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
# œ œ œ œ
&
‘Dangerous’ was the second single to be released impressive synth line which almost pays homage to
from French music producer David Guetta’s sixth the typical 1980s dance sound.
studio album, Listen. The track features vocals by
Grammy Award winning American singer-songwriter David Guetta has released seven studio albums

# w
Sam Martin. ‘Dangerous’ peaked at number 5 in over the years, with album sales of over nine million

ww
the UK official singles chart and number 2 on the and single sales of over thirty million worldwide. His

& w
UK dance singles chart, while only making it to debut album, Just a Little More Love, was released
number 56 on the US singles chart it did manage in 2002 but it wasn’t until his fourth studio album
6th place in the US dance chart. The song was well in 2009 that he achieved mainstream success. One
received globally and actually topped the charts in Love includes hits ‘When Love Takes Over’, featuring
more than fifteen countries across Europe, including vocals from Grammy Award winning singer Kelly
[3]
Luxembourg, Sweden, Poland, Slovakia, Spain and of Rowland, and ‘Gettin’ Over You’ which topped the
course Guetta’s native France. UK singles chart. Guetta is highly regarded in the
C his successful A
worldBof
mdance music and is known for

œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœ
The track was co-written by the two featuring collaborations. He holds nine Grammy nominations,

# œ œ œ
artists, Guetta and Martin, with additional input with wins for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical
from producer and songwriter Giorgio Tuinfort, with the aforementioned ‘When Love Takes Over’

&
singer-songwriter Jason Evigan and multi-platinum in 2009 and Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical
selling songwriter Lindy Robbins. The writing with his hit ‘Revolver’ in 2010. Often referred to as
and production team for this song hold quite the Grandfather of EDM, Guetta was an influential
the track record between them, with the likes of figure in the creation of Electronic Dance Music and

# ˙
Robbins having written hits for Jennifer Hudson, remains innovative in the genre to this day.

˙˙
One Direction and Jason Derulo (to name a few).

& ˙
The track features guest acoustic drums from Ron
Thaler, professionally known as Blondie Boy, who
is well known for several session appearances
Piano Grade 5

including Alicia Key’s double Grammy Award


winning ‘No One’. The recording is led heavily [6]
by a prominent rhythm section, paired with an

A 27 D/E
Em C/E
Dangerous
David Guetta feat. Sam Martin
q = 92 Synth-Pop/House

#4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Em

& 4
p
#4
& 4 ww ww

C D

œ œ œ œ
# œœ œ œœœœœœœ œ œœœœœ œœ œ œœœœœœœ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœœœœ
&

# ˙˙ ˙˙
& ww ww
[3]

Bm C Am B m sus4 B

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ. œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ
# ˙˙
& ˙˙ ˙w Ó ∑ ?
w
[6]

# r
A
Em C/E D/E Em C/E

& œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ
œ.
P œ œ œ œ
?# œœœœ œ œœœœ œ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œœœ
œ œ
[9]

# j œœ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœ œ. œœ œ œœœ


D/E Em C Am D

œ œ ≈œ
& œœ œ œ ≈R ≈Ó
J R
œ œ F œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? # œœ œ œœ œ œœ ?œ œ
Piano Grade 5

œ œ œ œ
œ œœ
&
[12]

Words & Music by Lindy Robbins, Sam Martin, David Guetta, Giorgio Tuinfort & Jason Evigan
28 © Copyright 2014 Artist Publishing Group West/Piano Songs/BMG Platinum Songs US/Sam Martin Music Publishing/Bad Robot/What A Publishing Limited/KMR Music Royalties II SCSP.
BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited, a BMG Company/BMG Rights Management (US) LLC/Kobalt Music Publishing Limited.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
# œœœ œœ œ. œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ
Em C Am D Em C

& ≈Ó
J R
œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
?# œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ
œ & œ œ œ ?œ œ &
[15] œœ

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
C maj 7

˙
Am D D

& ‰ œœ ˙˙ Œ ˙ Œ ‰. œ
J R
# œ œ œ œ
& œ œœ œ ?œ w w
[18]
œ

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.
B

œ
Em C Am D

& ‰. R œ
œ œ
œ œ œ œ
?# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
[21]

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
Em C Am D C

& R œ œ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
?# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
[23]

# œœ .. œ œ œ œ œœ ww
≈ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
D C D

& œ œ œ œ œ
R
œ œ œ œ
?# œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ w
[26]

# . œ œ œ œ
C
Em C Am D

& . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
P expressively, gradual cresc. on rpt.
Piano Grade 5

œ œ
? # .. œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
[29] œ œ
29
#
Em C Am D

œ œ œ œ .
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .

?# œ œ
œ œ œ œ ..
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
[31] œ œ

# C maj
Œ Œ ‰.
7 D

& ˙ œœ ˙ r
˙ ˙ œ
f
?#
[33] w w

#
D

‰. r
Em C Am D

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.
œ
œ œ
?# œ gg œœ œœ œ
gg œœ gg œœ œœ œ
gg œœ
œœ œœ
[35] œ œ œ

#
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œr œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .
Em C Am D Em C

& œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
œœœ œœ œ œ
gg œœ
?# œ g œ
œ g œ œœœ gg œœ
œ g œ
œ
g
g œ œœ g œ
œœ g
g œœ œœ
œ œ œ
[37]
œ

# j j
œ œ
Am D C D

& ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

?# œ
gg œœ œ
œ œ gg œœ w w
[40] œ œ w w

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
E
N.C.

&
π
Piano Grade 5

?# ∑ ∑
[43]
30
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
&

?# ∑ ∑ &
[45]

. œ œ œ œ. >œ œ œ
# œ œ œ ‰ Jœ >œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ
F Em C/E A m/E D Em C/E

& ≈ J ‰ J Œ
P
# ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
& ˙˙˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙˙ ˙
[47]

# œ œ œAm
œ œ œ
D
œ œ œ œ. >œ œ œ
C
œ œœ œœœ ˙
D

& ≈ Œ ‰ R≈ Œ ∑
F p
ww ww
subito

# ˙ ˙˙
& ˙˙ ˙
?
w w
œœœœœœœœ
[50]
œœœœœœœœ
Em C Am D

# œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
G

‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰. œ
& œ œ œ œ œ R R
f
?# œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
˙
[54]

r
Em C Am D Em C

# œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
& œœ œœœ œœ œ
R œ
œ œ œ
?# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
[56] œ œ œ

# œœ œ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Am D C D

& œ ≈œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ ≈œœ œœ œœœ


Piano Grade 5

œ
?# œ j
œ œ œ œœ ‰ Œ
œ œ œ ww ˙˙
[59]
31
Notes

The rhythmic precision required to play this music convincingly will be helped if students lightly tap one foot on all four
quarter notes in the bar, during practise, while keeping an inner feeling for the 16th-note subdivision of the beat.

The opening 16th-note pattern needs to be played rhythmically precisely with an even tone and secure legato. To help
develop the finger strength and control required, a useful technical exercise would be to loop one bar of the 16th-note
pattern and practise slowly, playing staccato. Starting at half speed, allow for a loose wrist, paying attention to the
hand position and keeping the fingers gently rounded. Aim to keep the volume even across all notes to ensure that the
traditionally weaker fourth and fifth fingers are matching the speed and volume of the other fingers. As the exercise is
mastered, gradually increase the tempo. When the student returns to performing the passage at legato, it should controlled
and even in tone.

The right-hand part in letters A and B, then later at D, are from the vocal melodies in the original recording and should
sound above the lilting left-hand part. The challenge here is to play two simultaneous different articulations with a quieter
more legato left hand part at the same time as a slightly more detached and forthright right-hand part. At section D, there
the left hand should be punchier with quarter-note chords alternating with rapid spread chords.

The character of section F requires a keen observance of the rhythmic pattern and articulations to create space and texture.
Note how there the right hand plays an accented note immediately after a staccato note in bars 47, 49 and 51. This should
be practised in isolation to ensure the two articulations sound correctly. This section also requires careful observance of the
varied dynamic indications.

The arpeggios in the left-hand part within section G require a loose wrist and good hand movement to reach up from the
lowest note of each arpeggio to a fifth above and then stretch up to the tenth. This passage would benefit from playing the
left hand separately and observing the wrist movement, first practising without the pedal to aim for precise timing and an
even tone. Once secure, the performer can add careful pedalling and then introduce the right-hand part above.
Piano Grade 5

32
Life On Mars?

SONG TITLE: LIFE ON MARS


ALBUM: HUNKY DORY
RELEASED: 1973 q = 60 Pop/Rock
LABEL: RCA F/E
F

44 œ . œ œ œ.
GENRE: ROCK


VOCALS:
PIANO:
DAVID BOWIE
RICK WAKEMAN & b œ œœ œ œ
F
GUITARS: MICK RONSON
BASS: TREVOR BOLDER

? b 44
DRUMS: MICK WOODMANSEY

˙ ˙
MELLOTRON
& STRING
ARRANGEMENT: MICK RONSON

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
WRITTEN BY: DAVID BOWIE
G m/F

& b œ. œ
Gm

œ
PRODUCED BY: KEN SCOTT

œ
UK CHART PEAK: 3

The song was released in 1973 as a single from the David Bowie has often been described as one of
1971 album Hunky Dory (Bowie’s fourth album) and the most influential British rock stars due to his

?b
stayed in the UK charts for thirteen weeks, peaking innovative ideas. He had an interest in embodying

˙ ˙
at No.3. The Daily Telegraphed ranked the hit at the different personae (such as Ziggy Stardust) and
top of their ‘Greatest Hits of All Time’ list and in 2016 the idea of telling cinematic stories. The selection
online music magazine Pitchfork titled it the best song of artists he gathered to play on this album and
of the 1970s. The track featured progressive rock band the producter, Ken Scott would all become part
[3]
Yes’ Rick Wakeman on guest piano. of the Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars
F
phase.FBowie felt Hunky Dory was oneF/E

œœ
of the most

b œ œ
œ œ œœ œ
The song was allegedly written as a parody of Frank important albums in his career, stating: “It was like:

& œœ ..
Sinatra’s ‘My Way’, with the liner notes of Bowie’s song I’m finding my feet. I’m starting to communicate

œ. œ
reading: ‘inspired by Frankie’. Bowie has referred to what I want to do”.
the song as “my kind of modern take on ‘My Way’ ”;
although he often provides different explanations as David Bowie sadly passed away on the 10th January
to the song’s meaning. He has been known to describe 2016. A leading figure in the music industry, Bowie

?b
it as relationship: “you fall in love, you write a love was regarded as one of the most influential musicians

b
song. This is a love song”. Although he had previously of the 20th century. His successes include an

˙ ˙
said that is was about a young girl struggling with induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, eleven
reality: “she’s being told there’s a far greater life number 1 UK albums, five UK number 1 singles,

˙
somewhere and she’s bitterly disappointed she doesn’t five Grammy awards and four Ivor Novello awards.
have access to it”. [5] These accomplishments only scratch the surface of his
career, but the list is simply too long to cover in full.
Bowie himself said that he composed the G m/F

œ œ œ œœ
song at the piano and “had the whole lyric and Gm

&b œ œ œ œ œ
melody finished by late afternoon”. Rick Wakeman

œ œ
embellished Bowie’s original piano parts and Mick
œ œ
œ
Piano Grade 5

Ronson created a string arrangement that layered


over this.

?b
33
Life On Mars?
David Bowie
q = 60 Pop/Rock
F F/E F/E b D7

& b 44 œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
F
? b 44
˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ..
Gm G m/F C7

& b œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
?b ˙ ˙
˙ ˙
F 7/E b
[3]

F F/E D sus 4 D7

& b œœ .. œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ. œ œ œ
?b
˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
[5]
˙
Gm G m/F C7

œ œ œ œ œœ
& b œ œ
œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ
?b œ œ œ œ
˙ ˙
A b/E b A b/G b A b sus 4/G b
[7]
C aug/E Fm

& b b œœœ ... œ œ bœ n œœœ ... œœ œ œ b œœœ ... œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ b œ œ bœœœ œœœ
œ
œ œ œ n
œ œ. œ œœ œ œ œ. œ œ bœ

? b bœ Œ nœ Œ œ Œ bœ Œ
bœ nœ œ bœ
[9]

Db F aug/A Bbm B b m/C b

b
& b œ bœ bœ œ bœ œœ œ
œœœ b
poco rall. 3

œ œ œ œ œ b œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ


œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ
? b bœ bœ œ
Piano Grade 5

œ ˙ œ œ b˙ bb
[11]bœ œ ˙ œ œ b˙
Words & Music by David Bowie

34 © Copyright 1971 (Renewed 1999) Tintoretto Music


RZO Music Limited/EMI Music Publishing Limited/Chrysalis Music Limited, a BMG Company.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Bb Eb G b aug

n œœ
G m7

b œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ


& b œj ‰ œœ
a tempo

œœ œ œœ œ b œ
œ œ
? bb ˙ b˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙
[13]

E b m7
œ
œ
b œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
F Fm C m7 œ œ
b
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈
œ b œ œœœ œœœ b œœœœ ....
? bb ˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙
[15]
˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙

Bb Eb G b aug
œœœ
G m7

b œ œ œœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
& b œœ œœœ œ œ œ œœ .. œœ œœ œ œ
œ œ. œ
? bb ˙ b˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙
[17]


E b m7
b œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
F Fm C m7 œ œ
b ≈
œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ b œ b œœœœ œœœœ
? bb ˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙
[19]
˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙

b
G m/F #
b œœœ œœ œœ œœœ
Gm G m7/F E m7 5

& b œœœ ... œ œ # œœœ ... œ œœ n œœœ ... œ œœ


œœ ..
œ. œ œ
? bb ˙ #˙ n˙ n˙
˙ #˙ n˙ n˙
[21]

F # dim Bb Bbm
œœœ b n œœœœ œœ œœ œœ b œœ œœ œœ œœ
D dim7

œœ n # œœœœ n œœœœ
F Gm Am

bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nb 4
& œœ
œœ
n œœœ œœœ
‰ J 42 4
œ #œ b n œœœœ œ
n œœ
Piano Grade 5

? bb ˙ 42 ˙ n b 44
rall.

˙ #˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
[23]
˙ #˙ ˙ 35
F F/E F/E b D7

& b 44 Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ. œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
a tempo

œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? b 44
[27]
˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
C7

œ œ œ
Gm G m/F

b œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œœœ
& œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ.
?b ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
[29]

F 7/E b
œœ
F F/E D sus 4 D7

& b œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ≈ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ. œ bœ
?b ˙
˙
[31]
˙ b˙ ˙

B b/C
œœœ œœœ œœœ
Gm G m7/F C

& b œœœ œœ œ œ
œ
œ. œ œœ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
?b
˙ ˙
[33] ˙ ˙

C m/E b C aug/E Fm A b/G b

& b b b œœœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ ‰. œ œœ


œ n œœœ ... œ
œ œœ
b œœ ..
œ. œ œ b œ œ œœ œ

? b b˙ n˙ ˙ b˙
b˙ n˙ ˙ b˙
[35]

b
Db Bbm
œ œ œ
B add 9 5

bb
F aug/A

& b bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
poco rall.

œ œ bœ b œœœ œ œ œ n n œœœ œ œœœ


œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ
Piano Grade 5

? b b˙
˙ œ œ n˙ bb
[37]b˙ ˙ œ œ n˙
36
Bb Eb G m7 G b aug

b œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œ


& b œœ œ œ œ
a tempo

œ œœ œ œœ œ b œ
œœ œ œ
? bb ˙ b˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙
[39]

E b m7
œ
œ œ
b œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ b œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œ
F Fm C m7

& b œ œ bœ œ
bœ œ œ.
? bb ˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙
[41]
˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙
Bb Eb G m7 G baug

b œ
& b œœ œœœœ œœœœœœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ b œœœ
œ
œœœ œ
œ œ œ œ œœœ
? bb ˙ b˙
˙ ˙ b˙
[43]
˙

E b m7
bb œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
C m7 œ œ

F Fm
œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ b œ b œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ ....
? bb ˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙
[45]
˙ œ œ nœ bœ œ ˙ ˙

b
G m/F # F # dim
b œœ # œœœœ
œœœ œœ œœ œœœ
Gm G m7/F E m7 5 F

& b n œœœ ... œœ


œ œ # œœœ ... œ œœ n œœœ ... œ œœ
œœ ..
œ. œ œ œœ œœœ
œ #œ
? bb ˙ #˙ n˙ n˙
˙ #˙ n˙ n˙ ˙ #˙
[47]
˙ #˙
œœœ B b/F Eb Ebm Bb
b U
Gm

&b œ œœ œœ œœ
molto rall.

œœœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ww
n œœ œ œ œ œ œ b œœ œœ œœ œœ w
Piano Grade 5

? bb U
˙ n˙ ˙ ˙ w
˙ ˙ w
[50]
˙ n˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ 37
Notes

This song requires a steady quarter-note pulse kept throughout and to carry the music across the syncopated rhythms.

Note that the chords in the right-hand part of bar 9 and, for some, in bar 10, involve a large hand stretch. If the student finds
that this is physically not possible, they should simply omit the lowest note of these chords.

Students will notice that there are several places within the score that require accurate hand position changes, such as the
chords in the right-hand part of bar 15 and again at bar 25. While these quarter-note chords are relatively slow moving,
students should aim to move quickly between each chord position to allow each chord to sound for their full value. Students
may find us of the pedal can be helpful at these points. Make sure to lift the pedal halfway through each of these bars, just
before each chord change, to avoid a muddy texture.

Although the right hand should take the melodic lead for the majority of this song, while the left plays a supporting role,
both hands should be evenly balanced in bars 29 and 30, as the melodic pattern passes back and forward between parts.

While the left hand poses fewer technical challenges than the right hand part, it is worth paying particular attention to
the 16th-note descending chromatic figure repeated four times in bars 15 and 19, then again in bars 41 and 45. This faster
octave work will benefit from playing slowly in isolation. Students should experiment with the finger pattern for this passage
to establish what fits most comfortably under their fingers to produce an even and legato feel. While some might find using
the first and fifth finger throughout works well, others might find it easier to use the fourth finger for the lower E flat.
Piano Grade 5

38
You’ve Got A Friend In Me

SONG TITLE: ‘YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND


IN ME’
ALBUM: TOY STORY q = 116 Soundtrack s
RELEASED: 1996 Eb G 7/D

j œ œ œ # œJ n
LABEL: WALT DISNEY

b bb 4 ‰
GENRE: COUNTRY/POP

œ
3/4

& 4
5
4
WRITTEN BY: RANDY NEWMAN 2

PRODUCED BY: RANDY NEWMAN

F
1

œœ
UK CHART PEAK: N/A 3

? bb 44 œ œ
b

Bb7 Eb
E b/B b
j j j
bb œ œ œœ n b œœ .. ‰
& b œ. # n œœ œ
‘You’ve Got a Friend in Me’ was written by Toy Story 2) and the same award for his piece ‘Our

J J
Randy Newman, for use in the 1995 Disney classic Town (from Cars) in 2006.

P
Toy Story and later released as a single featuring
Newman himself and Lyle Lovett. The song went on Disney-Pixar’s Toy Story was the first feature-

b œœ
to appear in each Toy Story film in some capacity, length film to be entirely computer-animated and

? bb b œ b œœ œ
either in its original format or song by one of the was the first feature-length release from the highly

œ
many endearing characters. Although the single regarded collaborating conglomerations. Toy Story

b
didn’t chart, the song itself was well received and was was extremely well received, being nominated
nominated for two prestigious awards; the Academy for three Academy Awards and winning a Special
Award for Best Original Song and the Golden Globe Achievement Academy Award for its contribution to
for the same award, both of which it lost out on to [3] animated film. Toy Story was followed by its sequel,
Pocahontas’ ‘Colours of the Wind’. Toy Story 2, in 1999 and its trilogy, Toy Story 3, in
2010. The franchise has been hugely successful and

b Eb9
Newman is an American singer-songwriter, so far has grossed at over $1.9 billion worldwide.
arranger and composer. Since the 1980s he has been A b
Disney-Pixar are currently working on Toy Story 4,

bb j œ j œ
B aug

Œ
expectedEfor release in June 2019 we can rest assured

œœ œ
best known for his work in film scoring, especially

& b œ œ. œ #
for his work with Disney-Pixar for whom he has that it will prove as popular as the previous films in

n œ
scored eight films. Although Newman’s ‘You’ve Got the franchise.

J
a Friend in Me’ missed out on the above awards,
many of his compositions for film were more

œœ
successful in this sense and many of those were

? bb œœ
other Disney-Pixar collaborations. In 2002 he took

b œ œ œ
the Academy Award for Best Original Song with
his Monsters, Inc. classic ‘If I Didn’t Have You’ and
in 2011 he won the same coveted award with his
song ‘We Belong Together’ written for Toy Story
[6]
Piano Grade 5

3. Newman also holds seven Grammy Awards,


including Best Song Written for a Motion Picture at

Ab
the 2000 ceremony for ‘When She Loved Me (from

E b/B b

bb b Œ ‰
39

œ
You’ve Got A Friend In Me
Randy Newman
From ‘Toy Story’ (1995)
q = 116 Soundtrack s
#
Eb
j j
G 7/D B 9 11

j j
Cm

b j œ œ œ # œJ n œœ œ œ #œ œ nœ œ
& b b 44 ‰ œ œ œ. œ n œ œ. œ
3/4 5
5

J
4

J J
2 1 4
1 3

F
1

œœ n œœ
# n œœ
3

? b b 44 œ œ œœ
b œ nœ

E b/B b Bb7 Eb B b aug B b m7 B b aug


j
bb b œ œ n œj j
œœ n b œœ .. ‰ ‰ j #œ ‰ j nœ ‰ j #œ
& œ. #œ j œœ
J J œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œn œ œ
P
? bb b œ b œœ b œœ œ
b œ Œ œ Œ œ Œ œ Œ
[3]

Eb B b aug Eb9 Ab
A

b j j ‰ œJ œœ œ ‰ # œœ .
A dim7

& b b œ œœ . œ œ n # œœœ œ Œ
b n œœ œœ.

œœ ..
œ
œ
J
J
? bb œœ œœ œ
œ œ
3

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ
[6]

E b/B b Ab E b/G G7

j
Cm

b ‰ œJ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œJ ˙œ . œ œ œ œ œ
&bb Œ œœ #œ œ
œ œJ œ .. œ.
? bb œ œ
b œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ nœ œ
[9] œ

Ab E b/G G7 Cm Ab A dim7 E b/B b G/B C m

b œ
&bb œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ j Œ ‰ b œ b œœ œ n œœ œ œ œ
œ œ œœœ œœœ
j
J
œ

Piano Grade 5

? bb œ œ œ œ œ
b œ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ
[12]

40 Music and Lyrics by Randy Newman


© 1995 Walt Disney Music Company
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Ab7 G7 B b13 Eb

bbb j j œ œ œ b œ œj j
œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ n œj
bœ œ
C m7 F7 C7

& # œœ n œœ œœ Œ œ œ J
F P
? bb j œ nœ bœ n˙ bœ œ œœ œœ
j œ œ œ œ n
b bœ œ b˙
[15] 3

F7 Bb7 Eb G 7/D

j œ
3
j
b œ œ # œ
b œ˙ j œ œ
œ œ œ œ
& b b n˙ œ ‰ œ nœ œ
J
3/4 5
4 5 4
1 1
2
1

? bb œ n œœ b œœ œ œœ n œœ
b œ œ
[18]

#
E b/B b Bb7
j j
Cm B 9 11

j bœ œ nœ j j j j
bb b œ œ œ œ œ
& œ. nœ œ. nœ œ. n
#œ œ œœ n b œœ ..
J J J J
? bb œ
b
œœ
nœ # n œœ bœ b œœ œ
b œœ
[20]

Eb B b aug Eb9 Ab
B

b j œ œ œ œ œ œ
& b b ‰ œ œœ œ œ œ
A dim7

‰ .
œ œ ‰ ‰ J œ
œ bœ œ œœ ..
P J
? bb œ œ # œœ œœ n œœ
œ œ œ
3

b œ œ nœ œ œ nœ
[22]

E b/B b Ab E b/G
b ‰ œJ œœ œ . œœ
G7 Cm

&bb Œ œœ œ ‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ Œ œ Œ
œ # œœJ œ ..
Piano Grade 5

? bb œœ œœ
b œ œ œ nœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
[25]
41
Ab E b/G Ab E b/G
b j j ‰ œj œœ œ b œ œ Œ
G7 Cm

& b b ‰ œJ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ
œ nœ œ œ bœ
? bb œ œ œ œ œ œ
b œ œ œ œ œ œ
[28]

B b13 Eb
b œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ b œ œj j
G7 F7 C7

& b b n œœœ œœœ


Cm

Ó œ
J
œ
J J J œœ œ
bœ œ
j
nœ . Œ
f P
œ œ nœ bœ n˙ bœ œ œœ
? bb
b œ œ b˙ œ œ n œœ
[31] 3

B b13 Eb Eb7
bb b F‰ bœ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰
7

& J œœ œœ b œœ ..
? bb b n œœ b œœ œ
3

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
[34]

Ab Eb6
C

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ
&bb Œ Œ
D7 D7
j
4 3 2 1 2 1 3 4

F
œœ # œœ n n œœœ œœ
3 3

œœ
3

? bb œ nœ œ œ œ Œ
b œ
[36]

Eb6 D/F #
Ó ‰ j D7 E m7
j
F dim7

& bbb œ #œ nœ #œ ˙ œ œ œ Œ # n œœ œ œ˙ ‰ œ œœ . œ n œœ œ˙ œ œ œ
J
1
Piano Grade 5

1 2 1 2

? bb œ œ b œ n œ ˙ œ nœ œ #œ
b nœ œ #œ

1 2 3 2 1

[39]
42
B b13

b b œj j j j
Gm C7 F m7

b œ œ œ˙ . œ j Œ
& œ. nœ œ b˙ œ œ œœ œœ
J
œœ
? bb
b œ œ n œœ b œœ œ
œœ
[42]
œ

Eb B b aug Eb9 Ab
n œ. .
D

b j ‰ b œœ ‰ œœœ ‰ n œœœ œ œ ‰ œ œ
A dim7

& b b ‰ œ œ œ # œ˙˙ œ
œ
œ
J J #œ
œ
œ
J J
P
? bb œœ œœ œ œ # œœ
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ
3

[44]
œ
E b/B b Ab E b/B b
rit.

- U̇
A dim7 G aug/B Cm

b j ‰ Jœ œ œ # œ˙ œ œ œœ n œœ œ
&bb Œ œœ ‰ # œœj œœ .. ˙
.
f
? bb œœ œ n œœ œ- œœ- U˙-̇
˙
b œ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ
[47]

B b13 Eb B b13
a tempo

b œ j bœ œ œ j
& b b ‰ J œ b œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Jœ ‰ œj n œ œ ‰
F7 C7 F7

œ œ œ œ
p
? b b n ˙˙ bœ œ œœ n œœ b n œœ b œœ
b b˙ œ œ œ
[50] œ
Eb B b13 Eb
C7 F7
j œ G 7/D
j
b œ bœ œ œ œ œ #
‰ œj œ œ ‰ n œœ œ
& b b ‰ J œ œ ‰ œj œ n œ œ œ œ œ
J
F
œœ n œœ
œœ n œœ b n œœ b œœ
3

? bb œ œ œ
b œ œ œ
[53]

#
E b/B b B b7 Eb
rit.

j
Cm
j j B 9 11
j j
bb b œ œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ j j U
& œ. n œ œ. œ œ. n
#œ œ œœ n b œœ . œœ ww
J J J J J
p
Piano Grade 5

U
? bb œ
b
œœ
nœ # n œœ bœ b œœ œ
b œœ
[56]
w
43
Notes

This light-hearted tribute to friendship is heavily influenced by New Orleans piano styles. Students should be encouraged
to listen to artists such as Jelly Roll Morton, Professor Longhair, Doctor John and the original performance of this song by
Randy Newman for context.

Students need to be clear which parts in the right hand are the original vocal melody and which are accompaniment,
to achieve the correct balance. It can be helpful to think of the piano part as representing a full band arrangement – for
example, the left hand part (in keeping with the New Orleans style of the song) could be thought of as a tuba or a double
bass. This will need to be controlled carefully to maintain clarity with the changes of dynamics through the piece. The notes
do not sustain for very long, so they should bounce along – detached but not staccato – and any pedalling should be very
light if being applied.

The swung rhythms of the music shouldn’t be laboured – it can be a useful exercise to compare straight and swung eighth-
note rhythms by tapping a foot on the pulse, and clapping the two subdivisions in order to understand the feel before
playing the notes. Confidence with swung rhythms will help achieve the desired effect in performance.

An alternating fingering pattern is suggested at bar 36 (letter C) – this can be a useful technique on faster repeated notes
to ensure that the delivery is smooth – this can also be adopted in bar 37. These are only suggestions for the ease of the
performer and can be freely adapted.
Piano Grade 5

44
45
Piano Grade 5
Technical Exercises

In this section you will be required to play a selection of exercises drawn from each of the groups below. The examiner will
be looking for the speed of your response and will also give credit for the level of your musicality. Please see the syllabus
guide for details on the marking criteria.

■■Candidates can choose to play either natural minor or harmonic minor scales
■■Major scales, minor scales, chromatic scales and arpeggios need to be played hands together, in straight or swung feel,
ascending and descending, across three octaves (except contrary motion scales, pentatonics, lydian and phrygian modes,
which must be played over two octaves and extended arpeggios which are one octave only)
■■Pentatonic scales are right hand only
■■Lydian and Phrygian modes need to be played hands separately
■■Groups A, B and C (scales, arpeggios and chords) need to be played from memory. You may use your book for
Group D (technical studies)

Note that Groups A and B need to be played to a click and any fingerings shown are suggestions only.

Group A: Scales
The tempo for this group is q =126 bpm.

1. B major (three octaves, two octave example shown)

#### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
& # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 4 5
2 3 4 3
1 2

œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 1 2 3

œ
? #### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?œ œ œ
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
&
4 3 2 1 4 3œ 2 1
3 2 1 4 3 2 1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2. B major | contrary motion

#### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
5

& # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2 3 4 1 3 4
1 2

œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 1 2 3

œ
? #### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 2 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

3. D b major (three octaves, two octave example shown)


œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bb b b œ
2

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
4 1
2 3
3 1 2 1

œ œ œ
2 3 4 1 2 3

œ
? bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?œ œ œ œ œ
bbb &œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3
3 2 1 4 2 1 3

4. D b major | contrary motion


œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bb b b œ
2

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1
Piano Grade 5

3 4
2 1 2
3 1

œ œ œ
2 3 4 1 2 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
46 bbb
3 1 2
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 1 2 3 4
4 1 2 3 1 2 3
5. G # natural minor (three octaves, two octave example shown)

#### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 2 3
3 1 2 1

œ
3 4 1 2 4 1 2 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
? #### œ œ œ œ œ ?œ
œ œ œ œ
# œ œ œ &
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 2 œ œ œ 1
œ3œ œ œ œ œ 4 3 2 1 4 3
2 1 3
2 1

6. B b natural minor (three octaves, two octave example shown)

bb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
4

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 4 2 3
3 1

œ œ œ œ
3 1 2 3 1 2

œ
? bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?œ œ œ
bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
&
2 1 3 2 1 œ 4 3 2
1 3 2 1 4 3 2

7. G # harmonic minor (three octaves, two octave example shown)

#### œ œ œ ‹œ œ œ œ œ œ
& # œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
3 2 3
1 2

‹ œ
3 1

œ
3 4 1 2 4 1 2 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
? #### œ œ œ ‹œ œ & ?œ
œ œ œ œ
# œ œ œ œ œ ‹ œ œ œ œ œ
3 2 œ œ œ
1 4
œ œ œ œ #œ œ 1 3 3 2 1 3
3 2 1 4
2

8. B b harmonic Minor (three octaves, two octave example shown)

bb b b œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
& b œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
4 3 4
1 2 3 2
3 1

œ œ œ œ
3 1 2 3 1 2

œ
? bb b œ œ œ nœ œ ?œ œ œ
bb œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
&
2 1 3 2 1 œ 4 3 2
1 3 2 1 4 3 2

9. B major pentatonic | right hand

#### œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
4

#
2

& œ
1

œ œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 1 2 1 2 3

œ œ œ

10. D b major pentatonic | right hand

bb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
5

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2 3
2 3 1 2 1

œ œ œ
3 1 2
Piano Grade 5

47
Technical Exercises

11. G # minor pentatonic | right hand

#### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2 1 2

œ
1

#
2

& œ œ œ œ œ œ
1
2 1 2 3 3

œ œ œ œ œ
œ
12. B b minor pentatonic | right hand

bb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
5

œ œ œ œ œ œ
4

& b
3

œ
2

œ
2 3 4 1 2 3 1

œ œ œ œ

13. C lydian | right hand

œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 3 4
1 2 3 2
4 1

œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 4 2 3

14. C lydian | left hand

? œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
# œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
4 3 2 1
3 2 1
5

15. C phrygian | right hand

b œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b œ
5

& œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2 3 4 1 3 4
1 2
3

œ œ œ
1 2 3 1 2

16. C phrygian | left hand

? œ œ b œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bœ bœ œ bœ b œ œ œ œ œ
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ bœ 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
4 3 2 1
3 2 1
5

17. Chromatic Scale | starting on any black key stated by examiner, example given in B (three octaves, two octave example shown)

œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ b œ n œ b œ n œ b œ n œ betc.œ
œ # œ
& œ #œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ #œ
1 3 1
1 3 1 3 1 3
3 1 2 3 1 2 3
1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 3

œ
œ #œ œ
? œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ œ & #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ œ b œ nœ bœ nœ bœ nœ bœ
etc.
Piano Grade 5

2 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 2 1 3 1 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 2
3 2 1 3 3

48
Technical Exercises

Group B: Arpeggios
The tempo for this group is q = 86 bpm.

1. B major arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)

#### 3 œ œ œ
œ œ
5

œ œ
1

& #4
3 3

œ œ
1 2 2

œ œ œ ˙.
œ œ œ
? # # # # 43 œ œ œ ? œ œ
# œ &
œ œ œ ˙.
5 3 2 1 2 1
3

2. D b major arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)


œ œ œ
b œ œ
4

& b b b b 43 œ
œ œ
2

œ œ
1

œ œ
2 1 2 4

˙.
œ œ
? b b b 43 œ œ œ ?œ œ ˙.
bb &œ œ œ œ
4 2 1 4
œ
2 1 2

3. G # minor arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)

#### 3 œ œ œ
& #4 œ œ
4

œ œ
2 4
2 1 1 2

œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ ˙.
? #### 3 œ œ œ œ
#4 œ œ œ œ œ
1 1 4 2
˙.
2 2
4

4. B b minor arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)

b œ œ œ
& b b b b 43 œ œ
2

œ œ
1 2
1

œ œ
2 3 3

œ œ œ œ ˙.
œ œ œ œ
? b b b 43 œ œ œ œ
bb œ œ œ ˙.
3 2 1 3 2 1 2

5. Cm maj 7 arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)

œ œ œ œ œ
& 44 œ b œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
4 5

œ
1 2 3 4 3

œ œ bœ
1 2

w
? 44 œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ ? bœ w
œ bœ bœ
&
Piano Grade 5

4 3 2 1
5 4 3 2 1

49
Technical Exercises

6. C 7add 4 arpeggio (three octaves, two octave example shown)

œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& 44 œ œ œ œ b œ œ
2 3

bœ œ œ œ
1 3 1
1 2 3 2 1 2

˙
? 44 œ œ œ œ b œ œ bœ œ œ
œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙
?
&œ œ
2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2
3 1
5

#
7. Cmaj 9 11 arpeggio | right hand


& 43 œ œ œ œ œ
1 2

œ œ
5

œ œ
1 3 3

œ
#
8. Cmaj 9 11 arpeggio | left hand

œ œ #œ œ œ
? 43 œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 3 1 2
5 3

9. C m11 arpeggio | right hand

œ
& 43 œ bœ œ œ bœ
1 2

œ œ
5

bœ bœ
1 3 3

10. C m11 arpeggio | left hand


œ œ œ
? 43 œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ bœ œ
1 3 1 2
5 3
Piano Grade 5

50
Technical Exercises

#
Group C: Chord Voicings | Minor 11 and Major 9( 11) Chords
In the exam you will be asked to play one of the chord exercises below, from memory. The examiner will state the chord
type. This test is performed in free time (without backing track or click), but the examiner will be looking for the speed of
your response.

Ex 1: C m 11 chords

& 44 ww b b wwww b b wwww


bw
? 44 b www ww w

#
Ex 2: C maj 9 11 chords

#w
& 44 n ww w
# www
www n # wwww
? 44 n ww
w

Group D: Technical Studies


In the exam you will be asked to perform your choice of one of the following three technical studies along with the
accompanying backing track.

Example 1 | VIm – IIm – V – I  progressions, syncopation and walking bass

c 110 s
b
G # m11 C # m9 F#9 A # m7 5 D#7 G # m11
#### 4 nnnn bb b
B maj 9 E maj 9

& # 4 ‰ œœ œj ˙ ‰ ‰ ‰ j ‰ jÓ n bb
œœœ ... œœœœ ... œœœ œœ ˙˙ œ œ
œœ ˙
P œ. œ ˙ œ. . . . œ. œ ˙ ‹ œœœ. œœœ
.
? # # # # 44 nnnn bb b
# œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n bb
œ œ ‹œ
œ œ œ nœ
b
B b m9 E b m9 Ab9 D b maj 9 G b maj 9 B b m9
b b b ‰ œj ‰ j ‰ œœj Œ ‰ œj ‰ œj ˙ ‰ œj Œ
C m7 5

‰ œj Œ
F7

b
& b œœœ ˙˙˙ ˙
œ.œ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ ˙˙ n œœœ. b ˙˙˙
œ ˙ . . .
? bb b œ œ
bb œ œ œ nœ ˙
œ œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ
Piano Grade 5

[5]

51
Technical Exercises
Ex 2: Lydian Mode - Film Soundtrack

Example 2 | Lydian modal study

c 120
#
D b maj 7 11
b œ œ œ œ œ œ.
& b b b b 44 ‰ œ œ œ œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ
f œ œ œ œ œ œ
? b b b 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bb
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
> > > >
œ œ œ œ r
bb b b ‰ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ
œœ ‰ .
r
& b n œœœ ‰ . œœ œœœ
> œ
>
? bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bb
[3] œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

b nœ. œ. œ nœ œ œœ. >œ


œ œ œ œ. œ
C m7

& b b b b ˙˙˙ œ nœ ‰ œœ
˙ J
? bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bb
[5] œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#
D b maj 7 11 Eb D b maj 7

j j
C m7

b b b b ˙˙˙ .. œœ œ ‰ n œœœ ‰ œœœ ˙˙˙ www


& b . œ n œœ
œ œ œ ˙ w
p
? bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j
bb ‰ œ ‰ œ ˙ w
[7] œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ w
Piano Grade 5

52
Technical Exercises
Ex 3: Phrygian Mode - Heavy Rock

Example 3 | Phrygian modal study

c 117
b
D#5 D # m/F #
#### 7
E maj 7 5 E maj 7

& # 4 œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ ˙˙ œ œ ww
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙
F œ œ œ œ œ
? # # # # 74
# œ œ œ œ œœ œ
˙. ˙ ˙ œ œ
˙. ˙ ˙ œ
D # m7 j
# # # # ‰ j œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œ
B

& # œœ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œœœ ˙. œ œ
J Ó
? #### œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ #œ # œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ
# nœ œ œ œ
[3] œ œ nœ œ #œ nœ œ œ
F #/G # E maj 7 D#5

œœ œ œœ œœ ˙˙ .. ww
#### œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œ œ ˙. œ œ w
& # œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ
œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰
p f
? #### ˙. ˙ ˙ œœ˙
# ˙. ˙ ˙ ˙. ˙ ˙ ˙. w
[5]
˙. ˙ ˙ ˙. w

Piano Grade 5

53
Sight Reading

In the exam, you have a choice between either a Sight Reading test or an Improvisation & Interpretation test. The examiner will ask
you which one you wish to choose before commencing. Once you have decided you cannot change your mind.

In the sight reading test, the examiner will give you an 8–16 bar example in the key of either B major or D b major. You will
first be given 90 seconds to practise, after which the examiner will play the backing track twice. The first time is for you to
practise and the second time is for you to perform the final version for the exam. For each playthrough, the backing track
will begin with a one bar count-in. The tempo is q = 60–130.

During the practice time, you will be given the choice of a metronome click throughout or a one bar count in at the beginning.

The backing track is continuous, so once the first playthrough has finished, the count in of the second playing will
start immediately.

Please note:
■■You will be required to play all notation and create appropriate parts to chord symbols.
■■Time signatures will be either 4/4 or 3/4.

Sight Reading | Example 1

c 80 Film Score
#### 3
& #4 Œ Œ ˙˙ Œ œœ
˙˙ œ ˙˙ ..
p j f
? # # # # 43 ‰ œ ˙ ‰ œj ˙ ‰ œj ˙ œ œ
# ˙. ˙. ˙. œ

####
& # ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙ ..
p ˙.
? #### ˙ . ˙˙ .. ˙˙ . ˙˙ ..
# .
[5]

####
& # Œ Œ ˙˙ Œ œœ
˙˙ œ ˙˙ ..
p f p
j
? #### ‰ œ ˙ ‰ œj ˙ ‰ œj ˙ ˙˙ ..
# ˙. ˙. ˙.
[9]

Please note: The test shown is an example. The examiner will give you a different version in the exam.
Piano Grade 5

54
Sight Reading | Example 2

c 80 Pop Ballad
j œ ˙
b
& b bbb c ‰ œ œ ‰ œj œ œ ˙ ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
p
˙. œ ˙. œ w w
? bb b c
bb

‰ œj œ œ
˙
b
& b bbb w œ œ ˙. ‰ œj œ œ ˙
p
˙ ww œ œ
? bb b ‰ œ œ œ ˙. ˙.
bb J
[5]

b
& b b b b ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ ˙˙ ˙˙ ww

? bb b j j w
bb w w œ. œ œ. œ w
[9]

Please note: The test shown is an example. The examiner will give you a different version in the exam.

Piano Grade 5

55
Improvisation & Interpretation

In the exam, you have a choice between either a Sight Reading test or an Improvisation & Interpretation test. The examiner will ask
you which one you wish to choose before commencing. Once you have decided you cannot change your mind.

In the Improvisation & Interpretation test, the examiner will give you a 8–16 bar chord progression in the key of either
B major or D b major. You will first be given 90 seconds to practise, after which the examiner will play the backing track
twice. The first time is for you to practise and the second time is for you to perform the final version for the exam. For each
playthrough, the backing track will begin with a one bar count-in. The tempo is q = 60–130.

During the practice time, you will be given the choice of a metronome click throughout or a one bar count-in at the beginning.

The backing track is continuous, so once the first playthrough has finished, the count-in of the second playing will
start immediately.

You will need to improvise diatonic, single note melodies with right hand and chords in left hand.

Improvisation & Interpretation | Example 1

c 110
b b D b maj 7 Ebm A b 9sus 4
bb b b 4 D G maj 7

& b4 ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

Db Gb A b 9sus 4 D b maj 7

& bbbb b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[5]

Gb6 Db Bbm Ab7


b
& b bbb ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[9]

Ab9 Db Bbm Ebm Ab7 D b maj 7

& bbbb b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[13]

Please note: The test shown is an example: The examiner will give you a different version in the exam
Piano Grade 5

56
Improvisation & Interpretation | Example 2

c 110

#### 4 B C#m F # 9sus 4


7 B maj 7

& #4 ’ ’ ’ ’
E maj

’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

#### F # 9sus 4 B maj 7

# ’ ’ ’ ’
B E

& ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[5]

#### E6 G#m F#7

# ’ ’ ’ ’
B

& ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[9]

#### F#9 G#m C#m F#7 B maj 7

# ’ ’ ’ ’
B

& ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
[13]

Please note: The test shown is an example: The examiner will give you a different version in the exam

Piano Grade 5

57
Ear Tests

In this section, there are two ear tests:


■■Melodic Recall
■■Harmonic Recall

You will find one example of each type of test printed below and you will need to perform both of them in the exam.

Test 1: Melodic Recall


The examiner will play you a 2 bar diatonic melody in the key of C major with a range up to an octave. The first note will be
the root note or a fifth. You will hear the test twice, each time with a one bar count-in, then you will hear a further one bar
count-in after which you will need to play the melody to the click. The tempo is q = 95 bpm.

It is acceptable to play over the track as it is being played as well as practising after the second playthough. The length of
time available after the second playthrough is pre-recorded on the audio track so the count-in may begin while you are
still practising.

œ œ œ œ œ
4
&4 œ œ œ œ ˙

Please note: The test shown is an example: The examiner will give you a different version in the exam

Test 2: Harmonic Recall


The examiner will play you a chord progression containing chords I, II, IV, V, VI in any order or combination in the key of
C major. You will hear the chord progression twice, each time with a one bar count-in. You will then hear a further one bar
count in before playing back to a click. At this grade, seventh chords are introduced. Please note, there is no requirement for
the chords to be voicing-specific. The tempo is q = 95 bpm.

& 44 ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙


˙ ˙ ˙
? 44 ˙ ˙
˙ ˙

Please note: The test shown is an example: The examiner will give you a different version in the exam
Piano Grade 5

58
General Musicianship Questions

The final part of your exam is the General Musicianship Questions section, which features five questions relating to one of
your choice of the performance pieces.

1.  You will be asked a question relating to the harmony from a section of one of your pieces
2.  You will be asked a question relating to the melody in a section of one of your pieces
3.  You will be asked a question relating to the rhythms used in a section of one of your pieces
4.  You will be asked a question relating to the technical requirements of one of your pieces
5.  You will be asked a question relating to the genre of one of your pieces

Further guidance on the types of questions asked at this grade can be found at the RSL website www.rslawards.co.uk

Piano Grade 5

59
Entering Rockschool Exams

Entering a Rockschool exam is easy, just go online and follow our simple six step process. All details for entering online,
dates, fees, regulations and Free Choice pieces can be found at www.rslawards.com

■■All candidates should ensure they bring their own Grade syllabus book to the exam or have proof of digital purchase
ready to show the examiner.

■■All Grade 6–8 candidates must ensure that they bring valid photo ID to their exam.
Piano Grade 5

60
Marking Schemes

Grade Exams | Debut to Grade 8

ELEMENT PASS MERIT DISTINCTION

Performance Piece 1 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 2 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 3 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Technical Exercises 9–10 out of 15 11–12 out of 15 13 + out of 15

Sight Reading
or 6 out of 10 7–8 out of 10 9 + out of 10
Improvisation & Interpretation

Ear Tests 6 out of 10 7–8 out of 10 9 + out of 10

General Musicianship Questions 3 out of 5 4 out of 5 5 out of 5

TOTAL MARKS 60%+ 74%+ 90%+

Performance Certificates | Debut to Grade 8

ELEMENT PASS MERIT DISTINCTION

Performance Piece 1 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 2 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 3 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 4 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

Performance Piece 5 12–14 out of 20 15–17 out of 20 18+ out of 20

TOTAL MARKS 60%+ 75%+ 90%+

Piano Grade 5

61
Copyright Information

A Thousand Miles
(Carlton)
Universal/MCA Music Limited

Teardrop
(Del Naja/Marshall/Vowles/Fraser)
Universal/Island Music Limited/Sony Music Publishing (UK) Limited

Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic


(Sumner)
G M Sumner

Dangerous
(Robbins/Martin/Guetta/Tuinfort/Evigan)
BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited/Kobalt Music Publishing Limited

Life On Mars?
(Bowie)
RZO Music Limited/EMI Music Publishing Limited/Chrysalis Music Limited

You’ve Got A Friend In Me (from “Toy Story”)


(Newman)
Universal Music Publishing Limited
Piano Grade 5

62
Piano Notation Explained

œ œ œ œ œ
4
&4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
THE MUSICAL STAVE shows pitches and
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
rhythms and is divided by lines into bars.

?4 œ
C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

œ œ œ
Pitches are named after the first seven letters

4 œ œ œ
of the alphabet.

œ œ œ œ

Grace Note: Play the grace note on Pedal Marking: Depress and then release the
or before the beat depending on the sustain pedal. Multiple pedal operations in a
style of music, then move quickly to short space of time may be simplified as shown
the note it leads onto. in the last two beats of the bar below.

3 4 œ
&4 œ
j ˙˙ .. &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
° °

Spread Chord: Play the chord from the bottom note up Glissando: Play the notes between the notated
(top down only if there is a downward arrow head). pitches by sliding over the keyboard with the
The final note should sound by the appropriate fingers or fingernails.

# 4 g ˙˙ ggg ˙˙˙˙
notated bar position.

& 4 ggg n ˙˙ g & h h


gliss.

Tremolando: Oscillate at speed Finger Markings: These numbers represent


between marked notes. your fingers. 1 is the thumb, 2 the index
finger and so on.

bw w
& & œ œ œ œ
1 2 3 4 5


D.%. al Coda
fi
(accent) • Accentuate note (play it louder). • Go back to the sign (%), then play until

fi
the bar marked To Coda then skip to

œ^
the section marked Coda.

D.C. al Fine • Go back to the beginning of the song and


play until the bar marked Fine (end).
(accent) • Accentuate note with great intensity.
Una Corda • Use soft pedal

œ. .. .. • Repeat the bars between the repeat signs.


(staccato) • Shorten time value of note.

œ-
• When a repeated section has different

.. ..
1. 2.
Piano Grade 5

endings, play the first ending only the first


time and the second ending only the
second time.
(accent) • Accentuate note with more arm weight.

63
Introducing…
Rockschoo
new theorl’s
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exams!

POPULAR
MUSIC THEORY
GRADES DEBUT–8

OUT NOW!
Discover more at
www.rslawards.com/theory
Enter online at
www.rslawards.com/enter-online