Anda di halaman 1dari 7

   

Tapping into the Space of Innovation through 
 
the Power of Stories 
 
  Terrence Gargiulo – Chief Storyteller 
 
Drawing each other into spaces of innovation requires us to put the natural power of 
stories to work. How do we tell our innovation stories?  
Below are seven steps of the story life cycle. We’ll look at this from the perspective of 
engaging with external clients. Keep in mind that the ideas presented are applicable with 
any stakeholders we’re seeking to collaborate with to incite innovation.   
These seven steps are presented as a mix of story techniques and best practices for 
maturing our stories and moving them through our external and internal channels: 
 
STEPS  DESCRIPTION
1. CRAFT OPENING STORY  Even before launching into a full story we begin 
PROBES  with either rich rhetorical questions or statements. 
  Use phrases like…”Can you picture”…”What if…”or 
  “Imagine if…” The goals of doing so are to: 
   
a. Paint a compelling picture 
b. Engage listeners 
c. Test and gauge responses of our listeners to 
dynamically pick a story path 
 
2. CHART A STORY PATH  My Passion stories are about you. Let the client 
  connect to you. Let them have a peek behind the 
My Passion   scenes of you. Give yourself permission to bring 
“Why do I care about this  more of your authentic self to your clients. 
technology? What is my personal   
relationship to the technology,  Find out more about the technologies and 
approach, challenge or  innovations you are pitching. For example, share 
opportunity being addressed?”  stories of how these technologies came into being. 
  These are also the stories of how these 
Innovation Background  technologies have been adopted, grown and been 
“What’s the background story of  developed.  
this innovation? How did this   
technology come into existence or  Start thinking about how you can bring your case 
studies alive. Focus on moment and think in terms 
STEPS  DESCRIPTION
woven into your organization’s  of characterizing the people, situations, and key 
practices?”  moments. Less is more here. Written credentials 
  contain the requisite rigor and details your stories 
  must be vivid to be memorable. See ICE below.  
   
Innovation in Action 
“What does this innovation look 
like when it delivers business 
benefits to others? How might 
these benefits translate for your 
client’s business? How will it feels 
to implement this innovation with 
 
us?”   

3. SHAPE YOUR NARRATIVE  I switch to word narrative here to indicate there are 
Make decision about how you are  likely to multiple stories and or story forms in what 
going to use stories. Put yourself  you craft. For example your narrative could include 
in the client’s shoes. Picture the  all three story paths outlined in Step 2. Here’s a 
setting. Who is the audience?  litmus test for your narrative it needs to melt the 
What’s in it for them? What are  ICE (it needs to Inform, Connect and Emote). When 
their concerns? What is going to  you get really good at this you will be able to do it 
pique their interest? What will  on the spot without thinking about it. You will have 
pull them into the conversation?  a rich index of stories and be able to create 
Set a target length for your  mashups on the spot that are impactful. 
narrative.   
For your individual stories within the narrative use 
the Story Journey Map to help you. Reach out to us 
if you need help and not sure how to construct a 
well formed story. 
4. PRACTICE  Work with a story coach and your colleagues to get 
comfortable with telling your story. Storytelling is 
physical you’ve got to do it to get good at it. No 
formula, tools or templates are going to make you 
a storyteller. 
 
For the serious we have a Business Storytelling 
Masterclass. Click here for more info. 
5. TELL STORIES to ELICIT  Bring stories to your clients and teams. Remember 
STORIES  the only reason to tell is a story is to hear a story. 
Hearing stories sharpens our sensitivity to the 
needs of our clients and opens a space of trust that 
STEPS  DESCRIPTION
leads us down a path of discovering opportunities 
and co‐creating solutions. 
6. REFINE & INTEGRATE  Return to your narrative and make new narratives 
from the stories you hear. Tweak your narrative to 
work with different clients and industries. See how 
quickly you can Lego together new narratives that 
resonate with different audiences. 
7. SOCIALIZE  Stories are not about collecting and hoarding 
power in the form of information…stories stoke the 
fires of meaning. Meaning is to be shared. The 
growth and evolution of ideas feeds off the 
frequency and intensity with which we engage in 
sense making with each other. Stories are the 
currency that buys new dreams and fashions 
unimagined futures. 
 
Want to explore this further. Here’s a video with Accenture’s former Chief Storyteller 
with some examples to help you see how this works: 
 

 
CLICK HERE FOR LINK TO VIDEO 
We're pleased to share with you a set of storytelling performance markers we've 
identified in building teams of sales executives:

Do you have embedded learning strategies and experience in your organizations that 
cultivate these skills? Would you be interested in creating a network of peer‐to‐peer 
coaches that elevates the performance of people in your organization to hits these 
markers? We'd love to share things that have worked in other organizations and 
collaborate with you to create performance solutions that will work in your organizations.
Storytelling & Human Centered Design 
Human Centered Design (HCD) and Innovation are buzz words right now. It's good we re‐
brand and rename the basics from time to time. If you are going to put people at the 
heart of any collaborative processes you're going to need master storytellers.  

There are three pillars of storytelling that support the communication, interaction, 
research, collaboration and innovation activities of Human Centered Design: 
  

We've been working with a number of Fortune 100 clients to help them integrate and 
scale the concrete behaviors contained in the story listening, story thinking, and 
storytelling pillars. Here's a snapshot of a new learning asset we have developed: 
This course is designed to: 

 Introduce practitioners to storytelling to galvanize Human Centered Design with 
the natural power of stories. 
 Provide tools & methodologies that are applicable to any collaborative, problem 
solving context 
 Facilitate the connection and application of storytelling methodologies across 
initiatives, projects, and teams 

  
The overall objectives of the training are: 

 Define three pillars of storytelling (story listening, story thinking, and storytelling) 
and how they can be used in HCD. 
 Receive instrument‐based feedback and personalized coaching on storytelling 
skills. 
 Practice story listening, story thinking and storytelling skills. 
 Apply tools and techniques of story listening, story thinking and storytelling to HCD 
activities. 
 Review and practice facilitation techniques. 
 Develop greater comfort using storytelling presentation skills to share ideas with 
greater confidence and influence 

 SETUP A MEETING TODAY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR LEARNING ASSETS 
   
   
 
 
Terrence earned his Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from 
Brandeis University. The Thomas J. Watson Foundation of IBM 
awarded him a fellowship for a year of independent study and 
research in Hungary on peak performance. Shortly thereafter, 
Terrence earned his Masters of Management from Brandeis 
University.  
 
   
 
Terrence is the former Chief Storyteller of Accenture. He is the author of eight books several of which 
have been translated into Chinese, Korean, and Spanish. For his creative use of narrative, INC Magazine 
awarded Terrence their Marketing Master Award. His work as an internationally recognized 
organizational development consultant earned him the 2008 HR Leadership Award from the Asia Pacific 
HRM Congress for his ground breaking research on story‐based communication skills.   

Highlights of some of his past and present clients include, GM, HP, DTE Energy, SalesForce, Nokia, 
MicroStrategy, Dow, Visa, Citrix, Fidelity, Federal Reserve Bank, Ceridian, Countrywide Financial, 
Washington Mutual, Intel, Guidance Software, Dreyers Ice Cream, US Coast Guard, Boston University, 
Raytheon, City of Lowell, Arthur D. Little, KANA Communications, Merck‐Medco, Coca‐Cola, Harvard 
Business School, and Cambridge Savings Bank. 

Terrence wrote the libretto for his father’s opera Tryillias which was accepted for a nomination for the 
2004 Pulitzer Prize in music. In 2009, Terrence and his sister Franca founded the Occhiata Foundation. 
The Occhiata Foundation brings arts engagement to Monterey County schools through the multi‐
discipline prism of opera (http://www.occhiata.org ).  

Terrence is a frequent speaker at international and national conferences including the Association for 
Talent Development (formerly known as ASTD), International Society for Performance Improvement 
(ISPI), Academy of Management, Conference Board, Asia Pacific HRM Congress, Linkage Inc, Asia HR 
Summit, Association of Business Communications, Feast of Asia and he was a Field Editor for ASTD for 7+ 
years. His articles have appeared in American Executive Magazine, Journal of Quality and Participation, 
Communication World, Training Industry Magazine, ISPI Journal, and ASTD Links.   

Terrence enjoys scuba diving, cooking, singing, and the sport of fencing. He was Junior National 
Champion, member of three US Junior World Championship teams, NCAA All American and an alternate 
for the 1996 Olympics. 

He has appeared in interviews on FOX TV, Comcast Network and CNN radio. 
 
Cell: 415‐948‐8087, terrence@makingstories.net, web: www.makingstories.net