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56TH CONG1RE., ? SENATE.

DoCuMENT
18t tSein. )' - :No. 380.

IMPORTATION OF JAPANESE LABORERS.

LE T T E R
NROM

THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,


TRANSWITING,
IN RESPONSE TO RESOLUTION OF SENATE OF XAY 16, 1900,
A REPORT FROX THE COXXISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMXMIRA-
TION RELATIVE TO THE IMPORTATION OF JAPANESE LABOR-
ERS UNDER CONTRAOT IN VIOLATION OF CONRACT-
LABOR LAWS.

MAY 18, 1900.-Referred to the Committee on Immigration and ordered to be printed.

TREASURY DFxPARTMENT,
OFFIOE OF THE SEClTnARY,
WaM ngqton, D. 0a, fay 17, 1900.
SnR: I submit herewith the accompanying report, from the Commins-
sioner-General of Immigration, in answer to Sonate resolution dated
the 16th instant.
Respectfully, yours, L. J. GAoE,
To the PaEDWNT OF THE SENATL

TRPA8U1RY DEPiRTMENT,
OFFICE OF, COMMISSTIONER-GENNUAL OF IMMIGRATIONK
WTzs1/inJton^, May 17, 19X.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge, by reference, the receipt of
the following resolution:
IN THR fE3NATX OF THU UNITED STAT0,
Afaqi 16, 19X0.
ieolve(l, That the Secretary of the Treaiuury Is hereby directed to iHlid to the Sen-
ate aly illforliuition he may have ill regard to tho importation of Japaneee labore.s
under conltrat in violation of the contrt-labor Aws.
Atte:
CHARLUs G. BINNXrW,
Secretary,
By HUNRY M. E009,
0&ie/ aerk.
:9 EIPORTATION OF JAPANESE LABORERS.
in response thereto, I have to inform you that the information
requested in said resolution, or so much thereof as is in the possession
of the Bureau, appears for the fiscal years 1898 and 1899 in the annual
reports of the, Bureau and in the files of this office up to the 1fst day
of May of the current year, from which the following arrivals of
Japanese immigrants appear for the times indicated: 1898,2,230; 1899,
8,395, and for the ten months ending April 30, 1900, 7,181.
TThese figures indicate the number of those only who have come
directly to the United States, and do not embrnwe the'very large numn-
her (how many the Bureau has no power to determine) who are des-
tined ostensibly to the Dominion of Canada, and most of whom, it is
believed, ultimately enter the United States on the northwest Canadian
border.
In view of the fact that the recommendations contained in the annual
reports of the Burelau for several :'ears past, to the effect that exclusive
ports of entry for immigrants should be established at, the principal
porjIt.s on the boundary ime between the United Stateskand Canaa,
have not becon adopt, there is no mens at the command of the Bureu
to either inspect or keep a record of immigrants entering along said
border; but the large number of Japanese engated in construction
work in the Western States an(l Territories conttrins the impression
above expressed thalit the bulk of those professing to be destined to
Canada ultimately reach this country.
With reference to the probabilities af to such immigration for the
ensuing year, this, again, is a subject upon which the Rureau can only
conjecture in g5ne'ral terms, froM the steady increatse of such arrivals
and the common rumnor which reaches the Bureau from time to time
through its officials on the Pacific coast, that there will be a large
increase in such immigration.
Respecting the examination of Japanese immigrants, the same pre-
cautions are observed to avoid violations of the alien contract labor
and immigration laws as are lnow in use at the immigrant stations
along the Atlantic coast, and the attitude of the immigration officials
along the Pacific coast is perhaps one of even greater eaIlousy for the
inltrests of the laborers of this country than that which is displayed
at the Eastern immigration sbitions, for the reason that Such imninligra-
tion of :a totally alien race and one as well whose langutlagl and ba§)its
are little understood in tiis country, renders additional precaution
necessary.
The Bureau does not feel, however, that under prevailing conditions
the difficulties presented- by the influx of orientals can be as ily met
for various reasons, chief among which may be mentioned the fact that
Japanese interpreters are very difficult to secure, few being familiar
with the language except those who are themselves members of that
race, whose sympathies are naturally enlisted in behalf of their coun-
trynien rather than in favor of the. enforcement of the laws intended
for the protection of the citizens and institutions of this country.
Eighteen months ago, as a result of 'the increase of this class of
ImmIgrants, a special officer was detailed to visit Japan, where he
spent several months investigating the inducements to this increase of
immigration by a race which theretofore had exhibited no desire to
come to this country in large numbers. The report of this officer
expressed the opinion that such immigration was fostered by a number
of societies, among whose members were found Japanese subjects high
IMPORTATION OF JAPANESE LABORERS. 8
in political and social life, and that the occasion of the organization
of such societies, whileobstcnsibly for the purpose of furnishing pass-
ports to such subjects of the Mikado as desired to conei to this coun-
try, and to insure that only such as were admissible under the laws of
the United States should embarlk for the purpose of temporary or per-
manent Settlement here, the true occasion wwas the large profit derived
from commissionsNpid either directly by the immigrants or through
the agency of the stetiunship lines. rhe report referred to is now in
the hands of the House of Representtives, where it was referred in
response to a resolution dated May 10, 1900.
The Bureau desires f urther; to report that it has from time to time
had reason to believe that the influx of Japanese imilligrants was due
to sonic extent to the, solicitations of citizens of thih country who
desired to avail theminsle.vs of cheaper labor than could be seclred
here, and has attempted by making Special investigations to substan-
tiate this opinioll hut thus far, owinhg partly to thle impossibility of
securing reliable interpreters; and: in part to the in(lirectness of the
methods adopted in securing such laI)or, its efforts have been fruitless.
Within the past few weeks, in view of the repolts in the .public
press and from other sources, of a still greater increase in the neai'
future of the kind of immigration under consideration, the Bureau
hasdetailed Special Ifimigrant lnspectoi bltoIert Wateihor n to proceed
to the principal Pacific ports, including Vancouver and( Victoriat,
British Columbia? and to Suich other points as the necessities of the
mission may require, to make a0full investigation of the subject and a
full report of his findings. This report,itisupon rccelpt, in your
judlment consistent with the interests involved, will he accessible
to congress and to such persons as umay be interested in Japanese
immigration.
Respectfully, yours, T. V. POWDERLY,
C09mmi"esilr- G(vwraZ.
The SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
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