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EC7 Environmental Statement

Appendix E Noise and Vibration Supporting


Information

LOW CARBON ENERGY CENTRE


Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

APPENDIX E: NOISE AND VIBRATION


APPENDIX E1: GLOSSARY OF ACOUSTIC TERMINOLOGY
Ambient The totally encompassing sound in a given situation at a given time, usually
sound composed of sound from all sources near and far.
Assessment
The period in a day over which assessments are made.
period
A frequency weighting applied to measured or predicted sounds levels in order to
A-weighting
compensate for the non-linearity of human hearing.
Background noise is the term used to describe the noise measured in the absence
of the noise under investigation. It is described as the average of the minimum
Background
noise noise levels measured on a sound level meter and is measured statistically as the
A-weighted noise level exceeded for ninety percent of a sample period. This is
represented as the L90 noise level (see below).
Broadband Containing the full range of frequencies.
Decibel [dB] The level of noise is measured objectively using a Sound Level Meter. This
instrument has been specifically developed to mimic the operation of the human
ear. The human ear responds to minute pressure variations in the air. These
pressure variations can be likened to the ripples on the surface of water but of
course cannot be seen. The pressure variations in the air cause the eardrum to
vibrate and this is heard as sound in the brain. The stronger the pressure
variations, the louder the sound that is heard.
The range of pressure variations associated with everyday living may span over a
range of a million to one. On the top range may be the sound of a jet engine and
on the bottom of the range may be the sound of a pin dropping.
Instead of expressing pressure in units ranging from a million to one, it is found
convenient to condense this range to a scale 0 to 120 and give it the units of
decibels. The following are examples of the decibel readings of every day sounds;
Four engine jet aircraft at 100m 120 dB
Riveting of steel plate at 10m 105 dB
Pneumatic drill at 10m 90 dB
Circular wood saw at 10m 80 dB
Heavy road traffic at 10m 5 dB
Telephone bell at 10m 65 dB
Male speech, average at 10m 50 dB
Whisper at 10m 25 dB
Threshold of hearing, 1000 Hz 0 dB
dB(A): The ear is not as effective in hearing low frequency sounds as it is hearing high
A-weighted frequency sounds. That is, low frequency sounds of the same dB level are not
decibels heard as loud as high frequency sounds. The sound level meter replicates the
human response of the ear by using an electronic filter which is called the ‘A’

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

filter. A sound level measured with this filter switched on is denoted as dB(A).
Practically all noise is measured using the A filter. The sound pressure level in
dB(A) gives a close indication of the subjective loudness of the noise.
Do-Minimum Describes a scenario under which the road scheme that is under consideration
does not proceed.
Façade Noise A noise level measured or predicted at the façade of a building, typically at a
Level distance of 1m, containing a contribution made up of reflections from the façade
itself (+3dB).
LAmax noise This is the maximum noise level recorded over the measurement period.
level
LAmin noise This is the lowest level during the measurement period.
level
LAeq,T noise This is the ‘equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level, in decibels’
level and is defined in British Standard 7445 as the ‘value of the A-weighted sound
pressure level of a continuous, steady sound that, within a specified time interval,
T, has the same mean square sound pressure as a sound under consideration
whose level varies with time’.
It is a unit commonly used to describe construction noise, noise from industrial
premises and is the most suitable unit for the description of other forms of
environmental noise.
LA90 noise This is the noise level that is exceeded for 90% of the measurement period and
level gives an indication of the noise level during quieter periods. It is often referred to
as the background noise level and is used in the assessment of disturbance from
industrial noise.
LA10 noise This is the noise level which is achieved for 10% of the monitoring period and is
level often used to describe road traffic noise

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

APPENDIX E2: BASELINE MONITORING DATA


A desk based study and site walkover was undertaken to identify existing and future noise sensitive
receptors (NSRs) that could potentially be affected by noise arising from the construction works and the
operation of the Development.
Baseline noise surveys were initially undertaken in December 2007, however, monitoring was undertaken
during the daytime period only. Following consultation with the local authority it was agreed that
additional monitoring would be required during the night-time period. Night-time monitoring was
undertaken on the night of Thursday 7th May 2009. The selected monitoring locations are described
below.
The parameters logged throughout the survey period were LAeq, LAmax, LAmin, LA90 and LA10. The LAeq
level is the equivalent continuous sound pressure level over the measurement period; LAmax is an
indicator of the highest sound level during the measurement period; the LAmin is the lowest level during
the measurement period; LA90 is used as a descriptor of background noise levels and LA10 is the noise
level which is achieved for 10% of the monitoring period and is often used to describe road traffic noise.
All measurements were undertaken under free-field conditions and were taken at a height of
approximately 1.5m from ground level. The ambient temperature was approximately 8°C during the
daytime and 5°C during the night-time. Throughout both the daytime and night-time, wind speeds were
less than 4 m/s. A wind shield was fitted to the monitoring equipment at all times.

Location N1 – Daytime

Date Time LAeq LA10 LA90 LAmax


21/09/2010 10:48:20 61.3 63.3 59.0 68.0
21/09/2010 10:53:20 62.3 64.5 58.4 76.6
21/09/2010 10:58:20 63.1 63.8 58.8 78.2
21/09/2010 11:03:20 62.1 64.6 57.9 74.6
21/09/2010 11:08:20 61.9 64.0 59.2 71.5
21/09/2010 11:13:20 61.6 63.5 58.8 70.1
21/09/2010 11:18:20 62.0 62.6 61.5 62.8
Average 62.1 63.8 57.9 78.2

Location N1 – Night-time

Date Time LAeq LA10 LA90 LAmax


22/09/10 01:11:13 63.4 64.8 51.1 80.8
22/09/10 01:16:13 66.9 68.9 50.4 81.5
22/09/10 01:21:13 68.8 68.6 48.4 86.4
Average 66.9 67.8 48.4 86.4

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

Location 1 ‐ Weekend Data
90

80
Sound Pressure Level (dB(A))

70

60
LAeq
LAmax
LA90
50
LA10

40

30

Time (HH:MM:SS)

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

APPENDIX E3 CONSTRUCTION NOISE ASSESSMENT


Construction Noise and Vibration Significance Criteria
Construction Noise Assessment

The significance criteria for the construction noise assessment are based on ‘The ABC Method’ from BS
5228-1:2009. An extract describing this method is provided below.

Example Method 1 – The ABC Method

Table E.1 shows an example of the threshold of significant effect at dwellings when the total noise level
rounded to the nearest decibel, exceeds the listed value. The table can by used as follows: for the
appropriate period (night, evening/weekends or day), the ambient noise level is determined and rounded
to the nearest 5 dB. This is then compared with the total noise level, including construction. If the total
noise level exceeds the appropriate category value, then a significance effect is deemed to occur.

Table E.1 Example threshold of significant effect at dwellings

Assessment category and threshold value period Threshold value, in decibels (dB)
(LAeq) Category AA) Category B B) Category C
C)

Night-time (23.00-07.00) 45 50 55
Evenings and weekendsD) 55 60 65
Daytime (07.00-19.00) and Saturdays (07.00-13.00) 65 70 75
NOTE1 A significance effect has been deemed to occur if the total LAeq noise level, including construction, exceeds the
threshold level for the Category appropriate to the ambient noise level.
NOTE 2 If the ambient noise level exceeds the threshold values given in the table (i.e. the ambient noise level is higher than
the above values), then a significant effect is deemed to occur if the total LAeq noise level for the period increases by more
than 3 dB due to construction activity.
NOTE 3 Applied to residential receptors only.
A)Category A: threshold values to use when ambient noise levels ( when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are less than these
values.
B) Category B: threshold values to use when the ambient noise levels (when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are the same as

category A values.
C)Category C: threshold values to use when the ambient noise levels (when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are higher than
category A values.
D) 19.00-23.00 weekdays, 13.00-23.00 Saturdays and 07.00-23.00 Sundays.

(Source: BS 5228-1:2009, Page119)

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

Calculations have been undertaken using the data and procedures of BS 5228 for the noisiest
construction phases, to derive indicative noise levels at selected NSRs. The highest noise levels tend to
be associated with plant that would be employed during piling, earthmoving, concreting and road
pavement:

• Demolition 93 dB(A) at 10m


• Earth moving 85 dB(A) at 10m
• Concreting 86 dB(A) at 10m
• Piling 85 dB(A) at 10m
• Road pavement 80 dB(A) at 10m

NSR Construction Total Threshold Significance


Phase Noise Level
Level* (dB(A))
(dB(A))

75
Minor 
Earth moving  78 
Adverse 
Road  75
English Churches 73  Negligible 
Housing Group Hostel Pavement 
NSR A approximately 20m from Minor 
Concreting  78  75
eastern site boundary Adverse 
75
Substantial 
Demolition  85 
Adverse 
Auger piling  68  75 Negligible 
Earth moving  73  75 Negligible 
Road  75
3 to 26 Ladybeck Close 70  Negligible 
located approximately 55m Pavement 
NSR B from the eastern site Concreting  73  75 Negligible 
boundary
75
Minor 
Demolition  79 
Adverse 
Auger piling  68  75 Negligible 
Earth moving  71  75 Negligible 
Road  75
69  Negligible 
Possible future residents Pavement 
NSR C of the proposed mixed 75
use Lunar Properties
Concreting  71  Negligible 
scheme on Bridge Street
75
Minor 
Demolition  76 
Adverse 
Auger piling  71  75 Negligible 

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

APPENDIX E4 CADNA MODEL INPUT PARAMETERS


In order to allow an accurate assessment of the potential noise impacts to be determined, acoustic
modelling of the proposed Development was undertaken using the software package CADNA-A.
CADNA-A is a computer programme used for the assessment of noise exposure, the model calculates
industrial noise propagation according to the guidance provided in ISO 9613-2 ‘Acoustics – Attenuation
of sound during propagation outdoors. Part 2 – General Method of Calculation’. The model takes into
account local topography, ground absorption and screening in undertaking the calculations.
Source Noise Data
Indicative plant specifications and source noise data was provided by the schemes traffic engineers and is
presented as Table E3 below.
All noise levels based upon free field subject to directivity.

The following table summarises the ventilation requirements and expected noise levels for each
operating unit. For example:

• In the case of the cooling towers, a total of 18 cooling tower fans are to be installed but it is
expected that only 15 of these will operate at any one time;

• In the case of the condenser pumps, a total of 5 pumps are to be installed but it is expected that
only 4 of these will operate at any one time.

Noise Level and Ventilation Summary


Noise level with Total
Maximum
Noise Level additional Ventilatio
Description number in Notes
attenuation n (free
operation
(extra cost) air)
Ground Floor
CHP Enclosure 1 75db(A) @ 1m 65db(A) @ 1m NA
CHP Exhaust Silencer 1 75db(A) @ 1m 65db(A) @ 1m NA
Each inlet & outlet Louvre
CHP Attenuation grills 2 75db(A) @ 1m 65db(A) @ 1m 8.0m² requires 4.0m² free air (no
attenuation required)
Biomass Boiler ID Fan 1 83db(A) @ 1m 71db(A) @ 1m NA
Biomass Boiler FD Fan 2 73db(A) @ 1m NA
Soot Blower Compressor 1 80db(A) @ 1m NA

N.Gas Boiler Burner 3 81db(A) @ 1m NA


Ground Floor Low Level Ventilation within 1.0m of
18.75m²
Ventilation floor
Ground Floor High Level Ventilation to be located
9.375m²
Ventilation as high as practical.

1ST Floor
See also tolerances on the
6.0MW Chiller Unit 3 See data sheet below NA
data sheet
See also tolerances on the
4.0MW Chiller Unit 1 See data sheet below NA
data sheet
Cooling Pumps 3 72db(A) @ 1m NA
Condenser Pumps 4 84db(A) @ 1m NA
Heating Pumps 3 69db(A) @ 1m NA
1st Floor Low & high Level Ventilation required to
Ventilation dissipate 250kW of heat

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

Noise level with Total


Maximum
Noise Level additional Ventilatio
Description number in Notes
attenuation n (free
operation
(extra cost) air)
Roof Space
See also additional data
Cooling Tower FD Fan 15 65db(A) @ 10m 58db(A) @ 10m
below
Located as low as possible,
Roof Space Low Level
412m³/s distributed along west &
Ventilation
north elevations
All noise levels expressed above are for individual plant items

6.0MW Output Chiller Noise Level


CENTRIFUGAL LIQUID CHILLER SOUND PRESSURE LEVELS-Cooling (Constant ECWT)

The octave and A-Weighted sound pressure levels are the levels expected to be obtained if
measurements are performed in accordance with AHRI Standard 575-94, Method of measuring
machinery sound within equipment rooms.

TOLERANCES: The sound level of identical unit selections can vary due to manufacturing tolerance
and test repeatability. Variations of +-3 DBA on the A-Weighted levels and +-5 DB on the octave
band levels are possible.

Rated in accordance with AHRI STD. 550/590.


Compliant with ASHRAE 90.1 -2004
Compliant with ASHRAE 90.1 -2007
4.0MW Output Chiller Noise Level

CENTRIFUGAL LIQUID CHILLER SOUND PRESSURE LEVELS-Cooling (Constant ECWT)

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

The octave and A-Weighted sound pressure levels are the levels expected to be obtained if
measurements are performed in accordance with AHRI Standard 575-94, Method of measuring
machinery sound within equipment rooms.

TOLERANCES: The sound level of identical unit selections can vary due to manufacturing tolerance
and test repeatability. Variations of +-3 DBA on the A-Weighted levels and +-5 DB on the octave
band levels are possible.

Rated in accordance with AHRI STD. 550/590.Compliant with ASHRAE 90.1 -2004
Cooling Tower (each fan)

Each fan produces 65 dB(A) @ 10m (free field, subject to directivity).


The sound power spectrum per fan and the reduction for a 1D attenuator on the fan inlet is as follows:

Hz 63 125 250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k


dB 97 99 97 96 92 86 80 74
Attenuator -5 -7 -13 -16 -10 -8 -7 -6
free field, subject to directivity.

Appendix E
Low Carbon Energy Centre Noise and Vibration

Building Facade Information


Details of the proposed façade construction are presented within Chapter 5: Description of the
Development and the submitted Design and Access Statement. In brief the façade of the proposed
Development would be constructed in three key designs:
• 75mm block work/75mm cavity/140mm blockwork overlain with an expanded steel mesh
providing approximately 40dB Rw attenuation to noise;
• Precast concrete panels providing approximately 40dB Rw attenuation to noise; and
• Expanded steel mesh for use in areas of low sensitivity.
Ventilation points would be required and would primarily be located on the western and northern
façades of the building. Where required on the more sensitive eastern façade (given the proximity of
residential receptors) ventilation areas would be minimised as far as practicable, located at high level in
preference, and provided with acoustic attenuation measures.

Appendix E
EC7 Environmental Statement

Appendix F Air Quality Supporting Technical


Information

LOW CARBON ENERGY CENTRE


 
 
Leeds Eastgate Energy Centre, Air Quality Assessment    
 

Appendix F.1 – Derivation of Baseline Conditions at Each


Receptor
A10.2.1 Since the impact of the Development on concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 has been shown to be
insignificant, regardless of the baseline conditions, there is no need to consider the baseline
conditions for these pollutants. Similarly, at most of the receptor locations, the Development will
have an insignificant impact on nitrogen dioxide concentrations regardless of the baseline
conditions. At a small number of receptors (Receptors 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12), it is necessary to
consider the total annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations. The total concentration will be
made up of the increment from the Development, a contribution from local road traffic, and the
ambient background, which represents concentrations well away from local emission sources. The
background annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations at each of these key receptors were
taken from the national maps published by Defra (Ref.10.15). They are set out in Table A10.2.1.

Table A10.2.1: Annual Mean Background Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations in 2009 and
2015 at Key Receptors (µg/m3)

Receptor 2009 2015

5 28.3 21.6
6 28.3 21.6
7 28.3 21.6
11 28.5 21.8
12 28.5 21.8

A10.2.2 Waterman, in preparing the Environmental Statement for the Eastgate Quarters development, has
used the ADMS-Roads model to predict ambient concentrations of key pollutants from road traffic.
The method used by Waterman, along with the traffic data assumptions, is described in the
Eastgate Quarters ES (EED10866-100 R6). Since the focus of the current assessment is
emissions from the boiler/CHP plant, full details of the traffic data used are not reproduced here.
For the current assessment, modelling of road traffic emissions has only been undertaken to define
the baseline concentrations to which the proposed boiler/CHP emissions will be added.

A10.2.3 The ADMS-Roads model files used by Waterman for the Eastgate Quarters development were not
tailored specifically to the current assessment, and so some minor edits to road alignments and
widths in key areas of interest were made so as to improve the reliability of the predictions. In
addition, the model outputs have been verified specifically for this current assessment against
measurements made at the A2 Corn Exchange automatic monitor.

A10.2.4 ADMS-Roads was used to predict annual mean concentrations of nitrogen oxides in 2009, and
2015. For the 2015 assessment, the model was run assuming that traffic associated with the

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Eastgate Quarters development (and other committed developments) would be in place. The total
predicted concentrations thus take account of the cumulative impact of the Development and the
traffic related emissions from other proposed developments. Annual mean nitrogen dioxide
concentrations were derived as described in the section below on model verification.

ADMS-Roads Verification

Nitrogen Dioxide

A10.2.5 Most nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is produced in the atmosphere by reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with
ozone. It is therefore most appropriate to verify the model in terms of primary pollutant emissions
of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2). The model has been run to predict the annual mean road-
NOx concentrations during 2009 at the Corn Exchange automatic monitoring site. Concentrations
have been modelled at 3 m, the height of the monitor.

A10.2.6 The model output of road-NOx (i.e. the component of total NOx coming from road traffic) has been
compared with the ‘measured’ road-NOx.

A10.2.7 An adjustment factor was determined as the ratio of the measured road contribution and the model
derived road contribution. This factor was then applied to the modelled road-NOx concentration for
each receptor to provide adjusted modelled road-NOx concentrations. The total nitrogen dioxide
concentrations were then determined by combining the adjusted modelled road-NOx
concentrations with the predicted background NO2 concentration within the recently updated NOx
from NO2 calculator available on the Defra LAQM Support website (Defra, 2010b).

A10.2.8 A secondary adjustment factor was determined as the ratio of the measured total NO2 and the
model derived total NO2. This factor was then applied to the modelled nitrogen dioxide
concentrations for each receptor.

A10.2.9 The data used to calculate the adjustment factor are provided below:

• Background NOx: 48.41 μg/m3

• Background NO2: 28.58 μg/m3

• Measured NO2 : 65 μg/m3

• Measured total-NOx : 204 μg/m3

• Measured road-NOx (total – background): 156 μg/m3

• Modelled road-NOx = 18.07 μg/m3

• Road-NOx adjustment factor: 156/18.07 = 8.6353

• Modelled NO2 (after adjustment): 71.44 μg/m3

• NO2 adjustment factor: 65/71.44 = 0.9099

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Leeds Eastgate Energy Centre, Air Quality Assessment    
 

• Final adjusted modelled NO2: 65 μg/m3

A10.2.10 The factor implies that the model is under-predicting the road-NOx contribution. This is a
common experience with this and most other models.

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Appendix F.2 – Stack Results


Table A10.2.1: Maximum Process Contribution to Annual Mean Nitrogen Dioxide
Concentrations and 99.8th Percentiles of 1-hour Mean Nitrogen Dioxide
Concentrations at Any Relevant Receptor Height a
Receptor Process
Process Process Process
Contribution to
Contribution to Contribution as % Contribution as %
99.8th Percentile of
Annual Mean NO2 of 40 μg/m3 of 200 μg/m3
1-hr Mean NO2
(μg/m3) Objective Objective
(μg/m3)
1 0.3 0.8% 3.6 1.8%
2 0.4 1.0% 3.9 2.0%
3 0.3 0.7% 3.9 2.0%
4 0.2 0.5% 4.5 2.3%
5 0.6 1.5% 2.3 1.2%
6 0.5 1.3% 2.3 1.2%
7 0.4 1.1% 2.1 1.1%
8 <0.1 0.1% 0.8 0.4%
9 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 <0.1%
10 0.3 0.7% 3.1 1.5%
11 0.8 2.0% 3.5 1.8%
12 0.9 2.2% 4.4 2.2%
13 <0.1 0.0% 0.3 0.1%
14 <0.1 0.1% 2.7 1.4%
15 0.1 0.2% 2.6 1.3%
16 0.3 0.8% 4.3 2.1%
17 0.2 0.5% 3.1 1.6%
18 0.3 0.9% 4.0 2.0%
19 <0.1 <0.1% 0.1 0.1%
20 0.4 0.2%
21 0.3 0.1%
22 0.3 0.1%
23 <0.1 <0.1%
24 0.2 0.1%
25 0.2 0.1%
26 2.0 1.0%
27 0.5 0.2%
a
Percentage values shown in bold represent locations where the Environment Agency screening criteria are
exceeded.

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Leeds Eastgate Energy Centre, Air Quality Assessment    
 

Table A10.2.2: Total Predicted Annual Mean Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations in 2015 with a
stack height of 53 m (μg/m3)a,b
2009 Without Scheme (2015) 53m Stack (2015)
R
gf 1f 2f gf 1f 2f gf 1f 2f
5 45.6 44.7 43.1 35.8 35.1 33.7 36.4 35.7 34.3
6 61.4 56.9 50.6 50.6 46.3 40.4 51.1 46.8 40.9
7 58.1 54.1 48.5 47.2 43.5 38.3 47.7 43.9 38.7
11 37.6 36.9 28.5 28.0 29.3 28.8
12 47.1 45.1 36.8 35.0 37.6 35.9
a
Objective exceedences highlighted in bold, locations with no relevant exposure shaded grey
b
gf = ground floor, 1f = 1st floor, 2f = 2nd floor. No relevant exposure at any receptor at third floor or higher.

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Table A10.2.3: Maximum Process Contribution to Annual Mean PM10 and the 90th Percentile
24-hr mean PM10 Concentrations at Any Relevant Receptor Height a
Receptor Process
Process Process Process
Contribution to
Contribution to Contribution as % Contribution as %
90th percentile of
Annual Mean PM10 of 40 μg/m3 of 50 μg/m3
24-hr mean PM10
(μg/m3) Objective Objective
(μg/m3)
1 <0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.3%
2 <0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.4%
3 <0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.4%
4 <0.1 0.1% 0.1 0.2%
5 0.1 0.2% 0.2 0.4%
6 0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.3%
7 <0.1 0.1% 0.1 0.3%
8 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 <0.1%
9 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 <0.1%
10 <0.1 0.1% 0.1 0.3%
11 0.1 0.2% 0.2 0.5%
12 0.1 0.3% 0.3 0.6%
13 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 <0.1%
14 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 0.1%
15 <0.1 <0.1% 0.1 0.1%
16 <0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.4%
17 <0.1 0.1% 0.1 0.3%
18 <0.1 0.1% 0.2 0.4%
19 <0.1 <0.1% <0.1 <0.1%
20 <0.1 <0.1%
21 <0.1 <0.1%
22 <0.1 <0.1%
23 <0.1 <0.1%
24 <0.1 <0.1%
25 <0.1 <0.1%
26 <0.1 <0.1%
27 <0.1 <0.1%
a
Percentage values shown in bold represent locations where the Environment Agency screening criteria
are exceeded.

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Leeds Eastgate Energy Centre, Air Quality Assessment    
 

Table A10.2.4: Maximum Process Contribution to Annual Mean PM2.5 Concentrations at Any
Relevant Receptor Height a
Receptor Process Contribution to Annual Mean Process Contribution as % of 25 μg/m3
PM2.5 (μg/m3) Objective

1 <0.1 0.2%

2 <0.1 0.2%

3 <0.1 0.2%

4 <0.1 0.1%

5 0.1 0.3%

6 0.1 0.2%

7 <0.1 0.2%

8 <0.1 <0.1%

9 <0.1 <0.1%

10 <0.1 0.2%

11 0.1 0.4%

12 0.1 0.5%

13 <0.1 <0.1%

14 <0.1 <0.1%

15 <0.1 0.1%

16 <0.1 0.2%

17 <0.1 0.1%

18 <0.1 0.2%

19 <0.1 <0.1%

20 <0.1 <0.1%

21 <0.1 <0.1%

22 <0.1 <0.1%

23 <0.1 <0.1%

24 <0.1 <0.1%

25 <0.1 <0.1%

26 <0.1 <0.1%

27 <0.1 <0.1%
a
Percentage values shown in bold represent locations where the Environment Agency screening criteria
are exceeded.

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