Anda di halaman 1dari 48

UCAT Preparation Roadmap - Path To The “Holy Grail”

Click ​here​ to download the “UCAT Preparation Roadmap Pinup”

Step 1 - Gather Basic Information

The first thing is just acknowledging that you probably have some questions, I’ve been doing
these workshops for a long time and everyone always has questions about what the UCAT is,
how to prepare, and all these things, and so I’ve seen how much uncertainty there is, and so it’s
very important that before you start preparing, you reduce that uncertainty and you give yourself
a lot of clarity. And we do that by answering these questions and getting some basic
information. This kind of stuff is readily available, you’ll find a lot of it on the official ​UCAT
Website​, and if there’s anything you can’t find there, we’ve summarized all the key stuff on our
blog, just click here for the ​UCAT Secrets Blog​ and that should answer all this stuff. What you’ll
find is that once you know this stuff, if you don’t feel like you already know it today, once you get
it, it’ll really ease your stress about the exam.

Step 2 - Build A Top 1% Mindset

And so now we’re at a stage where we’ve got this basic information, and we can begin thinking
about the principles of the UCAT. But before we do that, there’s a big problem I’ve found. Most
students come and me and say, ‘I don’t think I’m capable of getting the scores I need to get into
Medicine’ or ‘I think I’ll fail’. And look, if you want to get into Medicine, you really have to
overcome this barrier of belief as you won’t be capable of getting into Medicine if you don’t
believe deep down that you can. So before we do anything UCAT related, we must change your
mindsets and instill this belief that you can get into Medicine. You must believe that you can get
a UCAT score in the top few percentiles and that you can get into Medicine, and then you really
do have to start acting like the type of student that gets these results. You can’t just believe
you’re going to do well but you have to actually start acting in a manner that reinforces this
belief.

So think about the students you’ve seen get amazing results and get into Medicine, I want you
to think about the way these students act, what do they do. Find one of the students at your
school who you know will do well and start copying how they approach each day. What time do
they wake up, when do they prepare, how do they prepare, for how long do they prepare, just
look at what they’re doing and copy this things as you want to instill these habits and behaviors
into your life. I want you to starting acting like a student that that scores in the top few
percentiles on the UCAT immediately, because if you think about it, if you did act exactly how
these students acted, you’re probably going to do quite well. And so a big part of your UCAT
success is your mindset and believing that you can achieve success, and then taking the
actions to back up that belief, and if you get this stuff right, the way you approach your UCAT
prep is just going to be far superior to almost everyone else.

Step 3 - Establish Your Baseline

And so now we’ve accumulated the basic information about the UCAT you’ll need and really
cultivated our mindset and so now we start thinking about the UCAT. What we want to find out
first is where are you at right now?

What I want you to do when you get to this point is to do a full UCAT mock exam (or these 100
UCAT practice questions ​here​), mark it, and get a baseline indication of what score you’d get it
you sat the exam right now. And the reason for this is because, like we talked about before,
whatever score you get on this first UCAT exam, just like with a generic IQ test, it will be pretty
similar to what you will get 6 months down the road if you just do practice questions. Because
as we established throughout this webinar, the UCAT is designed to filter out people who do
practice questions and just drill their brain with repetition, and so this is why you want to
establish your baseline, figure out what score you’d get right now, figure out your strengths and
weaknesses and stuff like that, and then figure out how much do you need to improve.

Just knowing where you are right now will be super useful as you can sit down and work out
exactly how much you need to improve in the next few months and this will give you a big
advantage over everyone else who just does practice questions but never really knows for
months whether they’re improving or not. It’s impossible to know how to improve if you don’t
know where you’re at right now.

Step 4 - Get An Instant Win In Each Section

And this is why the next step, getting a QUICK WIN is so important.

What you need to do next is prove to yourself that it is possible to improve on the UCAT. So
now you know what your baseline UCAT score is, lets say 30, you want to prove to yourself that
you can improve your score by using medical principles, very quickly. You want to get a quick
win.
So I want you to go out and find some of these medical principles, you can search up ‘Good
Medical Practice Guide UK’ and test these on Situational Judgement questions and what you’ll
find is that after using some of these principles to answer questions from this section, if you do it
right, your score will instantly shoot up to a 50, or even more. And what this will do is prove to
yourself that the UCAT can be hacked. You really shouldn’t wait until the actual exam date to
prove to yourself if the exam can be hacked or not. You need to know asap which is why you
want to test out the validity of your study method after your baseline. And I want you to do this
because when you see yourself improving, it’s really going to give you the drive to continue you
with your study and do deep into each section, and this is really where you see the dramatic
improvements.
And just compare this to the previous path. We haven’t even started practicing yet and we’ve
already improved our UCAT score by 20%, 30% or maybe even 40% overnight and this is going
to give us a lot of confidence going forward.

Step 5 - Deep Dive Into Each Section

And this is where the magic happens now as once we’ve got that quick win, we do a deep dive
into each section. What we do here is really understand the principles that each section is
assessing us for, we want to know every single one we’re being assessed on so we can take
them with us and use them to easily answer these UCAT questions.

Like Situational Judgement is really assessing how we react to critical situations and we’d have
to uncover the principles for how they want doctors to act, there’s issues of communication,
issues of confidentiality, there’s all these principles and we want to uncover what they are, so
that we can use them to answer these questions.

For Abstract Reasoning, you’ll want to figure out the subconscious triggers, the little thoughts
before an answer pops into our head on each question because for this section everyone
focused on finding patterns but the problem everyone faces is what to do when they can’t see
the pattern, and so if we can work out what we think about before we see the pattern, it’ll really
help us get to the right answers. And what you’ll find is that once you know what the principles
are for each section, you’ll find that it’s very easy to answer each type of question in it. You’re
really deconstructing the exam, but you’re deconstructing it based on principles, and you’re
really looking to uncover what the UCAT Consortium is looking for in each section. All this
information is out there, you’ll have to spend time reading research papers, publications and
studies but you’ll be able to find it all out there.

The UCAT Consortium’s website is a great place to start for these types of research papers.
Click ​here​ to access them. You’ll want to allow a few months for this process as it takes a lot of
time to read through all these research papers, publications and studies (it’s taken me 6-12
months).

Step 6 - Attempt Practice Questions & Mock Exams

And once we’ve done this, and we know all the medical principles and what each question is
testing us for now, and only now do we do practice questions. We’ve spent a lot of today
bashing practice questions but they do have their place, we just can only get started on them
once we’ve learnt all the medical principles we’re being assessed on. Because now when we’re
practicing, we’re doing it in the right way. We’re seeing the principle. Can you imagine doing
that? All you see when you do these questions is the principle and the answer is just popping
out at you now. So answering questions becomes very easy now as you’re doing practice
questions again and again and when you’re doing them, you’re doing them in the right way, so
you’re ingraining the right things.

You can find practice questions from the UCAT Consortium by clicking ​here​.

Step 7 - Isolated Exam Training

And then once we’ve done that, we started honing ourselves for the actual exam ourselves. You
know it’s not enough to just understand how to answer these questions, we need to understand
time restrictions, exam techniques, what questions we should avoid, which ones we should do
and shouldn’t do. There’s a whole strategy around how to approach the exam and this comes
after you’ve done all this other stuff. And what this will do is make sure that when you walk into
the exam you’re confident, you know how it works, you know how to approach it and you’re
excited to get started and implement on all the knowledge you’ve got.

Result - Achieve The “Holy Grail” of UCAT Performance

And so by this stage, you’ve got all the basic information, you established your baseline, got
some small fast wins, you’ve gone deeply into exactly what every single question requires and
then you’ve practiced implementing that, and then now you have strategies about how to
approach the exam, and so you walk into the room with unshakable confidence in your abilities,
no uncertainty and you’re ready to show the examiners everything you’ve learnt.

And so if you follow this approach, you’re on track to reach the Holy Grail of UCAT performance,
and this is where you score a 700 on the UCAT, which is a score in the 95​th​ percentile on the
exam and get into Medicine. This is what I’ve been building you up to for this entire time, if you
follow this system you’re building up to achieve the Holy Grail of UCAT performance, and you’re
probably going to achieve it. These kind of results are what you’re going to get.

100 UCAT Practice Questions

Situational Judgement

Questions 1-5
Jason is a junior doctor who has just finished covering for the work of a colleague in the surgical
department who has gone on holidays. Towards the end of his shift she is told by the surgical
team that a surgery for a patient called Mary , has to be postponed till tomorrow morning.
The change in time for the surgery will not have any effect on Mary’s health and safety, however
Jason knows that Mary has been highly stressed about the surgery for quite some time.
Jason informs Mary that her surgery will not take place today.

How ​appropriate ​are each of the following responses by ​Jason ​in this situation?

1. Explaining to Mary the reason as to why haha er surgery will not take place today?

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

2. Explaining to Mary that she will have to wait until tomorrow morning to ask her
questions due to how busy the surgical department is today.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

3. Asking a final year medical student to explain to Mary, the reasons as to why her
surgery will not take place today, because Jason is too busy.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

4. As Mary is so upset, promising to her that he will make sure her surgery somehow
goes ahead today as scheduled.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

5. Explaining to Mary, that having the surgery delayed till tomorrow will not effect her
health and safety in any way.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

Questions 6-10
Dansel is a medical student, and witnesses one of his peers taking a phone call during a
consultation with a patient. Dansel overhears his peer discussing her friends break-up on the
phone call. Neither the patient nor the peer notices Dansel.

How ​appropriate ​are each of the following responses by ​Dansel ​in this situation?

6. Informing the peer after their consultation of what he noticed, and how it is
inappropriate behavior during interactions with patients.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate but not ideal
C. Inappropriate but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

7. Reporting the peer student’s behavior to a senior doctor.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

8. Informing his peer, that if he is to witness this behaviour again, he will report it to a
senior physician.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

9. Monitor the behavior of his peer carefully for the next few weeks, to see if she displays
further misconduct.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do
10. Apologise to the patient on behalf of your peer, and explain to them that this is not
common practice in the hospital, and your peer is just one of the “bad” medical students
who probably won’t make it as a doctor.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

Questions 11-15
Elizabeth is a 4th year medical student, who is on a pediatric placement. One day, as she
enters the ward, she notices that her supervising doctor doesn’t seem to be himself. He
stumbles on his way into work, and looks especially disheveled, even struggling to get his
patient notes in order. Elizabeth is concerned that the doctor may be intoxicated, and so she
decides to approach the supervising doctor to question him. However, he snaps at her to “mind
her own business, and that he’s fine.”

How ​important ​are each of the following factors to take into account for ​Elizabeth w
​ hen
deciding how to respond to this situation?

11. That Elizabeth has already questioned the supervising doctor about his unusual
behavior and received an unsatisfactory response.

A. Very important
B. Important
C. Of minor importance
D. Not important at all

12. Patients might notice the supervising doctor’s unusual behaviour

A. Very important
B. Important
C. Of minor importance
D. Not important at all

13. The supervising doctor is one of the most reputable doctors in the hospital.

A. Very important
B. Important
C. Of minor importance
D. Not important at all

14. This is Elizabeth’s supervising doctor, and if she takes any action she might be
treated unfairly.

A. Very important
B. Important
C. Of minor importance
D. Not important at all

15. Finding out that the supervising doctor is not involved in any major consultations
today. Rather, he has a few patients with minor conditions coming to see him.

A. Very important
B. Important
C. Of minor importance
D. Not important at all

Questions 16-20
Debra is a medical student who is entering her 5th (and final year). One day she catches up
with an old friend who shows her a harsh rash on her arm, and asks for Debra’s advice. Having
spent a lot of time on dermatology rotations, Debra is very confident that she has seen the rash
before, and knows the cause and treatment for the condition.

How ​appropriate ​are each of the following responses by ​Debra ​to this situation?

16. Ignore her friend, as Debra is not a qualified doctor

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

17. Explain the situation to one of the doctors in the Dermatology ward, and ask for their
opinion on the rash.
A. A very appropriate thing to do
B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

18. Explain to her friend, that she has seen these rashes in the past and that they have
generally been caused by an allergic reaction, however, advises her friend to seek
professional advice.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

19. Explains to her friend, that based on her experience, she believes it to be allergic
reaction, and recommends a special cream.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

20. Refusing to give her opinion and suggesting that her friend should visit a qualified
doctor instead.

A. A very appropriate thing to do


B. Appropriate, but not ideal
C. Inappropriate, but not awful
D. A very inappropriate thing to do

Verbal Reasoning

Questions 21-24
Physical Education (PE) is often viewed as a marginal subject within the curriculum. And many
secondary schools actively reduce PE time to make way for what are deemed more “serious” or
“important” subjects.
Research from the Youth Sport Trust shows that 38% of English secondary schools have cut
timetabled PE for 14- to 16-year-olds. One of the main reasons for this is the increased
pressure to produce exam results. Much of the time pupils would usually spend in PE lessons is
now spent receiving extra tutoring on topics other than PE.

Despite these cuts, however, PE is still championed for its potential to promote health and
encourage lifelong physical activity. This is an important issue given that over 30% of year six
pupils are classed as “overweight” or “obese” according to the latest government figures.
PE is also praised for its contribution to improved psychological health, for helping to nurture
social and moral development – as well as supporting cognitive and academic performance.

The Association for Physical Education maintains that high quality PE fosters the physical,
moral, social, emotional, cultural and intellectual development of pupils. But the many aims for
PE – such as health promotion, skills development as well as a focus on social and moral
issues – has resulted in confusion about the subject and has done little to further the
educational experiences in practice. In fact, it has been argued that PE offers more
entertainment than education.

Source:​ The Conversation

21. PE is being overlooked in favour of more serious subjects.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

22. Which of the following is true?

A. Schools prefer students to be studying Maths than doing sports.


B. Increased pressure to produce exam results has led to schools cutting PE time.
C. PE is a source of fun and entertainment for students and should be cut out.
D. PE is viewed as a vitally important aspect of the curriculum.

23. Incorporating PE into schools helps to reduce obesity.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

24. PE offers more entertainment than education.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

Questions 25-27
According to Westpac research and recent statistics by Visa, Australia is leading the world in
contactless payments, with 325.4 million contactless payments made in 2017 - up from 258.6
million in 2016.

And this 26% rise is only set to increase further in the coming years, as at the moment,
contactless payments are the preferred payment method in over 90% of purchases.

While many Aussies tap their cards wherever possible, takeaway was the most popular use of
contactless payments, with 98% of all purchases made at fast food restaurants being
contactless.

This was followed by food and groceries and discount stores, both sitting at 93% each.
Surprisingly, only 59% of healthcare payments were contactless.

“Our customers seem to prefer contactless for purchases as it’s simple and easy” said Roshni
Naidoo, Head of Payment Strategy at Westpac.

“Higher purchase volumes associated with eating out and shopping support this - they’re
situations where time-poor consumers prefer a way to pay that lets them to get back to what’s
important.”

Source: Mozo.com.au

25. Australia leads the world for contactless payments because of its simplicity and ease.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

26. Which of the following is true?

A. Contactless payments lead to higher purchase volumes and poor savings habits.
B. A very large amount of contactless payments fell were classified as healthcare
payments.
C. Most fast food chains only accept contactless payment.
D. Takeaway is the most common purchase with contactless being used 98% of the time in
fast food restaurants.

27. Contactless payments are Australians preferred method of payment for all purchases.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

Questions 28-30
When major retail chains decided to ban plastic bags across their Australian stores this year, it
caused a major uproar.

The controversial new rules saw the traditional free plastic shopping bags vanish from stores,
something some shoppers struggled to come to terms with, however others embraced the
change, applauding Coles and Woolworths for leading an environmental change.

Since introducing reusable bags three months ago, the country’s two largest supermarkets have
prevented an estimated 1.5 billion bags from entering the environment.

Three months on, the radical change has translated to an 80 per cent drop in the consumption
of plastic bags nationwide, according to the National Retail Association (NRA).

“Indeed, some retailers are reporting reduction rates as high as 90 per cent,” NRA’s David Stout
told AAP.

Mr Stout said the ban was a “brave” move from the major supermarkets and it’s paving the way
for smaller businesses, who typically can’t afford to risk the wrath of their customers, to follow
suit.

“They’re (supermarkets) obviously seen as the product stewards so a lot of people will come
back to them,” Mr Stout said.

Source:​ News.com.au

28. Coles and Woolworths faced major outrage when they banned plastic bags as
consumers were not happy about having to pay for them.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

29. Which of the following is true?

A. The banning of plastic bags has prevented an estimated 1.5 million plastic bags from
entering the environment and harming local wildlife.
B. Small supermarkets have faced an even greater wrath from customers since banning
plastic bags.
C. Many shoppers have struggled to embrace this new change, switching to supermarkets
that still use plastic bags.
D. Many more retailers have planned to ban plastic bags in the coming months.

30. Smaller businesses lack the financial capacity to ban plastic bags as they have a far
smaller clientele base.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

Questions 31-34
Punjab is a state in Northern India sharing a 553-kilometre border with Pakistan. Its name
translates to the “Land of Five rivers” due to the presence of five rivers within the state. The
presence of fertile land in Punjab enables agriculture to be its main industry and thus giving the
state the title “The Food Bowl of India”. However, in the recent years due to the depletion of
groundwater and the increasing mechanisation of farming and subsequent rise in
unemployment, its food production has decreased dramatically. Punjab faces another urgent
issue that has also seen an increase over the last four years– Drug Addiction.

There are many theories as to how the demand for drugs in Punjab has increased – some
blame the unemployment while some blame the Green Revolution which led to the creation of
an overindulged and bored youth. Some also believe that this is a form of narco-terrorism where
anti-government groups are deliberately trying to turn the youth of Punjab into drug addicts.

Whatever the reason, the statistics are shocking - 73.5% of Punjab’s youth are now addicted to
drugs with 67% of households in rural areas having at least one drug addict.

Of all drugs in circulation, heroin gets the most attention in the media. Around 350 packets of
heroin, originating mainly in Afghanistan, pass through the porous border everyday into
Amritsar. This has made Punjab one of the busiest drug transit points in the world. There are
also cottage heroin industries popping up across the country especially in Rajasthan and Uttar
Pradesh. The Indian Government have tried to control the borders and thus the drug trading
with a number of different organisations namely the Border Security Force, the Directorate of
Revenue Intelligence, the Narcotics Control Bureau and the Intelligence Bureau in order to
control the supply. However, more drastic steps need to be taken immediately to control this
epidemic before tackling any of the indolent problems.

31. According to the passage, agriculture is the major industry in Punjab.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

32. The depletion of groundwater and its impact on the agricultural industry is by far the
most urgent issue facing Punjab.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

33. Which of the following is true?

A. Punjab had five rivers however recent droughts have meant that just 4 rivers remain.
B. Punjab’s youth are addicted to drugs with 350 packets of heroin passing through its
borders each day.
C. Magic mushrooms is the drug of choice for Punjab’s youth.
D. Mexican cartels have become to import drugs into the region.

34. Punjab’s youth are becoming addicted to drugs as they see drugs like heroin as an
outlet to express themselves after time spend doing hard labour in agricultural
occupations.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

Questions 35-40
Depression is a common mental health disorder, which affects people in many different ways.
The symptoms can range from persistent feelings of unhappiness and fatigue to losing interest
in all activities and feeling tearful. There are no diagnostic tests available and so doctors will ask
many questions during a comprehensive assessment. This is guided by the ICD-10
(International Classification of Disease) criteria, which lists a set of symptoms that must be
present in order to make the diagnosis of depression. This is the most common assessments
used by doctors in 2019. Just under 90% of UK residents report knowing someone that is
dealing with depression.

Unfortunately, there is a common misconception that depression is not a genuine health


condition. People believe that depression is trivial and a sign of weakness. Subsequently, this
stereotyped view has lead to the stigmatisation of depression. As a result, large numbers of
people with depression feel ashamed and are reluctant to seek treatment. A big public health
challenge is to remove the stigma that surrounds depression so that people can recover with
effective treatment and support. The scale of the problem was emphasised by the data released
in The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. It showed that almost one in six adults in England
suffers from a common mental health disorder such as depression and of those, only 39% were
accessing mental health treatment.

35. Eighty-seven percent of UK residents report knowing someone that is dealing with
depression.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

36. Which of the following is true?

A. Large numbers of people with depression are reluctant to seek help as they fear it’s
seen as a sign of weakness.
B. Society still views depression as being trivial and a sign of weakness.
C. 97% of UK residents with depression seek help.
D. There is many diagnostic tests available to help doctors identify depression in their
patients.

37. A big public health challenge is to reduce the stigma around depression so that more
people are willing to seek help and assistance.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell
38. The most common assessment for depression is the Jerry-Daniels Comprehensive
Assessment.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

39. The treatment for depression is effective.

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

40. The ICD-10 is no longer used by GPs to determine whether patients have depression
as it enforces the stigma that ‘depression is a sign of weakness’

A. True
B. False
C. Can’t Tell

Decision Making

Questions 41-46
41. All hats are black. All t-shirts are white. This piece of clothing is either a hat or a
t-shirt.

A. This piece of clothing is white.


B. This piece of clothing is either black or a t-shirt.
C. If not a hat, this piece of clothing is a black t-shirt.
D. This piece of clothing is either a hat or white.
E. This piece of clothing is neither black or white.

42. A football club has been split into groups of five to learn about size. Each group
needs to establish who is tallest and who is shortest. They know the following:

A. Jeff is shorter than Michael.


B. Jackson is shorter than Charlie.
C. Tim is taller than Charlie but shorter than Jeff.
D. Charlie is shorter than Jeff and Michael.

Who are the tallest and shortest members of the group?

A. Jackson (tallest) and Tim (shortest)


B. Michael (tallest) and Jackson (shortest)
C. Charlie (tallest) and Michael (shortest)
D. Jeff (tallest) and Charlie (shortest)

44. To reduce the number of fatal traffic accidents on Australian roads, should the use of
self-driving cars be encouraged on all roads in Australia?

A. Yes, it will be a persuasive incentive for governments to enhance the quality and safety
of roads.
B. Yes, self-driving cars will be safer than cars driven by humans as they can not become
tired, get distracted or be distracted by mood or emotions.
C. No, self-driving cars should be banned on all roads until the public feels confident in the
safety of these vehicles.
D. No, a pilot on a small section of roads is first necessary to determine the suitability of
such a move, and the consequences it has in all circumstances.

45. Should government owned farmland in windy areas be forced to install at least one
wind turbine on their properties to fulfil the countries environmental commitments?

A. Yes, the government should be doing their bit to help the environment.
B. Yes, installing wind turbines will help to fulfil the countries environmental commitments.
C. No, wind turbines take up space and farmland should be preserved for farming activities
only.
D. No, wind turbines will not be suitable for every government owned piece of farmland and
a greater plan is required to meet the countries environmental commitments.

46. Should public parks be able to charge users a small fee to pay for maintenance of the
parkland?

A. Yes, the government has put severe cuts on public parklands meaning that without this
fee they may need to close, or become messy and untidy.
B. Yes, many parklands are underfunded and it is fair to charge users a small fee to
operate maintenance of the parkland.
C. No, most people do not go to parks very often and so it won’t affect them if the park is
closed.
D. No, most parklands do not need maintenance and can be left to look after themselves.
Residents should be happy with whatever parkland they’re given access to.
Questions 47-52
The following is a graph representing the reaction between starch and enzymes that cause its
breakdown to maltose. The enzyme works straightaway.

47. The enzyme was added at 10 minutes.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

48. As the concentration of maltose decreased, the concentration of starch increased.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

49. Half of the starch concentration was used 20 minutes after the start of the reaction.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

50. The enzyme took 40 minutes to breakdown 5 g/l of starch


A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

51. Eventually, 5g of maltose was produced

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

52. The enzyme was successful in satisfying the purpose of this experiment

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

Question 53

53. What combination completes the final equation in place of the question marks?

A. 2 Squares, Triangle
B. 2 Triangles, Square
C. Triangle, Triangle
D. Square, Pentagon
Question 54-58
There are 3 friends: John, Michael and Roger. John gets good grades 90% of the time. Michael
gets good grades 70% of the time. Roger gets excellent grades or very poor grades.

54. Teachers may get annoyed at Roger for his fluctuating grades.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

55. John will always get the best grades

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

56. Roger is the most naturally gifted but being lazy leads to his marks fluctuating a lot

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

57. John or Michael will always beat Roger

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

58. There is an award for the top student in the cohort. Roger may win it.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

Question 59-60
Jimmy has a box full of bubbly and non-bubbly drinks. Some of the bubbly drinks are cold, but
all the rest of the drinks are warm.
59. All of the non-bubbly drinks are warm.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

60. When Jimmy gives a drink to his friends, they may be shocked to find that it’s bubbly.

A. Yes
B. No
C. Can’t Tell

Abstract Reasoning

Question 61-65

61.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither
62.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

63.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

64.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

65.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither
Question 66-70

66.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

67.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

68.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

69.
A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

70.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

Question 71-75

71.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither
72.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

73.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

74.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

75.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither
Question 76-80

76.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

77.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither
78.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

79.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

80.

A. Set A
B. Set B
C. Neither

Quantitative Reasoning

Question 81-84
Shanaka and Charlie are planning a 3 day trip to Barcelona. They arrive on Friday and will leave
on Sunday. They need to pay for accommodation, flights and transfers. City Break Central and
Thomas’s offer individual prices for each of these whilst All in One offers a package deal (as
shown in Table 1). Shanaka and Charlie also need to exchange currency. Three shops offer
different exchange rates, as shown in Table 2.

81. How much will it cost for the trip to Barcelona if Shanaka and Charlie book through
City Break Central, flying from London (excluding travel money)? 
 
A. £251 
B. £358 
C. £651 
D. £673 
E. £883 
 
82. What is the percentage difference in price between travelling from Birmingham with
City Break Central compared to Thomas’s?

A. 1.2%
B. 1.7%
C. 1.9%
D. 2.2%
E. 2.5%

83. How much cheaper is it to book the trip via Thomas’s from London instead of through
All in One?

A. £84 
B. £121 
C. £230 
D. £500 
E. £665 

84. Shanaka and Charlie want to convert £250 to Euros. How many more Euros do they
get if they go to Shop B rather than Shop C?
A. £5.40 
B. £6.00 
C. £7.50 
D. £10.00 
E. £17.50 
 

Question 85-88 
The Sun is 149.6 million kilometres from the Earth. The diameter of the Sun is 1391400
kilometres and the Earth is 12742 kilometres.

1 mile = 1609 metres


Volume of sphere = 4/3 πr^3
Speed = distance/time

85. If the speed of light is 186282 miles per second, how long does it take for light to
reach Earth?

A. 2.32 Seconds
B. 4 Mins 10 Seconds
C. 8 Mins 19 Seconds
D. 8 Mins 32 Seconds
E. 10 Mins 34 Seconds
 
86. Assuming the Sun and Earth are spherical, how many times larger is the volume of
the Sun compared to the Earth? 
 
A. 7.68 x 10​-7 
B. 7.68 x 10​-6 
C. 0.52 x 10​3 
D. 1.30 x 10​5 
E. 1.30 x 10​6 

87. If the orbit of the Earth around the Sun is circular and one complete orbit
occurs in 1 year, what is the orbital speed in miles per hour?

A. 6.67
B. 66.69
C. 666.89
D. 66689
E. 6668900

88. The distance of the Moon from the Earth is 384,400 kilometres. If the speed of the
orbit of the Moon around the Earth is 2288 miles per hour and the orbit is assumed to be
circular, how long does it take for the Moon to complete one orbit? 
 
A. 26 Days 2 Hours
B. 26 Days 4 Hours
C. 27 Days 3 Hours
D. 27 Days 8 Hours
E. 27 Days 10 Hours

Question 89-92

Mary is decorating her home. As part of this she wishes to replace the flooring in certain rooms.
Figure 1 shows the floor plan for her house, where the overall dimensions of both floors are the
same. Three shops offer different prices for laminate, carpet or lino flooring as shown in Table 1.
All of them offer a standard fitting charge (which is charged per m2), which Mary decides to pay
for.
89. How much does it cost in total, to the nearest pound, to fit carpet in the living room
and lino in the kitchen if Shop C is chosen?

A. £475
B. £513
C. £691
D. £772
E. £775

90. What is the minimum amount Mary can pay, to the nearest pound, to fit carpet in
bedroom 1 and bedroom 2 and fit lino in the bathroom?

A. £815
B. £1073
C. £1077
D. £1084
E. £1112

91. What is the percentage difference in price in fitting carpet in the living room and
laminate in the dining room, between Shop B and Shop A?

A. 2.01%
B. 2.42%
C. 2.74%
D. 2.84%
E. 3.01%

92. What is the difference in price, to the nearest pound, between Shop C and Shop A
when fitting laminate in the kitchen and fitting carpet in bedroom 3?

A. £9
B. £10
C. £11
D. £12
E. £13
Question 93-97

In Sri Lanka, Shanaka’s family were predominantly fisherman, selling the fish they’ve caught at
wholesalers and markets (at the prices shown in Table 1). The average mass of each type of
fish and the price charged to customers at a local restaurant called ‘Jayakody Delights’ are also
shown in Table 1.

93. If the daily amount of cod, hake, pollock and plaice caught are 70kg, 65kg, 84kg and
73kg and the fishing quotas dictate that 4%, 3%, 7% and 1.5% must be returned to the sea
(respectively), how much fish in total is available to be sold at the wholesalers?

A. 12kg
B. 120kg
C. 240kg
D. 280kg
E. 390kg

94. The wholesalers sell a total of 1650 kg of fish per week. The sell cod, hake, pollock
and plaice in the ratio of 4:3:2:2 respectively. How much money do the wholesalers make
in total per week?

A. £25376
B. £32768
C. £41231
D. £55080
E. £126720

95. A local restaurant sells on average 50 servings of cod, 47 servings of hake, 61


servings of pollock and 77 servings of plaice per week. How much do they spend at the
wholesalers per week?
A. £901
B. £942
C. £1042
D. £1241
E. £1347

96. What is the total profit that the restaurant makes when they sell 1 serving of each
fish?

A. £8.84
B. £19.15
C. £21.75
D. £53.04
E. £63.04

97. One customer at Jayakody’s Delights ordered one serving of each type of fish. What
is the average mass of the fish they purchased?

A. 221.5kg
B. 231.25kg
C. 230.5kg
D. 298.5kg
Question 98-100

Matt and Jean are hosting a charity gala dinner for 25 people and they charge £75 per ticket.
The cost of ingredients for each course is shown in Table 1.

98. How much does it cost to purchase the ingredients for the main course, to the
nearest pound? 
 
A. £21
B. £75
C. £142
D. £207
E. £264

99. What percentage of the desert cost do apples account for?

A. 47.7%
B. 49.3%
C. 50.1%
D. 53%
E. 54.6%

100. What is the difference in price between the beef and salmon? 

A. £13.55
B. £17.00
C. £33.75
D. £151.40
E. £186.25
 

Answers
Question 1 Answer:

Principle: Communication. Jason is keeping an open and transparent line of communication with
his patient. This is favourable.

Consequence: As a result of good communication. It is likely that the patient’s concerns and
stress levels will reduce, leading to greater rapport and trust with Jason and the medical system.

Therefore answer is A: A very appropriate thing to do.

Question 2 Answer:

Principle: Communication. Jason is compromising communication by not facilitating an open


channel b/w patient & doctor.

Consequence: This poor communication is likely to lead to lingering resentment from the patient
towards Jason, the surgery and the medical practice as a whole.

Therefore answer is D: A very inappropriate thing to do.

Question 3 Answer:

Principle: Communication. You should not ask others to communicate your message (especially
to a patient). Furthermore, a medical student should not be conveying this information to a
patient directly.

Consequence: This poor communication is likely to lead to lingering resentment from the patient
towards Jason, the medical student, the surgery and the medical practice as a whole.
Therefore answer is D: A very inappropriate thing to do.

Question 4 Answer:

Principle: Honesty. Jason is being dishonest and misleading the patient here.

Consequence: This lack of honesty is likely to lead to lingering resentment/ issues of trust from
the patient towards Jason, the surgery and the medical practice as a whole.

Therefore answer is D: A very inappropriate thing to do.

Question 5 Answer:

Principle: Communication & Professionalism. Jason shows transparency and professional


honesty.

Consequence: This will reduce Mary’s levels of stress & anxiety leading to her mental state until
the surgery being drastically improved.

Therefore answer is A: A very appropriate thing to do.

Question 6 Answer:

Principle: Teamwork & Conflict Resolution

Consequence: Daniel has effectively communicated the inappropriateness of his peer’s


behavior, by waiting until after the consultation (thus maintaining professionalism). It is important
for this information to be communicated to the peer as soon as possible, however it is also
important to have the conversation without the presence of the patient.

Therefore answer is A: A very appropriate thing to do.

Question 7 Answer:

Principle: Teamwork & Collaboration. Situations like these should be resolved internally in order
to maintain good working relationships.

Consequence: Whilst the consequences aren't disastrous, this action is likely to compromise the
relationship Dansel has with his peer.

Therefore answer is C. Inappropriate, but not awful.


Question 8 Answer:

Principle: Professionalism. It is important that this breach of conduct is communicated in a clear


transparent manner.

Consequence: This ensures the peer is aware of their poor actions, and also allows them to
remedy their behavior before a senior is involved. Wherever possible it is correct to resolve
problems internally before taking it to a higher/superior doctor.

Therefore answer is A: A very appropriate thing to do.

Question 9 Answer:

Principle: Professionalism. Whilst this action in itself is ok, it’s important for Dansel to take much
more immediate action within the domain of professionalism.

Consequence: Having a passive approach like this could lead to poor patient satisfaction in the
interim, or even the peer not being aware of their mistake until later. The consequences are not
devastating, however this is still inappropriate.

Therefore answer is C: Inappropriate, but not awful.

Question 10 Answer:

Principle: Ethics & Respect. This is inappropriate. It is not your position to criticise your
colleagues in front of patients. Additionally, we do not know if this is even true.

Consequence: Poor public view of the medical student, and consequently a potential poor
outlook of the medical profession. Consequences involving public perception of medicine, is
generally a very severe consequence.

Therefore answer is D: A very inappropriate thing to do.

Question 11 Answer:

Principle: Communication & Boundaries. This is an important consideration as it shows that


Elizabeth has made the effort to clarify the situation internally with the practising doctor
(unsuccessfully).

Consequence: This becomes an important concern, because Elizabeth has additional


information, and it makes it more likely that this doctor is intoxicated. It is significant enough to
have some weight in her decision moving forward, however is not vital enough to justify “Very
Important” as our answer.
Therefore answer is B: Important.

Question 12 Answer:

Principle: Public Confidence. This is important. Public perception of doctors and consequently
the profession of medicine is highly important, and it’s vital that Doctors (and other medical
professionals) maintain professional conduct for this reason.

Consequence: Patients will lose confidence in the field of medicine, leading to a lower likelihood
of seeking medical care in the future. This is Very Important.

Therefore answer is A. Very important.

Question 13 Answer:

Principle: Professionalism.

Consequence: It does not matter what this doctors reputation is, given the severity of the
situation. This would have no effect on Elizabeth's decisions moving forwards.

Therefore answer is D. Not important at all.

Question 14 Answer:

Principle: Integrity

Consequence: It is important to put patients and the field of medicine above personal desires in
situations as severe as this. A doctor being potentially intoxicated is far too severe for this to be
a justifiable factor.

Therefore answer is D. Not important at all.

Question 15 Answer:

Principle: Professionalism & Patient Health & Safety.

Consequence: Whilst the doctor may not be involved in any major consultations, he is still
practising. Minor conditions, may be treated inappropriately, and moreover he will still be
interacting with both patients and colleagues.

Therefore answer is D: Not important at all.


Question 16 Answer:

Principle: Boundaries & Communication. Whilst Debra should not be providing medical advice
as a medical student, it is not appropriate to ignore her friend in this manner.

Consequence: It may lead to her friend thinking poorly of Debra as a medical student, and also
not realising she may need to seek professional medical advice.

Therefore answer is C. Inappropriate, but not awful

Question 17 Answer:

Principle: Ethics. It is inappropriate for Debra to discuss confidential information like this, even
with a doctor. Additionally, this is not the right channel of communication for her friend to receive
advice or an opinion.

Consequence: As we do not know if Debra will be directly communicating with her friend
afterwards, we cannot pick option D, however it is inappropriate to engage in this behaviour,
and it can lead to potentially severe consequences with patient health but also patient
confidentiality.

Therefore answer is C. Inappropriate, but not awful.

Question 18 Answer:

Principle: Boundaries. Debra is correct to advise her friend to seek professional advice, however
she should not be providing any opinion on the matter, as she is unqualified to do so.

Consequence: The patient has been given the right advice, and so is more likely to seek
medical advice, however Debra’s opinion may be taken as fact by the patient which is not ideal.

Therefore answer is B. Appropriate, but not ideal.

Question 19 Answer:

Principle: Boundaries. Debra has no right to make any medical diagnosis, let alone
recommendation.

Consequence: Unqualified medical students should not give medical advice or


recommendations under any circumstance except emergencies. This could lead to disastrous
consequences if her diagnosis is incorrect in the form of health & safety but also public
confidence.
Therefore answer is D. A very inappropriate thing to do.

Question 20 Answer:

Principle: Boundaries. This is appropriate. Debra has remained within the domain of her
responsibilities here.

Consequence: Her friend is likely to seek medical advice without being incorrectly bias via an
unqualified opinion.

Therefore answer is A. A very appropriate thing to do.

Question 21 Answer:

Question 22 Answer:

Question 23 Answer:

Question 24 Answer:

Question 25 Answer:

Question 26 Answer:

Question 27 Answer:

Question 28 Answer:

C
Question 29 Answer:

Question 30 Answer:

Question 31 Answer:

Question 32 Answer:

Question 33 Answer:

Question 34 Answer:

Question 35 Answer:

Question 36 Answer:

Question 37 Answer:

Question 38 Answer:

Question 39 Answer:
A

Question 40 Answer:

Question 41 Answer:

Question 42 Answer:

Question 44 Answer:

Question 45 Answer:

Question 46 Answer:

Question 47 Answer:

Question 48 Answer:

Question 49 Answer:

Question 50 Answer:

Question 51 Answer:
A

Question 52 Answer:

Question 53 Answer:

Question 54 Answer:

Question 55 Answer:

Question 56 Answer:

Question 57 Answer:

Question 58 Answer:

Question 59 Answer:

Question 60 Answer:

Question 61 Answer:

B
Question 62 Answer:

Question 63 Answer:

Question 64 Answer:

Question 65 Answer:

Question 66 Answer:

Question 67 Answer:

Question 68 Answer:

Question 69 Answer:

Question 70 Answer:

Question 71 Answer:

Question 72 Answer:

A
Question 73 Answer:

Question 74 Answer:

Question 75 Answer:

Question 76 Answer:

Question 77 Answer:

Question 78 Answer:

Question 79 Answer:

Question 80 Answer:

Question 81 Answer:

Question 82 Answer:

Question 83 Answer:
A

Question 84 Answer:

Question 85 Answer:

Question 86 Answer:

Question 87 Answer:

Question 88 Answer:

Question 89 Answer:

Question 90 Answer:

Question 91 Answer:

Question 92 Answer:

Question 93 Answer:

Question 94 Answer:
B

Question 95 Answer:

Question 96 Answer:

Question 97 Answer:

Question 98 Answer:

Question 99 Answer:

Question 100 Answer: