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KORONADAL NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOL

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

DETAILED LESSON PLAN IN ENGLISH (GRADE 10)

Subject Level: English 10 Date: March 5, 2019


Quarter: 4th Quarter No. of Meeting: 1 Meeting (2 hours)
Designer/Teacher: Charm A. Posadas Class Section: Silang (Rm. 50)
Time: 9:45-11:45

I. Administrative Routine
Prayer
Greetings
Checking of attendance and uniform

II. Objectives

a. General
At the end of the lesson, students are expected to know the Four Literary Devices
(Analogy, Caesura, Paradox and Synecdoche).

b. Specific
At the end of two hours class session, 85% of the students are expected to do the
following tasks with 85% accuracy.
Define paradox, synecdoche, caesura and analogy.
Differentiate the four literary devices.
Identify whether the sentence, statement or phrase is paradox, synecdoche, caesura or
analogy.
Explain each Literary Devices under study in 2-5 sentences.

III. Subject Matter

Literary Devices (Analogy, Caesura, Paradox and Synecdoche)

IV. Materials
 Colored chalk and Chalk board
 Laptop and Monitor- with lesson encoded
 Cartolina- for the objectives and classroom rules
 Colored Chalk and flash cards- for the group activity

V. Procedure(4 A’s Method)


Teacher’s Activity Students Activity

Daily Routine

 Prayer

Say: I’m requesting everyone to please stand.


Let us pray.
(The teacher will lead the prayer)

 Greetings

Say: Good morning class! Good morning Ma’am!

Say: How are you today? We’re good Ma’am!

Say: That’s great!

Say: Anyway, I would like to introduce myself


to you first. I am Charm A. Posadas, a pre-
service teacher from King’s College of Marbel,
Inc. and I will be your teacher for two days.

Say: I hope that in this short period of time of


being with you as your practice teacher, we
will be able to build a good relationship with
each other.

 Checking of Attendance

(The teacher will check students’ attendance)

 Classroom Rules

Say: Class, I have made a classroom rules for


you to follow and I am expecting all of you to
comply with these rules willingly and
responsibly. Can I count on you with that? Yes Ma’am!

Say: Thank you!

*Rules are written in cartolina and will be


posted on the board*

Say: I’m requesting those who have taken


their bath to please read our classroom rules.
Classroom Rules Classroom Rules
1. Always listen when the teacher 1. Always listen when the teacher
is talking. is talking.
2. Raise your right hand if you 2. Raise your right hand if you
want to speak. want to speak.
3. Wait for your turn to speak; do 3. Wait for your turn to speak; do
not answer in chorus. not answer in chorus.
4. Do not disturb your classmate 4. Do not disturb your classmate
or seatmate when the discussion or seatmate when the discussion
or activity is going on. or activity is going on.
5. Show courtesy and respect to 5. Show courtesy and respect to
one another. one another.

Say: Thank you. Do you have any questions or


clarifications regarding our classroom rules? None Ma’am.

A. Activity (Complete Me)

Say: Before we proceed to our lesson, let’s


have first an activity.

(The teacher will post a manila paper on the


board. The manila paper contains unfinished
words that needs to be completed)

Directions:
 Look at the manila paper posted on the
board.
 You are going to complete each
unfinished word by means of writing
the missing letters on the blanks.
 I am going to give you clue through
giving you the definition of the word
you have to complete.
 This activity is open to all students but
you must go in front one by one. One
at a time.
 You will be given 10 minutes to
complete all the unfinished words.

Say: Are my instructions clear? Yes Ma’am!


1. Techniques that 1. Techniques that
L _ _ _ R _ _Y writers use to create a writers use to create a
special and pointed LITERARY special and pointed
_EV__E_ effect in their writing, DEVICES effect in their writing, to
to convey information, convey information,
and/or to help reader and/or to help reader
understand the piece understand the piece on
on a deeper level. a deeper level.
2. A comparison of 2. A comparison of two
two things to show things to show their
their similarities. similarities. Sometimes
A_____Y Sometimes the things ANALOGY the things being
being compared are compared are quite
quite similar, but other similar, but other times
times they could be they could be very
very different. different.
3. Refers to a break 3. Refers to a break or
or pause in the middle pause in the middle of a
_A__UR_ of a line of verse. It’s CAESURA line of verse. It’s simply
simply part of the way part of the way the
the reader or singer reader or singer
pronounces the line. pronounces the line.
4. A statement or 4. A statement or group
group of sentences of sentences that seems
that seems to to contradict the truth but
PA_ _ _ O _ contradict the truth is an implied truth. They
but is an implied truth. PARADOX describe an action or
They describe an situation that seems
action or situation that absurd but yet can be
seems absurd but yet true.
can be true. 5. Can use a part to
5. Can use a part to represent a whole; it can
SYNECDOCHE
represent a whole; it also use the whole to
_Y___D_C__
can also use the represent a part.
whole to represent a
part.

B. Analysis

Say: Good job class! What do you think is our Ma’am, our topic for today is about literary
topic for today based on our activity? devices.

Say: That’s right!

Say: Our lesson for today class is about


literary devices. Specifically, analogy, caesura,
paradox and synecdoche. But before we
proceed to our discussion, let’s read first our
lesson objectives.

At the end of two hours class session,


85% of the students are expected to do the
following tasks with 85% accuracy.
Define paradox, synecdoche, caesura
and analogy.
Differentiate the four literary devices.
Identify whether the sentence,
statement or phrase is paradox,
synecdoche, caesura or analogy.
Explain each Literary Devices under
study in 2-5 sentences.

Say: I am requesting those who are wearing


their I.D’s to kindly read the objectives posted
on the board. At the end of two hours class session, 85% of
the students are expected to do the following
tasks with 85% accuracy.
Define paradox, synecdoche, caesura
and analogy.
Differentiate the four literary devices.
Identify whether the sentence,
statement or phrase is paradox,
synecdoche, caesura or analogy.
Explain each Literary Devices under
study in 2-5 sentences.

Say: Thank you!

C. Abstraction

(Discussion)

Literary Devices–are techniques that writers


use to create a special and pointed effect in
their writing, to convey information, and/or to
help reader understand the piece on a deeper
level.
Figure of Speech– is a word or phrase using
figurative language- language that has other
meaning than its normal definition. In other
words, figures of speech rely on implied or
suggested meaning, rather than a dictionary
definition.
Four Literary Devices

I. Analogy(ǝ-’na-lǝ-jē)
- The term analogy derived from the Greek
word “analogos” which means
“proportionate.”
- An analogy is a comparison of two things
to show their similarities. Sometimes the
things being compared are quite similar,
but other times they could be very
different.
- An analogy is comparable to metaphor
and simile in that it shows how two
different things are similar, but it’s a bit
more complex. Therefore, analogy is
more extensive and elaborate than either
a simile or a metaphor.

Function of Analogy

- Writers use analogy to link an unfamiliar


or a new idea with common and familiar
objects. This makes it is easier for
readers to comprehend a new idea,
which may have been difficult for them to
understand otherwise. In addition, by
employing this literary tool, writers catch
the attention of their readers. Analogies
help increase readers’ interest as
analogies help them relate what they
read to their life.

Examples:
1) Life is like a race. The one who keeps
running wins the race, and the one who
stops to catch a breath loses.
2) Just as a sword is the weapon of a
warrior, a pen is the weapon of a writer.
3) Just as a caterpillar comes out of its
cocoon, so we must come out of our
comfort zone.
4) They crowded very close about him,
with their hands always on him in a
careful, caressing grip, as though all the
while feeling him to make sure he was
there. It was like men handling a fish
which is still alive and may jump back
into the water.
5) The people are taking a prisoner to the
gallows to be hanged. They are holding
him firmly, as if he were a fish which
might slip away and escape.

II. Caesura(see-ZOO-ra)
- the term caesura derives from the Latin
verb “caedare”, which means to “cut
off.”It is a complete pause marked by a
comma, space, dash, ellipsis or any
other punctuation mark.
- Caesura refers to a break or pause in
the middle of a line of verse. It’s simply
part of the way the reader or singer
pronounces the line. It can be marked
as || in the middle of the line, although
generally it is not marked at all. At times,
it occurs with punctuation; at other times
it does not. In this article, we’ll include
the || mark for the sake of clarity.
Types of Caesura
1) Initial Caesura- a caesura that occurs at
the beginning of line of poetry.
2) Medial Caesura- a caesura that occurs at
the middle of the line of poetry.
3) Terminal Caesura- a caesura that occurs at
the end of the line of poetry.
Function of Caesura

- A caesural break creates various effects,


depending upon the way it is used.
Sometimes it breaks the monotonous
rhythm of a line and forces readers to
focus on the meaning of the phrase
preceding the caesura. In some other
cases, it might create a dramatic or
ominous effect. Normally, it happens in
the middle of a sentence, or phrase in
poetry. It also adds an emotional and
theatrical touch to a line, and helps
convey depth of the sentiments.
Examples:
1) I hear lake water lapping || with low
sounds by the shore.
2) Lord forgives him, || he got them dark
forces in him.
3) We gather, || we shout,Then we gossip
together on festivities.
4) It is for you we speak, || not for
ourselves:
You are abused || and by some putter-on
That will be damn’dfor’t; || would I knew the
villain,
I would land-damn him. || Be she honour-
flaw’d,
I have three daughters; || the eldest is eleven
5) I’m nobody! || Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there’s a pair of us || – don’t tell!
They’d banish || – you know!

III. Paradox (PAR-a-dox)

- The word paradox comes from the Greek


"paradoxos," meaning contrary to
expectation, or strange.
- A paradox is a statement or group of
sentences that seems to contradict the
truth but is an implied truth. They describe
an action or situation that seems absurd
but yet can be true.
- A paradox can be thought provoking but
also fun to think about.
Function of Paradox

- Paradox in most poems normally strives


to create feelings of intrigue and interest
in readers’ minds, to make them think
deeper and harder to enjoy the real
message of the poem.
Examples:
1) I know one thing; that I know nothing.
2) This is the beginning of the end.
3) The second sentence is false. The first
sentence is true.
4) Nobody goes to Murphy’s Bar anymore
— it’s too crowded.
IV. Synecdoche (si-nek-duh-kee)

- Synecdoche is a Greek word which


means receiving together.
- Synecdoche can use a part to represent
a whole; it can also use the whole to
represent a part.
Let us look at some of the examples of
synecdoche that we often hear in casual
conversations:
 The word “bread” refers to food or
money, as in “Writing is my bread and
butter,” or “He is the sole breadwinner.”
 The phrase “gray beard” refers to an old
man.
 The word “sails” refers to a whole ship.
 The word “suit” refers to a businessman.
 He drives the most expensive “wheels”
in the city. Wheels refers to “a car”
 Referring to a helper as a "hand."
 Referring to the alphabet as the "ABCs."
 Get out of my face! This means “get
away from me”

Function of Synecdoche

- Like any other literary device,


synecdoche when used appropriately
adds a distinct color to words, making
them appear vivid.
Examples:
1) The Department of Education
announced new plans for the education
reform.
2) Lend me your ears.
3) Philippines beat Japan in the Olympic
Games.
4) He has many mouths to feed.
5) I have 10 minds working on the solution.

Say: Do you have any question regarding our


lesson for today class?
None Ma’am.
Say: If that’s so, then who can define the term
“literary device?” *Student’s Answer*

Say: Who can give me an example of


paradox? *Students’ Answers*
Say: Thank you! How about analogy? Caesura
*Students’ Answers*
and Synecdoche?

Say: Very good class!

D. Application

Say: This time, we will have a group activity.


Are you ready?
Yes Ma’am!

Directions:
 The class will be divided into 8 groups.
 Each group will be given a chalk, a
black strip and an eraser.

Say: Please count-off from 1-8.


Say: I am requesting everyone to go to your
respective group and form a small circle. This
is a group activity; therefore you are expected
to work as a team. I am going to flash each
line, phrase, statement or sentence in the
monitor and what you are going to do is to
identify whether it is analogy, caesura, paradox
or synecdoche. You should take turn in writing
the correct answer on the flashcard I have
given you. You are given 10 seconds to
answer each item. Is that clear? Yes Ma’am!

1. I survived, but it’s not a happy ending. 1. Paradox


2. Was it a vision, or a waking dream? 2. Caesura
3. People care about animals, but embrace 3. Paradox
diets that involve harming them.
4. A boy has been admitted to the hospital.
The nurse says, “He’s in good hands.” 4. Synecdoche
5. I was a coward. I went to war. 5. Paradox
6. Raising children requires the same 6. Analogy
dedication you would give to a garden. Nurture
them, feed them, introduce them to both light
and dark, and have patience; and soon you
will see them grow into blooming wonders.
7. The microphone explodes.// shattering the
mold. 7. Caesura
8. Hand is to glove as foot is to sock. 8. Analogy
9. Adrian asks for Joy’s hand. 9. Synecdoche
10. Cold is to hot as wet is to dry. 10. Analogy
11. What gunpowder did for the war the 11. Analogy
printing press has done for the mind.
12. To be, || or not to be — || that is the 12. Caesura
question...

VI. Evaluation
General Objective: To show knowledge about literary devices.
A. Specific Objective: To explain the terms; analogy, caesura, paradox and
synecdoche.
Directions: Explain the following terms in 2-5 sentences. (5 pts. each)
1-5. Analogy
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
6-10. Caesura
11-15. Paradox
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
16-20. Synecdoche
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________

B. Specific Objective: To explain some examples of paradox.


Directions: Choose 3 examples of paradox from the list given below and explain each. (2 pts.
each)
1. War is peace.
2. Freedom is slavery
3. I only message those who do not message.
4. Mozambique is a rich country of poor.
5. Please ignore the notice.
6. They must go to war to make peace.
7. I close my eyes so I can see
8. A poor man of great wealth
9. Ignorance is strength

VII. Assignment
 For the teacher: Check student’s works
 For the Students: Have an advance study about “Drawing Conclusion”

Prepared by:

CHARM A. POSADAS
Practice Teacher
Checked by:

GRACE C. ARELLANO
Cooperating Teacher