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Every organization, from small businesses to large corporations, has a culture.

The culture refers to


the values and attitudes of employees in the business or organization. In a business with an
unhealthy culture, employees act as individuals, performing their duties to meet their own needs,
such as a paycheck or health benefits. A healthy corporate culture values each employee in the
organization regardless of his job duties, which results in employees working as a team to meet the
company’s and their own personal needs. Additionally, a supportive organizational culture is often cited
as a key component of successful quality improvement initiatives in a wide variety of organizations,
including health care.

According to a study, published in yale school of public health, a hospital organization culture can impact
the patient care. Furthermore, it says that the study describes specific strategies–of little or no cost to a
hospital–that can be used to improve the organizational culture of a hospital with team collaboration
being a key factor in a hospital’s success. Whether strategies could or would work depended on “buy in”
from senior management, said Curry. “Most notably, we saw that if hospital administration was open to
communication and suggestions from employees–without any fear of retaliation—the team collaboration
and success improved.”

And that is why we came up of this idea where the organization’s team must dwell on becoming more
cohesive and creating organizational clarity. Moreover, cohesive leadership team must be build and that
clarity must be given emphasis. For instance, how can you save a patient when the team is not working
together which may have something to do with the lack of clarity the members portray. That is why there
should be good cultural changes that must be integrated. Also, hospitals that have this organizational
culture can greatly improve the delivery of health care.

Organizational culture refers to a wide range of social phenomena, including an organization's


customary dress, language, behavior, beliefs, values, symbols of status and authority, myths,
ceremonies and rituals, and modes of deference and subversion; all of which help to define an
organization's character and norms [7-9]. Daft [10] defines culture as "the set of guiding beliefs,
understanding, and ways of thinking that is shared by members of an organization and is taught to
new members." Daft [10] explained that organizational culture serves to critical functions: internal
integration and external adaptation.Regardless of the size, industry, or age of the organization,
organizational culture affects many aspects of organizational performance [12], including financial
performance, customer and employee satisfaction, and innovation [13,14].

Additionally, a supportive organizational culture is often cited as a key component of successful


quality improvement initiatives in a wide variety of organizations, including health care [17-18].

A hospital’s culture is reflected by what is valued, the dominant managerial and leadership styles, the
language and symbols, the procedures and routines, and the definitions of success that make a
hospital unique.

For instance, hospitals that increased communication with emergency medical teams and
pharmacists could provide better care.