Anda di halaman 1dari 41

SELF-STUDY VISITING COMMITTEE REPORT

ACCREDITING COMMISSION FOR SCHOOLS


WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
GUAM STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

FOR

SOUTHERN HIGH SCHOOL


P.O. Box 8719

Agat, Guam 96928

March 10-13, 2019

Visiting Committee Members


Helen H. Sanpei, Chairperson
Principal, McKinley Community School for Adults

Richard Guerrero, Teacher


St. Paul Christian School, Guam

Lance Jyo
Hawaii Department of Education

Anne Kane, Principal (Retired)


Kauai High School, Hawaii

Dr. Stacey B. Roberts, Professor


University of Hawaii

1 GDOE/ACS WASC FOL, 2016 Edition


Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

CONTENTS

Chapter I: Student Community Profile 3

Chapter II: Progress Report 8

Chapter III: Self-Study Process 11

Chapter IV: Quality of the School’s Program 14

Chapter V: Ongoing School Improvement 42

2
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Chapter I: Student/Community Profile


Briefly summarize the most critical information from the student/community profile that impacts
the school.

Southern High School (SHS), one of six public high schools within the Guam Department of
Education is located in the village of Santa Rita on the southwestern side of the Guam. Although
SHS has the smallest student enrollment, they serve the largest geographic area. SHS services
students from the southern-most villages of Agat, Asan, Inarajan, Malojloj, Piti, Santa Rita,
Talofofo, Umatac, Merizo, and Yona. These students are transitioned from Inarajan Middle
School, Oceanview Middle School, and Jose Rios Middle School.

The campus occupies 45 acres and includes offices, five wings of classrooms, three vocational
wings, a library, fine arts auditorium, outdoor amphitheater, gymnasium, football, soccer,
baseball and softball playing fields, outdoor tennis and basketball courts and track and field
facilities.

Since Fall of 2000 this four year high school has utilized a 4X4 block schedule with a trial 3X3
block schedule during the 2011-12 school year. After the trial year, SHS reverted back to the
4X4 schedule to accommodate the Johns Hopkins Program and continues on that schedule to
the present time.

The student population for SY 2018-19 totaled 1,295 with a gradual decline of 7% of the
enrollment in the past years. Students have either transferred to other public schools, off-island
schools, or withdrew voluntarily.

The gender breakdown finds the number of males is consistently higher than females with a
continual overall decrease in enrollment from the 2015-16 to the present school year.

3
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

SHS provides educational services to a diverse population of students to include the largest
population of Pacific Islanders which is further delineated by CHamoru representing the largest
ethnic population with about 75% of the student enrollment. The CHamoru population includes
the students originating from Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas
(CNMI)The remaining student population includes: other Pacific Islander (17%), Asian (7%),
and other (1%).

Special education student enrollment continues a steady decline while the English Language
Learners increased somewhat for SY 2016-2017 and then remains relatively consistent for
SY 2017-2018.

The SHS faculty and staff total approximately 148 with 81 teachers, 5 administrators, 38 support
staff, 2 health counselors, 5 guidance counselors, 1 library staff, 11, professional or ancillary, 3
instructional aides, 1 administrative support and 1 custodial/maintenance/cafeteria staff.

● School’s analysis of student achievement data


With the adoption of the Comprehensive Student Assessment System in 2014 by the Guam

4
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Board of Education, SHS has been provided with assessment data that is utilized by the school
to help increase student achievement. The assessment includes the following:

Annual Guam DOE Comprehensive Student Assessment System (2014)


1. Act Aspire (Math, English, Reading) 9th and 10th grade
2. Standards Based Assessment (SBA) 9th-12th grade

Interim/Additional Assessment (initiated 2012)


1. Gates-MacGinite Test for Reading Comprehension 9th-12th grade
and Vocabulary

2. CTBS (Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills) Reading 9th-12th grade


Comprehension & Vocabulary

The graph below shows that students enrolled in the Human Anatomy and Physiology have
done exceeding well during SY 2017-18, whereby 50% of the students scored proficient and the
other 50% scored advanced.

Students in the History of Guam classes have consistently performed better in comparison to
other high schools.

While students enrolled in Anatomy and Physiology performed well during SY 2017-18, Math
students’ scores fall 91% Below Basic and in are need of much improvement.

5
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

ACT scores in reading and math are also in need of much improvement with the ACT 10th
grade English Readiness level showing a slight improvement from SY 2015-16 to SY 2017-18.
To address the low test scores SHS administered additional assessment to include the Gates-
MacGinitie Test (reading comprehension and vocabulary)and Comprehensive Test of Basic
Skills for math (CTBS).

Student enrollment in the Advanced Placement classes continues to increase from SY 15-16
which is very positive. Of all the Advanced Placement exams in Calculus AB, English Literature
Composition, U.S. Government, and U.S. History administered during SY 2017-18 it was
reported that 1 student out of 8 taking the exam in U.S. History scored “well qualified”. The
increase in the number of AP courses from 1 to 4 should serve that population students in the
upper achievement scoring level even though a small number.

The graph below is a reflection of the continuing decrease in the number of graduates from SHS
which could be directly correlated to the decline in student enrollment over the years. The
school continues to monitor and regularly communicates graduation requirements with their
students to encourage them to meet the minimum passing.

6
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Data from the School Performance Report Card shows an attendance rate of 88.5% for
SY 2017-18 which is an increase for over the past three years. The school expects the number
to increase with the recent change in the compulsory age mandate requiring students to remain
in school until 18 years of age.

Discipline referrals continue to be the highest of all high schools in the Guam DOE district. This
school year, SHS is piloting a Substance Abuse Intervention (SAI) program to help teenagers
reduce their dependence on drugs and alcohol. Student participation in the program shortens
the number of suspension days. Also, students are afforded the ability to participate in a Brief
Tobacco Intervention (BTI) program called the Second Chance Program that will hopefully
encourage them to quit smoking.

SHS continues to maintain a partnership with Guam Community College in eight career and
technical education (CTE) programs at SHS. These programs include: Allied Health,
Automotive Service Technology, Collision Repair Technology (AutoBody), Computer
Networking, Lodging Management, ProStart (Culinary Arts), Marketing, and Electronics.

Eight faculty members are employed by college and instruct and coordinate the CTE programs
on campus. Junior and Senior students who are enrolled in the Business classes or the Guam
Community Colleges courses at SHS are eligible for a Dual Credit Articulated Program of Study
(DCAPS)

SHS established a credit recovery program, Eskuelan Puengi for SY 2017-18 that is held at
George Washington High School and Tiyan High School. Also available are programs through
Asmuyao Community School and Evangelical Christian Academy.

SHS’s JROTC program is one of the school’s longest running student support program on
campus and have earned them awards in off-island competition held at North High School in
Torrance California.

Chapter II: Progress Report

7
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Critical Areas for Follow-up:


1. Investigate ways to address the inconsistencies in the master schedule that
have caused students to enroll in classes out of sequence as well as create an
imbalance in teacher/student workload courses.
Progress:
The school has put in place a procedure whereby the counselors conduct meetings with
individual students to determine individual academic needs and course selection is a joint effort
between the counselor and student. By February of the preceding year, counselors submit to
the principal a tally of coursed needed to meet the needs of the students.

A class schedule matrix of is then shared by the principal with the counselors and department
chairs based on students required academic needs. In turn, Department chairs share the
approved matrix with teachers in their respective Department to establish preference
selection. This process continues to be monitored and evaluated by the administration and
counselors throughout the course of the year. To facilitate the process, course progression
or flow charts from the Math and Science departments are provided to the counselors for
appropriate scheduling of students.

During the summer months, the master schedule is approved by administration and the
district. In collaboration, the computer operator and the curriculum administrator ensures that
schedules are ready for students as the beginning of the school year. Within the first week of
each block, students are allowed to add or drop classes based on meeting their graduation
requirements, work schedule, or family needs. If necessary, student course selection could
be modified to meet the needs of the individual.

2. Use student achievement data to make informed decisions regarding curriculum,


instruction, assessment, and resource allocation to focus on student learning.
Progress:
In previous years, the district-wide assessment (DWA) results have been received later than
expected. As a result, teachers feel that the information received was not available in time for
the current block and information was limited. However, teachers use the results from the
DWAs for the second block to guide instruction. During the 2018-19 school year, teachers were
provided specific data to include item analysis and comparison analysis of the district’s
schools. This information assisted teachers with the identification of specific areas of their
content which needed greater emphasis or clarity.
Besides the DWAs, teachers use the Marks Analysis to guide instruction. The Marks analysis
data is reviewed each semester. This data is utilized by teachers to address students’ needs
such as remediation and/or honors courses. Also, individual teachers are able to address
professional goals and promote and address specific student needs using the data.

Math and English teachers also use interim assessments such as CTBS (Math), WRAT4
(Math), and Gates-MacGinitie (Vocabulary/Comprehension) to help analyze individual
student’s strengths and weaknesses to better design appropriate instruction.

8
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

3. Implement consistent professional development that focuses on strengthening


school wide teaching practices and strategies to inform instruction and improve
student achievement.

Expand teacher driven Professional Development opportunities to allow increased


opportunities for site-based and island wide collaboration and learning to improve the
delivery of instruction for students.

Progress:
Since the Mid Cycle Progress report, the Guam Department of Education has continued to
provide eight professional development days for SHS teachers. Four of the professional
development days were used for island wide teacher collaboration. Teachers were grouped
by content area and were tasked to create horizontal and vertical curriculum maps. The
remaining four professional development days were school based. SHS utilized these days to
focus on Standards Based Grading and Classroom Instruction That Works.

4. Expand course offerings to include AP courses, more honor courses, and music
to enhance the learning opportunities for all students.
Progress:
Since the 2013 Full Self-Study, Southern High has experienced an increase in the number of
AP and Honors courses and since the 2016 Mid Cycle Visit, AP Literature and Composition,
English 9 Honors, AP U.S. Government and Politics, AP U.S. History, World History Honors
and Concert Band have been added. The school has seen a significant increase in student
enrollment in the English 10, English 11, and Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry classes,
however, a significant decrease in student enrollment in the music classes. The school
realizes the importance of the music classes and are working on plans to encourage
enrollment by students in music.
During the 2016-2017 school year, a Curriculum Fair was created to showcase the AP and
Honors Courses. In 2017-2018, the GCC program and the Humanities department were
invited to showcase their courses also. At the fair, students were able to sign up for courses
they were interested in and counselors were provide with the sign-up sheets so that
schedules for the following year could be initiated.
5. Become technologically literate by offering computer courses and providing
access to computer and internet.
Progress:
Freshman Academy teachers are provided with the opportunity to sign up for the use of the
laptops. Currently there are 3 carts with approximately 25-30 laptops each and 2 Striving
Reader carts with approximately 28 IPads. Although the laptops are assigned to the
Freshman Academy, upperclassmen teachers are also encouraged to sign up for a cart.
The library has seen increase in computers and now has a total of 60 desktops and 30
laptops available for student use. Teachers provided with a sign-up for mobile labs for
classroom use. In the library the internet and Wi-Fi are accessible at all times and E-books will
be available for students starting next school year. It has been reported that at times wireless
access is delivered inconsistently. To remedy this situation some classes have been practicing
downloading document that have been converted to a PDF file.

9
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Since the last WASC Self Study visit there has been a significant increase in student
enrollment in the information processing classes, keyboarding classes, and Business Math
Using Excel classes.
6. Leverage instructional resources to ensure students and teachers have adequate
materials needed for instruction and learning.
Progress:
The district has been slowly adopting new textbook for the various subjects, while teachers
have been creative by using other resources for updated information needed to drive
instruction.
Although the schools do not receive itemized budgets, the district provides each school a
lump sum appropriation. In addition, the district provides an appropriation called Salape’
Prinsipat, that administration utilizes to partially fund the purchase of instructional supplies for
teachers.
During School Year 2017-18 the Social Studies department received multimedia projectors
for every teacher and the Consumer Family Science teachers each received a laptop for use
in the classroom.

7. Develop a transparent budgeting process to bring clarity to stakeholders and an


increased understanding of the decision-making rationale.
Progress:
The administration continues to solicit department input into the school’s budget. In turn,
administration submits its school budget plan to the Board of Education. Guam Department of
Education provides a website for the purpose of transparency and clarity. For the past
several years, budget cuts were made to all Guam government agencies and that information
was shared by SHS’s administration with the faculty and staff. In response to the budget
reductions, administration requested input on cost saving measures from all stakeholders for
implementation.

8. Investigate the systems of support for those students who are having to repeat
courses numerous times to ensure that students have the appropriate interventions
to be successful.
Progress:
The Freshman Academy has in place an Early Warning Systems (EWS), also known as Early
Warning Indicators (EWI). This embedded “team structure” ensures that students are
provided with an environment and support system that helps students stay on-track while
promoting high achievement. Also offered in the Freshman Academy are the Talent
Development Secondary curricular courses of Strategic Reading, Transition to Advanced
Mathematics, and Freshman Seminar. These courses are “double dose” interventions
designed to close achievement gap for struggling students. In addition, Computer and Team
Assisted Math Acceleration (CATAMA) provides for another intervention that combines
computer assisted instruction and cooperative learning to increase procedural and conceptual
understanding.

10
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

This school year, SHS introduced a course for struggling 10th grade students called
Reading Development mirroring the TDS framework of Reading Writing in Your Career and
is currently monitoring its progress.
Other significant developments which have have impacted SHS include:
1. Standards Based Grading: The district is shifting towards the implementation
of Standards Based Grading in by 2020.
2. Change in Math Graduation Requirements from 3 credits to 4 credits: Students
must complete the following:
1 credit of Algebra I and 1 credit of Geometry
Remedial Math, General Math, Transition to Advanced Math, Pre-Algebra or any other
adopted developmental math course may be taken as needed to ensure readiness for
Algebra I and Geometry and will count toward their overall math requirements but will
account for no more than two math credits. In cases where a student needs to take
more than 2 credits of these developmental courses, or if the total number of credits
for math exceed the required number, excess credits will count towards the students
CCL requirements.”
“Upon completion of the Algebra I and Geometry requirements, students can take
any combination of advanced coursework, applied mathematics, practical math,
consumer math and financial literacy.”

Chapter III: Self-Study Process


● Include a copy of the school’s schoolwide learner outcomes.
● Comment on the school’s self-study process with respect to the expected outcomes of the
self-study.
1. Inclusiveness: The involvement and collaboration of all school/community
stakeholders to support student achievement.
2. Purposefulness: The clarification of the school’s vision/mission and the schoolwide
learner outcomes.
3. Student-focused: The analysis of data about students and student achievement.
4. Evaluation: The evaluation of the entire school program and its impact on student
learning based on schoolwide learner outcomes, academic standards, and the
GDOE/ACS WASC criteria.
5. Accountability: The implementation and monitoring of the schoolwide action plan that
supports high-quality learning.
6. Leadership: The facilitation by school leadership of the GDOE/ACS WASC
accreditation/school improvement process that advocates, nurtures, and sustains the
vision and the culture of learning.

The Schoolwide Learner Outcomes include the following:

The goal for Southern High School’s Dolphins is to RISE up to be:


Responsible and respectful members of society,
Innovative Thinkers,
Self-Directed Individuals and
Effective Communicators

11
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Inclusiveness: The involvement and collaboration of all school/community stakeholders


to support student achievement.

SHS collaborated with school and community stakeholders to support student achievement.
The Leadership Team met regularly to share Focus and Home Group progress throughout the
process. These meetings encouraged discussions regarding schoolwide critical learner needs
and provided each team with opportunities to reflect on data and responses made to address
critical learner needs.

Purposefulness: The clarification of the school’s vision/mission and the schoolwide


learner outcomes.

The process to ensure an understanding of the school’s vision and mission along with the
schoolwide learner outcomes is in place. The school continues to ensure consistency between
the school’ mission, schoolwide learner outcomes (SLO), academic programs, and ongoing
school improvement processes.

Student-focused: The analysis of data about students and student achievement.

Teachers, staff, parents, administration and community members were involved in the analysis
of data, assessing student needs, and the development of the school’s action plan to address
the focus on learning process. Data on behavior, attendance and academics are frequently
monitored. Southern High School’s improvement and planning process is a broad-based and
collaborative effort centered on areas of improvement that is guided by the SHS School-Wide
Action Plan. SHS is committed to improving student performance, both academically and
socially.

As a result of continued data analysis and dialogue with faculty and staff, the following Critical
Learner Needs are being addressed:

Math

Improve test scores in the district-wide assessments of the ACT Aspire and Standards
Based Assessment.

Reading Literacy

Improve test scores in the district-wide assessment of ACT Aspire and Standards Based
Assessment

Attendance

Improve attendance of the at-risk students

Evaluation: The evaluation of the entire school program and its impact on student
learning based on schoolwide learner outcomes, academic standards, and the
GDOE/ACS WASC criteria.

12
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

The school is guided by the School Improvement Plan that encompasses the five district goals
and expectations. These expectations provide the framework needed to carry out the
curriculum, assessment and instructional goals as well as all other goals necessary for the
school’s operation. Documents utilized to assess the school’s program include the SIP which is
reviewed and updated twice yearly, the school report card that indicates progress on a district-
wide assessment, daily attendance and behavior records and accomplishments.

Accountability: The implementation and monitoring of the schoolwide action plan that
supports high-quality learning.

SHS’s Schoolwide Action Plan (SAP)serves as a useful document in planning activities that
support areas of need. Activities in the SAP are visited twice a year and provide stakeholders
with an opportunity for input.

The SAP is aligned with the district’s goals, the school’s SMART goals and SLOs. Academic,
behavioral, attendance, and school environmental data are areas that are included in the plan.

This plan also outlines activities that range from the effective implementation of the eCSS,
vertically aligning priority standards, implementation of positive behavior intervention and
supports and collaboration with community stakeholders.

Leadership: The facilitation by school leadership of the GDOE/ACS WASC


accreditation/school improvement process that advocates, nurtures, and sustains the
vision and the culture of learning.

The administration and School Leadership group facilitates the GDOE/ACS WASC
accreditation/school improvement process that advocates, nurtures, and sustains the vision and
culture of learning by emphasizing the following district goals and expectations:

1. All Guam Department of Education students will graduate from high school prepared
to pursue post-secondary education on or off-island or to assume gainful employment with
the public or private sector.
2. All students in the Guam Department of Education will successfully progress from
grade to grade and from one level of schooling to another in order to maximize
opportunities to successfully graduate from high school.
3. All Guam Department of Education's personnel will meet high standards for
qualifications and ongoing professional development and will be held accountable
for all assigned responsibilities.
4. All Guam Department of Education's school facilities will meet high standards for
health and safety and provide optimal conditions for learning objectives.
5. All Guam Department of Education's operations activities will maximize the critical
uses of limited resources and meet high standards of accountability.

GDOE and SHS strive to produce students who are academically successful and SHS’s current
action plan is the impetus for implementing effective instruction with fidelity to increase the
number of students reading on or above grade level. In order to achieve this goal, student
progress is constantly monitored and lessons are data-driven.

13
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Chapter IV: Quality of the School’s Program


CATEGORY A. ORGANIZATION: VISION, MISSION, SCHOOLWIDE LEARNER
OUTCOMES, GOVERNANCE, LEADERSHIP AND STAFF, AND RESOURCES

A1. Vision, Mission, and Schoolwide Learner Outcomes Criterion


To what extent has the school established a clearly stated vision and mission (purpose) based on student
needs, current education research, and the belief that all students can achieve at high academic levels?
To what extent is the school’s purpose defined further by academic standards, schoolwide learner
outcomes, and the schoolwide plan?
A1.1. Vision, Mission, Schoolwide Learner Outcomes, Profile, Schoolwide Action Plan: The school has
established a clear, coherent vision and mission of what students should know and be able to do; the
school’s action plan is based upon high-quality standards and is congruent with research, practices, the
student/community profile data, and a belief that all students can learn.

Southern High School’s (SHS) vision, mission and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) have
remained unchanged since the last self-study in 2016. In SY 2017-2018 the faculty, students,
and other stakeholders were surveyed and chose not to change them. The Schoolwide Action
Plan (SAP) aligns with the district State Strategic Plan (SSP) for academic achievement and to
prepare students for college and career readiness.

A1.2. Development/Refinement of Vision, Mission, Schoolwide Learner Outcomes, and


Schoolwide Action Plan: The processes to ensure involvement of representatives from the entire school
community in the development/refinement of the vision are effective.

Electronic online forums are widely used to disseminate and collect information from a diverse
group across the island to expand and inform discussions that occur within the school in
department meetings, student government meetings, and faculty meetings. The SAP was
developed as a result of the last self-study, with departments regularly reviewing it.

A1.3. Understanding of Vision, Mission, Schoolwide Learner Outcomes, and Schoolwide Action
Plan: Students, parents, and other members of the school community demonstrate understanding of and
commitment to the school’s vision, mission, schoolwide learner outcomes, and Action Plan.
The Guam Department of Education (GDOE) has established district-wide vision and mission
statements that are reflected in SHS’s mission SLOs. The vision and mission statements and
SLOs are clearly articulated to all stakeholders through school meetings and appear throughout
the school in various forums and the school community understand and are committed to
supporting them.

A1.4. Regular Review and Revision:The school is implementing an effective process for regular
review/revision of the school vision, mission, schoolwide learner outcomes, and the schoolwide action
plan based on student needs in an evolving global society.
The school has in place process for regular review/revision of the vision, mission, and SLOs,
however it is not consistent from year to year.
A1.5. Schoolwide Learner Outcomes and Vision and Mission: Schoolwide learner outcomes and
academic standards are reflected in the school’s vision and mission.

14
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

The SLOs are reflected in the school’s mission, vision, and SLOS are evident in instructional
lessons. The academic standards define what all students should know and be able to do by
graduation from high school. They describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities that students
should have to attain high levels of competency and proficiency in all subjects.

A2. Governance Criterion


To what extent are the school’s program and operations in alignment with the a) the Guam Board of
Education’s policies and b) the Guam Department of Education rules, regulations, and procedures?

To what extent does the Guam Education Board delegate the implementation and monitoring of these
policies to the Guam Department of Education and approve the GDOE State Strategic Plan?

A2.1. Understanding the Role of the Governing Authority: The school community understands the
governing authority's role, including how stakeholders can be involved.

The school community understands the relationship between the governing authority’s role,
including how stakeholders can be involved.

A2.2. Relationship Between Governing Authority and School: The school’s stakeholders understand
the relationship between the governing authority’s decisions, expectations, and initiatives that guide the
work of the school.
The SHS community understands the relationship between the governing authority and the
school. An example of the depth of understanding was a decision in June 2011 to change
SHS’s schedule from a 4x4 block to a 3x3 block. This was done unilaterally and without
consultation and the community expressed their feelings, attending several Board meetings
about it. This resulted in the original schedule being reinstated the following year.

A2.3.Faculty, Staff, and Governing Authority:There is clear understanding about the relationship
between the governing authority and the responsibilities of the faculty and staff.
Policies regarding the governing authority of the GDOE are posted on SHS’s publicly available
website to which faculty and staff have access. Public Law 31-19 regarding education is also
available. The Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the Guam Federation of
teachers (GFT) and GEB identifies the responsibilities of both parties. In addition to information
posted on websites, the GDOE and GEB decisions are communicated to staff and faculty via e-
mail, memoranda, board meetings, and presentations.

A3. Leadership and Staff Criterion – Data-Informed Decision-Making


To what extent does the school leadership and staff make decisions and initiate activities that focus on all
students achieving the schoolwide learner outcomes and academic standards?
To what extent do the school leadership and staff annually monitor and refine the schoolwide action plan
based on action plan alignment with the Guam State Strategic Plan and the analysis of data to ensure
alignment with student needs?
A3.1 Broad-Based and Collaborative Planning Process: The school’s planning process is broad-
based, collaborative, and has the commitment of the stakeholders, including the staff, students, and
parents.
The school’s Leadership Team consists of administrators, Department Chairpersons, the
librarian, ESL coordinator, and two student representatives of the Island-Wide Board of
Governing Students (IBOGS). Weekly Department Chair and biweekly Leadership Team

15
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

meetings are held at which student achievement and behavioral data, policies, and procedures
are discussed and reviewed. DCs share this information with their departments and solicit input
from department Collaborative Teams (CTs).

A3.2. Correlation between Student Learning and the Schoolwide Action Plan: the school’s
schoolwide action plan.The analysis of multiple sources of data (e.g., demographic, student achievement,
perceptual process) guides
The analysis of student data is directly correlated with the school’s SAP. Results of data derived
from the ACT Aspire, SBA, marks analysis, pre- and post-tests and surveys are analyzed by
administrators and faculty. DC meetings, Leadership meetings, faculty meetings, PDs, PLCs,
and CTs, are held to ensure that the data is analyzed. From the analysis, the faculty identify
critical learner needs, create goals or modify the existing goals of the school’s SAP.

A3.3. Alignment of All Resources and the Schoolwide Action Plan: There is correlation between the
allocation of time/fiscal/personnel/material resources and the implementation, monitoring, and
accomplishment of the schoolwide action plan.
As SHS’s SAP was developed and aligned with the State Strategic Plan and resources
identified to meet the critical learner needs. The leadership team implements and monitors the
activities in the SAP. Faculty and staff identify the resources needed to increase student
achievement. The school follows Guam Department of Education budget planning procedures,
which involve the district level and school level administrators, faculty, and staff. Budget
requests are compiled and a proposal is submitted to the district. Once approved by the GEB
and legislature, funds are allocated.

A3.4. Progress Monitoring of the Schoolwide Action Plan: The school’s Leadership Team/Academic
Review Team has defined roles and responsibilities and monitors the progress of the implementation of
the schoolwide action plan.
The Leadership Team meets bi-weekly to discuss items related to the schoolwide action plan.
Minutes from the meeting are shared by DCs via email. Progress and/or lack of progress of
completion of activities in the action plan result in next steps for all faculty, staff, and
administration.

A4. Leadership and Staff Criterion – Schoolwide Organization for Student


Achievement
To what extent does a qualified staff facilitate the achievement of the schoolwide learner outcomes,
academic standards, and the successful implementation of the schoolwide action plan through a system
of preparation, induction, and ongoing professional development?
A4.1. Qualifications of Staff: The school implements state personnel policies and procedures to ensure
that staff are qualified based on background, training, and preparation.
Instructional and ancillary staff are hired through GDOE’s Human Resource Division.
Verification of the applicant’s documents are reviewed and checked. The Guam Commission for
Educator Certification (GCEC) ensures that Guam educators are competent to perform their
duties as teachers, counselors, librarians, and school administrators.

16
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

A4.2. Maximum Use of Expertise: The school has a process to assign staff members and provide
appropriate orientation for all assignments so that the expertise of the staff members is maximized in
order to promote quality student learning and teaching.
The school’s master schedule is created by the principal and determined by course tallies based
on student selection. For SY 2018-19, administration determined what course offerings students
could select from. Depending on the needs and interests of the students, teaching assignments
may vary. Teachers’ assignments to departments are based on certification and and teaching
lines are based upon seniority according to the CBA.

A4.3. Defining and Understanding Policies and Procedures: The school has clear written policies and
procedures that define responsibilities and expectations, operational practices, and decision-making
processes for administrators and staff.

SHS’s weebly, (https://shstuninos.weebly.com/) and the GDOE website contain written policies,
Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), protocols, templates, etc. These documents define the
responsibilities, and practices for the faculty and staff. The GDOE website contains the SOPs
and the CBA for teachers and administrators. The CBA also defines the roles and
responsibilities of administrators and faculty.

A4.4. Internal Communication and Planning: The school has effective structures for internal
communication, planning, and resolving differences.
Internal communication occurs through official GDOE email, intercom announcements, cell
phones, WhatsApp chat groups, and meetings. Many faculty and staff are part of SHS’s
WhatsApp broadcast group, a messaging platform is used for immediate announcements or
responses. Meetings, such as the DC, Leadership, Collaborative Teams (CT), and faculty
meetings, are also used to share information, make decisions or address issues. There are
several protocols in place for resolving differences about school issues.

A4.5. Staff Actions/Accountability to Support Learning: The school evaluates the effectiveness of the
processes and procedures for involving staff in shared responsibility, actions, and accountability to
support student learning throughout all programs. This includes an evaluation of the collegial strategies
used to implement innovations and encourage improvement, such as shadowing, coaching, observation,
mentoring, group presentations.
In SHS Leadership meetings, the SAP is developed, reviewed and revised based on identified
critical learner needs and areas of growth. This information is shared with all members in the
department for input and feedback. The actions that stem from the SAP identifies responsible
individuals, such as the administration, counselor(s), DCs, and the faculty. Students in Special
Programs are monitored by their team of teachers, counselors, CRTs, and ESL Coordinators.
The team ensures and provides the support for the student learning.

A5. Leadership and Staff Criterion – Research and Professional Development


A5.1. Support of Professional Development: The school effectively supports professional
development/learning with time, personnel, material, and fiscal resources to facilitate all students
achieving the schoolwide learner outcomes and academic standards.
Professional Development (PD) is provided to faculty and staff through days scheduled within
the GDOE school year. The school has a PD plan for the year and the district also schedules
numerous instructional trainings. Teachers have opportunities to participate in district level PDs
offered, about various curricular programs, policies, and school wide regulations. Faculty are

17
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

encouraged to discuss strategies with each other. Teachers may also explore professional
development opportunities and training outside of what is offered by the school district. The
administration supports this and invites teachers to share new skills and knowledge with
colleagues during faculty/department meetings or scheduled PD days. Faculty meetings are
also used for professional development opportunities.

A5.2. Supervision and Evaluation: The school implements effective supervision and evaluation
procedures in order to promote professional growth of staff.
The school has a system in place to evaluate and supervise teachers. Administrators observe teachers
as part of the evaluation system . Experienced teachers often help new teachers feel welcome and
prepare them by providing observations, lesson planning sharing, sharing teaching strategies that work,
however there is no formal schoolwide mentorship plan in place. Department meeting are primarily
devoted to PLCs.

A5.3. Measurable Effect of Professional Development: There are effective operating processes that
determine the measurable effect of professional development, coaching, and mentoring on student
performance.

The English and Math departments administer college placement testing at the start of each block, using
the results to identify focus areas for teaching during the block. Pre and post tests are used to help
teachers in core subjects monitor student achievement over a given course of instruction. Graduation
rates have subsequently increased throughout the past several years at SHS.
A6. Resources Criterion

To what extent are the human, material, physical, and financial resources sufficient and utilized effectively
and appropriately in accordance with the legal intent of the program(s) to support students in
accomplishing the schoolwide learner outcomes and academic standards?
A6.1. Allocation Decisions: Decisions about resource allocations are aligned with the school’s vision,
mission, schoolwide learner outcomes, the academic standards, and the schoolwide action plan.
Decisions regarding the GDOE and SHiS’s resource allocations are aligned with the school’s
vision, mission, schoolwide learner outcomes, academic standards, and the SAP to an extent
based on needs and available allocated resources. Administrators and division heads take
GDOE and the district-wide mandates into account during the overall budgetary process. The
budget allocated to the GDOE has historically been less than the requested amount, requiring
SHS to prioritize and find different ways to maximize use of resources. While the funding
shortfall has been challenging, the overall impact with regard to student learning has been
mitigated because SHS teachers have adapted to overcome challenges, with many using their
own funds to purchase supplies and materials.

A6.2. Allocation Involvement: The school leadership and staff are involved in the resource allocation
decisions.

SHS leadership and staff are involved in and responsible for resource allocation decisions,
however the school’s short-range and long-range planning is contingent upon the GDOE’s
allocation to the school. A budget shortfall in funding to education in Guam of $19 million for
FY 2019, and a projected $27 million for FY 2020, is resulting in cuts to the school.

A6.3. Practices: Processes and procedures are in place for developing an annual budget, conducting
internal and external audits, and utilizing sound quality business and accounting practices, including
internal controls within the school to ensure protection against mishandling of institutional funds.

18
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

In accordance with the Guam Department of Education’s standard operating procedures, SHS
has processes and procedures in place for developing an annual budget, and conducts internal
and external audits when necessary to maintain sound quality business and accounting
practices. Controls are in place within the school to ensure protection against the mishandling
of institutional funds. The school administration is also be accountable to GDOE which is
ultimately held accountable by the Guam Office of Public Accountability.

A6.4. Facilities Conducive to Learning: The school’s facilities are adequate to support high-quality
learning.
Recent funds to GDOE from the Adequate Education Trust have been used for roof repairs,
updated fire alarm systems, electrical upgrades, communication systems, and air conditioning
units. The GDOE has stated that it will provide $1,000,000 per year over the next five years to
address health and safety issues district-wide. SHS, however, faces challenges such as aging
facilities and severe weather conditions and this is not enough to cover all needed repairs. As
of 2018, SHS has received funding to replace and upgrade of the school’s previously
inoperative fire alarm system, and to replace and upgrade of the school’s communication
system. The majority of the school’s classrooms are climate controlled, however the system is
outdated and not often adequately maintained.

A6.5. Instructional Materials and Equipment: The policies and procedures for acquiring and
maintaining adequate instructional materials and equipment, such as textbooks, other printed materials,
audio-visual, support technology, manipulatives, and laboratory materials are effective.

SHS must follow the GDOE’s policies and procedures for acquiring and maintaining instructional
materials and equipment such as technological tools and software, the support systems for
technology, software, textbooks, supplemental printed materials, and laboratory materials.
Limited budgets of years past have adversely affected the GDOE’s ability to provide adequate
funding to the school. Federal grants have often been used to augment local funding. Funding
for instructional supplies is a challenge, especially with regard to textbooks, SHS teachers are
resourceful in utilizing online/digital PDF files of textbooks and also provide copied and
supplemental material via the Fair Use Doctrine.

A6.6. Qualified Personnel: Resources are available to hire, retain, and provide professional
development for a qualified staff for all programs.
Resources to hire and retain qualified personnel for all programs at SHS come from the GDOE.
Resources are available to hire and retain qualified, contingent upon the annual operating
budget and areas of most critical need. The hiring process is also handled largely through the
GDOE, with the principal recommending final candidates to be hired for positions.

GDOE/ACS WASC Category A. Organization: Vision, Mission, Schoolwide


Learner Outcomes, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources

Summary, Strengths, and Growth Areas

Review all the findings and supporting evidence and summarize the degree to which the criteria in
Category A are being met.
Include comments about the degree to which these criteria impact the school’s ability to address
one or more of the identified student learning needs (Chapter III).

Summary (including comments about the student learning needs):

19
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Southern High School’s commitment to provide all students a quality education is evident in the
school’s mission and SLOs. The school’s programs and operations align with the Guam Board
of Education and Department of Education’s regulations and procedures. Its leadership and
staff make decisions that focus on learner outcomes and academic standards for all students,
which are monitored and refined annually. SHS’s organization promotes student learning
through a strong, inclusive communication system and ongoing professional development
based on research. The school focuses the use of often limited resources to promote
continuous improvement and maximize student success.

Prioritize the strengths and areas of growth for Category A.

ategory A: Organization: Vision, Mission, Schoolwide Learner Outcomes,


Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Areas of Strength

● SHS’s mission, vision, and SLOs are clearly articulated and used consistently to support
the schoolwide plan.
● SHS’s faculty and staff have regularly engaged in research-based Professional
Development to inform instruction and improve student achievement.
● The school’s organization provides support for student success in multiple ways,
including the Freshman Academy.
● Teachers are resourceful and flexible in finding alternatives to meet the learning needs
of students.

Category A: Organization: Vision, Mission, Schoolwide Learner Outcomes,


Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Areas of Growth

● Develop and implement a more systematic process for regular review/revision of the
vision, mission, and SLOs.
● Continue to work to obtain and maximize resources needed to support student learning.
● Use faculty meetings to explore and address school-related issues in addition to
professional development.
● Explore the implementation of a formalized, schoolwide mentorship program for new
teachers, given the relatively high rate of teacher turnover at SHS.

20
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

CATEGORY B. STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: CURRICULUM

B1. Curriculum Criterion – Student Participation in a Standards-based Curriculum


To what extent do all students participate in a rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based
curriculum that supports the achievement of the schoolwide learner outcomes, academic standards, and
priorities identified in the schoolwide action plan and Guam State Strategic Plan?
B1.1. Current Educational Research and Thinking:
SHS teachers over the past 3 years have reviewed educational resource using sources
such as Classroom Instruction that Works, Standards Based Grading Research and
Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP). In addition the instructional program
has been enhanced by adding some Honors and AP classes to the instructional program.
CTE classes provide career focused elective instruction for students. Via the PLC’s,
members collaborate on these researched based practices.

B1.2. Academic Standards for Each Area:


Schoolwide learner outcomes (SLO’s) are publicized in: classrooms, library, cafeteria and
offices. Implementation of SLO’s is evidenced in curriculum maps, reviewed during class
lessons and through interviews with students. The schools use of a syllabus template with
SLO’s and content standards assures consistency with implementation.

B1.3. Congruence: and


B1.4. Student Work :
Utilizing half of the 8 allocated PD days, collaboration between district-wide schools to create
consensus curriculum maps has occurred prior to sy 2018-19. These maps align to the CCSS
and appropriate National and College Readiness standards. Posting standards in classrooms
followed by monitoring student achievement of standards in the PLC helps SHS to assure
congruence.

Implementation of Standards based curriculum is evident based on student work observed


during the visit and teacher standardized lesson plan templates observed. Given the SBA and
ACT readiness data outcomes over past few years, the rigor level expressed in the curriculum
maps (K-12) will continue to be monitored according to the action plan presented in chapter 5.

B1.5. Accessibility of All Students to Curriculum:


Accessibility for all students to an appropriate curriculum is addressed when students work with
their assigned counselor to develop an academic plan for the student. Promotion of all
curriculum possibilities is done via 4 school counselors, 1 GCC counselor and another special
programs counselor in addition to AP/ Honors fair. Students are assigned to one counselor to
‘facilitate access and success for all’ the students toward meeting graduation requirements.

B1.6. Integration Among Disciplines:


There is curriculum integration among disciplines at the school. Freshman academy structure
allows for curriculum integration among disciplines, using the TDS framework (Talent
Development Secondary). The use of CCSS intentionally allows all subject area teachers to
embed reading, writing and research standards; providing curriculum integration across a
discipline.

21
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

B1.7. Curricular Development, Evaluation, and Revisions:


Curriculum review of an existing course starts with curriculum maps completed by all teachers
and discussed, along with student data, in PLC’s to see if curriculum meets student needs.
Second there is a process for piloting new curriculum as evidenced by the addition of the TDS
courses of Freshman Seminar, Strategic Reading and TAM and all stakeholders are involved to
receive approval to pilot a course.

According to the action plan in chapter 5; during sy 2018-19, the Department head and admin
will look at the top six weak SBA areas and the top six weak ACT Aspire areas. This action will
allow stakeholders to assess if the existing curriculum meets student learning needs.

B1.8. Articulation and Follow-up Studies:


SHS recognizes the need to articulate with feeder schools to prepare students for grade 9. In
SY 2017-18 vertical articulation was organized by the district and future dates are planned for
sy 2019-20. The action plan in Chapter 5 stated that “a PD day for vertical and horizontal
collaboration … addressing guaranteed and viable curriculum” would happen sy 2018-19 but
did not due to weather complications.

Articulation with Guam Community College (GCC) and with the University of Guam (UOG) also
supports students who exit SHS. There is a GCC counselor at the high school, UOG ELA
department held work sessions with English 12 teachers regarding the UOG placement test
expectations and shared placement data in both English and Math. Thus articulation does
happen regularly and follow up data regarding effectiveness of curriculum is obtained.

B2. Curriculum Criterion – Planning and Monitoring Student Learning


To what extent do all students have equal access to the school’s entire program and assistance with a
personal learning plan to prepare for the pursuit of their academic, personal, and school-to-career goals?
INDICATORS:
B2.1. Variety of Programs:
A variety of programs exist at SHS to support student learning. Curriculum is based on Standards in
CCSS, and Guam DOE expectations. Programs to support students, to provide real world experiences,
and to promote transition to college/career are in evidence.

B2.2. Student-Parent-Staff Collaboration:


Assuring all students make appropriate choices starts when students are assigned a counselor
who then works with them to assure graduation in 3 or 4 years; explaining courses options
available with parents as part of the process. Special Program students have a CRT assigned
who works with parents regarding curricular choices and post secondary goals. The UOG and
GCC campus tours promote satellite curriculum choices offered on campus, and a school
AP/Elective fair in the spring promotes the full range of curriculum choices. Evidence indicates
all are aware of choices.

Career and College exploration starts in grade 9 in Freshman Seminar, to develop a portfolio
with resume and job application. Other exploratory opportunities are visits from colleges/
Universities/ Military, attending district College Fair, attend campus tours at GCC and UOG. All

22
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

students take the ASVAB test as it provides students access to college and career readiness
information along with the WorkKeys assessment to test Career Readiness.

B2.3. Monitoring/Changing Student Plans:


Monitoring is facilitated by the counselor; adjusting schedules based on interest, discussing post
secondary plans. In addition the GCC counselor meets with students to discuss programs
available and also monitors students progression through a GCC program in CTE areas which
are offered on campus. ESL and SPED students are monitored by assigned teachers
/coordinators.

B2.4. Transitions:
Transition is facilitated by the gr 9 team and counselor who involve multiple student groups to
welcome new students to grade 9 and provide prior orientation at grade 8 level. Transition
courses are offered during the first grade 9 block to assist students with reading, math and
Freshman Seminar.
Transition out is facilitated along the way by counselors as mentioned in B2.1 and B2.2 above.
Surveys indicate 73% of students satisfied with schools assistance in transition to post
secondary .
B3. Curriculum Criterion – Meeting All Curricular Requirements
To what extent have students met the standards with proficiency for that grade span or all the
requirements of graduation upon completion of the elementary, middle, or high school program?

B3.1. Real World Applications:


Real world applications of learning keep students interested and attendance data indicates an
increase in attendance from 77% to 88% over past 3 years. Service learning projects
embedded in the classroom; CTE programs with GCC, and various electives which offer field
trip or collaboration with students from other countries are various ways in which the “real world”
enters the students curriculum. Dance students are part of a mentorship 3 year program which
leads to jobs in tourism industry upon completion. The GCC program leads to college credit and
certifications from the college. Thus evidence indicates there is access to real-world educational
opportunities. The rigor of the curriculum associated is the area which will be monitored and
acted upon according to the action plan in chapter 5. Currently the ACT Aspire readiness tests
indicate a lack of readiness, and the SBA tests indicate a lack of even basic knowledge in
multiple curriculums.

B3.2. Meeting Graduation Requirements


Foundation for academic support is the counselor working with student/families. There are
options for night school, summer school and other possibilities which do cost money. The
Special Program students get support from the CRT’s. Tutoring is one support offered at school
for academically off-track students. The grade 9 academy has multiple venues for supporting
students to meet the graduation requirement. The school plans to introduce similar supports into
grade 10 if budget constraints can be accommodated.

23
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

GDOE/ACS WASC Category B. Standards-based Student Learning: Curriculum


Summary, Strengths, and Growth Needs
Review all the findings and supporting evidence and summarize the degree to which the criteria in
Category B are being met.

Summary (including comments about the student learning needs):

Curriculum choices have been improved to address the need for more elective and academic
choices (adding AP and Honors classes). Students are provided with various real world
experiences via CTE opportunities earning college credits. Relevant PD has been provided to
teachers. These actions should support a cohesive way to address Student Learning Needs
around Math and Reading Literacy. Interventions to support students such as expanding grade
9 supports for students with “gaps” into grade 10 and use of curriculum map to assure teacher
consistency, are addressed by the action plan submitted in chapter 5 of the self study. Results
should be evident in the next few years.

Category B: Curriculum: Areas of Strength


● Addition of more AP classes and more honors classes to provide additional curriculum
options to students has been accomplished.
● Coordination with GCC to provide real world curriculum experiences via CTE classes on
campus is on going.
● Coordination with SHS counselors, UOG and GCC counselors provides college/ career
information for students; using available resources to provide necessary student
information.
● Teacher PD has been provided in an effort to maximize student learning at SHS.

Category B: Curriculum: Areas of Growth
● Data on achievement indicates a lack of readiness for classes when students enter grade
9; Curriculum vertical articulation should be revisited on a consistent basis.
● Most teachers would benefit by horizontal articulation to support teacher growth across
school districts.
● Curriculum taught must be monitored with fidelity, so that the appropriate rigor required
by the CCSS standards, is provided to all students to address the stated student learning
needs.
● On-going PD for all new faculty should be available annually to ensure consistency
across teachers of similar subjects.

CATEGORY C. STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: INSTRUCTION


C1. Instruction Criterion – Student Access to Learning
To what extent does differentiated, high-quality instruction provide access, challenge, and support to all
students to achieve the academic standards and the schoolwide learner outcomes?
C1.1. Differentiation of Instruction: and
C1.2. Student Understanding of Performance Levels:

24
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Teachers use various differentiation methods and incorporate the Marzano research regarding
“Classroom instruction that works”. Teachers collaborate (88% responded to a survey)
regarding instructional strategies during PLC time, department time and during teacher free
time. Given data indicating a lack of readiness on the part of at least 70% of the cohort of 2019
and 2020 in reading and math, the action plan in chapter 5 recognizes that ongoing
interventions must be provided and effectiveness of supports tracked.

Students know the course expectations/standards via course catalogs and counselor
communications. Using daily learning targets in classrooms/objectives reinforces the information
provided in a syllabus. Instruction at a rigor level to ensure all student achieve the academic
standards are reviewed during PLC collaboration.

C1.3. Students’ Feedback:


Pre/Post tests (teacher generated) allow students to chart their progress and get feedback.
Department PLC’s examine student data and teachers collaborate on how to modify instruction.
Impact of the modifications on student learning outcomes will be continually evaluated
according to Chapter 5 action plan.

Feedback in the Freshman Academy is done via student conferences w/ a student/ adult
providing immediate two way feedback. The process for direct student communication of a
need or concern using the “we need to talk/ I need your help” letter is an innovative way to
promote student feedback. How often this “letter” feedback mechanism is used was not
addressed in the self study.

C2. Instruction Criterion – Rigorous and Relevant Instruction


To what extent do all teachers provide students with a variety of activities and assignments that are
engaging (e.g., technology-enhanced and experiences beyond the textbook) and call for higher order
thinking?
C2.1. Current Knowledge:
SHS teachers have been trained on multiple Technology Teaching tools (Promethean Board,
Google Apps, Work Keys, i-Pads etc.). Students use tools like graphing calculators and ipads/
laptops when accessible. SHS recognizes that technology is rapidly advancing and supports
device access as budget allows. The action plan in Chapter 5 states that by October 2019
data will be collected regarding the use of technology resources.

C2.2. Student Engagement: and


C2.3. Teachers as Facilitators of Learning:
Curriculum maps guide lesson plans to assure complex thinking is present in the student
centered classroom. Teachers try to have students take ownership of their learning via
engagement in discussions, projects and outside of classroom activities.

Multiple clubs provide leadership opportunities and complex thinking opportunities outside the
classroom walls (NHS,, JROTC, Reef Watchers , Mock Trial etc). Intellectual engagement and
student led activities/clubs were confirmed by student representatives.

C2.4. Variety of Strategies:

25
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Collaborative groups, gallery walks, write to learn and strategies from Marzano book are some
of the strategies observed during classroom visits. ESL classes use the SIOP model. All
teachers state they use best practices to support student learning. These strategies are noted in
the pacing guides and observed by the visiting committee.

C2.5. Variety of Strategies: and


C2.6. Variety of Strategies:
Using computers, students in multiple classes research and build knowledge about the world.
Google apps and Kahn Academy skills are used in some classes for communicating and
researching. The Group activities, projects, discussions all develop a student ability to
demonstrate thinking , reasoning and problem solving. Use of standards based
grading/assessments, once fully implemented, should support the focus on critical thinking skills
rather then just percentage complete.

C2.7. Real World Experiences:


Educators at SHS strive to provide students opportunities to gain real world knowledge that
transcends their high school learning. SPED students have community Based Education; are
placed at job sites to support transition to post high school. GCC has a work experience
program available to students resulting in a “mastery” certificate in multiple fields. Clubs ,
JROTC, Band and Dance do activities with community partners and go off island to gain real
world knowledge.

26
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

GDOE/ACS WASC Category C. Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction


Summary, Strengths, and Growth Needs

Review all the findings and supporting evidence and summarize the degree to which the
criteria in Category C are being met.
Include comments about the degree to which these criteria impact the school’s ability to
address one or more of the identified student learning needs (Chapter III).
Summary (including comments about the student learning needs):
Student learning needs in Math and Reading literacy are intentionally supported by instruction
techniques observed and evidence provided. The prevalence of student centered classes with
many educational best practices utilized such as: having daily objectives posted; the use of
pre/post testing to allow adjustments in instruction. The Freshman Academy instructional
coordination efforts have resulted in less students needing remedial courses. School wide
coordination across subjects with pacing guides provides consistency and rigor. Evidence
indicates slight increases in scores (in some areas) if basic through advanced data are
included. Review of the six weak areas in the SBA and the six weak areas identified by Aspire
data is planned for 2019 according to chapter 5 action plan. The resulting data will focus
teacher efforts to assure instruction is rigorous and aligned to meet the standards expected by
CCSS.

Prioritize the strengths and areas of growth for Category C.

Category C: Instruction: Areas of Strength


● Teachers use of best practices, implementation of PD provided over past years is evident
in classroom visits.
● Student centred classrooms, with active engagement was observed as a result of
instructional practices utilized school wide.
● Instruction provides real world experiences in multiple ways, GCC courses, outside
classroom projects and program experiences.
● Freshman Academy coordination in instruction and support structures, has resulted in
less need for student remediation.

Category C: Instruction: Areas of Growth


● Continue to build upon best practices in the classroom; on-going adjustments are needed
to address SBA data and ACT Aspire data in order to assure growth in student learning
outcomes.
● Attention to CCSS reading and writing standards embedded in all content areas
schoolwide will support student learning outcomes.
● Continued, focused articulation and data sharing with feeder schools to address low
readiness levels for incoming grade 9 students.
● Provide on-going teacher training to assure that during instruction there is: efficient use
of ‘block’ schedule class length; curricular mapping consistency; and CCSS rigor w/
fidelity.

27
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

CATEGORY D. STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: ASSESSMENT AND


ACCOUNTABILITY
D1. Assessment and Accountability Criterion Criterion – Reporting and Accountability
Processes
To what extent does the school leadership and instructional staff use effective assessment processes to
collect, disaggregate, analyze, and report student performance data to all stakeholders?
To what extent does the analysis of data guide the school’s programs and processes, the allocation and
usage of resources, and form the basis for the development of the schoolwide action plan?

D1.1. Professionally Acceptable Assessment Process:


The school leadership and instructional staff use effective assessment processes to collect,
disaggregate, analyze, and report state/complex/school performance data to all stakeholders.
Southern High School (SHS) evaluates the validity of the assessment process being done by
the different subject areas. They utilize the ACT Aspire and Standard Based Assessment (SBA)
ever since the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) adopted it in SY 2014-2015. The results
of the District Wide Assessment (DWA) are used to develop each department’s effective goals.
The school monitors on the results of the students’ first year and second year to render early
intervention. Each department identifies the substantial skills that will prepare the students to
improve their District Wide Assessment (DWA) scores. For the departments whose content is
not in the District Wide Assessment (DWA), they review the Marks Analysis and use its data to
communicate on the effectiveness of their instruction and assessment.
The assessment process being done by each department is used adequately to have an
accurate placement for incoming freshmen. The Math department uses its placement test early
in the Middle School to identify the students’ proper distribution. The students will be placed
either in the Transition to Advanced Mathematics (TAM) or Algebra I. Through the English
Language Arts (ELA) classes, the English Department uses the Gates- McGinitie Reading Tests
for all grade levels and the University of Guam (UOG) writing rubric for all grade levels to
determine college-readiness in terms of writing skills. The Gates- McGinitie Reading Tests
determine students’ reading grade level and any progression at the end of each course.
The Freshman Academy Math teachers have used results from similar assessments through
Professional Learning Community (PLC) that determine the difficulty level of the questions.
They are still developing the process of the conversion scales and creation of Common
Formative Assessment (CFA). The Math department also uses the Wide Range Assessment
Test (WRAT) and Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS). These assess the students’ math
grade equivalency and Math progress throughout the students’ four years at Southern High
School (SHS).
The English Language Arts classes (ELA) uses two main pre- and post- tests in the Gates-
McGinitie Reading Tests. The results from pre- and post- tests of Southern High School (SHS)
students under the Special Education program are shared to Individualized Education Plan
(IEP) review meetings and recorded on IEP documents in order to assess students’ progress.
Furthermore, English as a Second Language (ESL) coordinator assesses the incoming ESL
students to determine their program level. The students at level 1, 2, or 3 are placed in
sheltered classrooms. Students at level 4 or 5 are mainstreamed into general education
classes. Along with the inputs of the teachers, the counselors and the coordinator monitor
mainstreamed students’ success after each semester to determine if students can continue to
benefit from ESL placement, or if they can be withdrawn from the program.

28
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Southern High School (SHS) is a pilot school for the implementation of Standards Based
Grading (SBG). Teachers in the departments are tasked to develop conversions scales and
CFAs. Currently, the assessment process is being monitored.

D1.2. Basis for Determination of Performance Levels:


The school leadership and instructional staff determine the basis for students' grades, growth,
and performance levels to ensure consistency within grade levels and content areas.
Southern High School (SHS) upholds the claim of being the pilot school for Standards Based
Grading (SBG). Its implementation helps the students understand the correlation between the
assignments they complete and the grade they receive. Base on the results of the teachers’
survey in 2018, seventy percent (70%) of the respondents have partially implemented
Standards Based Grading (SBG) in their classroom, and twenty percent of the teachers have it
fully implemented. The district wide full implementation of Standards Based Grading (SBG) is
expected by 2020.
Southern High School (SHS) determines proficiency and conversion scales in the
implementation of Standards-Based Grading (SBG). In the districts Professional Development,
the teachers of the same content or subject area meet and create a common curriculum map.
The curriculum map, based on chosen priority standards, is created, reflected, and used to drive
instruction to ensure consistency and uniformity of implementation in school and district levels.
The teachers create scales and rubrics based on the curriculum maps during departments’
Professional Learning Community (PLC). Teachers are encouraged, but not required, to use a
common syllabi and lesson plan format which outlines the Southern High School (SHS) mission
statement, student learner outcome, student objectives, priority standards, content standards,
and Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers use various forms of assessment and data to guide
them through with lesson planning, pacing, and/or teaching skills. The school closely monitors
student’s performance through progress reports and report cards in each block with citizenship
grades. These reflect the school’s Student Learner Outcomes (SLO). Early interventions such
as the Early Warning System (EWS) in the Freshmen Academy are provided to ensure the
growth and performance of the students throughout the school year.

D1.3. Modifications Based on Assessment Results:


The school leadership/Academic Review Team/Data Teams use assessment results to modify
the school’s programs and processes, professional development, and resource allocations to
demonstrate a results-driven continuous process.
Southern High School (SHS) efficiently uses assessment data as bases of making decisions,
modifying the school’s program and processes, Professional Development (PD), and resource
allocations to demonstrate a results-driven continuous process. These assessment data are
used and analyzed for comparison of the previous years’ data. These data guide administration,
department, and faculty decisions for reference for the incoming school year program and
processes, Professional Development (PD), and resource allocations. Administrators focus the
Professional Development (PD) towards Classroom Instruction That Works (CITW) strategies to
help improve students’ learning in the classroom, Standards-Based Grading, and Common
Formative Assessments (CFA).
Southern High School (SHS) have aided modifications based on their studies and analyses of
various assessment data. They invested into a research program, Talent Development
Secondary (TDS), after reviewing the school’s different programs and course offerings. The

29
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

students who need improvement on literacy skills and math skills are enforced to take the
Strategic Reading (SR and Transition to Advanced Mathematics (TAM).
Southern High School’s (SHS) departments compare students’ district assessment scores and
Marks Analysis to adjust their curriculum maps and priority standards to guarantee student
success and improve other aspects of data on drop outs, failures, attendance, graduation and
others. The teachers adjust their curriculum for individual students, such as Special Education
(SPED) and English as a Second Language (ESL), to guarantee that they are accomplishing
their goals and objectives in the relevant content areas. Accommodations and modifications are
supported in most academic classes and feedback is observed and recorded to make
improvement and intuitive changes to student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

D1.4. Monitoring of Student Growth:


The school has an effective system to monitor all students’ progress toward meeting the
academic standards and schoolwide learner outcomes and provides appropriate interventions.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers give attention to students’ progress in numerous
ways. They use formative and summative assessments such as assignments, test,
presentations and projects to monitor students’ improvement and development. Additionally,
they give importance to students’ comments, criticisms, judgments and responses and adjust
their future lessons so that the students can achieve academic standards and expected learner
outcomes.
The Southern High School (SHS) counselors, Consulting Resource Teachers (CRT) and the
English as Second Language (ESL) coordinator closely monitor student’s progress by meeting
the students and different student organizations throughout the year to confirm and certify that
the students are meeting the academic standards, graduation requirements and learner
outcomes. The Freshman Academy holds Report Card Conferences with freshmen on a
quarterly basis to guarantee that they are aware of their credit status. They also look at the
attendance, behavior, and Course Performance through Early Warning System (EWS). After
each conference, students will have a self-evaluation on their drawbacks, misconducts and
accomplishments. This whole process allows the students to reflect on and be aware of their
performance.

D2. Assessment and Accountability Criterion– Classroom Assessment Strategies


To what extent do teachers employ a variety of appropriate assessment strategies to evaluate student
learning?
To what extent do students and teachers use these findings to modify the learning/teaching process and
support the educational progress of every student?

D2.1. Appropriate Assessment Strategies:


Teachers use appropriate assessment strategies to measure student progress toward acquiring
academic standards and the schoolwide learner outcomes.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers use varied and appropriate assessment strategies to
measure student progress toward acquiring academic standards and the schoolwide learner
outcomes. The master schedule has been arranged to create similar prep periods relative to the
teacher’s content area. The teachers with the same subject area have the benefit to participate

30
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

and focus on their specific content issues. The Professional Learning Community (PLC) allows
teachers to develop and collaborate common Formative and Summative Assessments that can
be used effectively to assess the students. The assessment based on the teachers’
collaborative efforts can be aligned to standards of the district-wide Standards-Based
Assessments (SBA). With the teachers’ consistency in developing and administering Standards-
Based common formative and summative assessments, the students will be trained and used to
the skills based on the district-wide Standards-Based Assessments (SBA).
The following assessments are being practiced: The CHamoru Language and Japanese
courses conduct oral presentations to assess fluency in the spoken language. The students are
given written pre-test at the beginning of the Block and a written post-test toward the end of the
Block to track growth; the Freshmen Math teachers utilize a Common Formative Assessment
(CFA) or Problem of the Day in which problem relative to the unit covered is chosen and
distributed to teachers and students; the English 9, particularly Freshmen Academy, and
Creative Writing teach and use common techniques, such as figurative language or rhyme
scheme. However, English 9 would focus on traditional sonnets, whereas Creative Writing
utilizes contemporary sources; and, the Fine Arts Cultural Dance Program (Inetnon Gef Pago)
hosts multiple performances throughout the year both on and off campus. Students learn
performance skills and are assessed in their public performances. Advanced classes are given
professional recital opportunities where students function as working professionals who perform
in the community.

D2.2. Using Assessment Data:


Assessment data is used to make decisions and modify instructional practices.
Southern High School (SHS) efficiently applies assessment data in deciding and adapting
instructional practices that correspond to students’ academic needs and prerequisites. Several
of the assessments used and analyzed are then compared to previous years and guide the
administration, departments and faculty decisions regarding changes in order, placement,
enrollment, failure rates, graduation rates, and other student necessities for the future school
year.
Most departments guarantee students’ success and improve the different aspects of data by
comparing and analyzing the previous year’s district assessment scores to revamp and update
the curriculum map and priority standards. Faculty and staff modify current curriculum for
individual students (SPED and ESL) to certify that the students are meeting their goals and
objectives in relevant content areas. Accommodations and modifications are afforded and
supported in most academic classes and feedback is monitored and reported to make
adjustments and affective changes to student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

D2.3. Demonstration of Student Achievement:


A variety of standards-based curriculum-embedded assessments (e.g., student work, pre- and
post- assessments, performance tasks, etc.) demonstrate student achievement of the academic
standards and the schoolwide learner outcomes.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers engage in a variety of Standards- Based Curriculum-
Embedded Assessments to develop and evaluate demonstrative students achievement with
respect to the academic standards and general learner outcomes currently in place. In a
Standards-Based Grading (SBG) system, a student can be given grades per goal rather than

31
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

per assignment. These grades are also based on student achievement rather than including
participation and other items.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers advance toward the full implementation of the
Standards-Based Grading (SBG) model as response to the call of the Deputy Superintendent of
Curriculum and Instruction and Guam Department of Education (GDOE) in 2016 that all schools
should have been trained in the new model by 2019. They believe and agree that the
Standards-Based Grading (SBG) makes grading clearer and focuses on a student’s growth in a
specific subject overall. As proficiency scales for content areas have been developed to reflect
as Level 1 (Help is Needed), Level 2 (Basic), Level 3 (Average/Above Average), or Level 4
(Mastery) student proficiency, the proficiency scales are aligned with the Depth-of-Knowledge.
They are developed to specifically target and enhance student learning goals and outcomes
within teachers’ lesson plans.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers continue to incorporate and embed the said
standards within their instructional methods that are based on the elements of Marzano’s High
Yield-Yield instructional strategies through Classroom Instruction That Works (CITW). They also
adopted and incorporated additional instructional methods such as Sheltered Instruction
Observation Protocol (SIOP) to make content material comprehensible to English Language
Learners (ELL).
The Southern High School (SHS) and the district-wide utilize the ACT Aspire. The ACT Aspire is
an additional standards-based curriculum-embedded assessment that assesses the Common
Core standards and college readiness of third through eleventh graders. It aligns to the ACT
subject areas and specifically tests Math, Reading, English, Writing, and Science.
The Southern High School (SHS) teachers’ use of variety of standards-based curriculum-
embedded assessments combined with the consistent and uniform instructional methods has
resulted to the development of district-wide standards-based assessments. The significance of
the district-wide standards-based assessments is that the Southern High School teachers who
use and incorporate GDOE district-wide standards have created these assessments.

D2.4. Teacher Feedback to Students:


Teachers provide timely, specific, and descriptive feedback in order to support students in
achieving learning targets, academic standards, and schoolwide learner outcomes.
Southern High School (SHS) has a 4x4 block schedule thus enabling the teachers regularly
report students’ progress every twenty school days either through progress reports or end of
term report cards. Consequently, students see their grade approximately every two weeks in
mid quarter or in a quarter and semester. Teachers are expected to input student grades on a
weekly basis through the online grade book, PowerTeacher Gradebook. These grades are
based on the priority standards and learning targets identified in the school’s curriculum maps.
They are also aligned with the school’s Student Learner Outcome (SLO).
The Southern High School (SHS) has a system that bridges student concerns to the faculty and
administration. In the Freshman Academy, caring adults and students review individual report
cards in a Report Card Conferencing. If a student feels that there is a need to write to a teacher
about the grade or concerns, the student fills out a “We Need To Talk/I Need Your Help” letter
addressed to the teacher.

GDOE/ACS WASC Category D. Standards-based Student Learning:


Assessment and Accountability
Summary, Strengths, and Growth Needs

32
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Review all the findings and supporting evidence and summarize the degree to which the criteria in
Category D are being met.
Include comments about the degree to which these criteria impact the school’s ability to address
one or more of the identified student learning needs (Chapter III).

Summary (including comments about the student learning needs):


Southern High School (SHS) identifies the need to develop sound strategies for a uniform and
consistent implementation of Standards Based Grading (SBG) with regards to student
performance. The district’s recent shift from the traditional grading system to Standards-Based
Grading (SBG) emphasizes the call for more collaboration in respect to the use of variety of
standards-based curriculum-embedded assessments and development of district-wide
standards-based assessments as a vital part of a data driven curriculum. This move is chiefly
driven by district requirements to combine Common Formative Assessments (CFA) as a
significant part of the school curriculum.
The school recognizes that with a full implementation, procedures must be in place for
consistency and accountability between the school and district.

Category D: Assessment and Accountability: Areas of Strength

● Departments receiving assessment data for analysis.


● Use of a variety of assessments to monitor students’ achievements
● Continuation of the Talent Development Secondary Program in the Freshman Academy
● Freshman Academy developing Standards Based Grading assessments and proficiency
scales
● Improvement in the passing rate of the freshman classes

Category D: Assessment and Accountability: Areas of Growth

● Consistent and uniform implementation of the Standards Based Grading


● Common conversion scales for the departments to follow from the administration level or
from the district level
● Teacher training on school specific data programs

CATEGORY E. SCHOOL CULTURE AND SUPPORT FOR STUDENT PERSONAL


AND ACADEMIC GROWTH

E1. Parent and Community Engagement Criterion

E1.1. Parent Engagement:


Southern High School (SHS) administration and faculty have systems and processes in place
that promote regular engagement of parents and community stakeholders. Student
Orientations, Open House, Chamorro Month, Career Day, Parent Teacher Conferences (PTC)
and Parent Teacher Student Organization (PTSO) meetings are some of the more notable.
Parent teacher conferences provide parents the opportunity to learn about their child’s
academic and behavioral progress, while PTSO meetings are used to keep parents and
community stakeholders informed of school events, programs, and initiatives. All in an effort to
include all stakeholders have the opportunity to be part of the teaching/learning process.

33
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

Parents are kept informed on events and SHS happenings through a variety of means which
include the school’s website, newsletters, school marquee, Education Update section of the
Pacific Daily News and PowerSchool (Parent Portal) which allows parents and guardians online
access to their child’s academic and behavioral progress. All of these are systems in place that
allow parent and teachers the opportunity to communicate with one another.

SHS students have access to a variety of Service Learning activities that begin in the classroom
and provide students opportunities to learn about real world issues. Most notable are the Annual
Coastal Clean-up, Food and Toy Drives, Big Brother activity between Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps (JROTC) and Harry S. Truman Elementary School, Special Olympics, National
Honor Society, Japanese Club, Band, Cultural Dance Classes and the school’s collaboration
with Guam Community College.

Parents are asked annually to take part in Perception Surveys, soliciting their “perceptions” on
the education program, school environment, teachers, and administration. Results show that
59% of parents feel the administration at SHS always or usually has a positive influence on the
school culture, 58% of teachers always or usually have a positive influence on the school
culture, and 54% of staff always or usually have a positive influence on culture. 51% of parents
always or usually support how administrators, faculty, and staff operate SHS. Additionally, 72%
of parents at SHS are always or usually proud to have their child attend SHS.

E1.2. Community Resources: The school uses community resources to support students, such
as professional services, business partnerships, non-profits, organizations, military, etc.
SHS collaborates with community agencies to support students succeed socially and
academically. Examples of the school effectively utilizing community resources to enhance
learning in and out of the classroom include: The Pacific Daily News through its “Education
Update” section, The School to Work Program, Guam Mayors Office, Inafa’Maolek (mediation
group), Supreme Court of Guam, Special Olympics and Student Exchange programs with
various schools in Japan are but a few. SHS also holds a Career Day where professionals in the
community are invited to share first hand knowledge and experiences with students.

E1.3. Parent/Community and Student Achievement


To ensure parents and the school community understand the importance of student
achievement of the academic standards and schoolwide learner outcomes through
curricular/co-curricular programs, SHS provides opportunities throughout the year to explain
district and school wide expectations.

Each school year, parents are invited to attend Student Orientation and Open House events at
the beginning and throughout the year. At the Student Orientation, parents are informed of
student academic and behavioral expectations, while the Open House provides parents the
opportunity to meet with teachers who are able to elaborate on their academic expectations.
PTSA meetings provide a forum for discussing school issues and concerns among various
stakeholders and are held on a monthly basis. The annual Open House is sponsored by the
PTSO is scheduled to inform parents of the school goals, expectations and support services
available to them to ensure their child’s success at SHS.

34
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

At the beginning of the year, information is disseminated to all students and parents. These
include class syllabi, Student Planner, Mission Statement as well as the SLOs. Additionally, the
school publishes newsletters to inform parents of school events, celebrations of school
achievements and successes. The school also maintains a website that is updated on a regular
basis, providing all stakeholders with communication from the school.

E2. School Culture Criterion

E2.1. Safe, Clean, and Orderly Environment


SHS, guided by GEBD Policies and SOP, ensures a safe and nurturing environment for all
students, faculty and staff. The school has in place, an updated school-wide emergency plan
that address scenarios such as fire, assault, bomb threats, gas leaks and terrorist attacks on
campus. School-wide fire, lock down and earthquake drills are carried out on a regular basis
and are documented. Evacuation maps are posted in every room, including the office. School
Resource Officers and School Attendance Officers, work with school administrators to enforce
safety on campus.

All students, parents and school personnel sign an Acceptable Technology Use Policy and
Network & Technology Waiver Form, both mandated by the GDOE that explains the proper use
of technology while on campus. School rules, policies, expectations are outlined in the faculty
handbook, student planner and class syllabi to ensure awareness of behavior and safety
protocols.

SHS faculty and staff have been trained in implementing PBIS, a school-wide discipline and
management system. The program includes proactive strategies for teaching and supporting
appropriate student behaviors to create a positive school climate.

E2.2. Discipline and Behavior Management System


SHS implements the PBIS framework as a school-wide discipline and management system.
PBIS promotes positive behavior expectations and supports a school environment conducive to
learning. Discipline data is inputted and reviewed by the All staff on a regular basis.

E2.3. High Expectations for Students


Results of Perception Surveys taken by faculty/staff, parents and students show the vast
majority agree the school: Places an emphasis on student achievement, Motivates and
encourages student learning, Addresses individual learning styles, Provides a safe, healthy and
nurturing learning environment, Establishes positive relationships between teachers/staff and
students, and Shows respect for all students (e.g. culture, ethnicity, economic status. Etc.)

E2.4. Culture of Trust, Respect, and Professionalism


SHS strives to create an environment of mutual respect and effective communication among all
stakeholders. Parents are encouraged to get involved with the school through the PTSO. For it
is at these meetings both parents and school staff and officials can dialogue on everything from
issues and concerns to progress reports.

E3. Student Support Criterion – Personalization

35
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

E3.1. Adequate Personalized Support


SHS provides support for all students in the areas of health, career, personal counseling, and
academic assistance. Teachers use intervention strategies for students who require academic
assistance. The school has in place systems and processes available for students needing
additional academic, emotional and behavioral supports in and out of the classroom. Academic
support programs such as ESL, SPED, Advanced Placement and Honors Program and the
Freshman Academy help students meet the challenges of the curricular programs and enable
them to achieve the schools’ expected schoolwide learner outcomes.

Students seeking extra academic assistance, can access tutoring services through the National
Honor Society, and from teachers who provide sessions during lunch and prep periods.
Tutoring covers a multitude of content and is further enhanced through the utilization of various
tools such as Khan Academy, WorkKeys, ASVAB practice, ACT practice, computers, and other
modern resources.

Students have access to a myriad of services coordinated by the schools counseling


department. Typical areas of concern involve academic matters, peer mediation, attendance
problems, family issues, personal and social conflicts, career counseling and expectations for
appropriate behavior and attitudes in school. Counselors are also involved in consultations and
conferencing with parents, teachers and outside agencies in order to provide a comprehensive
system of support for students. Another significant role counselors have is to support teachers
in academic improvement by assisting the Child Study Team (CST) when a student is
suspected of having an academic, emotional, or behavioral issues.

E3.2. Direct Connections


SHS has a process in place for students who are at risk academically or behaviorally through
the school’s Child Study Team (CST). The team is comprised of a school counselor,
administrator, special education teacher, referring teacher, parents of child being referred and a
faculty member. The CST works collaboratively to develop an action plan to address the
student’s needs. Counselors provide teachers with a CST packet to fill out. After the CST packet
has been completed, students are then tested or observed by specialists who make
recommendations for program and service eligibility.

E3.3. Strategies Used for Student Growth/Development


SHS has programs in place that utilize strategies to develop personalized approaches to
learning and alternative instruction. Programs such as ESL and SPED provide
accommodations/modifications, enrichment and support through the use of instructional
practices such as Classroom Instruction that Works (CITW), Big 8, Marzano’s Framework,
Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), and the development of proficiency scales
to ensure access and success for all students.

Students who have been identified with specific educational needs have available to them a
wide variety of specialized services. At the school level, Individualized Educational Plans (IEP)
are developed for students in the special education program. Special education and general
education teachers work together to modify and/or adapt curriculum, discuss student progress
and review program goals.

36
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

SHS ESL program services students whose native language is not English. ESL teachers
conduct assessments throughout the year and track progress twice a year along with the
regular classroom teacher. Modifications and accommodations are revised throughout the year
using an ESL modifications sheet.

SHS PBIS program includes proactive strategies for teaching and supporting appropriate
student behaviors to create a positive school climate. Discipline data is inputted into the SWIS
program and reviewed by PBIS team members on a regular basis. Additionally, teachers work
in their Professional Learning Committees (PLC) to review data, monitor student progress and
to develop strategies

E4. Student Support Criterion – Accessibility

E4.1. Equal Access to Curriculum and Support

All SHS Students have access to a challenging, relevant and coherent curriculum. Advanced
Placement and Honors courses, are available for students who demonstrate the ability to
succeed in more challenging and higher level learning environment. For those requiring
academic and behavioral supports, the school’s ESL and SPED program and staff provide a
comprehensive array of services.

E4.2. Curricular/Co-Curricular Activities


Students at SHS can participate in various curricular and co-curricular activities that foster the
school’s SLO’s. These include clubs and organizations and through it’s athletic programs.
Clubs and Organizations include National Honor Society, Japanese Clubs, Fishing Club, Game
Changers, Nursing Club, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior Class Councils, SBA, Junior
Achievement, STEM Club, JROTC and Close Up.
Additionally the school’s Athletic Program offers its students the opportunity to engage in
competition with neighboring high schools on island. These include Basketball, Softball, Soccer,
Volleyball, Rugby, Paddling, Wrestling, Tennis, Cross Country, Cheerleading and Track and
Field.
Students who participate in co-curricular activities must comply with the academic and
behavioral requirements established by each organization.
E4.3. Meeting Student Needs Through Curricular/Co-Curricular Activities
The school offers academic support programs such as Advanced Placement/Honors, ESL,
SPED and the Freshman Academy. These support programs help students meet the
challenges of the curricular programs and enable them to achieve the schools’ SLO’s

E4.4. Student Perceptions


SHS administers an annual perception survey for students. Before the end of the school year,
students are given the survey to fill out. The survey consists of questions that address teacher
performance, school and classroom environment. Results of the student survey are then shared
with school administrators, teachers/staff and parents. Based on these responses, an
overwhelming majority of students believe their teachers provide a positive learning
environment, care and are kind to students. Students are able to voice their opinions and

37
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

concerns to the Guam DOE, Board of Education and internally through the Student Body
Association.

Summary (Including comments about the student learning needs):

Southern High School (SHS) administration and faculty have systems and processes in place
that promote regular engagement of parents and community stakeholders in an effort to ensure
all students succeed socially and academically. Students have access to a variety of Service
Learning activities that begin in the classroom and provide students opportunities to learn about
real world issues. For those students who require additional support academically, emotionally
and behaviorally, SHS offers an array of services and programs that utilize strategies to develop
personalized approaches to learning and alternative instruction. All SHS Students have access
to a challenging, relevant and coherent curriculum and can participate in various curricular and
co-curricular activities that foster the school’s SLO’s.

Category E: School Culture (Environment) and Support for Student Personal and
Academic Growth: Areas of Strength
● SHS has systems and processes in place that promote regular engagement of parents
and community stakeholders.
● The culture and learning environment at SHS provide students with a learning
environment that is safe, nurturing and enhances student achievement.
● SHS continues to provide opportunities for the community to be active participants in the
education of all students.
● Students at SHS can participate in various curricular and co-curricular activities that
foster the school’s SLO’s.
● Teachers are resourceful and flexible in finding alternatives to meet the learning needs
of students.

Category E: School Culture (Environment) and Support for Student Personal and
Academic Growth: Areas of Growth
● SHS will continue to develop strategies designed to increase parent involvement and
participation in their child’s learning.
● SHS will continue to seek, establish and maintain partnerships (public, private, military,
etc.) with community organizations to provide its’ students with educational and
employment options.

Part B: Schoolwide Strengths and Critical Areas for Follow-up

Schoolwide Areas of Strength

1. The limited allocation of resources minimally supports the school’s ability to


implement, monitor and accomplish the goals of the school’s SIP. However,
the positive attitude, care, and commitment of the faculty and staff allows the

38
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

school to strategically utilize available resources to support student learning


and achievement.
2. Teachers are resourceful and flexible in finding alternatives to meet the
learning needs of students.
3. SHS’s faculty and staff have regularly engaged in research-based
Professional Development to inform instruction and improve student
achievement.
4. Coordination with GCC to provide real world curriculum experiences via CTE
classes on campus is on going.
5. Since the inception of the Freshman Academy and coordination in instruction
and support structures, students passing rate has increased.
6. Use of a variety of assessments to monitor students’ achievements
7. SHS has systems and processes in place that promote regular engagement
of parents and community stakeholders.
8. The culture and learning environment at SHS provide students with a safe
and nurturing place to learn that enhances student achievement.
Schoolwide Critical Areas for Follow-Up

The Visiting Committee concurs with the school’s identified areas that are outlined in
the schoolwide action plan. These are summarized below:

1. SHS will continue to seek, establish and maintain partnerships (public,


private, military, etc.) with community organizations to provide its’ students
with an optimal educational environment and employment options.
2. SHS will explore the implementation of a formalized, schoolwide mentorship
program for new teachers, given the relatively high rate of teacher turnover at
SHS.
3. Administration will utilize faculty meetings to explore and address school-
related issues in addition to professional development.
4. Data on achievement indicates a lack of readiness for entering freshman
students, consequently SHS should participate in vertical and horizontal
articulation across the school district.

Chapter V: Ongoing School Improvement


● Include a brief summary of the schoolwide action plan.

The 2018-19 schoolwide action plan addresses the identified critical areas for follow-up and is
also aligned to the Guam Department of Education State Strategic Plan and District Level
Expectations that involve key initiatives that directly affect SHS stakeholders and the school’s
achievement outcomes. The format is taken from the SHS’ template and specifically lists the
Critical Areas for Follow-up, with goals and objectives clearly delineated.

● Comment on the following school improvement issues:


o Adequacy of the schoolwide action plan in addressing the identified critical areas
for follow-up.

39
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

The schoolwide action plan is very inclusive, addressed regularly, and is an integral part of the
educational plan at SHS.

Do the schoolwide action plan goals address the critical areas for follow-up?

The Critical Areas have been accepted by the SHS Leadership Team and work on their
identification and introduction in the SHS faculty and staff is on-going.

o Will the schoolwide action plan enhance student learning?

The SHS School wide Action plan addresses goals, objectives, activities to accomplish them
and the identification of persons responsible, target date, resources, projected/desired
outcomes, assessment and status of the activity.

o Is the schoolwide action plan a “user-friendly” plan that has integrated all major
school initiatives?
The school-wide action plan has been accepted by the SHS Leadership Team, is available for
review, and implementation.

o Is the schoolwide action plan feasible within existing resources?


The schoolwide action plan is feasible given the existing resources.

o Is there sufficient commitment to the schoolwide action plan?


All levels and stakeholders are committed to the schoolwide action plan and incorporate the
goals and objectives into their curriculum and instruction.

● Existing factors that will support school improvement.


The faculty, administration, students and the Guam DOE are committed to school improvement.
This usable plan is currently in place and utilized by role groups.

● Impediments to improvement that the school will need to overcome.


The lack of sufficient funding from the GDOE may present a challenge in implementation of the
goals and objectives of the schoolwide action plan. It is a governmental issue that the school
has little control over and there is very little the school can do to search for a solution but need
to continue to work with its present parameters.

● Soundness of the follow-up process that the school intends to use for monitoring the
accomplishment of the schoolwide action plan.
SHS is well organized into various teams that work for program improvement. There is support
for program improvement through further implementation of the goals and strategies found in
the schoolwide action plan.

The school’s design of the schoolwide action plan ensures an ongoing improvement cycle that
includes involvement of the leadership team, teachers, staff, students, and parents as critical
stakeholders. It is evident that the stakeholders at SHS are committed to the plan and support
the need for school improvement. Administrative leadership and commitment by key
stakeholders has enabled the school to attempt to address the critical areas for follow-up.

40
Southern High School WASC Visiting Committee Report

41