Anda di halaman 1dari 3

2017­6­18 When Pedagogic Fads Trump Priorities ­ Education Week

EDUCATION WEEK TEACHER DIGITAL DIRECTIONS MARKET BRIEF TOPSCHOOLJOBS SHOP ADVERTISE

June 18, 2017
LOGIN | REGISTER | SUBSCRIBE

             
Browse archived issues Current Issue TOPICS  BLOGS REPORTS & DATA  EVENTS  OPINION VIDEO GALLERY JOBS

Published Online: September 27, 2010        

Published in Print: September 29, 2010, as When Pedagogic Fads Trump Priorities
поменять
прокси
COMMENTARY Get more stories and free e­newsletters!

When Pedagogic Fads Trump Priorities Email 

By Mike Schmoker Password 

Several years ago, I had a courteous, if troubling, e­mail
Printer­Friendly
Select your primary connection to education
exchange with the architect of a hugely popular instructional
Email Article
 Send me Edweek Update e­newsletter (Daily)
innovation. She had heard that I had been criticizing this
Reprints
approach. (I had.) In a series of e­mails, I explained my REGISTER NOW
Comments
reasons, starting with the fact that there was no research or By clicking "Register" you are agreeing to the Terms of
Tweet
Service and Privacy Policy.
strong evidence to support its widespread adoption. I asked, with
Share 0
increasing importunity, for any such evidence. Only after multiple
requests did I finally receive an answer: There was no solid Data retrieving error
research or school evidence.
MOST POPULAR STORIES

The innovation­Differentiated Instruction­went on to become one of the most widely
Viewed
adopted instructional orthodoxies of our time. It claims that students learn best when
Data retrieving error
(despite some semantically creative denial) grouped by ability, as well as by their
Emailed
personal interests and "learning styles."
Data retrieving error
I had seen this innovation in action. In every case, it seemed to complicate teachers'
Commented
work, requiring them to procure and assemble multiple sets of materials. I saw
frustrated teachers trying to provide materials that matched each student's or group's Data retrieving error

presumed ability level, interest, preferred "modality" and learning style. The attempt
often devolved into a frantically assembled collection of worksheets, coloring exercises, SPONSORED WHITEPAPERS

and specious "kinesthetic" activities. And it dumbed down instruction: In English, • Assess and Support the Whole Child

"creative" students made things or drew pictures; "analytical" students got to read and • What Is the Right Time to Benchmark and
Monitor Progress?
write.
• How to Keep Up With School Tech Challenges
in the Digital Age
In these ways, Differentiated Instruction, or DI, corrupted both curriculum and effective
• 6 Ways to Cultivate Growth Mindset
instruction. With so many groups to teach, instructors found it almost impossible to
• Leveraging Digital Content to Differentiate
provide sustained, properly executed lessons for every child or group­and in a single Learning

class period. It profoundly impeded the teacher's ability to incorporate those protean, • How to Develop a Successful Personalized or
Blended Learning Program
decades­old elements of a good lesson which have a titanic impact on learning, even in
• How to Make Your Case for Early­Childhood
mixed­ability classrooms (more on this in a moment). Education

When I shared these reasons with
educators, many were glad to hear their
suspicions affirmed. They had often been Special Services Director / School Psychologist
SJISD, Friday Harbor, WA
required to integrate DI into all their lessons­against their best instincts­as the program
Chief Financial Officer
morphed, without any reliable evidence of its effectiveness, into established orthodoxy. Dallas ISD, Dallas, TX

Others, however, were angered by any criticism of DI. Their reactions stopped some of Mandarin Dual Language Immersion
Kindergarten Teacher
my presentations dead in their tracks. These educators, and their districts, had invested Batesville Community School Corporation, Batesville, IN
enormous amounts of time, treasure, and hope in this pedagogical approach. Athletic Director
Newburgh Enlarged City School District, Newburgh, NY
We now have evidence that the investment in DI, despite the hype and priority it Director of Special Education and Student
received, was never fully warranted. It is on no list, short or long, of the most effective Services, PK­12
Fairfield Public Schools, Fairfield, CT

Sci­Hub
educational actions or interventions. Several recent reviews of research by prominent
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html MORE EDUCATION JOBS >> POST A JOB >>
Открыто через прокси 2 из 6

scholars in the field demonstrate that the concept has been running largely on
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.edweek.org.sci­hub.io/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html Помочь проекту  1/3


2017­6­18 When Pedagogic Fads Trump Priorities ­ Education Week

enthusiasm and a certain superficial logic. As Bryan Goodwin of Mid­continent
Research for Education and Learning, or MCREL, has written, there is "no empirical
research" whatsoever for schools to adopt DI if they wish to avail themselves of the
best ways to promote learning or close achievement gaps. Literally hundreds of studies
confirm this. In fact, the very notion that DI put so much stock in­that every student has
a distinct learning style or "modality" and must be taught accordingly­has been roundly
debunked by New Zealand's John Hattie and the University of Virginia's Daniel T.
Willingham, both education researchers of the first rank.

Of course, Differentiated Instruction is only one among many prominent detours поменять
прокси
American education has taken, none more pernicious than the chop­logic and excesses
of what is now being advocated in the name of "21st­century education" or the simplistic
requirement for teachers to mindlessly "incorporate technology" into their lessons­as
though that will rescue poor instructional plans from failure.

What, then, should be our priorities? I would contend that we already know them. They
are essential to an education for the 21st century, but are in fact old friends. Three
simple things matter more than all else if we want better schools.

First, we need coherent, content­rich guaranteed curriculum­that is, a curriculum which
ensures that the actual intellectual skills and subject matter of a course don't depend on
which teacher a student happens to get. Such a curriculum need not be perfect, and it
should make some allowances for individual teachers' preferences. In a majority of
schools, we do not yet have such curricula, even though this may have more impact on
learning than any other factor.

Second­and just as important­we need to ensure that students read, write, and discuss,
in the analytic and argumentative modes, for hundreds of hours per school year, across
the curriculum. We aren't even close to that now. All students should be reading deeply,
discussing, arguing, and writing about what they read every day in multiple courses. We
can do this: Consider that students spend about 1,000 hours per year in school.

Third, we need to honor, beyond lip service, the nearly half­century­old model for good
lessons that all of us know, but so few consistently implement (except, notably, when
being formally evaluated).

Good lessons start with a clear, curriculum­based objective and The consistent
delivery of lessons
assessment, followed by multiple cycles of instruction, guided
that include multiple
practice, checks for understanding (the soul of a good lesson), checks for
and ongoing adjustments to instruction. Thanks to the British understanding may
be the most
educator Dylan Wiliam and others, we now know that the
powerful, cost­
consistent delivery of lessons that include multiple checks for effective action we
understanding may be the most powerful, cost­effective action can take to ensure
learning.
we can take to ensure learning. Solid research demonstrates
that students learn as much as four times as quickly from such lessons.

Nothing rivals these three considerations. Mountains of evidence proclaim their
centrality. They should, therefore, be education's near­exclusive focus, our highest
priority for at least a period of years­or until they are satisfactorily and routinely
implemented. Then we can innovate­judiciously­starting with pilots and sensible
monitoring before we expand promiscuously on the basis of superficial appeal.

For decades, we have put novelty and the false god of innovation above our most
obvious, proven priorities. If we gave these priorities the chance they deserve, we
would achieve perhaps the most swift and dramatic progress toward improvement in our
history. We could make breathtaking strides toward ensuring a high quality of education
for all.

Sci­Hub http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска
▶ Открыто через прокси 2 из 6

http://www.edweek.org.sci­hub.io/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html Помочь проекту  2/3


2017­6­18 When Pedagogic Fads Trump Priorities ­ Education Week

Mike Schmoker is an author, speaker, and consultant in education. His most recent book
is Results NOW: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and
Learning (ASCD, 2006). He can be reached at schmoker@futureone.com.

Vol. 30, Issue 05, Pages 22­23

RELATED STORIES
“Chat: Exploring Differentiated Instruction,” May 15, 2009.
"Differentiated Learning," (On Special Education Blog) February 25, 2008.
поменять
прокси

Commenting temporarily disabled due to scheduled maintenance. Check back soon.

Ground Rules for Posting 
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are
prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement. 
All comments are public.
Back to Top 

ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT CONTACT US POLICIES ADVERTISE WITH US EPE INFO EDUCATION WEEK PUBLICATIONS


• Register or Subscribe • Help/FAQ • User Agreement • Display Advertising • About Us • Education Week
• Online Account • Customer Service • Privacy • Recruitment  • Staff • Teacher
Advertising
• Print Subscription • Editor Feedback • Reprints • Work@EPE • Digital Directions
• Manage E­Newsletters/ • Letters  • Mission and History • Market Brief
Preferences to the Editor
• TopSchoolJobs
• Group Subscription

© 2017 Editorial Projects in Education
   
6935 Arlington Road, Bethesda MD 20814 1­800­346­1834 (Main Office) 1­800­445­8250 (Customer Service)

Sci­Hub http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска
▶ Открыто через прокси 2 из 6

http://www.edweek.org.sci­hub.io/ew/articles/2010/09/29/05schmoker.h30.html Помочь проекту  3/3