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Programme Specification Hospitality Management

1. Institution Responsible for the KENT INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE (KIC)


Programme
2. Final Award and Level of Qualification Advanced Diploma in Hospitality Management
FHEQ Level 5
3. QAA Subject Benchmark Statement(s) Subject Benchmark Statement for Hospitality ,
Leisure, Sport and Tourism (2008)
Further and Higher Education Qualifications
Framework for England (FHEQ, 2008)

4. Reference Points
The educational aims and outcomes of the Programme have been written with reference to the
following reference points.
 The level of the Programme and the learning outcomes are consistent with the level
descriptors published by the Further and Higher Education Qualifications Framework
for England (FHEQ, 2008)
 The outcome statements are informed by the Benchmark Statement for Hospitality,
Leisure, Sport and Tourism (2008)
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-
benchmark-statements/honours-degree-subjects

5. Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes


The aim is to provide a demand led, academically challenging and vocationally relevant
programme that focuses on the dynamics of the Hospitality Industry which is expanding in a
developing economy such as Vietnam.

The Programme aims to:


 Provide an integrated education in Hospitality Management which synthesises key
management principles in relation to the management of people, finances, marketing,
facilities and resources in Hospitality operations and services
 Engage students in theories and concepts of Hospitality Management and the way in
which they relate to practical situations and the work place
 Develop students’ cognitive skills in problem solving and reflection to improve their
professional competence in a variety of Hospitality contexts
 Offer opportunities to students who wish to pursue operational business or managerial
careers in the Hospitality Service sector and who are capable of benefiting from the
experience
 Enable students to develop the intellectual, vocational and personal skills relevant to
further learning challenges and careers in Hospitality Industry
 Analyse issues associated with managing within the principles and methods
appropriate to the Hospitality Industry

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Learning Outcomes
Learning outcomes are statements on what successful students have achieved as the result of
learning. These are threshold statements of achievement; the learning outcomes broadly fall
into four categories:

A Knowledge and Understanding


On successful completion of the Programme a student will be able to:
A1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the dynamic nature of the Hospitality
Industry, their external context and how they are managed
A2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the operational and management activities
within the context of the Hospitality Industry
A3 Evaluate the core methods of working in the Hospitality Service sector and be able to
apply these in practical contexts

B Intellectual/Cognitive Skills
On successful completion of the Programme a student will be able to:
B1 Collect and analyse information to present reasoned arguments and decision-making
that demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Hospitality Industry
B2 Use a range of established techniques to propose solutions to problems arising in a
Hospitality context

C Practical Skills
On successful completion of the Programme a student will be able to:
C1 Communication – verbal and written communication skills developed through a range
of activities and assessment methods
C2 Effective use of ICT skills in responding to set tasks – use of information technology
and an appreciation of its application in the Hospitality environment
C3 Evaluate, analyse and synthesise qualitative and quantitative information
C4 Problem Solving – experience developed of solving problems and decision making in
a variety of Hospitality contexts
C5 Improving own learning and performance – including lifelong learning skills,
continuous personal and professional development, managing time and workloads

D Key/Transferable Skills
On successful completion of the Programme a student will be able to:
D1 Research information about Hospitality situations using appropriate qualitative,
quantitative and ICT techniques and skills
D2 Demonstrate commercial awareness regarding the Wine and Beverage Service Sector
environment and an understanding of the cultural, moral, ethical, environmental and
legal issues that underpin best practice in the Hospitality Industry
D3 Display a range of personal and interpersonal skills, including the capacity for
continuous learning, taking initiatives, performing to deadlines, communicating
effectively and persuasively, which are skills necessary to enter a career in the
Hospitality Industry or to undertake further study

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6. Module Mapping

A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3
LEVEL 4
Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality           
Understanding Business Organisations            
Finance for Managers             
Hospitality Operations Management            
Managing People in the Hospitality             
Industry
Hospitality Property Management             
LEVEL 5
Event Concepts            
Event Management and Promotion             
Food and Beverage Management 1             
Food and Beverage Management 2             
Hospitality Marketing             
Revenue Management in the Hospitality            
Industry

Students completing the Programme should meet the QAA's Benchmark Statement. The
outcome should be a student who has developed the skills, awareness and mindset to meet
the needs for further study or prospective employers. In addition the student will have
acquired valuable life skills such as self-awareness, creative problem solving, autonomy and a
positive attitude towards life-long learning opportunities, which can be translated into the
pursuit of further qualifications and careers.

7. Mode of Delivery
The Programme will be delivered in a full and part time mode normally over four consecutive
Semesters.

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8. Teaching and Learning Strategies
The underlying philosophy of the teaching and learning strategy in relation to this Programme
is to:
 Help students achieve intended learning outcomes
 Develop knowledge, understanding and skills in Hospitality management
 Encourage students to take responsibility for independence in their learning
 Provide an appropriate range of, and balance between, learning methods
 Exploit any work experience which students have
 Develop students’ English proficiency in relation to the Hospitality industry throughout
the teaching and learning in each module

Teaching and learning is designed to enable students to achieve intended learning outcomes.
These learning outcomes tie in to external reference points, such as relevant subject
benchmarks.

Knowledge is developed through


 Lectures and Class participation
 Guided, directed and general reading
 Guided and independent primary and secondary research

Thinking skills are developed through


 Preparation of tasks for Lectures, Seminars and Practical Workshops
 Seminar discussions
 Group Work and Peer Learning
 Completion of written Coursework, Presentations and Practical Workshops

Practical skills are developed through


 Practical Workshops
 Problem Solving Exercises
 Use of Information Technology

Skills for life and work (General Skills) are developed through
 Developing and defending ideas and arguments in class and assessments in different
formats including Coursework, Presentations and Practical Workshops
 Managing time by meeting deadlines for ongoing work throughout the semester

Teaching and learning is achieved by Lectures supported by Seminars and Practical


Workshops. Part of the Programme will be delivered using specialist facilities including
Training and Production Kitchens. In order to maintain contemporary industry relevance,
visiting specialists from industry will complement the teaching team and students will
undertake Work Placements in a variety of different types of Hospitality establishments. The
Work Placement aspects of the Programme will make a major contribution to the
understanding of concepts and career development.

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The Programme should be both stimulating and demanding, and should lead students through
progressive stages of development through introducing
 increasingly complex and open-ended tasks
 increasingly sophisticated application of intellectual / conceptual and personal
(transferable) skills
 increasingly independent study

The methods of learning and teaching are geared to progression and integration through the
levels of the Programme. The individual module descriptors provide details of learning
outcomes as well as methods of teaching and learning. The major forms of teaching methods
will be lectures and seminars, directed reading, interactive learning, case study analysis,
individual research, group learning activities and presentations. Industry practitioners will also
be used wherever possible, as repositories of up to date, expert knowledge in their specialist
or functional areas.

As Students progress from level 4 to level 5, they are expected to undertake more
responsibility for self managed and independent learning – namely where students are
expected to expand their knowledge and understanding by researching and studying the
subject area using their initiative.

LEVEL 4
Develop a rigorous approach to the acquisition of a broad knowledge base; employ a range of
specialised skills; evaluate information, using it to plan and develop investigative strategies
and to determine solutions to a variety of unpredictable problems; operate in a range of
varied and specific contexts, taking responsibility for the nature and quality of outputs.
At Level 4 students will be introduced to the key concepts required to succeed in today's
dynamic Hospitality environment. Modules will address a range of issues through both a
theoretical and practical lens in connection with creative Hospitality processes and business
management. In addition to subject specific knowledge and skills, students will develop
effective study and time management skills so vital in learning to learn at undergraduate level.

LEVEL 5
Generate ideas through the analysis of concepts with a command of specialised skills and the
formulation of responses to problems; analyse and evaluate information; exercise judgement
across a broad range of functions; and accept responsibility for determining and achieving
personal and / or group outcomes.
At Level 5 students explore the relationship between functional areas and develop an
appreciation of the context in which Hospitality leaders and managers operate. Key aspects
of Hospitality thought and action and how to make effective decisions, are developed in
depth.

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At level 5, students are expected to take increasing responsibility for their individual learning
and for their development of approaches to learning. These strategies are facilitated within
the design of the Programme and are designed to encourage the development of student
confidence in their abilities while developing individual cognitive abilities, understanding of
discipline and subject content, academic and professional knowledge, reflection on academic
and applied aspects of the Programme, application skills and an enquiring mind capable of
devising and / or implementing creative solutions.

Skills Development
The cognitive skills below, which are referred to in the QAA Benchmark Statement, will be
developed and assessed in addition to teaching relevant subject knowledge. Students will be
introduced to a variety of Learning and Personal Development Skills via the Induction. The
skills developed by students while studying on the include:
 Examination technique in relation to summative written examinations
 Research and academic writing skills in relation to coursework including; Harvard style
referencing, critical evaluation and reflection
 Written and oral communication, in English, in a variety of formats including reports
and presentations
 Numeracy and information technology skills
 The ability to analyse and evaluate structured problems and to draw reasonable
conclusions
 Self-managed learning (through private study preparation for coursework and
examinations)

Lectures
Lectures provide the overview framework within which learning can be coherently and
effectively delivered within the Programme. They are devised to enable students to
contextualise their learning within the keynote concepts and subject exploration appropriate
for the Programme.

Seminars
Seminars are designed to enable students to develop their critical perspectives on a topic or
subject within the Programme by exploring theoretical or practical concepts as well as
introducing problem solving and creative thinking. Seminars are used to provide students with
valuable experience in the presentation of argument and discussion at a professional standard
as well as providing opportunities for formative, and where appropriate, summative feedback
to individuals and to student groups on their academic performance and skills development.

Induction
The aim of induction is to provide orientation, support and advice to students.
At the commencement of the , students will receive a Student Handbook, a Programme
Handbook and a Module Handbook for the Programme that includes relevant regulations, details
of assessment, progression and awards. It will incorporate any support features operated by ,
module descriptions and named persons to contact for support and advice.

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Principal Aims of the induction include:
 encouraging students to develop a proactive approach to learning and self-development
and the acquisition of personal transferable skills
 increasing student confidence in learning autonomously
 ensuring students are aware of the philosophy underlying the delivery of the Programme
and to clarify the Programme aims, content and structure; academic rigour and
standards; and the assessment of learning outcomes
 introducing students to skill areas and personal qualities which will enable them to
develop on the Programme
 ensuring students are aware of the nature and requirements of the Programme, the
quality assurance and support systems available to them
 specifying in detail the schedule of student activities and in particular the assessment
arrangements making explicit that students are required to set and manage their own
learning for significant parts of their Programme and to identify and use appropriate
learning resources
 selecting Student Representatives for the Programme Committee meetings
 delivery methods – the importance of attendance, commitment to class preparation
for discussion, the importance of participating in team work and the ethos of individual
learning along with reflection and plagiarism issues

The Programme Leader will be the main person at the induction with support from other
academic and administrative staff members.

Induction will be a process integrated into the Programme and not viewed as a one-off
administrative activity.

Information days will take place in each semester on a regular basis covering topics such as
case study analysis, report writing, examination techniques, plagiarism issues, how to manage
time, adapting to the learning environment, information on writing assignments (referencing,
structure and composition of essays) and examination techniques.

This is to avoid information overload on the induction day.

9. Assessment Strategies
Assessment Methods will relate directly to the Learning Outcomes for each Module and the
nature of the assessment task may involve quizzes, tests, theory examinations, practical
examinations, presentations, reports and essays.
The Assessment Strategy varies from Module to Module, The validity and reliability of the
Assessment Methods will consider not only the Module Learning Outcomes, but the Level, the
Module Content and the need to demonstrate the relationship between theory and practice,
and theory into practice

Assessment of cognitive skills takes place in the majority of tasks which will focus on
application of principles to realistic situations. Many tasks will encourage students to develop
critical skills of communication and problem solving and adopt a reflective approach to their
achievements and to the processes undertaken in the assessment task.

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Practical Assessments will be largely related to performance in the practical tasks undertaken
and where small groups are involved, methods of identifying individual performance will be
retained.

Assessment tasks will grow in sophistication and complexity as a student progresses on the
Programme. For example:
 at Level Four a student may be asked to describe, discuss, compare, and outline
 at Level Five a student may be asked to evaluate, analyse, justify, and differentiate

Knowledge is Thinking skills are Practical skills are Skills for life and
assessed by assessed by assessed by work (general skills)
are assessed by
Exams – Theory X X
Exams – Practical X X X X
Coursework X X X X
Presentations X X X X
Critical review of X X X X
academic literature and
business documents

10. Assessment Matrix


In order to be compliant with Vietnam’s Ministry of Education and Training (MOET)
Regulation No. 43, the Assessment for each Module must follow the pattern below.

Type of Assessment Weighting Assessment Activities


Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report / Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 Hour Practical Skills
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 Hour Practical Skills
Examination

11. Student Progression


A student shall not normally progress from one stage of the Programme to the next until the
Assessment Board is satisfied that the student is eligible to proceed as determined by
Programme regulations or by exercising academic judgement. In exercising this judgement the
Assessment Board may in exceptional circumstances, employ reasonable discretion in arriving
at a decision which is the result of a legitimate interpretation of Programme regulations.
At the discretion of the Assessment Board, students will not be allowed to progress if they are
required to be reassessed in more than two modules per semester.

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 The Overall Pass Mark for each Module is 50%
 Students must attempt All Assessments for each Module with the following
compulsory weightings of Coursework 20%, Mid Term Exam 30% and Final Exam 50%
 A student will not be permitted to repeat any item of assessment previously completed
successfully in order to improve the mark for a Module
 Students who do not Pass a Module may re-sit or resubmit the assessment for that
Module a Maximum of three times, but this is subject to any re-sit or resubmission
being undertaken within 12 months of completion of all assessment components for
the Programme
 The maximum mark which can be awarded for a module after reassessment is 50%
irrespective of the academic merits of the reassessed work, unless the student has
been allowed to ‘sit as if for the first time’, as a result of a successful mitigation claim
 The Assessment Board will make decisions on Pass and Proceed, Referral, Deferral and
Fail.
 All Assessment Board decisions will be lodged with the Programme Administrator

12. Award Titles and Designation


In order to be eligible for the Award of the Programme, a student must
[a] Pass all the Taught Modules in Years 1, 2 and 3
[b] Complete the Internship at the end of Year 3 and submit and pass the Reflective Report
[c] Complete any Work Placement / On the Job Training as part of the Programme

Where students do not successfully complete all the requirements of [a], [b] and where
relevant [c]; they will not be eligible for an Award but will receive a Transcript showing those
modules completed to apply for credit.

13. Admission Requirements


 UK and International Qualifications equivalent to the standard entry for First Year or
Level 4 of Undergraduate Study
 Applicants who have been taught and assessed in a language other than English should
have an English Language equivalent to IELTS 6.0; exceptionally, those with an English
language level of 5.5 may be admitted, on the condition that they continue to study
English so that they achieve a level of 6.0 prior to completing the Programme
 Consistent with a commitment to widen access and participation, the Programme has
a flexible admissions policy, and encourages applications from mature students and
from groups normally under-represented in higher education
 The general policy is to look for a good level of literacy, together with proven interest
and / or experience in an appropriate subject

14. Quality Assurance and Support for Students

14.1 Quality Assurance Systems and Policies


The overall responsibility for managing the Programme lies with the Programme Leaders and
the Module Tutors. There is also a Programme Committee which comprises the Management
Team, Student Representatives, Module Tutors and Administrators.

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14.2 Programme Committee
The Programme Committee will meet once each Semester. Minutes of these meetings will be
used to complete an end of year review. The Committee will also be responsible for
consideration of major issues arising from Assessment Boards and feedback from the Student
Evaluation Survey.

The Programme Committee has the final authority on academic matters relating to the
development and direction of all Programme. The Committee is responsible for carrying out
the following functions.
 Developing, reviewing and monitoring the aims, objectives and operations of the
Programme
 Formulating and standardising assessment policies relating to the development and
administration of the Programme
 Evaluating reports from the Assessment Board and taking appropriate actions
 Submitting reports to external bodies

The membership of this Committee includes


Programme Leaders
Programme Administrators
Module Tutors
Student Representatives

14.3 Module Tutors


Module Tutors are responsible for:
 Preparing and reviewing module implementation plans
 Ensuring high quality delivery of the module to enable students to attain Learning
Outcomes
 Monitoring, reviewing and developing module content, and teaching and learning
strategies
 Providing feedback to students on formative and summative assessment
 Counselling students as regards progress in the module

14.4 Programme Leader


Programme Leader will have day to day management of the Programme and specific
responsibility for:
 Dealing with applications for the Programme
 Organising an induction Programme for students and preparing and distributing the
Student Programme Handbook
 Counselling students in respect of academic and personal problems and ensuring that
students are aware of the range of support offered by
 Help and support in negotiating academic systems and understand regulations
 Advise on study skills and ensure that students are directed to the most appropriate
source
 Help and support on non-academic matters such as personal development
 Participating in Programme management, team development and Assessment Board
meetings
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 Issue Student Evaluation Surveys and prepare a summary of results
 Providing academic and administrative leadership for the Programme
 Convening and chairing Programme Team and Committee meetings
 Assisting in co-ordinating timetables and examination / assessment schedules
 Co-ordinating the preparation of Annual Monitoring Reports (AMR)
 Ensure adequate resourcing for the Programme, including staffing, rooming, library
and IT facilities
 Assisting with the completion of requests for reports

14.5 Programme Team Meetings


The Programme Team, comprising the Programme leader and Module Tutors will meet prior
to each Intake and once during each semester, or as and when required. Such meetings will
deal with various aspects of Programme provision, including:
 On-going monitoring of the Programme, including responding to student feedback
 Review of student attendance and performance
 Review of recruitment in relation to targets and drop-out rates
 Consideration and modification of Programme marketing strategies
 Implementation of the action agenda produced in the Annual Monitoring Report
(AMR)

14.6 Programme Monitoring and Evaluation


Programme are continually monitored at two levels, one involving a short feedback loop and
the other a long feedback loop.
The short feedback loop involves the Programme Team responding quickly to issues arising on
a day-to-day/week-to-week basis. Issues and responses are recorded in Team meeting minutes
and any action agenda arising. The issues may be raised by individuals, groups, Student
Representatives or staff.
The long feedback loop involves a more formal review by the Programme Committee. This will
involve longer term planning culminating in the AMR.
Student feedback is a key element in evaluating the success of the Programme. Student
comments are noted as they are presented and actioned in relation to the short feedback
loop. A more formal mechanism for securing student feedback on the Programme will be via
Student Satisfaction Surveys issued at the end of the delivery for each module. Such feedback
is presented to the Programme Committee for discussion.

14.7 Staff Development and Recruitment Strategy


All members of staff associated with the Programme are experienced in teaching and
assessing at the undergraduate level within their respective subjects and / or the broader
aspects of taught undergraduate study. This experience has been gained from their prior
employment within higher education; and from their long standing membership of
professional bodies and / or their professional backgrounds.
The general staff development strategy will be adopted within the constraints of available
resources. Strategy may be benchmarked against appropriate good practices which have been
successfully applied at other institutions.

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The staff development strategy is broadly aimed at:-
 Enhancing the Learning Environment which supports the delivery of the portfolio of
Programme offered by the college in its on-campus provision, at its overseas campuses
and partner campuses, and in future areas and modes of development
 Providing a coherent framework for the development of faculty and support staff
particularly in supporting and enhancing the delivery of the portfolio and in responding
to student learning and teaching requirements and educational developments
 Supporting and maintaining the currency of approaches taken towards Learning and
Teaching and Programme delivery requirements, to Programme-portfolio content and
its relevance, to pedagogy and learning philosophy, and to the development of
scholarship and research approaches which are pertinent to the aims and objectives of
its Programme and overall portfolio

The following steps outlined below will be adopted by within the constraints of available
resources.
 All staff engaged with the Programme will be encouraged to engage in research, higher
degree work and other scholarly activity appropriate to their own personal stage of
development. At the current time all members of the core teaching team are engaged
in Continuing Professional Development
 All staff engaged on the Programme will be encouraged to participate in at least one
other module with two objectives in mind: to allow them to expand their own
understanding of the subject and to promote vigorous debate and discussion within
the participant group
 All members of the teaching team will be encouraged to join where they have not
done so scholarly or professional associations pertinent to the Programme
 All members of staff associated with the Programme will be experienced with teaching
and assessing at undergraduate level. This experience will have been gained from their
employment, teaching and professional experience.

Tutors will be subject to the following selection criteria:

Qualification Essential (E) / Desirable (D)


Relevant First Degree E
Relevant Professional Membership E
Relevant Masters Degree E
Teaching Experience up to HE Level 6 E
Professional / Practical Experience E
Proficiency in English E
Relevant Doctorate D

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Induction of Staff will concentrate on the academic and administrative requirements of the
Programme. The content of the Staff Induction will include:

 Academic Features – Curriculum Structure, Aims and Objectives


 Teaching, Learning and Assessment / Preparing Assessments incorporating best
practice / Peer Review of Teaching
 Learning Outcomes and Feedback / Assessment Boards
 Module Guides
 Use of Knowledge and Practical Experience to inform Scholarly Activity
 Programme Quality Assurance
 Student Induction
 Student Support – Academic and Pastoral
 Programme Committee Meetings / Team Meetings of Staff
 Student Satisfaction Surveys and Module Evaluation Reports by Staff
 Staff Development
 Roles of Programme Leader and Programme Administrators

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15. MODULE DESCRIPTORS

LEVEL 4
Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality
Understanding Business Organisations
Finance for Managers
Hospitality Operations Management
Managing People in the Hospitality Industry
Hospitality Property Management
LEVEL 5
Event Concepts
Event Management and Promotion
Food and Beverage Management 1
Food and Beverage Management 2
Hospitality Marketing
Revenue Management in the Hospitality Industry

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MODULE Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


The module exposes students to the key concepts and issues relevant to the changing
business environment as related to the products and services associated with Tourism and
Hospitality enterprises.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Examine changing trends and consumer lifestyles through food and beverage culture
in SE Asia and trends in the development of Tourism and the Hospitality industry in
Vietnam

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Understand the context and concept of 1.1 Identify key points in the development of
Tourism and Hospitality developments in Tourism and Hospitality in Vietnam
Vietnam
2. Appreciate the changing trends and 2.1 Identify the changing trends and consumer
consumer lifestyles in Tourism and the lifestyles in Tourism and the Hospitality
Hospitality industry through food and industry
beverage culture in SE Asia 2.2 Assess the impact of these changes on food
and beverage culture in SE Asia
3. Apply best practice of customer orientation 3.1 Demonstrate the appropriate use of
and quality service in a food and beverage equipment in a food and beverage service setting
service setting 3.2 Display knowledge of all relevant operational
tasks and the safe use of equipment
3.3 Demonstrate effectively the interpersonal
skills necessary for professional and personal
development in the context of customer care
3.4 Display, dispense and serve the extensive
range of beverages in a professional manner

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Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 9 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 135
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 105
Assessment Preparation
Total 240

Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Tourism and Hospitality Today: An Introduction Unit
Development of the Tourism and Hospitality industry / Definitions / Purpose of
Tourism / Components of the Tourism and Hospitality product and industry from
the perspective of Vietnam / Tourism and Hospitality trends and patterns /
Economic impacts on Tourism and Hospitality / Product trends in Tourism and
Hospitality / Branding / Social, Cultural, Demographic, Political and Economic
forces influencing Tourism behaviour and their impacts on the Hospitality
industry
45 Food Culture in SE Asia Unit
Evolution of cuisines in SE Asia – origin and development / Principles and
concepts of Asian foods and beverages – historical, religious and geographical
influences / Regional ingredients of Asean dishes / Food and beverage Tourism /
The marriage of food and wine in Asia / Food ideology and ethnocentrism /
Development of restaurants / Impact of the media on food and beverage and on
restaurant and hotel ratings
45 Food and Beverage Service Techniques
Food and Beverage Operation - Best Practices / Health and Safety Law / Policy
and Procedures in relation to Food and Beverage service and events / The
importance of Product knowledge / Types of alcoholic and non-alcoholic
beverages / Taste and sensory evaluation of drinks / Bar Service Techniques and
modern Bar Tender Ethics
135

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Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Williams A Understanding the Hospitality Consumer Butterworth
Heinemann
Textbook Hall CM et al Food Tourism: Around the World, Elsevier
Development, Management and Markets
Textbook Vongerichten Food photography by Sang An, Travel Broadway Books
JG photography by del Vecchio D Asian flavours
of Jean-Georges
Textbook Lillicrap D, Food and Beverage Service Hodder and
Cousins J and Stoughton
Smith R

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short Answer 1.1
Questions / Presentation / Report / 2.1, 2.2
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1, 2.2
3.1, 3.2
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1, 2.2
3.3, 3.4
Overall Pass Mark 50%

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MODULE Understanding Business Organisations
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


The ability to understand the culture of an organisation and the factors shaping Public Relations
are essential and integrated components of Hospitality Service.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Appreciate culture in its various forms within the Hospitality Industry as the Industry
adapts to a dynamic and changing environment
(b) Evaluate the role of Public Relations within the Hospitality Industry

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is expected
to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Evaluate various types of Hospitality 1.1 Compare and contrast the form, aims, objectives and
organisations operations of business organisations in the Hospitality sector
2. Evaluate various forms of culture 2.1 Compare and contrast the mechanistic and organic
within Hospitality organisations forms of culture in the Hospitality sector
3. Examine the role and importance 3.1 Examine the importance and impact of Public Relations on
Public Relations in the Hospitality organisational performance in the Hospitality sector
sector

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 18
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Culture in Hospitality Organisations Unit
Types of organisations in the Hospitality sector / Compare and contrast the features
of mechanistic and organic forms of organisational culture in the Hospitality sector /
Influence of organisational culture on Hospitality sector / International and
Intercultural communication
45 Public Relations in the Hospitality Industry Unit
Public Relations, Media Planning and Advertising in the Hospitality sector /
International Mass Communications / Cultural aspects of the mass media /
Ethics and Regulation in Hospitality advertising and Public Relations / Public
Relations media and methods in the Hospitality sector
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Wood RC Organisational Behaviour for Butterworth
Hospitality Management Heinemann
Textbook Cutlip S, Center A and Effective Public Relations FT Prentice Hall
Broom G
Textbook Mullins A Management and Organisational FT Prentice Hall
Behaviour

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions / 2.1
Presentation / Report / 3.1
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination 3.1
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination 3.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 19
MODULE Finance for Managers
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module has a focus to equip Hospitality students with a conceptual understanding and
practical use of accounting and financial information. The content will explore financial
information systems, managerial accounting procedures, quantitative analysis techniques and
reporting concepts. Students will be encouraged to use financial language and to analyse the
'why', 'how' and 'what' in financial terms as applied to the Hospitality sector.

Specific objectives will enable students to:


(a) Develop the ability to prepare, read and interpret financial statements
(b) Apply the process of using and presenting structured financial data to assist the
management decision making process

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student
is expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following
learning outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment
criteria determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Understand the main features 1.1 Prepare financial statements and reports using
characterising the structure and content relevant financial principles, concepts and
of financial information for conventions
organisations 1.2 Discuss the concepts underpinning the
statements
2. Apply a range of performance 2.1 Compute a range of performance indicators
indicators to measure the financial from financial statements
performance and financial position of an 2.2 Analyse, interpret and evaluate the results of
organisation these computations
2.3 Assess and measure the financial performance
and financial position of an organisation both
internally and externally
3. Apply management accounting tools 3.1 Compute, analyse and evaluate management
to inform the management decision accounting tools to inform the management
making process decision making process

PROF BG Page 20
Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

Teaching Schedule

HOURS INDICATIVE CONTENT


45 Principles of Finance Unit
Preparation of financial statements – Statement of Financial Position, Income
Statement, Cash Flow Statement taking into consideration adjustments, sources
of finance, accounting conventions, standards and legal requirements
Analysis and interpretation of financial statements including profitability,
liquidity, working capital, gearing and investment ratios
45 Cost Management in Hospitality Operations Unit
Budgets / cash flow forecast / forecast profit or loss / profit vs. cash
Product / service costing / absorption costing / overhead allocation,
apportionment and absorption
Marginal costing / Cost-volume profit analysis / Investment Appraisal
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Atrill P and Accounting and Finance for Non Specialists FT Prentice Hall
McLaney EJ
Textbook Drury C Management and Cost Accounting Thompson Learning
Textbook Dyson JR Accounting for Non Accounting Students FT Prentice Hall

PROF BG Page 21
Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short Answer 1.1, 1.2
Questions / Presentation / 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
Report / Assignment 3.1
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1, 1.2
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
3.1
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1, 1.2
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
3.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 22
MODULE Hospitality Operations Management
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module will enable students to develop students' understanding of operations management
within the Hospitality sector.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Analyse the operational issues and challenges faced in various types of operating
systems, including an assessment of issues involved in their effective design and
management
(b) Explore the key principles, concepts and processes associated with the short term
planning and control of operations
(c) Undertand the principles of environmental management and their applications in the
Hospitality Industry, including water, energy, indoor environment and waste
management

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is expected
to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Recognise and analyse the competencies 1.1 Discuss the roles and functions of managers
related to the management and control of related to Hospitality operations
Hospitality operations 1.2 Evaluate the key skills needed for the successful
management and control of Hospitality operations
2. Examine the interaction of the workforce, 2.1 Identify the key management result areas
organisation and customers in terms of key 2.2 Evaluate the impact of interacting stakeholders in
management result areas achieving these key management result areas
3. Recognise the importance of a theoretical 3.1 Demonstrate a theoretical and practical
and practical knowledge of the measurement, knowledge of the measurement, management and
management and implementation of product implementation of product and service quality
and service quality initiatives initiatives
4. Apply and assess a range of modern 4.1 Demonstrate the application and assessment of a
operational issues range of modern operational issues
5. Describe the theoretical approaches to 5.1 Discuss the challenges posed by productivity,
productivity, income, asset protection and income, asset protection and employee performance
employee performance and their application to and their application to the Hospitality Industry
the Hospitality Industry

PROF BG Page 23
Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Hospitality Project Management Unit
Nature of Operations in the Hospitality Industry
Description and interrelationship of the main component sectors, operating
characteristics and their implications for Hospitality operations / Structure of
the industry, hotel product, factors affecting demand, sales and letting / Safety
and security legislation
Capacity Management and the Customer
Waiting Line Management / Flexible Capacity / Partitioning Demand /
Complimentary Services / Increasing Customer Participation / Capacity
management and its influence on revenue / Saying NO to the customer
45 Managing Technology in Hospitality Industry Unit
Managing Quality Operations
Measuring product and service quality in Hospitality / The role of the manager
in implementing quality in Hospitality operations / The role of the customer in
the quality management process / TQM in the Hospitality Sector /
Benchmarking practices / Optimus Levels 1 – 5 / Six Sigma for Hospitality / ISO
9000 for Hospitality
Managing the modern Hospitality Organisation
Measuring and managing labour productivity in Hospitality operations / The
opportunities and challenges of outsourcing operational activities / Crisis
management and responding to change in the operating environment / The
control of costs and performance and productivity measures in operations / The
role of Information Technology in the service encounter
90

PROF BG Page 24
Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Jones P (Ed) Handbook of Hospitality Operations Elsevier
and IT
Textbook Fitzsimmons J and Service Management - Operations, McGraw Hill
Fitzsimons M Strategy, Information Technology
Textbook Johnson R and Service Operations Management FT Prentice Hall
Clark G
Textbook Slack N, Chambers Operations Management FT Prentice Hall
S and Johnston R

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1, 1.2
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 2.1, 2.2
Hour Practical Skills
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 3.1
Hour Practical Skills 4.1
Examination 5.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 25
MODULE Managing People in the Hospitality Industry
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


The Hospitality Industry has long been regarded as a fast growing and dynamic global industry
(Ernst and Young 2006). With a recognition that people are "the single most important issue in
the delivery of 1 st class service" (Hirst, 2013) it is evident that the effective management of
human resources is seen to have a relevance to the Hospitality sector's performance, reputation
and profitability. Furthermore the industry is seen as highly labour intensive and full of
paradoxes in relation to people management philosophies (Nickson, 2013). Hence this module
exposes students to sector specific people management challenges and responses via an
exploration of human resource management practice within Hospitality settings.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Develop knowledge and understanding of human resource management within
contemporary Hospitality contexts
(b) Interrogate the link between superior performance and human management practices
(c) Develop critical awareness of human resource issues and challenges in attracting,
selecting, utilising and retaining talent in Hospitality industries in both national and
international settings
(d) Develop critical awareness of issues of equality, diversity, ethical and moral implications
and the creation of sustainable reward strategies

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Recognise and understand the issues 1.1 Discuss the issues and challenges impacting on the
which influence people at work in the global management of people in the global Hospitality sector
Hospitality Industry
2. Explain the relationship between the 2.1 Identify the various relationships between the
personnel function and management personnel function and management
3. Describe the process of motivating the 3.1 Assess the methods of attracting and selecting
team, managing performance and employees with the relevant knowledge, skills and
recognising and rewarding excellence attitudes for the Hospitality Industry
3.2 Analyse the key issues involved in effectively
utilising learning and performance management
techniques to develop talent in the Hospitality Industry
4. Explain the processes of delegation, 4.1 Identify the challenges of maintaining
supervision and control in improving employment relationships; including the reward and
performance in Hospitality organisations retention of talent in improving performance for
Hospitality organisations

PROF BG Page 26
Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 3 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 45
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 155
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Introduction to the meaning and application of Human Resource Management
in five key areas (Attract, Utilise, Develop, Reward and Relations) to meet ever
changing organisational challenges in the Hospitality environment / Group
behaviour and performance / Attitudes, Perception / The people-organisation
relationship / The psychological contract
The nature and relationship between management and the personnel function
Management as an integrating activity and a social process / Flexibility of
managerial work / Management and job stress / Managerial effectiveness / The
personnel function as a shared responsibility / Staffing and staff turnover /
Human resource planning / Role of the manager in recruitment, selection and
induction / The manager and staff development
Motivation, performance management and reward systems
Utilising people in the Hospitality Sector / Recruitment and selection of talent /
Needs and expectations at work / Practical applications of motivational
theories / Job design, restructuring and job enrichment / Involvement and
empowerment / People – service quality link / Managing workplace diversity /
Reward in the Hospitality Sector
Managing, delegation and control in improving organisational performance
Identifying and managing performance / The practice and difficulties associated
with delegation and the need for management control / Using benefits to drive
superior performance / Performance improvement and appraisal / The exercise
of control and stages in control systems

45

PROF BG Page 27
Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Baum T Human Resource Management for Thomson Learning
Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure: An
International Perspective
Textbook Boella M and Human Resource Management in the Routledge
Goss-Turner S Hospitality Industry: A Guide to Best
Practice
Textbook McKenna E Human Resource Management: A FT Prentice Hall
and Beech N Concise Analysis
Textbook Mullins LJ Hospitality Management and Longman
Organisational Behaviour

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 2.1
Hour Practical Skills
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 3.1, 3.2
Hour Practical Skills 4.1
Examination
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 28
MODULE Hospitality Property Management
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 4
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module introduces the student to the knowledge, techniques and competencies related
to the management of Hospitality properties.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Understand the theories and concepts concerning the functions of managing
Hospitality properties
(b) Identify the nature of managing properties in a variety of Hospitality organisations,
taking into account the impact of the external environment
(c) Develop the ability to apply theories, concepts and techniques to diagnose, analyse
and resolve problems in the management Hospitality properties
(d) Understand the role and value of managing Hospitality properties in the industry’s
increasingly competitive, dynamic and turbulent environment

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Explain the five stages in the building 1.1 Demonstrate how the theories, concepts and
development process tools used in the building development process
2. Describe the interaction of the workforce, 2.1 Consider and evaluate the various stakeholder
organisation and customers in effective contributions to understanding the subject of
building performance effective building performance
3. Identify the different spheres of Property 3.1 Analyse and evaluate the roles and
Management and the roles and responsibilities associated with the different
responsibilities associated with these spheres of property management
4. Outline the aims and scope of maintenance 4.1 Analyse the outcomes of applying maintenance
services in property management services in property management
5. Describe how good building design supports 5.1 Analyse the relationship between good building
effective environmental management design and effective environmental management
practices in Hospitality practices
6. Recognise the developments within the F & 6. 1 Demonstrate the developments including
B sector including legislation legislation within the F & B sector

PROF BG Page 29
Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Customer, Workforce and Organisation
The Customer as a resource to be managed, the impact of human resources on
service operations, operational relationships
The Building Development Process
Concept, Planning, Legal requirements, Construction, Operations, Asset
Management, Interior Design
Building design and environmental management
Environmental impact of buildings, sustainable building design, waste, energy,
water, indoor environment
Maintenance Services
Developing a maintenance policy, Maintenance systems and their control, Waste
disposal, Pest control, Standards (ISO)
The spheres of Property Management
The purchasing process, sourcing supplies, costs and budgeting, risk management,
contract services
45 Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System
Food Hygiene Regulations / Global Directives / HACCP systems and documentation /
Record keeping - storage and management / Auditing and periodic review / Dealing
with food safety complaints / HACCP compliance and food safety contravention /
Application of HACCP to food production situations / Individual responsibility under
the law / Food safety updates, traceability, labelling of food, requirements for
registration of food premises / Organisation and operational standards of food
safety / Health and Safety / HACCP procedures, zoning, personal hygiene
90

PROF BG Page 30
Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Ransley J and Ingram Developing Hospitality Butterworth-Heinemann
H (Eds) Properties and Facilities
Textbook Jones T and Zemke Managing the Built FT Prentice Hall
DMV Environment in Hospitality
Facilities
Textbook Davis B and Foskett S Food and Beverage Butterworth Heinemann
Management
Textbook Dittmer P Principles of Food, Beverage, John Wiley
and Labour Cost Controls
Textbook Wood RC Strategic Questions in Food Elsevier
and Beverage Management

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions / 2.1
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 2.1
Hour Practical Skills 3.1
Examination 4.1
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 4.1
Hour Practical Skills 5.1
Examination 6.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 31
MODULE Event Concepts
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module aims to provide students with knowledge of the Events Industry and will equip
students with the knowledge to design, plan, implement and evaluate creative Events.

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Recognise the characteristics the Events 1.1 Evaluate and discuss the significance of Events to
Industry the Tourism Industry in Viet Nam
2. Consider the factors salien to the design 2.1 Prepare, organise, implement and evaluate a
and production of Events planned Event and recognise the potential impact of
the Event on sustainability

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 3 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 45
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 155
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 32
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Introduction to the Events Industry
Defining Events. The range of Event types.Event stakeholders. Global Events and
celebrations. Role of the Event manager.
Events and Festivals industry in Viet Nam
Role and strategy of Tourism Viet Nam in Events promotion. Range of festivals and
Events in Viet Nam.
Event Design and Production
Event goals and objectives.Fundamental elements of Events. Events as designed
experiences. Creative concepts and themes. Marketing the Event. Health, safety
and risk management.
Event impacts and Sustainability
Social and cultural, environmental and economic impacts of Events. Sustainability
and environmental best practice for festivals and Events.
Deliver a planned team Event
Pre-Event organisation, deliver Event, post Event evaluation and review.

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Allen J et al Festival and Special Event John Wiley and Sons
Management
Textbook Getz D Event Studies: Theory, Research and Butterworth Heinemann
Policy for Planned Events
Textbook Berridge G Events Design and Experience Butterworth Heinemann

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short Answer 1.1
Questions / Presentation /
Report / Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1
Hour Practical Skills Examination 2.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 33
MODULE Event Management and Promotion
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


Events are a growing area of activity in both the profit and non-profit environment which
contribute to a significant component of both marketing communications activity and social
and entertainment provisions. This module looks at Events from the planning phase right
through to execution.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Understand the nature and scope of Event Management and Promotion with an
emphasis on building a knowledge base around the theoretical and technical areas
which will enable them to pursue a successful career in the Hospitality Management
fields

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Knowledge of the range of Events for 1.1 Generate proposals for Events, for both profit and
both profit and not-for-profit clients not-for-profit clients

2. Discuss and evaluate the links 2.1 Analyse the range of Event types and be aware of
between Events and the goals of the contribution that well organised Events can make
stakeholders to fulfilling stakeholder goals – both private and
public
3. Design and present an Event 3.1 Demonstrate competency in designing and
proposal, including setting out a presenting an Event proposal and propose
management and marketing strategy appropriate follow up measures for Events
for the Event

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 34
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Event Management
The variety of events and the purposes of each type - for profit, for entertainment,
sporting, cultural, educational or social purposes, charity, for corporate or
commercial purposes, lobbying.
Event initiator, organiser (sporting, cultural, educational public good, commercial
and corporate), content of events, acts, sporting events and competitions,
politicians, celebrities, public figures, media, photographers, journalists, reporters.
The promotion of events versus promotion through events.
45 Planning and Managing an Event
Initiators, participants, organisers, audience or delegates, press and media. Location
and venue, transport, parking, accommodation, food and drink, communication and
leisure facilities, timing, weather, permits and licences, public liability insurance.
Analysis of key stakeholders; Event content; Publication and communication.
Post Event Harvesting and Follow up. Assessment of objectives; Building of
relationships; Post Event audit and Future plans.
Analysis of the use of events by both profit and not-for-profit organisations.
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Beech J, Kaiser S and The Business of Events Pearson
Kaspar, R Management
Textbook Goldblatt J Special Events: Creating and John Wiley and Sons
Sustaining a New World for
Celebration
Textbook Getz D Event Studies: Theory, Butterworth Heinemann
Research and Policy for
Planned Events
Textbook Van Der Wagen L and Event Management Pearson
White L
Textbook Preston CA Event Marketing: How to John Wiley and Sons
Successfully Promote Events,
Festivals, Conventions and
Expositions
Journal of Marketing Events
International Journal of Event Management
Journal of Event Management
Journal of Attractions Management

PROF BG Page 35
Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination 3.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 36
MODULE Food and Beverage Management 1
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module expands on the module Bar Operations and equips the student with the knowledge,
skills and competencies to enable them to demonstrate food and beverage skills.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Extend the skills and techniques of bar operations to aspects of bar and restaurant
supervision

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Apply best practice of customer 1.1 Demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment in a
orientation and quality service in a food and beverage service setting
food and beverage service setting 1.2 Display knowledge of all relevant operational tasks and
the safe use of equipment
1.3 Demonstrate effectively the interpersonal skills
necessary for professional and personal
development in the context of customer care
1.4 Display, dispense and serve the extensive range of
beverages in a professional manner
2. Recognise the importance of food 2.1 Demonstrate knowledge of the range of alcoholic
and beverage service skills required in beverages available
the restaurant and bar areas 2.2 Show commitment to the Responsible Service of
Alcohol Programme
2.3 Perform confidently appropriate food and beverage
service skills required in the restaurant and bar areas
2.4 Implement cost control measures within the food and
beverage function

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 37
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
90 Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operation
Technical Food Service Skills / Technical Beverage Service Skills / Food and
Beverage Service Areas and Equipment / Restaurant terminology / Menu
terminology
Cost controls and expenditure returns in bar and restaurant settings / Stock
Operations: sorting stock, empties and crates / FIFO and Stock Valuation
Techniques / Product Placement and Display Techniques
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Freeth AW Professional Bartending New Holland Publishers
Textbook Lillicrap D, Cousins J Food and Beverage Service Hodder and Stoughton
and Smith R
Textbook Katsigris C The Bar and Beverage Book John Wiley and Sons
Textbook Fuller J Essential Table Service for Hutchinson
Restaurants

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Hour Practical Skills 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Hour Practical Skills 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4
Examination
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 38
MODULE Food and Beverage Management 2
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module develops the concepts and skills involved in the management of food and
beverage in the Hospitality Industry.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Gain knowledge in the technical aspects of running a food and beverage operations
such as facilities design, managing capacity and demand, and managing waiting lines
(b) Apply performance measurement techniques, food operation controls, kitchen
management and technologies in use within a food and beverage operation.

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following learning
outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment criteria
determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Appreciate the value of a Food and Beverage 1.1 Examine the value of a Food and Beverage
(F & B) Department and the importance of profit (F & B) Department and the importance of profit
centres centres within the functioning of a F & B operation
2. Appreciate the importance of people and 2.1 Evaluate the contribution of Human Resource
control in the success of a F & B operation Management to the success of a F & B operation
through food control, beverage control and people
control
3. Recognise the developments within the F & B 3. 1 Demonstrate the developments including
sector including legislation legislation within the F & B sector

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 39
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Management in Restaurant Business and Food Service
Performance Measurement in a F & B Operation
Controls in use within a F & B Operation – Food, Beverage and Human
Controls / Technology in use in F & B Operations / Kitchen Management / The
Meal Experience / Menu Engineering - Menu Planning, Types of Menus,
Structures of Menus / Wines and Wine Management / Managing F & B
Capacity Demand / Managing Waiting Lines
45 Purchasing for Food Service Operation
Concepts of food quality, and quality aspects of food / Deterioration of food,
prevention and causes / Food packaging principles, materials and methods /
Safety testing, influence of packaging on food quality / Legislation of food
contact materials / The nature of Quality Control and Assurance Programmes
and certification and their role
Classification of hotel restaurant catering and other service and commercial food
premises / Traditional and modern technology advances in food purchasing /
Future trends and development in food purchasing / Approaches and rationale
for preservation / Natural preservatives: salt, alcohol, sugar, acids, smoke /
Modern systems of preservation: pouch sealing, Modified Atmosphere
Packaging [MAP] / Aseptic packaging, Waxing, Canning, Bottling, Irradiation /
Future trends in preservation
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Davis B and Foskett S Food and Beverage Butterworth Heinemann
Management
Textbook Dittmer P Principles of Food, Beverage, John Wiley
and Labour Cost Controls
Textbook Wood RC Strategic Questions in Food Elsevier
and Beverage Management

PROF BG Page 40
Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination 3.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 41
MODULE Hospitality Marketing
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


This module introduces students to the principles and practices of Marketing as applied in the
Hospitality Industry.

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Understand the nature and scope of marketing with application to the Hospitality
sector
(b) Evaluate the concepts and tools underpinning marketing
(c) Use the knowledge of concepts underpinning marketing to diagnose the nature of
marketing problems in the Hospitality sector

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student is
expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following
learning outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment
criteria determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Knowledge of the unique 1.1 Identify the key characteristics of Hospitality
characteristics of Hospitality products products with reference to the marketing process in
and its implication within the the Hospitality Industry
Hospitality marketing process 1.2 Demonstrate how the characteristics of Hospitality
products are relevant to the marketing process
2. Recognise the importance of price 2.1 Evaluate impact on the price and pricing strategy
and pricing strategy in Hospitality with reference to changing role of distribution
marketing channels, segmentation, targeting and positioning and
e-marketing in the Hospitality business environment
3. Recognise the role and importance 3.1 Demonstrate the influence of marketing
of marketing communications communications on internal and relationship
marketing in service delivery, consumer behaviour,
branding and new product development

Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

PROF BG Page 42
Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Principles of Marketing
The role of marketing in the Hospitality Industry / How marketing interfaces with
key result areas in a Hospitality environment / The 5 key characteristics of
services / Introduction to the Marketing Mix for services / Components of the
Hospitality Product / The Product Life Cycle (PLC) and its application in a Hospitality
perspective / Strategies for extending the PLC
Economics and accounting principles in pricing / Factors affecting pricing decisions /
Pricing strategies / Matching supply and demand - the role of pricing and yield in
Hospitality marketing
Role and function of marketing and Hospitality intermediaries / Channel selection,
functions and costs of a distribution system / Shifts in distribution and effects on
Hospitality intermediaries / disintermediation, reintermediation / GDS and CRS /
Distribution in Hospitality and customer value
Market segmentation, variables for segmentation, role of positioning in marketing
strategy / Target marketing, positioning the product service mix, positioning for
competitive advantage / Role of e-marketing
45 Customer Psychology
Factors that influence Consumer Behaviour / Consumer Behaviour models /
Understanding Hospitality Consumers / Demographic trends and patterns /
Consumer Behaviour in service encounters – the 3 Stage Model of Service
Consumption (Pre purchase, Service encounter and post encounter stages) /
Customer satisfaction, service failures and recovery strategies / Shaping customer
experiences and behaviour / The role of the Customer and Employees in the
delivery of service provision / Customer interaction in service provision / The role of
Internal Marketing and Relationship Marketing
Role of communications / Marketing communication tools – Advertising, Sales
Promotions, Public Relations, Press Releases, Merchandising, Sponsorship, Print
Media and Design, Web Design / New product development / Branding and its
impact on the marketing process / Managing products within the service
environment
90

PROF BG Page 43
Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Kotler P, Bowen J Marketing for Hospitality and Pearson Education
and Makens J Tourism
Textbook Reid R and Bojanic D Hospitality Marketing John Wiley
Management
Textbook Kotler P and Keller K Marketing Management FT Prentice Hall
Textbook Doyle P Marketing Management and FT Prentice Hall
Strategy
Textbook Aaker D A Strategic Marketing John Wiley
Management
Textbook Wilson R M S, Strategic Marketing Butterworth Heinemann
Gilligan C and Management, Planning,
Pearson D J Implementation and Control

Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.2
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination
Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1, 1.2
Hour Practical Skills 2.1
Examination 3.1
Overall Pass Mark 50%

PROF BG Page 44
MODULE Revenue Management in the Hospitality Industry
PROGRAMME Hospitality Management
LEVEL 5
PREREQUISITE MODULE(S) None

Description and Aims of the Module


Revenue Management (RM) is about predicting customer demand and to respond rapidly as
demand changes. Implementing a revenue management strategy can be one of the most
important revenue-generating initiatives available to a hotel, significantly increasing room
revenue and profits. In this module, students will learn the essentials of RM philosophy and
associated systems, methods and applications and by the end of the module, the participants
will be able to make sound and effective revenue management decisions, and to defend their
solutions and decisions.
Revenue management is a systematic process designed to increase revenue by selling the right
room to the right person at the right time for the right price. Therefore this module also
provides an overview of revenue management applications to the hotel industry designed to
inspire a strategic shift to managing revenue per available room (RevPAR).

Specific aims will enable students to:


(a) Describe hotel revenue management and its benefits to the organisation
(b) Discuss the strategic levers of hotel revenue management and how they can be
manipulated to increase revenue
(c) Describe hotel revenue management in terms of its component parts and critical
considerations
(d) Recommend non-traditional ways in which revenue management techniques can be
applied to increase revenue in the hospitality industry

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria


The knowledge, understanding and cognitive, practical and transferable skills which a student
is expected to be able to demonstrate after studying this module is expressed in the following
learning outcomes.
In order to pass this module, the evidence that the student presents for assessment needs to
demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the module. The assessment
criteria determine the standard required to achieve the module.
Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
1. Apply revenue management 1.1 Analyze and make decisions from a revenue
techniques and identify fundamental management perspective
information for application in 1.2 Evaluate the daily tasks of a revenue manager and
revenue management their impact on hotel’s business and its customers
2. Elaborate the tactical use of 2.1 Apply specific segmentation for revenue
revenue management management
2.2 Quantify the impact of revenue management
2.3 Appreciate the customer price-value relationship
and the effect different levels of pricing have on
demand

PROF BG Page 45
Teaching and Learning

MOET CREDITS 6 UK CREDITS 20 HOURS


Class Contact 90
Directed Reading, Independent Study and 110
Assessment Preparation
Total 200

Teaching Schedule

Hours Content
45 Hotel Revenue Management
An Overview of Hotel Revenue Management. Necessary Conditions for Revenue
Management
Measuring Success with RevPAR – the RevPAR Measuring Revenue. Calculating
RevPAR. Managing Duration – Reducing Duration Uncertainty. Tips for Managing
Duration
45 Implementing Revenue Management
Apply techniques to maximise and measure occupancy and rooms revenue.
Controlling Price – Variable Pricing. Best Available Rate. Leverage Price.
Yield management techniques and the use of forecasting. Overbooking and
ethical issues – common policy on no-shows and Customer Blacklists. Room
Booking Data Systems. Managing Revenue in Other Industries
90

Indicative Reading
Current Editions of the following Textbooks and Journals are recommended

Type Author Title Publisher


Textbook Hayes DK and Miller A Revenue Management for the John Wiley and Sons
Hospitality Industry
Textbook Cross RG Revenue Management, Hard- Broadway Book
Core Tactics for Market
Domination
Textbook Kappa M, Nitschke A Managing Housekeeping Educational Institute
and Schappert PB Operations of the Hotel and
Motel Association
Textbook Ingold A et al (Ed) Yield Management, Strategies Continuum
for the Service Industries

PROF BG Page 46
Assessment

Assessment % Of Types of Assessment Learning Outcomes


Element Overall
Mark
Coursework 20% Quiz / In Class Test – Short 1.1, 1.2
Answer Questions /
Presentation / Report /
Assignment
Mid Term Exam 30% 1 Hour Theory Examination / 1 1.1, 1.2
Hour Practical Skills 2.1, 2,2 2.3
Examination
Non KIC Final Exam 50% 2 Hour Theory Examination / 2 1.1, 1.2
Hour Practical Skills 2.1, 2,2 2.3
Examination
Overall Pass Mark 50%

Other Resources – Journals and Websites

Hospitality Management http://www.chr.cornell.edu


International Journal of Hospitality Management www.world-Tourism.com
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management www.wttc.org
Journal of Hospitality Marketing and Management www.clutterbuckassociates.co.uk
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality
http://www.infed.org/b-explrn.htm
Management
International Journal of Operations and Production www.hsmai.com
Management http://feedroom.business.week.com
Journal of International Hospitality, Leisure and www.Hospitality net.org/index.html
Tourism Management http://www.hbr.org/case_studies
Journal of Operations Management www.bbc.co.uk
Journal of Service Management www.caterer.com
Managing Service Quality www.cheftalk.com
The Journal of Hospitality Financial Management www.foodnetwork.com
The Service Industries
www.hotelier.co.uk
Journal Tourism and Hospitality Management
www.restaurant.org
Annals of Tourism
Caterer and Hotelkeeper
Centre for Hospitality Research at Cornell University
Tourism Management
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing

PROF BG Page 47