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WORK IMMERSION AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE EMPLOYABILITY OF

GRADE 12 STUDENTS IN SAN JORGE NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

SAN JORGE NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

Poblacion. II San Jorge Samar

Jackielielai P. Cabilogan

Ritz S. Dy

Erica P. Duca

Rojan B. Cabrido

March, 2019
CHAPTER I

This chapter includes the Background of the Study, Statement of the

problem, Objectives of the study, Scope and Limitation, Importance of

the Study, Theoretical Framework, Conceptual Framework, Paradigm,

Null Hypothesis, and Definition of Terms.

Background of the Study:

The word “immersion” as it applies to the Kto12 curriculum is

defined in the Department of Education (DepEd) order no. 40, series of

2015.

Work immersion refers to the part of the Senior High School (SHS)

Curriculum consisting of 80 hours on experience or work simulation with

the Grade 12 students will undergo to expose them to actual workplace

setting and to enrich the competencies provided by the school under the

supervision of the school campus in a “workplace immersion venue,”

defined as “the place where work immersion of students is done.

Examples of work immersion venues include offices, factories, shops,

and project sites.”


What could lead to confusion is that the word “immersion” actually

has two meanings in K to 12. The first meaning refers to a required SHS

subject in the curriculum. The second meaning refers not to a subject

but to a preferred mode of delivery of Tech. Voc Subjects.

One of the concerns of the implementation of the K to 12

curriculums is that, are the students will be what the government and

themselves expects them to be? Will they be competent to their respective

field of interests and will they be skillful and knowledgeable enough to

help suffice the economic needs of the Philippines especially in the

manpower field. The government comes up to implementing work

immersion that will be conducted depending on what the learners’

purposes or needs. And before further discussing, I totally agree on this

stand for it will be one of the key practices on improving student

performances. So, what is work immersion? It is a work simulation, or

how other students in their comfort called it as “OJT” that consists of

80hrs basic time allotment up top 320hrs maximum time for grades 11

and 12 students. Through this, the students will become familiar with

work- related environment related to their field of specialization to

enhance their competence. Education secretary Leonor Briones said that

"we should start training our SHS students in the actual field of work to

enhance their competency early" On the other hand, future successes of


the work immersion program also have flaws like the fact that our

country had a lot of experience with on-the-job training programs on the

collegiate level. Unfortunately, many (if not most) college OJT students

are assigned only to insignificant jobs in a company (answering the

phone, making photocopies, making coffee– that sort of thing). Rarely are

OJT students expected to produce the same products that regular

employees produce. If that’s the case, how are these students going to

learn prior to their expectation with these experts that are going to teach

them to be future professionals. Immersion in SHS will be useless if it is

patterned after most of the OJT experiences currently being undertaken

by college students. But, there is a solution simple enough to end this

dilemma if that’s how we call it. And that is to involve the companies and

not just the schools for them to be aware of the educational objectives of

the K to 12. To conclude my stand, work immersion is a solid matter in

terms of enhancing the learners’ skills and discipline not only for self-

improvement but also for the betterment of his/ her future company that

is because the student will be able to asses himself early inside the

company during the immersion period and will be used to it. They will

know about the work ethics, will gain knowledge about the safety in the

workplace, the rights, responsibilities, learning the effective way to

resolve conflicts among coworkers and the work will not be that hard for

them if they apply at the same or related company in the future. With
that, I am closing my speech with quote from my favorite marshal artist,

Bruce Lee:

“A good teacher protects his pupils from his own influence.”

Statement of the Problem:

This study aims to determine the effect of having Work Immersion

Program in terms of the Employability of the Grade 12 Students in San

Jorge National High School.

More specifically, this study ought to answer the Following

questions:

1. What is the profile of the students in terms of following variates

1.1. Sex

1.2. Age

1.3. General Weighted Average

1.4 Track/ Course

1.5 Number of hours on Immersion?

2. What is the level of employability after work immersion?


3. Is there a significant relationship between the level of employability of

the student respondents and their experience on work immersion?

4. Is there a significant relationship between the perception of the

student-respondents on the effect of having work immersion in terms of

employability and each of their personal variates?

5. What are the implications that may derive base on the study?

Objectives of the Study:

This study aimed to:

1. Determine if there is a significant relationship between the level of

employability and the following variates:

1.1. Sex

1.2. Age

1.3. General Weighted Average

1.4 Track/ Course

1.5 Number of hours on Immersion


2. To analyze if there is a significant relationship between the level of

employability and the experience on work immersion

3. Determine the level of employability after work immersion

3. To determine the implications that may derived base on study.

Scope and Limitation:

This study will be conducted in San Jorge National High School

located at Poblacion II, San Jorge Samar. The respondents will be the

students of Grade 12 of the said school in the school year 2018-2019.

The duration of our study

Importance of the Study:

The findings of this study are significant to the following:

Students- This study will help them to know the effects of having work

immersion and its benefits it’s the terms of their employment in the real

future. Likewise, this will also encourage them to work hard during the

immersion.

Teachers- The result of this study will give them knowledge on how and

on what way they will guide their students during immersion, this will

also encourage the teacher to implement the information well.


Parents- This will help the parents to be aware about what their child

would be doing during period, any by these they shall support their child

in any aspect, may it be financially or morally.

School- This can be a way for the school to provide enough materials for

the students that can help them to learn more and to have a better

partnership with the chosen work place.

Future Researchers- This study might serve as springboard for further

researchers into the other subjects included in the Secondary Education

Development Program, as well as into other areas of educational

research.

Theoretical Framework:

Some theories served as anchors for this study. They lent relevance

and provided as strong justification for this research undertaking.

The Bridging Theory and Practice through Immersion popularized

by Dorothee Pauly Teaching business and human rights (BHR) at a

business school requires instructors to make the case for human rights

from a business perspective. Business students who are already primed

by a narrow mainstream business paradigm with a focus on profit

maximization need answers to the question of how a corporation can

reconcile its core business with a human rights commitment. 1 To that


end, business students need examples from daily management practice

that illustrate the business relevance of human rights issues, their

urgency and complexity, as well as the challenges associated with

resolving these issues. In the context of business school culture,

business students are particularly keen to learn from real-world cases

that allow them to develop actual management skills. It is through these

concrete examples that business school students can begin to reflect on

the existing business paradigm and broaden their understanding on why

respecting human rights makes good business sense.

Several business schools are currently experimenting with

innovative teaching approaches that immerse students to various

degrees in a real-world BHR scenario. Immersion can take many forms

but in all cases, immersive teaching approaches turn students from

external analysts into active decision-makers in scenarios that have both

a business and a human rights component. These immersive approaches

go beyond inviting business practitioners as guest speakers and

discussing business case studies with students, which are both standard

teaching approaches at business schools. Immersive teaching

approaches are also different from consulting projects those students.

The Technological Immersion Learning: A Grounded Theory

advocated by Donnie Coleman The Technological Immersion Learning


Theory (TILT) was developed through a classic grounded theory study in

the seminal tradition of Glaser and Strauss (1967) and Glaser (1978,

1992, 1998, 2001, 2007). The purpose of the study was to investigate an

exemplary case of self-determined technology enthusiasts in the hopes of

generating a substantive grounded theory that conceptualizes their

experiences and concerns. Twelve unstructured interviews of amateur

radio enthusiasts from the eastern United States provided the initial /

primary data for this study. Experimenting and self-teaching in

technological activities was highlighted as the main concern of the

participants. The basic social process (BSP) of technological immersion

learning (TIL) emerged as a theoretical construct and core variable that

illuminates the experiences of individuals immersed in a community of

practice, where hands-on engagement with technology is a primary

activity. Adventuring, Affirmation, Doing Technology, Experimenting,

Overcoming Challenge, Self-teaching, and Social Networking were

properties of technological immersion learning that interact dialectically

in an amplifying causal loop, with Problem solving and Designing as

active sub processes in response to unmet challenges. TIL occurs

cyclically in three stages, beginning with Induction, a credentialing stage

wherein the neophyte is prepared with the necessary knowledge and skill

to become a novice participant in an activity. The transition from

Induction into the Immersion phase is a status passage whereby the


novice is absorbed into the technical culture of the group and

commences autonomous active participation in hands-on experimenting.

Hands-on experiences with experimenting, problem solving and social

interactions provide diverse learning and affirmation for the doer and

multiple sources of feedback that promote sustained engagement. The

transition into the Maturation phase proceeds gradually over time, with

prolonged engagement and cumulative gains in knowledge, skill, and

experience. Maturation is a quasi-stable state that remains responsive to

new contexts as a random-walk process, wherein trigger events can

initiate new cycles of technological immersion learning in a perpetually

evolving process of personal development. Engagement, Empowerment,

and Self-Actualization are underlying dimensions of the TIL basic social

process that provide the impetus for continued persistence and personal

development.

Conceptual Framework:

The conceptual framework of the study uses the input, process

and output where as you can get the result on how we can have

assurance on the employability of the graduating students with the help

of Work Immersion Program.

To conceptualize these concepts, the succeeding paradigm is presented


Paradigm:
ASSURED EMPLOYABILITY OF
THE GRADE 12 STUDENTS IN
SAN JORGE NATIONAL HIGH
SCHOOL.

Finding/Recommendations

Profile Perception on *Level of


the Effects of Employability
1.1. SEX Having Work
*Experience in
1.2. AGE Immersion
Work
Program in
1.3. GENERAL Immersion
terms of The
WEIGHTED Employability
AVERAGE of grade 12
Students in
San Jorge
National High
School.

Figure 1: The

Senior High Students


Specially Grade 12
Students

Figure: 1. Conceptual Framework of the Study


The scheme in figure one shows the conceptual model in

conducting of the study in determining the perception on the effects of

Work Immersion Program in terms of Employability of Grade 12 students

in San Jorge National High School.

Hypothesis:

𝐻𝑎 −There is a significant relationship between level of employability and

experience on work immersion

𝐻𝑜 −There is no significant relationship between level of employability

and age of student-respondents

𝐻𝑎 − There is a significant relationship between level of employability and

sex of student-respondents

𝐻𝑜 − There is no significant relationship between level of employability

and general weighted average of student-respondents

Definition of terms:

Employability- the skills and abilities that allow you to be employed

Immersed- involve oneself deeply in a particular activity or interest

Implementation-

Perception- a thought, belief, or opinion, often held by many people and

based on appearances

Senior High School- is a secondary school that students attend in the

three or four highest grades before college.


Specialization-

Workplace- a place where people work, such as an office or factory

Work Immersion Program- “Work Immersion refers to the part of the

Senior High School (SHS) Curriculum consisting of 80 hours of hands-on

experience or work simulation which the Grades 11 and 12 students will

undergo to expose them to the actual workplace setting and to enrich the

competencies provided by the school under the supervision of the School

Head and the designated personnel of the Partner.”


CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

A. Related Literature

According to FTS, 2016 On-the-job training is usually the most

effective way to learn the skills needed for your job. Employees being

trained on-the-job are working in their real work environment, gaining

experience and working through challenges that are a part of their

everyday jobs. They learn general skills that apply to any job, but also

specific skills that apply directly to the company they work for On-the-

job training benefits both employers and employees

Investigates the effectiveness of on‐the‐job training (OJT). Presents a

definition of OJT used for this research project which involved two

studies: the first in the call centres of a large company, and the second in

post offices. Gives the results of the study which indicate the OJT

programs were only partially successful in 15ealizing training goals.

Indicates that self‐efficacy, prior experience with tasks, managerial

support and workload were the most powerful predictors for training

effectiveness. Concludes that the evidence suggests that OJT is not


entirely an effective training method although more research is needed in

this area (Streumer and van der Klink 2013).

On‐the‐job training has a large positive effect on wages for employees

in Sweden, and employees in jobs that require long on‐the‐job training

earn significantly more than workers in jobs with short training

requirements. The effects of training are large for recently hired and low

for senior employees. There are significant wage effects of general and

specific on‐the‐job training, and the effect is significantly larger for

general training. Separate estimates for the public and private sectors

show significant effects of specific training only for public‐sector

employees and large effects of general training for private‐sector

employees. The results suggest that the distinction between general and

specific training matters, that firms are willing to pay for general training

and that there is heterogeneity in the returns to these forms of training

(Regner, 2013)

On-the-job training, also known as OJT, is a hands-on method of

teaching the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed for employees

to perform a specific job within the workplace. Employees learn in the

environment where they will need to practice the knowledge and skills
obtained during training. On-the-job training uses the existing workplace

tools, machines, documents, equipment, and knowledge to teach an

employee how to effectively do his job. Training takes place within the

employee’s normal job environment and may occur as she performs

actual work. Or it may happen elsewhere within the workplace using

dedicated training rooms, workstations, or equipment. The simple

objective of OJT is to use the existing environment, tools, and skill

training available in the workplace to train employees to do their jobs—

on the job (Heathfield, 2018)

This literature review presents the current state of research on

structured on-the-job training (S-OJT) and proposes a research agenda

for future research activities on this form of workplace learning. In the

past three decades, S-OJT has emerged as an integral part of human

resource development practice. The literature review seeks to identify the

nature of S-OJT as it is described in the literature, categorize the existing

research and practices of S-OJT, provide overview of three dimensions

(audience, location, and conclusion) of each study involving S-OJT, and

develop a conceptual framework for conducting research on S-OJT.

Online databases including Business Source Premier & Complete,

Academic Source Premier, Scopus, Primo Articles, JSTOR, and ERIC

were used for the reviews. The results of this literature review provide a
theoretical framework for understanding S-OJT as a means to promote

future research and theory building (Ahadi and Jacobs, 2017)

B. Related Studies

(According to Haolan Zheng with the book titled, An analysis of the

relationship between effective on the job training and job satisfaction: a

study of a language training school in China) Some scholars emphasize

that a learning culture in organizations can highly increase employee

retention and loyalty (Beynon et al.,2015; Nadeem,2010) and training is

one of the most important parts of a learning culture provided by firms.

Vasudevan (2014, p.3, citing Buckley and Caple) defines training as “a

systematic procedure that helps people to discover how to be more

efficient at work by modifying their knowledge, skills or attitudes through

the learning experience to achieve an efficient performance”, indicating

that the employees can obtain all kinds of required skills and knowledge

through the training arranged by an organization, thereby showing their

potential and competencies when doing their work (Zumrah ,Boyle and

Fein, 2013; Garavan , Carbery and Rock,2012). Moreover, Huang and Su

(2016, p.43) refer to Kirkpatrick’s hierarchical model of training

outcomes, describing that it can be divided into 4 different stages of

training effects such as “trainees’ reactions to the training content and


process, knowledge learning and skill acquisition, behavior change and

some individual and organizational outcomes improvements.”

(According to Haolan Zheng with the book titled, An analysis of the

relationship between effective on the job training and job satisfaction: a

study of a language training school in China) This chapter is to explore

the literature which is linked to job satisfaction and on the job training in

the workplace, especially in teaching sector. The purpose is to have a

better under –standing of what have existed based on others’ previous

researches and findings to further confirm the necessity of the

development in the future. As there is few research conducted to explore

the job satisfaction and on the job training in Chinese teaching sector,

which for – ms the gap and explains why this research is worthy of

exploration. Rahman (20 14) once stated that training in the workplace

play an important role in personal abilities’ improvem – ent and

companies’ productivities. Therefore, some experts stress that the

investment in on – 3 the-job training can’t be ignored

According to Anna Weiler, 2010 with the book titled Impact of training

on people’s employability, The lifelong learning and competence

development approach aims at equipping the workforce with the

necessary knowledge and skills. Rapidly changing work processes


necessitate both the capacity and opportunity to adapt to such

processes. Two interrelated key aspects determine employability in the

long run:

 training measures;

 Competence development.

According to Debra Truitt, 2011 with the book titled The Effect of

Training and Development on Employee Attitude as it Relates to Training

and Work Proficiency, It is incumbent on training and development

professionals to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of

their programs in reducing disputes in workplace performance. This

study explores the relationships between training experiences and

attitudes and attitudes about perceived job proficiency. In a sample of

237 full-time salaried/exempt and hourly/nonexempt employees from

one academic institution and three businesses in the states of Maryland,

Delaware, and Arizona, the author finds a direct relationship between

one’s positive training experiences and attitudes and one’s proficiency. In

this study, 86.8% of those who had updated training had the most

positive attitudes toward training (γ = .293, p < .05). Furthermore, 80% of

those who had negative training attitudes also had negative views on

their proficiency (γ = .465, p < .000)


CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY

Locale of the Study:

This study was conducted in San Jorge National High School,

Poblacion II. San Jorge, Samar

.
Figure: 2. Map of the Locale

Respondents of the Study:

The respondents of our study are Senior High Students specifically

the Grade 12. But we are also after the opinions of the graduates in

SJNHS because we want to know their perceptions about our study

Research Design:

The Descriptive-Correlation design of research is used in this

study. Descriptive because its main concern is to acquire information

about the perceptions on the effects of Wok Immersion Program in terms

of employability of Grade 12 students in San Jorge National High School.

This study is also correlational because we will correlate the significant

relationship between the level of employability to the experience on work

immersion and to the other personal variants. Both quantitative and

qualitative research shall be observed as it will elicit opinions and

numerical data from the respondents through survey questionnaire.

Variables and Their Measures:

In this study, the following were used as the variables and their

measures:

Level of Employability- refers to the attributes of a person that make that

person able to gain and maintain employment. This can be measured

through weighted mean.


Experience on work immersion- Work experience is any experience that a

person gains while working in a specific field or occupation, but the

expression is widely used to mean a type of volunteer work that is

commonly intended for young people — often students — to get a feel for

professional working environments. This can be measured through

weighted mean.

Research Instruments:

The researchers used survey questionnaire as an instrument in

collecting the data. The scale covers questions that are needed to be

identified if the respondents agree, Undecided or Disagree. The

questionnaire may divide into three parts- Part I profile of students or

Personal Factors, Part II the Experience on Work Immersion. Part III are

questions needed to be described and justified. The questionnaire used

to describe and assess the student’s perceptions about the effects of

Work Immersion in terms of the Employability.

Scoring and Interpretation:

In order to measure the level of employability and experience on

work immersion of the respondents, the following scoring and

categorization were used:

Score Description

0-1 Disagree
1.1- 2 Undecided

2.1- 3 Agree

Population and Sampling:

This study used The Slovin’s Formula Sampling technique and

Stratified Sampling because we want a more précised sample size from

the Grade 12 students in San Jorge National High School.

Validation of Instruments:

Questionnaire was used to gather the data. Part I of the

questionnaire which dealt on the respondents Personal Factors and was

made by the researcher. Part II of the questionnaire was taken from a

thesis titled the Effects of Work Immersion Program to the Employability

of the Graduating Students of Pagsulhugon National High School,

Macairan (2018). Part III of the questionnaire was made by the

researcher. The questionnaire was validated by simply following the

steps. On Dave Collingride “Validating a Questionnaire” (2015)

Data Gathering Process:

There were procedures that were followed in data gathering.

It permit distribute the questionnaire was secured from the School

Academic head to allow the researchers to conduct their study. Upon

approval, the researchers proceeded to the identified places and


personally meet the respondents explained the purpose of the study and

the manner of answering the questionnaire.

After all the questionnaire was retrieved, the data were tallied and

tabulated, and further statistically treated using statistical treatment.

Statistical Analysis of Data:

Frequency Count. This statistical was used in reporting the

number of student-respondents of the same age, sex, and student

responses on the instrument.

Percentage Distribution. This tool was employed in the analysis

and interpretation of data on the student-respondents’ age, sex, and

student responses on the instrument.

Fx 100
P=----------------
N

Where:

P= Percentage

F= Frequency

N= Number of Respondents

100= Constant

Mean. This statistical was used in reporting the average age.


Standard Deviation. This tool was employed in the analysis and

interpretation of data on the age.

Weighted Mean. This statistical tool was employed to determine the

quantitative responses on the instrument to measure the level awareness

In interpreting the weighted mean

Pearson Product Moment of

Correlation Coefficient (Pearson r). This statistical tool was used to test

the relationship of the variable involves.

Where:

𝑟𝑋𝑦 = the computed statistical

value

𝑋𝑖 = the independent variable

𝑌𝑖 = the predicted variable

n= number of cases

∑ = the summation notation


In the evaluation of the computed r-value, the following scales were

used:

Values Degree of Correlation

0.00 to ±0.20 Negligible Correlation

±0.21 𝑡𝑜 ± 0.40 Low/ Slight Correlation

±0.41 𝑡𝑜 ± 0.70 Moderate Correlation

±0.71 𝑡𝑜 ± 0.90 High Correlation

±0.91 𝑡𝑜 ± 0.99 Very High Correlation

±1.00 Perfect Correlation


Chapter IV

Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data

This chapter discusses the results of the study with emphasis on

the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data.

Profile of the Student-respondents

The following tables show the profile of the student-respondents in

terms of age, sec and general weighted average.

Age of the Student-respondents

Table 1 presented the distribution of student respondents

according to their age.

Age Frequency Percentage

22 2 1.6%

21 4 3.125%

20 3 10.16%

19 16 12.55

18 47 36.72%

17 37 28.91%

16 9 7.03%
TOTAL 128 100%

Mean 18.05

SD 1.27

Table 1: Age of the student-respondents

As shown in table 1, 2 or 1.6 percent of the student-respondents

have ages 22, 4 or 3.125 percent of them are 21 years old. 3 or 10.16

percent were 20 years old, 16 or 12.5% percent are 19 years old. 47 or

36.72 percent are 18 years old, 37 or 28.91 percent are 17 years old.

Lastly 9 or 7.03 percent are 16 years old.

Hence, the student-respondents has a mean age of 18.05 years with a

standard deviation of 1.27.

Sex of the Student-respondents

Table 2 presented the distribution of student-respondents

according to their sex

Sex Frequency Percentage (%)

Male 54 42.19%

Female 74 57.81%

Total 128 100%

Table 2: Sex of the student-respondents

As shown the table 2, 54 or 42.19 percent of the student-

respondents are male and 74 or 57.81 percent are female. There was a

total 128 student-respondents.


General Weighted Average of the Student-respondents:

Table 3 presented the distribution of student-respondents

according to their General Weighted Average.

GWA Frequency Percentage (%)

94 1 0.78%

93 4 3.125%

92 8 6.25%

91 12 9.375%

90 13 10.16%

89 19 14.84%

88 13 10.16%

87 8 6.25%

86 9 7.03%

85 16 12.5%

84 8 6.25%

83 5 3.91%

82 5 3.91%

81 1 0.78%

80 6 4.69%

Total 128 100%


Mean 87.43

Standard Deviation 4.44

Table 3: General Weighted Average of the student-respondents

As shown in table 3, 1 or 0.78 percent of the student-respondents

has a GWA of 94, 4 or 3.125 percent of them has a GWA of 93.8 or 6.25

percent of them has a GWA of 90.19 or 14.84 percent of them has a GWA

of 89, 13 or 10.16 percent of them has a GWA of 88.8 or 6.25percent of

them has a GWA of 87, 9 or 7.03 percent of them has a GWA of 86.16 or

12.5 percent of them has a GWA of 85, 8 or 6.25 percent of them has a

GWA of 84, 5 or 3.91 percent of them has a GWA of 83, 5 or 3.91 percent

of them has a GWA 82, 1 or 0.78 percent of them has a GWA of 81.

Lastly, 6 or 4.69 percent of them has a GWA of 80.

Hence, the student-respondents has a mean average of 87.43

percent with a standard deviation of 4.44

Analysis and Interpretation of Data

The following tables show the analysis and interpretation of data

that have been gathered.

Relationship between the experience on work immersion of

student-respondents and their level of employability.

Areas 𝒓 𝒙𝒚 Interpretation Decision


Work immersion 0.49377414 Marked/ Reject Ho

experience vs Moderate

level of Correlation

employability

Table 4: Relationship between the experience on work immersion of

student-respondents and their level of employability

As shown in the table 4, the relationship between experience on

work immersion and level of employability has an 𝑟 𝑥𝑦 of 0.49377414

interpreted as Marked/ Moderate Correlation.

Relationship between the level of employability to the

student-respondents profile variates.

Profile Variates

Level vs 𝑟 𝑥𝑦 Interpretation Decision

Age 0.161130439 Negligible Accept Ho

Correlation

Sex -0.35156479 Low or Right Reject Ho

Correlation

GWA -0.021101318 Negligible Accept Ho


Correlation

Table 5: Relationship between the level of employability to the

student-respondents profile variates.

As shown in Table 5 there is no significant relationship between

the level of employability and Age of the student-respondents with an R-

value of 0.161130439 and is interpreted as Negligible Correlation. There

is a significant relationship bet ween the level of employability and Sex of

the student-respondents a R-value of -0.35156479 and is interpreted as

Low or Slight Correlation. There is no significant relationship between

the level of employability and the GWA of the student-respondents a R-

value of -0.021101318 and is interpreted as Negligible Correlation.

Table 6: Students Responses on the Questionnaire

Experience on Wok Immersion

Question Agree (3) Undecided Disagree (1) Title

(2)

1 123 3 2 Frequency

The work 96.04% 2.34% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.95 (agree) It means that most of our Weighted

program respondents understand the actual world Mean

helped me to of work because of work immersion


understand

the actual

world of work

particularly

the nature &

culture of the

workplace.

2 114 14 0 Frequency

The work 89.06% 10.94% 0 Percentage

immersion 2.89 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed and has worked Mean

helped me to efficiently by accomplishing assigned task

work

efficiently by

accomplishing

assigned task

within the

time frame.

3 82 45 1 Frequency

The work 64.06% 35.16% 0.78% Percentage

immersion 2.63 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted


program respondents agreed that they do task Mean

helped me to with less supervision

do assigned

task with less

supervision.

4 112 14 2 Frequency

The work 87.5% 10.93% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.86 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that work immersion Mean

helped me is helpful in integrating real life work

integrate real- experience

life work

experience

into my

academic

learning

seven fully

understand

the

curriculum

they are
specializing.

5 106 21 1 Frequency

The work 82.81% 16.41% 0.78 Percentage

immersion 2.82 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that because of work Mean

made me immersion they are now immersed and

become adjusted in the actual work setting

immersed and

adjusted in

the actual

work setting.

Average Weighted Mean = 2.83

Levels of Employability

Question Agree (3) Undecided Disagree (1) Title

(2)

1 106 20 2 Frequency

The work 82.81% 15.625% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.81 (agree) this means that majority of Weighted

program our respondents agreed that by work Mean


simulated my immersion there curiosity are simulated

curiosity to

learn more

about the job

assigned to

me.

2 104 24 0 Frequency

The work 81.25% 18.75% 0 Percentage

immersion 2.81 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that they have Mean

improved my improved their understanding in

understanding abstract concepts because of work

of abstract immersion

concepts I

learnt at class

session and

discussion by

directly

applying them

to work.

3 104 21 3 Frequency
The work 81.25% 16.41% 2.37% Percentage

immersion 2.79 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that they developed Mean

developed a a love of learning and desire because of

loved of work immersion

learning and

desire to

develop my

skills that are

necessary to

deliver the job.

4 106 21 1 Frequency

The work 82.81% 16.41% 0.78% Percentage

immersion 2.82 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that they developed Mean

helped me good decision-making skills because of

developed good work immersion program

decision-

making skills.

5 108 16 4 Frequency

The work 84.375% 12.5% 3.125% Percentage


immersion 2.81 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

experience respondents agreed that they improved Mean

improved my their ability to focus on the task given

ability to focus because of work immersion

on the task

given and pay

attention to the

steps and

policies of

delivering

such.

6 111 15 2 Frequency

The work 86.72% 11.72% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.85 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

experience respondents agreed that they develop Mean

helped me to communication skills because of work

develop my immersion

communication

skills

particularly my

listening skills,
speaking and

facilitating my

officers at the

immersion

7 78 28 2 Frequency

The work 60.94% 21.875% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.28 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that developed their Mean

developed my skills that are necessary to come up with

skills that are creative solutions to challenges because

necessary to of work immersion

come up with

creative

solutions to

challenges I

encountered in

delivering my

daily assigned

task

8 72 39 17 Frequency

The wok 56.25% 30.47% 13.28% Percentage


immersion 2.42 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that they exposed Mean

exposed me to their digital skills because of work

digital skills immersion

like typing,

encoding,

printing,

PowerPoint

making and

using of excel

for daily task

at work.

9 110 16 2 Frequency

The work 85.94% 12.5% 1.6% Percentage

immersion 2.84 (agree) this means that most of our Weighted

program respondents agreed that they improved Mean

improved my their ability to devise new ways to carry

ability to devise out tasks because of work immersion

new ways to

carry out tasks

and to thing in
a creative

manner.

Average Weighted Mean= 2.714

Implications of the Study:

The following implications were derived from the findings of this

study.

The highest number of student-respondents was 47 aged 18 years

old and the lowest was 2 aged 22 years old.

There were more female student-respondents of 74 than 54 male

student-respondents.
Chapter V

Summary of Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations

This chapter presents the summary of the study, findings, the

conclusions drawn and corresponding recommendations that were

formulated based on the result of the study.

Summary of findings:

Here are the findings that have been discovered by the researchers in

this study.

1. Age: The total number of student-respondents is 128, 74 of them are

female and 54 are male, further 47 or 36.72 percent of them has an age

of 18 years old which has the highest number of respondents while 2 or

1.6 percent of them has an age of 22 years old which has the lowest

number of respondents. It has a mean score of 18.05 and a standard

deviation of 1.27

2. Sex: The student- trainees are mostly female, accounting for 57.81

percent. The males counterpart consists only of 54 or 42.19 percent.

3. General Weighted Average the average of the student-respondents has

no effect to the level of employability and experience on work immersion


Conclusion

1. Most of the student-trainees were female and has a slight/low

correlation to the level of employability.

2. Most of the student-respondents were 18 years old.

3. The age of our student-respondents has no relationship to the level of

employability

4. The sex of or student-respondents has a slight/low correlation

coefficient to the level of employability

5. The general weighted average of our student-respondents has no

relationship to the level of employability.

6. There is a mark/ moderate correlation coefficient between the level of

employability and the experience on work immersion.

Recommendations

1. Students or trainees should always perform well on their assigned

workplace to avoid conflict with their supervisor

2. Teachers should always guide their students on where to go during

immersion and how they would act during, to be able to have a good

partnership with the specific workplace


3. Parents should always be a hundred percent supportive and

considerate to their child because Work Immersion takes a lot of time

and effort to be able to succeed