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A STUDY ON CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

AT ARIES INDUSTRIES Pvt, Ltd. Pudhucherry

PROJECT REPORT

Submitted by
M. REVATHY
REGISTER NO: 27348334

Under the guidance of


MR. S. JAYAKUMAR, M.E., M.B.A,
Faculty Department of Management Studies
In partial fulfillment for the award of the degree
of
MASTER OF BUSSINESS ADMINISTRATION

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES


SRI MANAKULA VINAYAGAR ENGINEERING COLLEGE
PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY
PUDUCHERRY,
INDIA
SEPTEMBER 2007

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Introduction to The Study


In today’s competition world, every company has to study consumer purchasing
power & behavior prior to develop a marketing plan for its product. This enables the
marketer to understand who constitute the market, what and why the market buys, who
participate in & influences the buying process & how, when & where consumer buy.

But such knowledge is critical for marketers since having a strong understanding
of behavior will help shed light on what is important to the customer & also suggest the
important to the customer decision – making. Using this information marketers can create
marketing programs that they believe will be interest to customers.

Buyer behavior is deeply rooted in psychology will dashes of sociology thrown in


just to make things more interesting since every person in the word is different, it is
impossible to have simple rules that explain how buying decisions are made
contemporary approaches to business emphasize the importance of adopting a consumer
focus. Marketing in particular, beings & ends with the consumer from determining his or
her needs to ensuring post-purchase satisfaction.
1.2 COMPANY PROFILE

Dura-Crete, Inc. is a Premier Pre-Cast Concrete Manufacturer and Custom


Concrete Specialist located in Salt Lake City, Utah.

With over 52 years experience, we have established ourselves as not just another
precast concrete company, but as a well-known, high-quality, dependable manufacturer
of custom concrete and precast concrete products, supplying the intermountain western
states.

1.2.1 About Us

Dura-Crete Inc. was incorporated in 1954 and has established itself as a premier
manufacturer in pre-cast concrete and custom concrete products. If you've driven down
I15 or I215, there is a good chance that you've seen some of our concrete barriers on the
freeway.

Anybody can try to sell concrete products, but year after year, Dura-Crete has
proven to be a quality manufacturer with an unmatched reputation. We are members of
NPCA, the Better Business Bureau, and listed on Dun and Bradstreet.

NCPA is the National Precast Concrete Association. Founded in 1965, NPCA


connects leaders in the manufactured concrete industry through educational, leadership
and networking opportunities. The association currently represents more than 900
companies that are committed to expanding the use of quality precast concrete.

The Dura-Crete Product Line includes custom concrete products as well as: Storm
Drains, Water Holding Tanks, Septic Tanks, Sand & Grease Traps, Barriers, Dry Wells,
and Concrete Landscape products.

Our plant is located at 1475 West 3500 South, West Valley City, UT 84119. Our
mailing address is Dura-Crete, Inc. PO BOX 65489, Salt Lake City, UT 84165
1.2.2 What are concrete roof tiles?

Do you want the appearance of a tile roof but not the high cost? Consider
beautiful, long-lasting, and economical concrete roofing tiles. In the middle of the 19th
century, in Bavaria, a mixture of cement, sand, and water was first used to form roof tiles
out of concrete. Many homes built with these first concrete roof tiles still remain, proving
their durability. In the early 1900s, coloring pigments were added to concrete roofing
tiles in Europe to simulate the appearance of clay. While these early concrete tiles were
handmade or made with semi-automated machines, innovation over the past century has
automated production, making concrete tile more economical than other roofing products
on a life cycle basis.

1.2.3 What are the advantages of concrete roof tiles?

Concrete roof tiles most often last the lifetime of a house, typically carrying a
limited lifetime, non-pro-rated, transferable warranty. Compare this to the limited
warranties that accompany most composition shingles, and also how shorter lived
products tend to overfill precious landfill space. Concrete tiles are Class A fire rated and
resistant to damage from hail and high winds, typically achieving a minimum of a Class 3
hail resistance rating. Concrete tiles can sustain winds in excess of 125 miles per hour
that would strip off most other roofing materials. Testing has also shown concrete tile
roofing systems, when installed according to building code standards, exceed current
seismic load requirements for building materials.

1.2.4 How much do concrete roof tiles cost?


Concrete tiles have grown more competitive in price, due in part to the rising
costs of petroleum based products such as asphalt shingles.

1.2.5 What options do I have in selecting concrete roof tiles?


Compared to unsightly weather-beaten asphalt shingles and their replacement
costs, concrete roof tiles offer an affordable and economical alternative, especially when
considering their life cycle cost. Concrete tile roofs have experienced 100-year lives in
Europe. There are many style and color options available with concrete tile. Not limited
to Sunbelt construction, concrete tiles can be used in cold climates provided specific
installation precautions are followed. Modern concrete tile designs can simulate the
appearance of traditional clay tiles, wood shake, slate, and stone. Like clay, concrete tile
surfaces can be textured or smooth, tile edges can be uniform or ragged, and architects
may select tiles of all one color, blended colors, or combinations of two or more shades
placed in a uniform or random pattern. Regular Portland cement is gray, but is also
available in white. Pigments can be blended with either white or gray cement to allow for
virtually any desired color, including bright whites, pastels, and deep rich shades.
Lightweight concrete tiles are also available in some regions of the country for re-roofing
applications where the roof structure is insufficient to support standard weight concrete
tiles.
1.3 NEED FOR THE STUDY
Studying customers provides clue for developing new products, product features
price and other marketing-mix elements.
To understand the buyer’s consciousness about the product and the purchaser’s
decisions.
This study helps concern to get the decisions about the tiles (product) devise
suitable strategies for marketing.
Study helps the concern in the fixation of price for their new product concrete
tiles.
It helps to learn about the consumer taste and preferences with regards to the Dura
Crete tiles product.
The study helps to estimate about the Dura Crete tiles sales and its future in the
market.
CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

2.1 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:

Degree of satisfaction provided by the goods or services of a firm as measured by


the number of repeat customers.

Customer satisfaction is in the Advertising, Marketing, Selling and Customer


Relations & Services subjects.

customer satisfaction appears in the definitions of the following terms: world


class, non value adding activity, customer analysis, balanced scorecard (BSC), direct
measures of quality, supply chain management (SCM), customer focused performance
and Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award

Customer satisfaction, a business term, is a measure of how products and services


supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. It is seen as a key
performance indicator within business and is part of the four perspectives of a Balanced
Scorecard.

In a competitive marketplace where businesses compete for customers, customer


satisfaction is seen as a key differentiator and increasingly has become a key element of
business strategy.

2.1.1 Measuring customer satisfaction

Organizations are increasingly interested in retaining existing customers while


targeting non-customers; measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of how
successful the organization is at providing products and/or services to the marketplace.
Customer satisfaction is an ambiguous and abstract concept and the actual
manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and
product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of both
psychological and physical variables which including follow-on database maintenance
and management.

The personal service that need to make our customer satisfaction research project a
success.

• Baseline Measurement of Customers' Satisfaction Levels. This measurement


will able to quantify your customers' satisfaction levels, and know the reasons for
satisfaction or dissatisfaction. We'll calculate and rank the importance of a
number of satisfaction-related attributes.
• Customer Satisfaction Tracking System. This will enable to tell how effective
are the efforts at improving customer satisfaction have been.
• Competitive Customer Satisfaction Measurement. This tells you just where
you stand on customer satisfaction relative to key competitors that you identify.
• Customer Retention Research. Find out why clients are leaving, and what
would make them stay. Use this information to design a customer retention
program.
• Transfer of an Existing Customer Satisfaction Tracking Program. If there are
existing customer satisfaction programs, this can continue its operation for
company. The transfer will be seamless, and you may benefit from a fresh look at
your company's existing approach.

The management guru, Peter Drucker states, "The purpose of a business is to


create and retain customers." So where do you start? Following are seven customer
service tips that can help ensure your organization is, indeed, providing superior
customer service that will pretty much guarantee a high retention rate.
1. Know Your Customer. Understand what it is about your organization that makes
customers come to you instead of your competition. Identify your strengths and build
upon them.

2. Know Your Competition. Know what your competition is doing at all times. Are they
doing something new or different? Are they doing something better than you? How can
you do something better than them? Always ask yourself these questions. Keep your
business on top when it comes to quality of products and service.

3. Retain Your Customers. It can cost 5-10 times more to acquire a new customer than it
does to keep an existing one. Keep your customers delighted. Treat them like gold. After
all, our customers are the reason we are in business. And remember, every customer you
lose is a customer gained by your competition!

4. Create a Positive First Impression. The first contact your customers have with your
organization is critical. Take measures to make sure that first contact is a magic moment
instead of a tragic moment. In these days of shrinking profit margins, little things can
make a big difference. Mother Theresa put it very well when she said, "Kind words can
be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless."

5. Approach Complaints with a Positive Attitude. When you're dealing with customers
on an ongoing basis, you'll undoubtedly receive your fair share of complaints. So keep in
mind Al Capone's motto: "Don't take it personally, it's just business." After that, it's
simply a question of approaching the problem with the right attitude to ensure customer
satisfaction.

6. Sharpen Your Customer Service Skills. Customer service training is the most valuable
tool you can give yourself or, as a manager, your employees. The skills mastered will
enable everyone to become more productive, enjoy their job more, increase their value to
the company and improve customer service at all levels.

7. Measure Customer Satisfaction. Continuously monitor your business. Never sit back
and relax. Offer new products or services as needs require. Always ask the customer what
you can do better. That information is the vital link between your business and your
customers and can help provide the kind of service and satisfaction that builds customers
for life.

In any business today, the superior customer service commitment must be


renewed every day. We have to tend to it, we have to feed it, we have to care about it and
we have to live it. When we do, that commitment translates into delighted customers,
repeat business, referrals and increased profits.

Customer satisfaction Research can address a variety of issues, including, but not
limited to:

o How satisfied are your customers?


o How satisfied are your competitors' customers?
o How satisfied are your employees?
o How do consumers/businesses use the products and services in your industry?
o Are your target customers aware of your business?
o What is the image of your business among target customers?
o Is your advertising effective? What could make it more effective?
o How should you design a new product or service to meet the needs of the market?
o What is the appropriate price to charge for a product?

Central message:

• High customer satisfaction makes money and enhances profitability.


• Periodic customer satisfaction surveys are absolutely essential to any growing
business.

2.1.2 Improving Customer Satisfaction Once a Customer Satisfaction Measurement


Program Is in Place:

Customer satisfaction research is not an end unto itself. The purpose, of course, in
measuring customer satisfaction is to see where a company stands in this regard in the
eyes of its customers, thereby enabling service and product improvements which will
lead to higher satisfaction levels. The research is just one component in the quest to
improve customer satisfaction. There are many others, including:

• Top management commitment,


• Linking of Customer Satisfaction scores with employee and management
monetary incentives,
• Recognition of employees who contribute to customers' satisfaction,
• Identification, measurement, and tracking of operational variables which drive
satisfaction scores,
• Customer-based improvement goals,
• Plans for improving operational variables,
• Incorporation of customer satisfaction skills into employee training programs,
• Measurement of and plans for improvement of employee satisfaction,

• Changes in corporate hiring practices.

2.1.3 Top Management Commitment:

Top management, through its actions, must show that customer satisfaction is important
to it. This can be done in several ways.

• Acknowledging areas where the company needs to improve,


• Allocating appropriate resources to the improvement of customer satisfaction,
• Involvement of management and employees in the development of plans for
customer satisfaction improvement,
• Linking management bonuses to satisfaction scores,
• Clear and frequent communication of what is being done to improve customer
satisfaction.

2.1.4 Linking of Customer Satisfaction Scores with Employee and Management


Monetary Incentives:

This really is just a case of having management put its money where its mouth is.
Monetary incentives for improving customer satisfaction scores should reach all levels of
the organization, from top management to front-line employees and suppliers. Incentive
programs can be structured so that all employees in an organizational unit receive
compensation if the unit's customer satisfaction goals are met. Additionally, exemplary
service on the part of individual employees can be rewarded on an ad hoc basis.
Management incentives do not have to result in incremental expenditures; a reallocation
of current incentives will suffice. For example, if 100% of a manager's bonus is
dependent upon meeting operational and sales goals, the mix could be changed to include
a customer satisfaction goal.

2.1.5 Recognition of Employees Who Contribute to Customers' Satisfaction:

This is an inexpensive way to foster customer satisfaction. The keys to success are:

• Making sure that all employees are aware of why a particular employee is being
recognized,
• Making sure that each employee being recognized is worthy of recognition.

2.1.6 Identification, Measurement, and Tracking of Operational Variables Which


Drive Satisfaction Scores:

The results of a customer satisfaction survey need to be evaluated to determine


what needs to be improved. For example, a survey may find that customer waiting times
need to be reduced. The next step should be to quantify actual customer waiting times,
and to set goals and strategies for reducing them. Goals should be as specific as possible.
It is better to say "we want to reduce wait times during peak periods from an average of
twenty minutes to fifteen minutes by the end of June," than to say "we need to reduce
customer waiting times."

2.1.7 Customer-Based Improvement Goals:

This tie directly to the previous point. Once you have identified what needs to be
improved, you need to develop a plan for improving each identified area. Such plans need
to be based on what customers really need, rather than what management believes to be a
good goal. Using the previous example, if customers really desire wait times of ten
minutes or less, having management dictate that wait times must be reduced to fifteen
minutes will have limited appeal with customers. You may need to do a separate survey
with customers to actually set appropriate goals. If this is not economically feasible, at
least talk to a number of customers and gain their input before setting a goal.

2.1.8 Plans for Improving Operational Variables:

Once you have established what needs to be improved, and how much it needs to be
improved, plans need to be developed to make improvement happen. The keys to
successful planning are to:

• Involve front-line employees and management in the planning process,


• Make sure plans are specific,
• Evaluate the success of plans once they have been put into place. This is done by
measuring actual improvement in operations and customer satisfaction.

2.1.9 Incorporation of Customer Satisfaction Skills into Employee Training


Programs:

Employee training programs should be modified to include:

• A description of the importance of customer satisfaction to the company,


• Descriptions of what keeps customers satisfied,
• A description of customer satisfaction measurement programs, recognition
programs, and incentive programs,
• Specific employee-performance expectations with regard to keeping customers
satisfied.

2.1.10 Measurement of and Plans for Improvement of Employee Satisfaction:

Unhappy employees will have difficulty in keeping customers happy. You should
consider measuring the satisfaction levels of employees, and then developing action plans
to improve employee satisfaction.

2.1.11 Changes in Corporate Hiring Practices:


Certain types of people will do a better job of satisfying customers than will other
types of people, regardless of the quality of training, reward, and recognition programs.
Once you have determined the types of employee behaviors are important to customers,
you should incorporate this knowledge Measuring What Is Important to Customers

Most well-designed customer satisfaction surveys contain a series of "attributes,"


which are rating scales of a series of specific statements or questions (courtesy, accuracy,
timeliness, etc.). Naturally, some "attributes" will be more important than others. There
has been a long-standing controversy in the Research Industry about how to know the
"importance" of attributes used in a customer satisfaction survey. There are two basic
choices:

1. "Stated Importance," determined by asking customers how important an item is,

2. "Derived Importance," determined by calculating the relationship between attributes


and satisfaction.

I here favor the derived approach. Asking importance adds unnecessary


questionnaire length (which irritates respondents) and provides answers which, in and of
themselves, may lead you astray. The results of asking customers what is important are
useful if combined with the derived approach, but could well result in erroneous customer
satisfaction improvement strategies if used without also deriving importance. This can
happen if what customers say is important is a prerequisite to competing in the
marketplace. In other words, it is already being done well by your company and by your
competitors.

The derived approach will uncover items which are most important to the
satisfaction of customers. These attributes will not always be the same attributes that a
customer would identify as being most important. But they would be the ones which, if
improved upon by a business, will result in higher levels of satisfaction. It is not difficult
for someone who understands statistical analysis to calculate the relative importance of a
series of attributes, provided that a questionnaire also includes a satisfaction measure of
some sort. The basic process is to conduct a correlation analysis, eliminate attributes
which have high correlation coefficients with each other and are saying "much the same
thing," and then to run a regression analysis. There are a variety of PC statistical
applications which can be used to perform these analyses, including SPSS. I used the
derived approach to calculate attribute importance weights in each of our customer
satisfaction surveys.

2.1.12 Customer Satisfaction – a Critical Component of Profitability:

Exceptional customer service results in greater customer retention, which in turn


results in higher profitability. Customer loyalty is a major contributor to sustainable
profit growth. To achieve success, you must make superior service second nature of
your organization. A seamless integration of all components in the service-profit chain
– employee satisfaction, value creation, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, and
profit and growth – links all the critical dynamics of top customer service.

Sadly, mature companies often forget or forsake the thing that made them
successful in the first place: a customer-centric business model. They lose focus on the
customer and start focusing on the bottom line and quarterly results. They look for ways
to cut costs or increase revenues, often at the expense of the customer. They forget that
satisfying customer needs and continuous value innovation is the only path to
sustainable growth. This creates opportunities for new, smaller companies to emulate
and improve upon what made their bigger competitors successful in the first place and
steal their customers.

2.1.13 Innovation Defined

Innovation is a process of taking new ideas through to satisfied customers. It is


the conversion of new knowledge into new products and services.

Innovation is about creating value and increasing efficiency, and therefore growing
your business. It is a spark that keeps organizations and people moving ever onward and
upward. "Without innovation, new products, new services, and new ways of doing
business would never emerge, and most organizations would be forever stuck doing the
same old things the same old way."
2.1.14 Innovation: A Paradigm Shift

Innovation is bringing a paradigm shift in the way the business is done in a


rapidly globalizing economy. This new economy is characterized by enhanced
frequency of innovations, shortening of product, technology, and economic life cycles,
rapid generation and commercialization of new technologies, globalization not only
large but also small businesses, enhanced emphasis on business partnerships and
strategic alliances, intensive and multi-country research and development programs and
difficulty in accessing critical technologies.

2.1.15 Entrepreneurial Action – the Engine of Innovation

While research and invention is a major contributor to innovation, if there is no


entrepreneurial action there is no value creation.

• How satisfied are you with the purchase you made?


• How satisfied are you with the service you received?
• How likely are you to buy from us again?
• How likely are you to recommend our company to others?

2.1.16 Customer Expectations:

Customer is defined as anyone who receives that which is produced by the


individual or organization that has value. Customer expectations are continuously
increasing. Brand loyalty is a thing of the past. Customers seek out products and
producers that are best able to satisfy their requirements. A product does not need to be
rated highest by customers on all dimensions, only on those they think are important.

2.1.17 Customer expectation;


The "Customer Expectation Paradox" has to do with the difference between what
customers WANT, and what they have learned they are going to receive from the
companies they do business with. It goes like this:
While customers want more from the companies and employees they do
business with, they have actually come to expect less than they did before. We
suggested that generally, if you compare customers from twenty years ago to
customers nowadays, you'll find that today, customers want more. They want faster
service, more convenient service, more flexibility in things like payment plans and
options, or merchandise return polices. They want less time waiting in lines, and they
want their problems solved almost immediately.

2.1.18 SERVQUAL:

SERVQUAL is an instrument designed by the marketing research team of Berry,


Parasuraman and Zeithaml to measure service quality from the point of view of the
customer's minimum, desired and perceived levels of service. The survey is based upon
the concept of the Gaps Model of Service Quality which posits that the discrepancy
between customers' expectations for excellence and their perception of actual service
delivered is a customer-oriented definition of service quality. The twenty-two survey
questions are grouped into five service "dimensions" that have been consistently ranked
by customers in various service industries to be most important for service quality. The
five dimensions of service are:

• reliability - the ability to perform the promised service dependably and accurately
• responsiveness - the willingness to help customers and provide prompt service
• assurance - the knowledge and courtesy of employees and their ability to convey
trust and confidence
• empathy - the caring, individualized attention given to customers
• tangibles - the appearance of physical facilities, equipment, personnel and
communication materials

If you don’t make an emotional connection with customers, then satisfaction is


worthless
By
William J. McEwen and John H. Fleming

Source: Gallup Management Journal (http://gmj.gallup.com)


For several decades, marketers have been tirelessly searching for a highly coveted
but apparently elusive prize: customer satisfaction. The problem is, they’ve been
pursuing the wrong goal.

That’s right. Regardless of how high a company’s customer satisfaction levels


may appear to be, satisfying customers without creating an emotional connection with
them has no real value. None at all.
As Werner Reinart and V. Kumar noted in a Harvard Business Review article last
year, “To identify the true apostles, companies need to judge customers by more than just
their actions.” Others echo their sentiments. Wharton’s Peter Fader states, “It is hard to
diagnose past behavior to understand why people did what they did. Historical behavioral
data is rich and interesting, but it has its limits as a guide to the future.”

Customer satisfaction assessment was heralded some time ago as the obvious
solution to the need for more meaningful customer measures. Satisfaction, it was
claimed, provides insight into the reasons why customers behave as they do and is not
merely a reflection of repeated behavior that may have been earned — or “purchased”—
by the company.

Customer Service and Satisfaction


We must cultivate our garden.
—Voltaire

When we talk about customer service and/or satisfaction, we talk about creativity.

Creativity allows us to handle or diffuse problems at hand or later on in the


process of conducting the everyday business. We talk about how, or rather what, does the
organization have to do to gain not only the sale but also the loyalty of the customer. We
want to know the payoff of the transaction both in the short and long term. We want to
know what our customers want. We want to know if our customers are satisfied.
Satisfaction, of course, means that what we delivered to a customer met the
customer’s approval. We want to know if customers are delighted and willing to come
back, and so on. Fleiss2 and Feldman3 present examples of that delightfulness in their
writings. Fleiss has written about Ben and Jerry’s ice cream and Feldman has discussed
excellence in a cab ride.

CHAPTER III

OBJECTIVES
3.1 Primary Objective

To identify the satisfactory level of consumers of Dura Crete tiles products.

3.2 Secondary Objectives

To find out customer preferences and expectations on tiles.

To evaluate the price of the tiles products regarding the quality.

To find out the customer satisfaction on shape, size and colour of the Dura Crete
tiles product.

To find out customer relationship management activity of Aries industries in


production of Dura Crete tiles to satisfy the customer.
CHAPTER IV

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
4.1 RESEARCH:

Research is a process in which the researcher wishes to find out the end result for
a given problem and thus the solution helps in future course of action. The research has
been defined as “A careful investigation or enquiry especially through search for new
facts in any branch of knowledge.

4.1.1 Research Methodology:

The procedure using, which researchers go about their work of describing,


explaining and predicting phenomena, is called Methodology. Methods compromise the
procedures used for generating, collecting and evaluating data. Methods are the ways of
obtaining information useful for assessing explanations.

4.1.2 Type of Research

The type of research used in this project is descriptive in nature. Descriptive


research is essentially a fact-finding related largely to the present, abstracting generations
by cross sectional study of the current situation. The descriptive methods are extensively
used in the physical and natural science, for instance when physics measure, biology
classifies, zoology dissects and geology studies the rocks. But its use in social science is
more common, as in socio economic surveys and job and activity analysis.

Descriptive research aims at,

To portray the characteristics of a particular individual situation, or group (with or


without specific initial hypothesis about the nature of these characteristics).

To determine the frequency with which something occurs or with which it is


associated with something else (usually, but not always, with a specific initial
hypothesis).
The descriptive methods have certain limitations one is that the research may
make description itself an end itself. Research is essentially creative and demands the
discovery of facts on order to lead a solution of the problem. A second limitation is
associated whether the statistical technique dominates. The desire to over emphasis
central tendencies and to fact in terms of AVERAGE, correlation, means and dispersion
may not always be either welcome. This limitation arises because statistics, which is
partly a descriptive tool of analysis, can aid but not always explain casual relations.

4.1.3 Design of Descriptive Studies:


Descriptive studies aim at portraying accurately the characteristics of a particular
group or solution. One may under take a descriptive study about the work in the factory,
health, safety and welfare. A descriptive study may be concerned with the right to strike,
capital punishment, prohibition, etc.

A descriptive study involves the following steps:

• Formulating the objectives of the study.

• Defining the population and selecting the sample.

• Designing the method of data collection.

• Analysis of the data.

• Conclusions and recommendations for further improvements in the practices.

4.1.4 Description of statistical tool used

a) Percentage method

b) Chi-square Test

c) Correlation Method

4.1.4(a) PERCENTAGE METHOD:

In this project Percentage method test was used.

Formula:

No of Respondent
Percentage of Respondent = × 100
Total no. of Respondents

4.1.4(b) CHI-SQUARE Analysis:

In this project chi-square test was used. This is an analysis of technique which
analyzed the stated data in the project. It analysis the assumed data and calculated in the
study. The Chi-square test is an important test amongst the several tests of significant
developed by statistical. Chi-square, symbolically written as x2 (Pronounce as Ki-Spare),
is a statistical measure used in the context of sampling analysis for comparing a variance
to a theoretical variance.
Formulae:
(O-E)2
2
X =
E
O = Observed frequency E = Expected frequency

4.1.4(c) CORRELATION:
Correlation analysis deals with the association between two or more variables. It
does not tell anything about cause and effective relationship. Correlation is described or
classified in several different ways. Three important ways of classifying correlation are:
1. Positive and Negative
2. Simple. Multiple and Partial
3. Linear and Non-Linear

Karls Pearson’s Method is popularly knows Pearson’s Coefficient of correlation. It is


denoted by the symbol ‘r’
Formula for Karls Pearson’s coefficient correlation,

∑xy
r =
√∑x2×∑y2

The value of the coefficient of correlation as obtained by the above formula shall
always lie between +1 and -1, when r = 1; it means there is a perfect correlation between
variables. When r = -1; it means there is a perfect negative correlation between variables.
When r = 0; it means no relationship between variables.

4.1.5 Data Collection Method:

Survey method is considered the best method for data collection of data and the
tools used for data collection are Questionnaire. This method is quite popular particularly
in case of big enquires. Private individuals, research works, private and public
organizations and even government are adopting it.
In this method a questionnaire is sent to the persons concerned with a request to
answer and return the questionnaire. A questionnaire consists of a number of question
involves both specific and general questions relating to consumer behavior.

4.1.6 Benefits availed through this method

 There is low cost even when the universe is large and is widely spread
geographically.

 It is free from the bias of the interviewer; answers are in respondents own words.

 Respondents, who are not easily approachable, can also be reached conveniently.

 Large samples can be made use of and thus the results can be made more
dependable & reliable.

 Respondents have adequate time to give well thought out answers.

4.1.7 Limitations of this system

 Low rate of return of the duly filled in questionnaires; bias due to no-response is
often indeterminate.

 It can be used only when respondents are educated and cooperating.

 The control over questionnaire may be lost once it is sent.

 It is difficult to know whether willing respondents are truly representative.

 This method is likely to be the slowest of all.

4.1.8 Sources of Data

The two sources of data collection are namely


a) Primary
b) Secondary.

4.1.8(a) Primary Data

Primary data are fresh data collected through survey from the customers using the
questionnaire. Questionnaire helps to recognize the apprentice’s perception regarding the
apprenticeship training and to find out their expectations and their career path.

4.1.8(b) Secondary Data


Secondary data are collected from books internet and various journals, magazines
etc. regarding the apprenticeship.

4.1.9 Research design

A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of


data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in
procedure. The problem of the study is to find out the satisfaction level of the customers
Dura Crete tiles products.

4.1.10 Sample Design

Sample Element : Past Customers

Sample Size : 100 samples

Sample Test : Percentage Method, CHI-SQUARE analysis,


Correlation Method.

Sample Media : Questionnaire


CHAPTER V

DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION

TABLE NO: 5.1


Capital preferred by customers

S.No Capital use No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 5 Lakhs 22 22
2 10 lakhs 55 55
3 15 lakhs 23 23
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 23% customer were preferred their capital
to be 15 lakhs, 55%preffered 10 Lakhs and 22% preferred 5 lakhs.

CHART NO: 5.1

Capital preferred by customers


100

80

60 55%
Percentage
40
22% 23%
20

0
5 lakhs 10 lakhs 15 lakhs
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.2

Source of Identification of the Product

S.No Source of identification No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Media 28 28
2 Friends 44 44
3 Builders 27 27
Total 100 100

Source :Primary Data

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 28 %the respondents identify the product
through Media, 44 % identify through friends and 27% through Builders.

CHART NO: 5.2

Source of Identification of the Product


100

80

60
Percentage 44%
40
28% 27%
20

0
Media Friends Builders
No of Respondants

TABLE NO: 5.3

Nature of the Product bought

S.No Nature bought No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Wall tiles 29 29
2 Floor tiles 41 41
3 Staircase tiles 30 30
TOTAL 100 100

Source: Primary Data

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 29%of customer choose Wall tiles, 41 %
people prefer floor tiles and 30% customer prefer staircase tiles.

CHART NO: 5.3

Nature of the Product bought


100

80

60
Percentage 41%
40 29% 30%

20

0
wall tiles Floor tiles Stair tiles
No of Respondants

TABLE NO: 5.4 (a)

Price the tiles product bought

S.No The amount u bought the tiles No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Rs 10 33 33
2 Rs 15 42 42
3. Rs 20 25 25
TOTAL 100 100

Source: Primary Data

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 42 % respondents bought the goods for
rupees 15 , 25% bought for rupees 20 and 33% bought for rupees 10.

CHART NO: 5.4 (a)

Price the tiles product bought


45 42%
40
33%
35
30 25%
25
20
15
10
5
0
10 rs 15 Rs 20 Rs

TABLE NO: 5.4 (b)

Ideal Price for the Tiles Product

S.No Ideal price No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Yes 43 43
2 No 57 57
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 57% respondents the price limit is not ideal
And 43 % preferred that it’s ideal.

CHART NO: 5.4 (b)

Ideal Price for the Tiles Product


no
yes
57%
43%

TABLE NO:5.5
Benefits get out of the Product

S.No Benefit No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Shine 31 31
2 Design 32 32
3 Colour 37 37
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 37% of the people prefer colour as their
benefit get out of the product, 31% people preferred shine and 32% people prefer Design.

CHART NO: 5.5

Benefits get out of the Product


38 37%
37
36
35
34
33 32%
32 31%
31
30
29
28
Shine Design Colour

TABLE NO: 5.6

Place the tiles utilized

S.No Place were tiles utilized No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Outdoor 29 29
2 Indoor 35 35
3 Wall 11 11
4 Floor 19 19
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 29% of people use the products in
Outdoor, 19 % in Floor, 11% in Wall and 35% in Indoor.

CHART NO: 5.6


Place the tiles utilized

40
35%
35
29%
30
25
19%
20
15 11%
10
5
0
Outdoor Indoor wall Floor

TABLE NO: 5.7


Development in the Product

S.No Development in Product No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 In terms of quality 35 35
2 In terms of Price 31 31
3 In terms of Colour 19 19
4 In terms of Shape 15 15
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 35% in terms of Quality, 31% in terms of
Price, 19% customer prefer that the product should develop in terms of Colour, and
15 % in terms of shape.

CHART NO: 5.7

Development in the Product


40 35%
35 31%
30
25
19%
Percentage 20
15%
15
10
5
0
Quality Price Colour Shape
No of Respondants

TABLE NO: 5.8

Satisfaction level in Quality

S.No Satisfaction level in Quality No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Excellent 18 18
2 Good 27 27
3 Medium 27 27
4 Not bad 28 28
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 27% of people suggest that the satisfaction
level in quality is good, 18% of people suggest as Excellent, 28% as not bad and 27% as
Medium.

CHART NO: 5.8


Satisfaction level in Quality

100

80

Percentage
60

40
27% 27% 28%
18%
20

0
Excellent Good Medium Not bad
No of Respondents

TABLE NO:5.9

Satisfaction Level in Availability of Tiles

S.No Satisfaction level in No of respondents Percentage of


Availability respondents
1 Excellent 23 23
2 Good 36 36
3 Medium 21 21
4 Not bad 20 20
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the 36% customer preferred the
satisfaction level in availability as Good, 21% as Medium ,23 % as Excellent and
20 % as not bad.

CHART NO: 5.9


Satisfaction Level in Availability of Tiles

40 36%

23%
21% 20%
Percentage 20

0
Excellent Good Medium Not bad
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.10

Internal improvement required in the product

S.No Improve Internally No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Material 23 23
2 Colour 34 34
3 Size 27 27
4 Shape 16 16
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the 34%of the people suggest that the
product have to improve internally in Colour, 27 % in Size 23 % in Material and
16% in shape .

CHART NO: 5.10


Internal improvement required in the product

100

80

60
Percentage
40 34%
27%
23%
16%
20

0
Material Colour Size Shape
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.11

The Area the product to Improve Externally

S.No Improve Externally No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Marketing 25 25
2 Transportation 29 29
3 Advertisement 24 24
4 Discount 22 22
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 29 % in Transportation,24% of customer


wants the product to improve externally in the field of Advertisement, 25% in Marketing
and 22% of customer prefer Discount.

CHART NO: 5.11

The Area the product to Improve Externally


100
80
60
Percentage
40 25% 29% 24% 22%
20
0

t
g

nt
en
t in

t io

ou
m
ke

ta

c
e
or

is
is
ar

D
sp

rt
M

e
an

dv
Tr

A
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.12


Satisfaction level in Transportation Facility

S.No Satisfaction in Level No of respondents Percentage of


Transportation respondents
1 Highly satisfied 25 25
2 Satisfied 46 46
3 Dissatisfied 29 29
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the satisfaction level of Customer in the
transportation is 46% Satisfied, 29% Dissatisfied and 25 % highly satisfied.

CHART NO: 5.12

Satisfaction level in Transportation Facility


50 55%
45
40
35 25%
30 20%

25
20
15
10
5
0
Highly satisfied satisfied Dissatisfied

No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.13

Durability level of the Product

S.No Level of Durability No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Excellent 16 16
2 Good 42 42
3 Medium 17 17
4 Not bad 25 25
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the Durability of the tiles product preferred
by the customer is 42% Good, 25% not bad, 17% Medium and 16 % Excellent.

CHART NO: 5.13

Durability level of the Product


100

Percentage 80

60
42%
40
25%
16% 17%
20

0
Excellent Good Medium Not bad
No of respondents

TABLE NO: 5.14

Level of Satisfaction with the price of Tiles

S.No Satisfaction in Level Price No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Highly satisfied 30 30
2 Satisfied 30 30
3 Dissatisfied 40 40
4 TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the satisfaction level in Price preferred by
the customer 40% Dissatisfied,30 % is satisfied, and 30% highly satisfied.

CHART NO: 5.14

Level of Satisfaction with the price of Tiles


45 40%
40
35 30% 30%
30
25
Percentage
20
15
10
5
0
highly satisfied dissatisfied
satisfied
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.15


The Reason for the product attractiveness

S.No Attractiveness No of respondents Percentage of


respondents
1 Designs 34 34
2 Colour 30 30
3 Product availability 18 18
4 Low Cost 18 18
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that the Attractiveness level in minds of
customer is 34% Designs, 30 % Colour,18% Low cost , and 18 % Product availability.

CHART NO: 5.15

The Reason for the product attractiveness


100

80

60
Percentage
40 34% 30%
18% 18%
20

0
Designs Colour Product Low Cost
availability
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.16

Duration of usage of the Dura Crete tiles product

S.No Duration of using the product No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 2Years 57 57
2 3 Years 29 29
3 4 Years 14 14
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 57% of the customers are using the
products for 2 years, 29 % of customers for 3 years and 14% for 4 years.

CHART NO: 5.16


Duration of usage of the Dura Crete tiles product

60 57%

50

40
29%
Percentage 30

20 14%

10

0
2 years 3 years 4 years
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.17

Still Sticking to the Product

S.No Still using the product No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Yes 64 64
2 No 36 36
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 64% of the customers are still sticking to
the same tiles product and 36% of the customers are shift to other products.

CHART NO: 5.17

Still Sticking to the Product


70 64%
60

50

40 36%
Pe rce ntage
30

20

10

0
Yes No
No of Re spondents

TABLE NO: 5.18

Level of Suggestion to Friends to Utilize the Dura Crete Tiles

S.No Development of career opportunity No of Percentage of


respondents respondents
1 Yes 68 68
2 No 32 32
TOTAL 100 100

INFERENCE

From the above table it is inferred that 68% of the customer say they will suggest
their friends and another 32% of the customer say that they won’t suggest their friends.

CHART NO: 5.18

Level of Suggestion to Friends to Utilize the Dura Crete Tiles


100

80 68%
60
Percentage
40 32%

20

0
Yes No
No of Respondents

TABLE NO: 5.19

PEARSON’S SPEARMAN CORRELATION

STILL USING THE PRODUCT Vs SUGGESTION TO FRIENDS TO UTILIZE THE


PRODUCT

X Y ( X-X ) X2 (Y- Y ) Y2 xy

68 64 18 324 14 196 252


32 36 -18 324 -14 196 252

X = 100 /2 =50

Y = 100 /2 =50

∑xy
r =
√∑x2×∑y2
r = 0.88192

Inference:

It is inferred that the variable still using the product Vs suggestion to friends to utilize
the product is positive between the variables.

TABLE NO: 5.20

CHI-SQUARE TABLE:

OBSERVED FREQUENCY:
EXPECTED FREQUENCY:

Development Expected in the purchase of brand

In terms of In terms In terms In terms Total


Nature Quality of Price of colour of shape
of the
product Wall Tiles 7 17 5 0 29
Floor Tiles 19 8 7 7 41
Staircase 9 6 7 8 30
Tiles
31 19 15 100
Total 35

Development Expected in the purchase of brand

Nature In terms of In terms of In terms of In terms of Total


of the Quality Price colour shape
product Wall Tiles 9.0 5.5 4.4 29.0
10.1
Floor Tiles 14.4 12.7 7.8 6.1 41.0

Staircase 10.5 9.3 5.7 4.5 30.0


Tiles
35.0 31.0 19.0 15.0 100.0
Total

TABLE NO: 5.21

NATURE OF THE PRODUCT Vs DEVELOPMENT EXPECTED IN THE


PURCHASE OF BRAND

H0 : There is no significant difference between nature of the product and development


expected in the purchase of brand.
Ha : There is no significant difference between nature of the product and development
expected in the purchase of brand.

O E (O-E) (O-E)2 (O-E)2


E
7 10.1 -3.1 9.61 0.9514
17 9 8 16 1.778
5 5.5 -0.5 0.25 0.0454
0 4.4 -4.4 19.36 4.4
19 14.4 4.6 21.16 1.4694
8 12.7 -4.7 22.09 1.7393
7 7.8 -0.8 0.64 0.0820
7 6.1 0.9 0.81 0.1327
9 10.5 -1.5 2.25 0.2142
6 9.3 -3.3 10.89 1.1709
7 5.7 1.3 1.96 0.2904
8 4.5 3.5 12.25 2.7225

X2 = 15.0017

Inference:

Since Calculated value is lesser than the Tabulated value , the varience between Nature
of the product and Development expected in the purchase of brand is calculated and H 0
is accepted.

CHAPTER VI

FINDINGS OF THE STUDY:

 It is inferred that 23% customer were preferred their capital to be 15 lakhs,


55%preffered 10 Lakhs and 22% preferred 5 lakhs.
 It is inferred that 28 %the respondents identify the product through Media, 44 %
identify through friends and 27% through Builders.

 It is inferred that 29%of customer choose Wall tiles, 41 % people prefer floor tiles
and 30% customer prefer staircase tiles.

 It is inferred that 42 % respondents bought the goods for rupees 15 , 25% bought
for rupees 20 and 33% bought for rupees 10.

 It is inferred that 57% respondents the price limit is not ideal And 43 % preferred
that it’s ideal.

 It is inferred that 37% of the people prefer colour as their benefit get out of the
product, 31% people preferred shine and 32% people prefer Design.

 It is inferred that 29% of people use the products in Outdoor, 19 % in Floor, 11%
in Wall and 35% in Indoor.

 It is inferred that 35% in terms of Quality, 31% in terms of Price, 19% customer
prefer that the product should develop in terms of Colour, and 15 % in terms of
shape.

 It is inferred that 27% of people suggest that the satisfaction level in quality is
good, 18% of people suggest as Excellent, 28% as not bad and 27% as Medium.

 It is inferred that the 36% customer preferred the satisfaction level in availability
as Good, 21% as Medium ,23 % as Excellent and 20 % as not bad.

 It is inferred that the 34%of the people suggest that the product have to improve
internally in Colour, 27 % in Size 23 % in Material and 16% in shape .

 It is inferred that 29 % in Transportation,24% of customer wants the product to


improve externally in the field of Advertisement, 25% in Marketing and 22% of
customer prefer Discount.

 It is inferred that the satisfaction level of Customer in the transportation is 46%


Satisfied, 29% Dissatisfied and 25 % highly satisfied.

 It is inferred that the Durability of the tiles product preferred by the customer is
42% Good, 25% not bad, 17% Medium and 16 % Excellent.

 It is inferred that the satisfaction level in Price preferred by the customer 40%
Dissatisfied,30 % is satisfied, and 30% highly satisfied.
 It is inferred that the Attractiveness level in minds of customer is 34% Designs,
30 % Colour,18% Low cost , and 18 % Product availability.

 It is inferred that 57% of the customers are using the products for 2 years, 29 % of
customers for 3 years and 14% for 4 years.

 It is inferred that 64% of the customers are still sticking to the same tiles product
and 36% of the customers are shift to other products.

 It is inferred that 68% of the customer say they will suggest their friends and
another 32% of the customer say that they won’t suggest their friends.

CHAPTER VII

6.1 SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The price can be reduced by preparing the BX material by their own instead of
importing it from the main branch.
The company can introduced more colours and shape according to the need of the
customers.

They should increase their concentration on the price of the products.

The rate of sales of the tiles product can be increased by producing the tiles
product at cheaper rate with the same quality level when compared with the competitors
price limit.

6.2 CONCLUSION

In today’s knowledge based market, consumers are expecting more from the
marketers. With increased change in needs and expectation of the consumers, the
marketers need to be in close contact with the customers to learn their needs and satisfy
them with their needs for the product’s success.

From the study on the consumer behavior for the Dura Crete tiles of Aries
Industries Pvt Ltd. It was found that the concern has to produce more tiles of cheaper
cost with more designs & quality comparing with other manufacturers. Therefore the
concern has to concentrate more on producing Dura Crete tiles product with more added
features preferred by the consumers. On far with the tiles the producer has to stick on to
the quality preferred by customers.

To conclude, the study explores the market condition of the product and it infers a
good will among the consumers and it has to focus the areas where the consumers has to
be fulfilled.

CHAPTER VIII

8.1 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


The study is based upon small populations like 100 samples within the
Pondicherry region.

The time duration of the study is more than the expected.

The study only based on customer satisfaction level based on the Dura Crete tiles
product produced by the Aries Industries Pvt. Ltd.

8.2 SCOPE FOR THE FURTHER STUDY

The project throws light on the need for Customer satisfaction level so as to carry
out the organizational good in a perfect manner.

The project was developed based on benefits of customer satisfaction level


towards the product.

It will be helpful for the Management to identify the needs and wants customers
and to take decision to promote their business operation.

This project can be base for the students who are doing the project in the related
area and to the organization in viewing the worth of the customer satisfaction level.

ANNEXURE I

BIBLIOGRAPHY
BOOKS:

Kothari, C.R., “Research Methodology – Methods and Techniques”

WEB SITES

www.google.com

www.ask.com

www.about.com

www.search.yahoo.com

ANNEXURE II

QUESTIONNAIRE
Name :
Age :
Occupation :
Location :

1. Total Budget you spent for the Project (Premises)?

a. 5, 00,000 b. 10, 00,000 c. 15, 00,000

2. Who referred you to Dura Crete Brand?

a. Media b. Friends c. Builders

3. Please select the nature of the product you bought?

a. Wall Tiles b. Floor Tiles c. Staircase Tiles

4. a. For what price you have bought the tiles product?

a. 10 b. 15 c. 20

b. Do you suggest its ideal price for that product?

a. Yes b. No

5. Specify the benefit you get out of our brand?

a. Shine b. Design c. Colour

6. Where you used these tiles in your premises?

a. Outdoor b. Indoor c. Wall d. Floor

7. What kind of development you expecting the brand you purchase?


a. In terms of quality b. In terms of price

c. In terms of Colour d. In terms of Shape

8. Please select the satisfaction level of Dura Crete quality?

a. Excellent b. Good c. Medium d. Not bad

9. Please select the satisfaction level of Dura Crete availability?


a. Excellent b. Good c. Medium d. Not bad

10. Suggest, on which area the products have to improve internally?

a. Material b. Colour c. Size d. Shape

11. Suggest in which area the product have to improve externally?

a. Marketing b. Transportation c. Advertisement


d. Discount

12. Are you satisfied with the transportation facility?

a. Highly Satisfied b. Satisfied c. Dissatisfied

13. Select the Durability level of the product?

a. Excellent b. Good C. Moderate d. Not bad

14. Are you have satisfied with the price?

a. Highly Satisfied b. Satisfied c. Dissatisfied

15. What make the product more attractive?

a. Designs b. Colour c. Product availability d. Low Cost

16. How long you are using Dura Crete tiles product?
a. 2 years b. 3 years c. 4 years

17. Are you still sticking to the product?


a. Yes b. No

18. Will you suggest your friends to utilize Dura Crete?


a. Yes b. No

SRI MANAKULA VINAYAGAR ENGINEERING COLLEGE


MADAGADIPET, PUDUCHERRY.

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES


BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

This to certify that the project work entitled “ A STUDY ON CONSUMER


BEHAVIOUR “ is a bonafide work done by M. REVATHY (REGISTER NO :
27348334) in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of Master of Business
Administration by Pondicherry University during the academic year 2007-2008.

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT GUIDE

Viva-Voce Examination held on ____________________

EXTERNAL EXAMINER

ABSTRACT

Consumer satisfaction is a major criterion to know about the success of any


product whether it is a new or old one. The study on the consumer satisfaction for Dura
Crete tiles product of Aries Industries (p) Ltd, explores the needs and wants of the
consumers. These data helps the concern to incorporate the customer needs or modify
their products as per their needs.

The study concentrates on introduction of customer satisfaction level of Dura


Crete tiles product. From the study we can infer that the customers are in need of tiles
product of best quality and that too in cheaper rater. Also the study revels that the
customers are satisfied with shape and colour. It also elaborates that the concern has to
produce Dura Crete tiles with more designs, quality and at reasonable price according to
consumer preference.

The study shows that the products of Aries Industries (P) Ltd, have a very good
name among the consumers and the only thing is that they have to incorporate the needs
of the customers then and there such that they can sustain in the market. To retain their
valuable customer, the concern has to interact and get feedback from the customer more
frequently.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER TITLES PAGE NO


LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF CHARTS

I INTRODUCTION
1
1.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY
2
1.2 COMPANY PROFILE
5
NEED FOR THE STUDY

II REVIEW OF LITERATURE 6

III OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 18

IV RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 19

V DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 24

FINDINGS OF THE STUDY, 46


VI
SUGGESTION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 48

VII CONCLUSION 49

VIII LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY, 50


SCOPE FOR THE FUTHER STUDY 50

APPENDICES
ANNEXURE-1 51

ANNEXURE-2 52

LIST OF TABLES

S.no Table Table Name Page.No


no
1 5.1 Total budget spent on the project 24

2 5.2 Source of Identification of the Project 25


3 5.3 Nature of the product you bought 26
4 5.4(a) Price the tiles Product bought 27

5 5.4(b) Ideal Price for the product 28


6 5.5 The benefit you get out the brand 29
7 5.6 Usage of the tiles in premises 30
8 5.7 Development you expecting in the brand you purchase 31

9 5.8 Satisfaction level of Dura Crete quality 32

10 5.9 The Satisfaction level of Dura Crete availability 33

11 5.10 Internal improvement required in the product 34


12 5.11 The area the product have to improve externally 35
13 5.12 Satisfaction level in the transportation facility 36

14 5.13 Durability of the product 37


15 5.14 Level of satisfaction with the price of the tiles 38
16 5.15 Reason for the attractiveness of the product 39

17 5.16 Duration of usage of Dura Crete tiles product 40


18 5.17 Still sticking to the product 41
19 5.18 Level of suggestion to friends to utilize the tiles Dura 42
Crete
20 5.19 Pearson’s Spearman Correlation 43

21 5.20 Frequency Table 44

22 5.21 Nature of the product vises development expected in the 45


brand

LIST OF CHARTS
S.no Table Table Name Page.No
no
1 5.1 Total budget spent on the project 24

2 5.2 Source of Identification of the Product 25

3 5.3 Nature of the product bought 26

4 5.4(a) The tiles product bought 27

5 5.4(b) Ideal Price for the Tiles Product 28

6 5.5 The benefit you get out the brand 29

7 5.6 Usage of the tiles in premises 30

8 5.7 Development you expecting in the brand you purchase 31

9 5.8 Satisfaction level of Dura Crete quality 32

10 5.9 The Satisfaction level of Dura Crete availability 33

11 5.10 Internal improvement required in the product 34

12 5.11 The area the product have to improve externally 35

13 5.12 Satisfaction level in the transportation facility 36

14 5.13 Durability of the product 37

15 5.14 Level of satisfaction with the price of the tiles 38

16 5.15 Reason for the attractiveness of the product 39

17 5.16 Duration of usage of Dura Crete tiles product 40

18 5.17 Still sticking to the product 41

19 5.18 Level of suggestion to friends to utilize the tiles Dura 42


Crete

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The successful completion of any task would be incomplete without mentioning


the names of persons who helped to make it possible. I take this opportunity to express
my gratitude in few words and respect to all those who helped me in the completion of
this summer project.

I express my heartiest and deep gratitude to Mr. N.KESAVAN, Chairman,


Mr. M. DHANASEKARAN, Managing Director and Mr. S.V.SUGUMARAN, Vice-
chairman of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Engineering College.

I am extremely grateful to Our Principal Dr. V.S.K. VENGATACHALAPATHY to


provide necessary and essential facilities to do this project work.

I express our sincere thanks and deep sense of gratitude to our Head of
Department Mr. S.JAYAKUMAR, Department of Management Studies for
providing me with an opportunity to study and for his encouragement, support and
guidance to complete this project work successfully.

I convey my heartiest thanks to Mr. SUNDAR, FACTORY MANAGER, Aries


Industries Private Ltd, Puducherry, who kindly granted permission to do this project work
in his esteemed organization.

Finally, I express our sincere thanks and deep sense of gratitude to my parents and
friends for giving timely advice in all the ways and in all aspects for the success of this
project work.