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BA (Journalism &

Mass Communication)
Revised Curriculum & Syllabi (2007 – 10)
Semester Pattern

1
Eligibility

The journalism and mass communication course has been designed as Under-Graduate and Post-
Graduate courses, open to students completing Plus Two and Degree respectively from any
recognised Board/Institution recognised by the government. Students are advised to have their
eligibility confirmed by the School.

Preference in admission will be given to candidates who are proficient in written and spoken
English.

Application for Admission

The application for admission must be submitted in the prescribed form to the School on or before
the prescribed date as notified by the university. The application must be accompanied by true
copies of the mark certificate and the passing certificate of the qualifying examination issued by the
recognised Board as well as a passport-size photograph affixed with the signature of the student
on each one of them, with the prescribed fee.

Mere registration of application does not guarantee admission.

It is the responsibility of the candidate to ensure that he or she conforms to the eligibility norms
prescribed.

Application forms not accompanied by the prescribed fee (payable by bank draft) will not be
entertained. Cheques will not be accepted.

The management of the School reserves the right to reject any application without assigning any
reason. Admission must be considered provisional till the School confirms enrolment.

In the event of any dispute between the candidate and the School, the courts in Chennai alone
shall have the jurisdiction and their decrees are binding on all concerned.

Instruction

Instruction will be imparted through classroom sessions, practical assignments, and on-the-job
training.

Theoretical instruction will be imparted in the form of lectures and through seminars and
discussions. Practical assignments will include producing a newspaper as prescribed in the
curriculum, while on-the-job training will comprise visits to newspaper offices and presses where
students can study first-hand the various techniques and applications adopted.

Medium of Instruction

The medium of instruction shall be English.

2
Academic Year

The academic year is divided into two semesters: mid-July to December, and January to May. The
actual dates of commencement and conclusion of each term of the academic year will be intimated
to the students by the University. The minimum number of classes during the academic year will be
150 spread over two semesters.

Attendance

A minimum of 75 per cent attendance at lectures is compulsory in each term, and as an aggregate.
Any candidate falling short of this minimum attendance is liable to be barred from appearing for the
final examination. The candidate who has not qualified with the minimum required attendance of 75
per cent may, however, make up the deficiency by keeping additional term/s in the immediately
following academic year and appear at the subsequent examination.

Medium of Examination

The medium of examination shall be English.

Classroom Sessions

Lecture sessions are normally held for five days in a week, Monday through Friday. The timetable
for the various lecture sessions will be displayed on the notice board. The teaching faculty may
conduct classes on Saturdays, Sundays, and on holidays too, if it is found necessary. The teaching
faculty will generally provide guidance to candidates in the matter of selection of subjects for the
study paper or project work.

Syllabus

The syllabus for each paper in the BA, MA and PG Diploma courses are provided below. The
syllabus constitutes only the broad framework indicating the contours of the subject. While the
teaching faculty will endeavour to cover the whole syllabus, it may sometimes not be possible to do
so in professional programmes. Therefore, the spirit of the syllabus has to be taken into account
rather than the letter of it. The candidates are also expected to do their own homework vis-à-vis the
syllabus.

Revision of Regulation and Curriculum

The University may from time to time revise, amend or change the regulations, scheme of
examinations and syllabi as found necessary.

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BA (Journalism & Mass Communication)
Curriculum (2009 – 12)
Semester Pattern

Semester I

Semester I (For all students)

Code Subject Module Credits / Marks

BJMC01 Communication Theory 2 / 100


BJMC02 Understanding World: History 2 / 100
BJMC03 Communication Skills in English 5 / 100
BJMC04 Media History & Media Management 3 / 100
BJMC05 Media & Computer Application 5 / 100
BJMC06a/b/c Language* (French/Tamil/Hindi/Sanskrit/Japanese) 5 / 100

Total 22 / 600

* Language – Students can opt for one of the following languages – Tamil, Hindi, French, Sanskrit,
and Japanese. The School of Journalism adopts the syllabi developed by the respective
departments.

Semester II (For all students)

BJMC07 U. World: Culture, Polity & Constitution 2 / 100


BJMC08 Reporting, Features & Editing for Print Media 2 / 100
BJMC09 Communication Skills in English 5 / 100
BJMC10 Television, Radio and New Media 3 / 100
BJMC11 Advertising & Public Relations 3 / 100
BJMC12a/b/c Language* (French/Tamil/Hindi/Sanskrit/Japanese) 5 / 100

Total 20 / 600

* Language – Students can opt for one of the following languages – Tamil, Hindi, French, Sanskrit,
and Japanese. The School of Journalism adopts the syllabi developed by the respective
departments.

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Semester III

Core (For all students)

BJMC13 Media Laws & Ethics 3 / 100


BJMC14 U. World: Land, Economy & Development 3 / 100
BJMC15 Elective I or Elective II or Elective III 9 / 300

Total 15 / 500

Elective I (for Print Media)

BJMC15a Advance Reporting & Editing


BJMC15b Page Designing
BJMC15c Lab Newspaper Production

Elective II (for New Media)

BJMC15d Content & Technical Writing


BJMC15e Web Page Designing & Hosting
BJMC15f Graphics & Animation

Elective III (for Advertising & Public Relation)

BJMC15g Copy Writing


BJMC15h Advertising & Sales Promotion
BJMC15i Corporate Communications

Semester IV

Core (For all students)

BJMC16 Radio Journalism 3 / 100


BJMC17 Development Communication 3 / 100
BJMC18 Elective I or Elective II or Elective III 9 / 300

Total 15 / 500

Elective I (for Print Media)

BJMC18a Advance Reporting & Editing


BJMC18b Advance Page Designing
BJMC18c Lab Newspaper Production

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Elective II (for New Media)

BJMC18d Advance Content & Technical Writing


BJMC18e Advance Web Page Designing & Hosting
BJMC18f Advance Graphics & Animation

Elective III (for Advertising & Public Relation)

BJMC18g Advance Copy Writing


BJMC18h Brand Management
BJMC18i Event Management

MANDATORY: In order to gain a hands-on experience, students are required to bring out a
maximum of a 16-page weekly community newspaper from Semester IV onwards. In addition, the
students are required to contribute news reports for Spectrum.

Semester V

Core (For all students)

BJMC19 Media & Society 3 / 100


BJMC20 Photo Journalism 3 / 100
BJMC21 Elective I or Elective II or Elective III 9 / 300

Total 15 / 500

Elective I (for Print Media)

BJMC21a Advance Reporting & Editing


BJMC21b Advance Page Designing
BJMC21c Lab Newspaper Production

Elective II (for New Media)

BJMC21d Advance Content & Technical Writing


BJMC21e Advance Web Page Designing & Hosting
BJMC21f Advance Graphics & Animation

Elective III (for Advertising & Public Relation)

BJMC21g Advance Copy Writing


BJMC21h Media Management
BJMC121i Advertising Practices

MANDATORY: In order to gain a hands-on experience, students are required to bring out a
maximum of a 16-page weekly community newspaper from Semester IV onwards. In addition, the
students are required to contribute news reports for Spectrum.

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Semester VI

Core (For all students)

BJMC22 Communication Research Methodology 5 / 100


BJMC23 Project / Paper 5 / 100
BJMC24 Elective I or Elective II or Elective III 5 / 100

Total 15 / 300

Total Credits / Marks (for THREE years) 104 / 3000

Elective I (for Print Media)

BJMC24a Lab Newspaper Production

Elective II (for New Media)

BJMC24b Advance Content & Technical Writing

Elective III (for Advertising & Public Relation)

BJMC24c Advance Advertising Practices

MANDATORY: In order to gain a hands-on experience, students are required to bring out a
maximum of a 16-page weekly community newspaper from Semester IV onwards. In addition, the
students are required to contribute news reports for Spectrum.

Compulsory: FOUR WEEKS internship during Semester VI of the 3-year academic programme in
a media organisation of repute. Students should submit a Certificate of Completion of Internship
from the media organisation.

IMPORTANT

a) During Semester I and II, all modules are compulsory to all the students. Students will be offered
Electives from Semester III onwards.

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Semester I

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BJMC01 — Communication Theory

Unit 1

Introduction: definitions of communication — need for communication — types of communication


— barriers to communication — some models of communication — communication process.

Unit 2

Interpersonal communication: phatic stage — personal stage — intimate stage — transactional


analysis.

Unit 3

Group communication: small groups — definitions and differences — group interactions — problem
solving and decision making — structure and communication — advantages and disadvantages.

Unit 4

Social communication: folk arts — agents of change — social protest — transmission of knowledge
— ritual function — traditional media.

Unit 5

Mass communication: mass society — mass media — social functions — journalism — advertising
— public relations.

Suggested readings

1. Mass Communication Theory — Denis McQuail. New Delhi: Vistaar Publications, 2005.
2. Folk Arts and Social Communication — Durgadas Mukhopadhyay. New Delhi: Publications
Division, 1994.
3. Group Communication — Peter Hartley. London: Routledge, 2004.
4. Essentials Of Mass Communication Theory — Arthur Asa Berger. New Delhi: Sage
Publications, 1995.
5. Mass Communication In India — Keval J. Kumar. Chennai: Jaico Publishing, 2000.
6. A Dictionary Of Communication & Media Studies — James Watson & Anne Hill. New
Delhi: Universal Book Stall, 1996.

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BJMC02 — Understanding the World (History)

Unit 1

The civilisational context to the understanding of world history - the artificial breakdown of the study
of history into ancient, medieval and modern.

Unit 2

World History as seen from the perspective of Europe, America and Asia - The focus here will be
on European history in the pre-world wars; and in the rush for colonies in Asia and Africa and
elsewhere.

Unit 3

Patterns of colonialism and the foundations of nationalist movements across the world especially in
Asia and coverage and interpretation of the national and international media.

Unit 4

Rise and consolidation of political ideologies and their impact on the shaping of world history.

Unit 5

Post World Two era - de-colonialisation and independence and the scene setters for the
colonialists - Role for the media in the de-colonialisation process? - Public opinion, nationalist
movements and international journalism.

Suggested readings

1. Lyman Sargent, Contemporary Political Ideologies


2. Roy Macridis, Contemporary Political Ideologies
3. Bridget Allchin and Raymond, Origins of a civilisation: The pre-history and early
archaeology of South Asia
4. Edmund Clubb, 20TH Century China, Colombia University Press

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BJMC03 Communication Skills in English

Unit 1

Listening – listening to broadcasts – listening to speeches from tapes – mock news reading
sessions in the class – listening to budget sessions in the TV – taking notes – listening for specific
information – answering questions – listening in different situations

Unit 2

Reading – reading comprehension – reading newspapers – reading magazines – reading news


reports aloud and writing it in own words – skimming – scanning – cloze reading – gap fill exercises

Unit 3

Speaking – mock speeches in class – mock press conferences – mock interviews – debates –
enacting plays in the class – analysing and reviewing them – attending seminars and symposia in
the university – interviewing people

Unit 4

Writing – short story writing – Ten principles of clear writing – using plain English – using active
voice – when to use passive voice – jargons – clichés and journalese – simple words –
troublesome words – vogue words – superfluous words and phrases – converting complex texts to
plain English

Unit 5

Functional grammar – British English – American English – Indian English – difference in


pronunciation and usages – common mistakes that foreign speakers of English make – exercises –
basic Phonetics – vowels – diphthongs – consonants – stress and intonation

Suggested Reading

(To be submitted in due course)

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BJMC04 Media History & Media Management

Unit 1

Print media, electronic media and society - theories of media and society - social functions of
media, fourth estate - communication models: Berlo’s SMCR model, Shannon and Weaver’s
mathematical model, Lasswell’s formula, Newcomb’s ABX model.

Unit 2

Printing revolution: Origins of type; the Gutenberg era; the first books. First international
newspapers – mainly UK, US scenes; the Indian scene: Bengal Gazette, India Gazette, Madras
Courier, Bombay Herald - James Hicky, Serampore missionaries - Pre-independence Indian Press
– Select Indian newspapers - Pioneers of Indian Journalism - Government and the press - news
agencies - Radio, TV, commercial broadcasting.

Unit 3

Press freedom: The first press ordinance; liberators of the Indian press; censorship - Vernacular
Journalism - Pre-mutiny era - post-mutiny period - political journalism; Independence struggle.
Press regulation: Commissions - Post-Independence newspapers - Press regulations: 1858
regulations, Vernacular Press Act - Emergency, Press Commissions, Press Council. Magazine
journalism - implications of foreign media entry.

Unit 4

Principles of media management and their significance – media as an industry and profession -
Ownership patterns of mass-media in India – sole proprietorship, partnership, private limited
companies, public limited companies, trusts, co-operatives, religious institutions (societies) and
franchisees (chains) - Hierarchy, functions and organisational structure of different departments -
DAVP, INS, ABC and etc. Changing roles of editiorial staff and other media persons.

Unit 5

Economics of print and electronic media – Foreign equity in Indian media (including print media)
and Press Commissions on Indian newspaper management structure – Blue Ocean strategy
business model.

Suggested Reading

1. History of Indian Journalism: J. Natarajan, Publications Division, New Delhi.


2. Journalism In Modern India: Edited by Roland E. Wolseley, Asia Publishing House,
Bombay-Calcutta.
3. Handbook of Journalism And Mass Communication: Vir Bala Aggarwal and V.S. Gupta,
Concept Publishing, New Delhi.
4. Broadcasting In India: P.C. Chatterjee, Sage Publications.
5. Mass Communication in India: Keval J. Kumar, Jaico Publishing House.

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6. Bluw Ocea Strategy: Professor Kim and Affiliate Professor Mauborgne, Harvard Business
School Press, United States, ISBN 1591396190.
7. The Growth of Public Opinion in the Madras Presidency: D. Sadasivan, University Of
Madras.

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BJMC05 Media & Computer Application

Unit 1

Introduction to Computers - Evolution of the computer - Generation of computers - Types of


computers - Classification of computers - Overview of Information Technology – Scope - Binary
Systems - Standard systems - Octal systems - Hexadecimal systems.

Unit 2

Computer Hardware – CPU - Memory Storage capacity - Primary and Secondary Memory (RAM,
ROM) – Microprocessors - Input and Output devices.

Unit 3

Storage and Databases - Storage Fundamentals – Diskettes - Hard disks - Optical disks- Memory
Cards - Magnetic tape - Software - Operating System, MS-DOS, MS - Windows, Linux.

Unit 4

Multimedia - Goals of Multimedia - Applications of Multimedia - Compression, Decompression - File


formats - Text - Designing the text - Elements of text, graphics, images and colors.

Unit 5

Introduction to Html – Xml – Networking – Internet - Web page designing - Web hosting.

Suggested Readings

(To be submitted in due course)

14
BJMC06a/b/c Language* (French/Tamil/Hindi/Sanskrit/Japanese)

Students can opt for one of the following languages – Tamil, Hindi, French, Sanskrit, and
Japanese. The School of Journalism adopts the syllabi developed by the respective departments.

15
Semester II

16
BJMC07 Understanding the World: Culture, Polity & Constitution

Unit 1

The cultural and societal bases of world civilisations and polities; where each society “comes from”

Unit 2

The stages of societal, cultural and political development in Europe, Americas and Asia and the
patterns of development.

Unit 3

The constitutional development of various cultures and societies; the bonds between culture /
civilisation and constitutional development

Unit 4

The interpretation of the constitution and the differentiations in political systems: are democracies
better off than totalitarian systems?

Unit 5

The functioning media, national and international, in the various stages of development of polities
and societies.

Suggested Readings

1. A.Gabriel Almond and Sydney Verba, The Civic Culture


2. Richard Collins, Culture, Communication and National Identity, Carleton University,1990
3. C. Narayan Asopa, A Study of India: Historiography, Culture, Society, Polity and
Environment, Oscar Publications

NOTE: Suggested Reading/ Books Which Will Be Supplemented By Scholarly Articles And
Analytic Pieces In Newspapers And Magazines

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BJMC08 Reporting, Features & Editing for Print Media

Unit 1

What is news: definitions – concepts – components – values - Sources for news – Qualities and
characteristics of a good reporter – rights and responsibilities of reporter – Functional differences of
reporters, special correspondents, foreign correspondents, columnists, freelancers, roving
reporters, stringers.

Unit 2

Writing a news story: Lead and kinds of leads, Body, Back grounding and Conclusion - The
inverted pyramid - Importance of 5Ws and an H - Beat Reporting - Getting the basics right – rules
to develop a good style and avoid common mistakes – constructing clear sentences and
paragraphs – using active and passive tenses – how to say exactly what you mean – dangers to
avoid: verbosity, circumlocution, clichés etc.

Unit 3

Interview techniques - protecting a source - What every journalist needs to know about copyright
laws, libel, slander, public figures, and invasion of privacy - Ethics - accuracy and fairness.

Unit 4

Features – definitions scope – types of features – language and tools of feature writing – Magazine
journalism – Features on travel and tourism - Writing for the trade press – the importance of in-
depth research and accuracy – your writing style – avoiding jargon – in-house magazines –
sponsored magazines.

Unit 5

Editorial organisation: roles and responsibilities of editors, assistant editors, news editors, chief
sub-editors and sub-editors - Importance of sub-editor - The vanishing sub-editor - Sub-editor’s kit:
Style book, choice of spelling, honorific, titles, trade names, etc. - Three C’s of Editing: check,
clarify and condense. Six R’s of Subbing: read, remove, rectify, replace, rewrite and revise.
Substantive editing: restructuring content, checking with reporters, new story angles - A sub-
editor’s checklist: 5Ws and 1H - Picture editing: selection of pictures, cropping of pictures, colour
correction, visual ethics.

Suggested Readings

1. Indian Reporter’s Guide, Critichfield R.


2. Fundamentals of Journalism, Crump S.
3. Professional Journalist, Hohenberg J.
4. Professional Journalism, Sethi P
5. The Complete Reporter, Johnson S and Harris J.
6. News Reporting and Writing, 9th Ed., Melvin Mencher, McGraw-Hill

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7. The Journalist’s Handbook, MV Kamath.
8. Journalism as a profession, MV Kamath.
9. Writing and Reporting News: A Coaching Method, 4th Ed., Carole Rich, Wadsworth Series,
2003.
10. News Writing and Reporting, 5th Reprint – James M Neal and Suzanne S Brown, Surjeet
Publications, 2003.
11. News Writing, 2nd Ed. – George A Hough 3rd, Houghton Miffin co., 1980.
12. The Complete Reporter, 6th Ed. – Harris, et al., Allyn and Bacon, 1992.
13. Reporting Science – KS Jayaraman.
14. Theory and Practice of Journalism – BN Ahuja, 2003.
15. News Editing: Bruce Westley
16. Editors On Editing: National Book Trust
17. Essential Grammar: O.M. Thomson
18. The Simple Sub’s Book:— Leslie Sellers
19. On Newspaper Style: Keith Waterhouse
20. Editing And Design: Harold Evans
21. The Newsroom, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Bonn.
22. Professional Journalism, Sethi Patanjali, Orient Longman – 1974.
23. Your slip is showing, Indian Pres Today, S. Nihal Singh, UBS Publishers Distributors, New
Delhi – 1992.
24. India’s Information Revolution, Arvind Singhal and Everett M. Rogers.

19
BJMC09 Communication Skills in English

Unit 1

Writing – report writing – how to get story ideas – the writing process – getting organised – story
structure – leads – types of leads – direct leads – delayed leads – developing the body of the
report – quoting sources for credibility – endings – headlines – exercises.

Unit 2

Practical – exercises in report writing.

Unit 3

News feature – difference between news report and news feature – style of language in feature –
reading fiction and using techniques from it – narrative technique – developing sources as
characters – listening to audio tapes of plays and writing reviews – watching movies and writing
reviews – other reviews – books – sports – fine arts.

Unit 4

Practical – exercises in feature writing.

Unit 5

Proofreading – symbols – Ten common mistakes to look for while proofreading – tips for effective
proofreading – reading syllable by syllable – first, second and third readings (third eye) – time
factor – the problems of computer proofreading – exercises.

Suggested reading: To be submitted in due course

Reference books: To be submitted in due course

Dictionaries

1. Oxford advanced learners’ dictionary


2. Oxford dictionary for collocation
3. Oxford picture dictionary
4. Webster dictionary for synonyms and antonyms
5. Dictionary for idioms and phrases (Cambridge UP)
6. Dictionary for phrasal verbs (Cambridge UP)

20
BJMC10 Television, Radio and New Media

Unit 1

Radio as a medium of mass communication - Development of radio with a brief introduction to its
history - Radio round the world - Characteristics of Radio - Three different broadcasting systems:
Public service (development tool), commercial and community or local radio - Introduction to radio
technology - Amplitude modulation (AM), Short wave (SW), Frequency modulation and satellite-
Broadcast chains - Analog to Digital – Recording and editing.

Unit 2

Why need a script? - Styles and techniques of radio scripting - Radio talks and announcements -
Radio interviewing - Radio discussions and role of moderator - Radio features and documentaries -
Radio features and commercial advertisements - Music on radio : production techniques - News on
radio – Definitions - Elements that decide what is news., sources of news, types of news - News
Values and ethics - News writing - News based programmes. Presentation of programmes -
Announcing and anchoring - Radio jockeying - News reading - Running commentary.

Unit 3

TV as a medium of mass communication: Potentials and limits - Brief history of TV with special
reference to Indian TV - Introduction to Public Service and Commercial Television - Satellite
television including Satellite Instructional Television Experiment - (SITE) - TV Basics - Thinking
Visually - Basics of Visual literacy – light, eyes, brain, visual cues ( colour, form, depth,
movement ) - Communication with still and moving messages - Video camera and lenses-types of
cameras and lenses, colour balancing, Shots - Camera movement - Video editing - Introduction to
TV formats, TV programming and production processes - Interviews of various kinds. Interviews
with celebrities to no-holds barred interviews - Talk shows and other studio based programmes –
Documentaries - Sitcoms, serials, fiction.

Unit 4

TV News - Writing and Reporting for TV - Finding the story and sources - Live interviews - On-
Camera reporting - Role of specialists like vision mixer, property manager, lights man, scenic
designer and computer generated special effects, day for night shooting.. : - Field interviews -
Making of a News Bulletin - Structure and Functioning of a News Channel (including ethics and
regulations) - Electronics news production system - TV news team - News Graphics - TV
Presentation & Anchoring - Qualities of a news presenter and Newsreader. Ethics and regulations -
Role and importance of an anchor person - Body language - Speech personality - Tele prompting -
Ad libbing.

Unit 5

Blogs - RSS - Atom, it is an XML format used for publishing and editing content for websites, blogs,
and podcasts - Wikis - Wikipedia versus Britannica - Photo Sharing - Podcasting - Legal
considerations - Video Podcasts – Screencasts.

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Suggested Reading

1. Mass Communication In India: Keval J. Kumar


2. The Dramatic Experience: J.L. Styan
3. Directing TV And Film: Alan Armer
4. Writing The Screenplay: Alan Armer
5. Understanding Media: Marshall McLuhan

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BJMC11 Advertising & Public Relations

Unit 1

Introduction: Definitions of advertising and public relations — practitioners — advertising and PR


organizations.

Unit 2

Functions of advertising: economic impact — informative function — persuasive function — billiard-


ball principle — abundance principle — AIDA model.

Unit 3

Types of advertising: classification by target audience — by geographic area — by medium — by


purpose — advertising process

Unit 4

Public relations: PR transfer process — publicity — relevant publics — house journals — managing
media.

Unit 5

PR practice: business & industry — government & politics — healthcare & evaluation — corporate
communication.

Suggested readings

1. Contemporary Advertising —William F. Arens & Courtland L. Bovee. Sydney: Irwin, 1994.
2. How Advertising Works And The People Who Make It Happen — Jan Greenberg. New
York: Henry Holt, 1987.
3. Advertising & Sales Promotion —S.H.H. Kazmi & Satish K. Batra. New Delhi: Excel Books,
2006.
4. Effective Public Relations — Scott M. Cutlip, Allen H. Center, Glen M. Broom. Delhi:
Pearson Education, 2006.

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BJMC12a/b/c Language* (French/Tamil/Hindi/Sanskrit/Japanese)

Students can opt for one of the following languages – Tamil, Hindi, French, Sanskrit, and
Japanese. The School of Journalism adopts the syllabi developed by the respective departments.

24
Semester III

25
JMC13 Media Laws & Ethics

Unit 1

A comparative introduction to media laws and ethics - where media laws and the issues of ethics
are derived in constitutional societies

Unit 2

The roots of constitutions - a comparative perspective of India and the United States - the broad
outline of the Indian Constitution, including an analysis of what constitutes the Basic Structure of
the Indian Constitution.

Unit 3

Media Laws and Privileges within the Constitution of India and other derived sources.

Unit 4

Trial by The Media and the Issue of Ethics - the codified rules of conduct including the right to
privacy and the perennial conflict between authorities and media houses on the right to hold on to
sources.

Unit 5

Media and National Security Laws including the undefined and yet to be fully regulated cyber
space.

Suggested readings

1. Bakshi, p.m. The constitution of india, 2009 edition.


2. Arun bhatia, media and communication ethics, akansha 2005.
3. A.g.noorani, constitutional questions and citizen’s rights, oxford university press 2006
4. Venkat iyer, mass media laws and regulations in india, india research press 2000
5. P.p. Singh et al, media ethics and laws anmol publications 1998
6. Other material to be prescribed

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BJMC14 Understanding the World: Land, Economy & Development

Unit 1

North, South, East West – the physical setting - physiographic regions – monsoons - floods and
droughts - climatic regions - natural vegetation, soil types and their distribution - Major cities in the
region-land-soil-water-forests and mineral resources-agriculture-industry-transport-communication
and trade; Cultural setting-racial and ethnic diversities-distribution and density of population-
demographic attributes-literacy, poverty, employment, health, gender.

Unit 2

Environment: Natural and man-made hazards – landslides – earthquakes - floods and droughts –
epidemics - environmental pollution - environmental degradation; Urbanisation: Rural-urban divide
regional disparities in economic development - urban sprawl-slums and associated problems -
problems of urbanisation-population - population explosion and food security.

Unit 3

Measuring economic performance - Introduction and overview - Why are some countries rich, and
others poor? Are the poor catching up? Why does economic performance vary so much over time?
- Long-Run economic performance - A model of growth. Solow's model - Sources of growth:
technology and institutions - Using technology to promote growth. Development traps. What are
the keys to sustained growth?

Unit 4

Trade - Consequences of globalisation. Comparative advantage. Who gains from trade, who
loses? Political economy of trade - Trade deficits and foreign debt. Debt sustainability - World
Trade Organisation - Is the US trade deficit a threat to the economy? - Business cycles. Properties
of business cycles, leading indicators, forecasting, theories of business cycles - Money and prices -
Banks and the money supply, liquidity traps, Japan's banking woes, velocity, expectations-driven
inflation, hyperinflation, disinflation - Exchange rates and international capital flows - How are
currencies traded? - Financial and economic crises. Argentina's economic implosion.

Unit 5

What is development? - Measuring development - Economic development - Human development -


Development indicators – Health – Industry – Education - North and South - The North/South
divide - Economic development indicators - Human development indicators - Development indices
- Examples of development Indices - Country Evidence - Problems with indices.

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BJMC15a Advance Reporting & Editing

Unit 1

What is Reporting and what is expected of a Reporter; a reporter in a newspaper/ magazine


setting; different roles of reporters in different newspaper settings; a reporter in a
newspaper/magazine versus a reporter in a Newsletter or in a Political environment

Unit 2

Are there Reporters today? The Traditional hierarchy in a newspaper/magazine versus the
changing functional realities in modern times.

Unit 3

News versus Views: How to write and how not to write a news report; the “allowances” for
Reporters and others such as Special Correspondents/Diplomatic Correspondents etc

Unit 4

Reporting for a newspaper/magazine versus Reporting for a News Agency; the structural and
functional differences and limitations.

Unit 5

Editing: Is there a “sub editor” in the traditional sense? The changing functions of a sub editor; how
to edit a copy; the distinction between editing, rewriting and “manufacturing”.

Suggested readings

1. M.k.joseph outline of reporting, anmol publications.


2. William strunk and e.b.white the elements of style (amazon.com)
3. Donald murray, writing to deadline:the journalist at work (amazon.com)
4. B.kovach and t.rosensteil, the elements of journalism
5. Richard campbell et al media and culture:introduction to mass communication

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BJMC15b Page Designing

Unit 1

News design: Learn how to manage breaking-news design. Plus, how to make ordinary pages look
stunning, design effective centre-pieces, and plan news packages. Basic design principles -
Slideshow of examples - Modular design - Basic grids - Points and Picas - Content-driven design.

Unit 2

Features design: How to think outside the grid and approach design from an artistic perspective.
Learn how to create cut-outs and other special effects. - Sports design: How to keep sports pages
as exciting as the game. - Modular layout, grids - Dominance - Pages without art - Grey as a
colour. Feature Pages - Thinking outside the grid and approaching design from an artistic/organic
(not rectangle) perspective. - Cut-outs and other special effects.

Unit 3

Typography: Your computer comes with hundreds of fonts. Learn how to choose the right typeface
and how to get professional-looking typography - Postscript vs. bitmap - Fonts, size, leading,
kerning, alignment - Making type look good - Columns of text - Old style, transitional, modern, slab-
serif, sans-serif, and novelty typefaces. How to choose a font and how to get professional-looking
typography - Designing display headlines - Subheads, decks and quotes.

Unit 4

Photography: How to get better photos on your pages – from the photo assignment to the editing
process. Understand image formats (tiff, PSD, gif, jpeg) and what works best - How to crop a photo
for greater impact, colour-correction, and how to set up images for the printing press. Photos and
Art - Colour models and formats for images (jpeg, tiff, eps, psd, etc.) - Resizing images - Getting
good photos into the paper - Working with photographers - Good and bad photo assignments -
How to crop a photo for greater impact - Colour-correction and setting up images for the printing
press - Photo ethics - Stand-alone photos.

Unit 5

Colour: Basic colour theory, how to build a colour palette and how to get sophisticated,
professional-looking results.

Reference books

(To submit in due course)

29
BJMC15c Lab Newspaper Production

This is a practical module, in which students will be trained to produce a tabloid-size and a
broadsheet newspaper by using QuarkXPress, PageMaker and other software.

30
BJMC15d Content & Technical Writing

Unit 1

Introduction: what is technical writing — the technical text — grammar, style and content —
readability.

Unit 2

Applications: structure of technical reports — progress reports — instructions — user guides —


organizational policies and procedures.

Unit 3

Document design: book design — page design — headings — graphics and tables — report format
and final packaging.

Unit 4

Processes: audience analysis — task analysis — power-revision techniques — documentation.

Unit 5

Guidelines: strategies for peer reviewing — team writing — common pitfalls — checklist.

Suggested readings

1. Power Tools for Technical Communication — David A. McMurrey. Thomson


Learning/Heinle Publishers.
2. Online Technical Writing — David A. McMurrey. http://www.io.com/~hcexres/textbook/
3. Good Style — John Kirkman.
4. How To Take The Fog Out Of Your Writing — Robert Gunning.

31
BJMC15e Web Page Designing & Hosting

Unit 1

Introduction to Webpage designing – Requirements – Good design Vs bad design – Color


schemes – Website planning: Purpose – Audience – Content - Compatibility and restrictions –
Planning documentation.

Unit 2

Networking: Working procedure – Types of networking – LAN – MAN – WAN - Network topology –
wired and wireless networking – Concept of routing.

Unit 3

Introduction to HTML – Basic Alignment tags – Table creation - Creating forms – Usage of Frames
– Hyperlink.

Unit 4

Introduction to XML – Comparisons of HTML and XML – Attributes of XML – XML structure - XML
links.

Unit 5

Web hosting introduction: Services - Types of web hosting – Free web hosting – Shared web
hosting – Reseller web hosting – Virtual dedicated server – Clustered hosting – Grid hosting –
Dedicated hosting service – Managed hosting service.

32
BJMC15f Graphics & Animation

Unit 1

Digital Technologies – Computer Architectures – Graphics Basics – Vector graphics, Raster


Graphics – Conversion Techniques.

Unit 2

Computer Graphics: Aesthetics and design – CG Application areas and equipment – CG


Standards and formats.

Unit 3

2D Images and Graphics – Principles of Raster graphics – Resolution, color, graphics accelerators,
digital image representation and formats - 3D modelling.

Unit 4

Photoshop – Introduction – Image Editing – Brightness and contrast – Saturation and de saturation
– Text effects – Color settings.

Unit 5

Animation – Flash: Introduction – Flash animation – Tween creation – Motion guide layer – Button
settings.

33
BJMC15g Copy Writing

Unit 1

Introduction: functions of advertising — what is copywriting — what copywriters do —


understanding audiences — understanding clients.

Unit 2

Types of advertisements: classified — superlative copy — comparative copy — testimonial —


advertorial — teaser — humour copy — corporate advertising.

Unit 3

Creative strategies: lateral thinking — interdisciplinary approach — projection technique —


substitution method — text and visual — from concept to copy.

Unit 4

Understanding media: print advertising — radio advertising — television advertising — Internet


advertising — outdoor media.

Unit 5

Critiques: ethical issues — aesthetic dimensions — social perspectives — marketing forces —


children and women in advertising.

Suggested readings

1. The Copywriter's Handbook — Robert W. Bly, Henry Holt and Company, 1985.
2. Advertising Creativity: Techniques for Generating Ideas — James L. Marra, Prentice-Hall,
1990.
3. Contemporary Advertising —William F. Arens & Courtland L. Bovee. Sydney: Irwin, 1994.
4. How Advertising Works And The People Who Make It Happen — Jan Greenberg. New
York: Henry Holt, 1987.

34
BJMC15h Advertising & Sales Promotion

Unit 1

Introduction: brief history — how advertising works — classification — functions — client and
advertising agency.

Unit 2

Marketing communications: source, message and medium factors — consumer behaviour


perspective — attention, comprehension and recall.

Unit 3

Brand strategy: segmentation and positioning — brand awareness — brand attitudes and feelings
— brand equity — image and personality — objectives and budget allocation.

Unit 4

Media: planning — strategy — evaluation — support media — case studies.

Unit 5

Sales promotion: objectives — budget allocation — design issues — planning guidelines —


evaluation — tools and techniques.

Suggested readings

1. Contemporary Advertising —William F. Arens & Courtland L. Bovee. Sydney: Irwin, 1994.
2. How Advertising Works And The People Who Make It Happen — Jan Greenberg. New
York: Henry Holt, 1987.
3. Mass Communication In India — Keval J. Kumar. Chennai: Jaico Publishing, 2000.
4. Advertising & Sales Promotion —S.H.H. Kazmi & Satish K. Batra. New Delhi: Excel Books,
2006.
5. Brand Management — Y.L.R. Moorthi. Noida: Vikas Publishing House, 2008.

35
BJMC15i Corporate Communication

Unit 1

Introduction: communication system — corporate citizenship — core functions of a corporate —


four media (advertising, sales promotion, direct mail, promotional literature)

Unit 2

Corporate communication: definitions — management communication — marketing communication


— organizational communication — tools — 3Es (education, experience, expertise)

Unit 3

Functions: creating identity — building brand image — maintaining brand reputation — 3Cs (clarity,
consistency, credibility) — re-branding — creating corporate stories.

Unit 4

Communication process: testing corporate story — prioritising stakeholders identifying


communication objectives — creating a brief — developing a creative concept — selecting the
media — pre-testing — IMPACT model.

Unit 5

Promotional literature: literature strategy — types of promotional literature — good literary


techniques — concept, text and layout — production and distribution.

Suggested readings

1. Essentials of Corporate Communication — Cees B.M. van Riel & Charles J. Fombrun.
New York: Routledge, 2007.
2. Corporate Communications — Joseph Fernandez. New Delhi: Response Books, 2004.
3. The Fourth Medium — Cameron S. Foote. Illinois: Dow-Jones Irwin, 1986.

36
Semester IV

37
BJMC16 Radio Journalism

Unit 1

The advent of radio as a means of communication and in journalism. The different kinds of radio
journalism as it evolved in the West and in India.

Unit 2

Government, Society and the Radio - did the mechanism of the radio make a difference in popular
perceptions of governance? The different kinds of radio broadcasting.

Unit 3

Writing for the radio; the advantages of a short script, the disadvantages of brevity and the
changing facet of deadline journalism.

Unit 4

Doing radio interviews - is there a difference between interviewing a common person and a so-
called VVIP? The dilemmas of cutting a script and the decision of airing a segment.

Unit 5

In an era of a proliferation of radio stations what is the future of radio journalism? Is there a market
for serious news, political, economic or societal?

Suggested readings

1. Ravindran r.k., handbook of radio,tv and broadcast journalism, anmol publications 1999
2. Chaterjee, p. C., broadcasting in india
3. R. Campbell et al media and culture:introduction to mass communication
4. Mcluhan, marshall understanding media

NOTE: Suggested Reading/ Will Be Supplemented With Articles In Scholarly Journals.

38
BJMC17 Development Communication

Unit 1

Definition, nature and scope of Development Journalism - Development Communication.

Unit 2

Origin and theories of Development – Third World Countries

Unit 3

Theories of Development Journalism – Development Reporting – Experiments, problems and


criticisms of Development Journalism.

Unit 4

Development Journalism and the Indian Press – Role of Regional Press - Positive media –
Noteworthy initiatives.

Unit 5

Examples of Development Reporting – Finding Story ideas – Constraints in Development


Reporting – Dos and Don’ts in Development Reporting.

Suggested Readings

1. Grassroots, Various Issues, Ajit Bhattacharjea (1999-2002), Press Institute of India, New
Delhi.
2. Communication and Development: The Challenge of the Twenty First Century, V S Gupta
(2000), Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi.
3. Communication, Development and Civil Society, V S Gupta (2003), Concept Publishing
Company, New Delhi.
4. India 2020: A Vision for the New Millennium, APJ Abdul Kalam and Y S Rajan, Penguin
Books, New Delhi.
5. Everybody loves a Good Drought – Stories from India’s Poorest Districts, P Sainath
(1996), Penguin Books, New Delhi.
6. Developmental Journalism, DVR Murthy (2001), Dominant Publishers and Distributors,
New Delhi.

39
BJMC18a Advance Reporting & Editing (Editorial Writing)

Unit 1

What is meant by editorial writing and who is an editorial writer in a newspaper? The functions of
an editorial writer, as opposed to an Assistant Editor or a News Editor.

Unit 2

The structure of the newspaper and the relationship between the editor and the editorial writer.
Qualifications of an editorial writer and the composition of the editorial writing team in a major
newspaper.

Unit 3

The editorial meeting and the discussion of topics: Does every newspaper have a distinct style of
functioning in the editorial meeting. The distinction between editorials and Proprietorials. What
happens at the “Noon Meeting”?

Unit 4

Does an Editor have a set view or does he allow his team of editorial writers to develop what the
paper should stand for in an issue. Issue based editorials versus agenda based editorials. Setting
the scene for the editorial writer.

Unit 5

What happens after the Noon meeting? The prerogatives of the editor in editing an editorial; Does
the editorial writer have any say in how the opinion piece on behalf of the editor is shaped?

Suggested readings

1. Roy peter clark, writing tools: 50 essential strategies for every writer.
2. Curtis macdougal, principles of editorial writing
3. Kate stanley, even ten year olds can write editorials: can editorial writing be taught?

40
BJMC18b Advance Page Designing

Unit 1

Introduction to Communication Design - ‘Why’ design – graphic design, editorial design


typography - Digital workflow and print process - Semiotics, Gestalt, visual aesthetics - Lab
assignments and reviews.

Unit 2

Design Fundamentals - Language of Design - (point, line, colour, texture, shape, space, tone) -
Principles of Design - (contrast, balance, rhythm, unity / harmony) - Lab assignments and review.

Unit 3

Design Process - Research & planning (1) - Thumbnail (1) - Rough (1) - Comprehensive layout
(1) - Lab assignment and review.

Unit 4

Approaches to design - Newspaper (2) - Newsmagazine (2) - Web sites (1) - Books (1) -
Advertising (1) - Business Communication (1) - Lab assignment and review.

Unit 5

Editorial Design – designing Newspaper & magazine - Typography (3) - Using Art and
Photography (2) - Information Graphics (1) - Flexible Grids (3) - Lab assignment and review.

41
BJMC18c Lab Newspaper Production

This is a practical module, in which students will be trained to produce a tabloid-size and a
broadsheet newspaper by using QuarkXPress, PageMaker and other software.

42
BJMC18d Advance Content & Technical Writing

Unit 1

Business correspondence: inquiry letters — complaint and adjustment letters —application letters
— resumes.

Unit 2

Common components: heading — inside address — salutation — reference line — body of the
letter — complimentary close — signature block — end notations.

Unit 3

Formats: block letter — semi-block letter — alternative block letter — simplified letter — other
formats.

Unit 4

Business plans: need and scope — resources and archive — software, samples and strategy —
business plan guide.

Unit 5

Proposals: different types — typical scenarios — content and structure — organization and formats
— method, procedure, theory.

Suggested readings

1. Power Tools for Technical Communication — David A. McMurrey. Thomson


Learning/Heinle Publishers.
2. Online Technical Writing — David A. McMurrey. http://www.io.com/~hcexres/textbook/
3. Good Style — John Kirkman.
4. How To Take The Fog Out Of Your Writing — Robert Gunning.

43
BJMC18e Advance Web Page Designing & Hosting

Unit 1

Internet principles – Basic web concepts – Client Server model – Internet protocols and
applications – Html and Scripting languages.

Unit 2

Html forms – CGI concepts – Server – Browser communication – Email generation – Authorization
and security.

Unit 3

Firewalls – Proxy servers – Active and Java server pages – Dream weaver concepts – Designing
principles – Error checking -Testing methodologies.

Unit 4

Introduction to PHP – Applications of PHP – Functions of PHP – PHP databases – Comparison of


PHP and Xml.

Unit 5

Introduction to web hosting – Stages of web hosting - Different types of hosting technologies –
Implementation.

44
BJMC18f Advance Graphics & Animation

Unit 1

Overview of computer graphic systems – two and three dimensional concepts – polygon surfaces –
polygon tables.

Unit 2

Graphics: hardware – video display devices – crt – lcd – raster scans – 3d devices – virtual reality
– touch screens – 3d translation – scaling – rotation – matrix representation .

Unit 3

Animation: flash introduction – buttons – tween creation – motion guide layer – animating objects –
color schemes.

Unit 4

Introduction to 3d images – introduction of maya – 3d modelling – graphic images and text


technology.

Unit 5

Color – achromatic – chromatic color – color models – reproducing color – applications- rendering
– shadows – transparency.

45
BJMC18g Advance Copy Writing

(To be submitted in due course)

46
BJMC18h Brand Management

Unit 1

Brand success: successful brands — pioneer advantage — common sense definitions — market
redefinition — methodological framework.

Unit 2

Brand equity — cost-based methods — price-based methods — customer-based brand equity.

Unit 3

Brand extension: typology — classic paradox of brand — category-related extensions — image-


related extensions — unrelated extensions.

Unit 4

Brand personality: emotion-centered definitions — brand image — country of origin — established


products — new products — building brand personality.

Unit 5

Brand repositioning: positioning & repositioning — product differentiation — making the brand
contemporary — changed market conditions.

Suggested readings

1. Brand Management —Y.L.R. Moorthi. Noida: Vikas Publishing House, 2008.


2. Contemporary Advertising —William F. Arens & Courtland L. Bovee. Sydney: Irwin, 1994.
3. How Advertising Works And The People Who Make It Happen — Jan Greenberg. New
York: Henry Holt, 1987.
4. Advertising & Sales Promotion —S.H.H. Kazmi & Satish K. Batra. New Delhi: Excel Books,
2006.

47
BJMC18i Event Management

Unit 1

Introduction: definition of event management — role of public relations — basic skills — qualities of
event managers.

Unit 2

Types of events: business events — corporate events — cause-related events — fundraising


events — exhibitions — trade fairs.

Unit 3

Skill set: negotiating skills — creative skills — planning skills — execution skills — persuasive
skills.

Unit 4

Managing the media: drafting the press release — press conference — media coverage — in-
house publications — promotional materials — advertising campaign.

Unit 5

Process: planning — putting together a team — budgeting the event — executing — evaluating.

48
Semester V

49
BJMC19 Media & Society

Unit 1

The broad overview that includes the relevance of media to society and society to media.. Is there
a rationale to even study the relationship between the media and society?

Unit 2

The culture of the media in developed and developing societies; the culture of the media in ancient
and modern societies; the culture of the media in western and non-western societies.

Unit 3

To what extent has the media shaped popular perceptions of the polity and society, globally,
regionally and nationally? Does media make a conscious effort to “convert” its audience on issues
of political, economic and societal importance?

Unit 4

To what extent has society shaped media coverage of events? Can society at large be some sort
of a watch dog on the media? Instruments of societal pressure and the responsiveness of the
media groups.

Unit 5

Has societal influence played a role in the shifting fortunes of the news media - print, radio and
broadcast? Is there a future for the media given the societal readiness to accept the new medium
of instruction such as the Internet and the Blog?

Suggested readings

1. Lyn Gorman and David McLean MEDIA AND SOCIETY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY:
A HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION.
2. James Carey ESSAYS ON MEDIA AND SOCIETY
3. Arthur Asa Berger MEDIA AND SOCIETY: A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE
4. John Ryan and William Wentworth MEDIA AND SOCIETY:THE PRODUCTION OF
CULTURE IN THE MASS MEDIA
5. Mot Gokulsingh POPULAR CULTURE IN A GLOBALISED INDIA

NOTE: All The Books In This Section Are Available Through The Net In Amazon.Com - Suggested
Readings / To Be Supplemented By Latest Articles In Journals And Newspapers.

50
BJMC20 Photo Journalism

Unit 1

Introduction: how a camera works — choosing a camera — loading film — film speed — looking
after your camera.

Unit 2

Composition: light — colour — shape — form — texture — pattern — depth — format — angles —
frame — movement.

Unit 3

News photography: local colour — candid portraits — funfairs — weddings — accidents —weather
— sports.

Unit 4

Techniques: interchangeable lenses — macro photography — exposure — focusing — shutter


speed — filters — editing — common faults.

Unit 5

Critiques: ethics of photojournalism — aesthetic perspectives — privacy — contextual criticism.

Suggested reading

1. Photojournalism — By the editors of Time-Life Books. New York, 1971.


2. Basic Photography — John Hedgecoe. London: Collins & Brown, 1993.
3. The Color Photo Book — Andreas Feininger. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1969.
4. The Colour Book of Photography — L. Lorelle. London: Focal Press, 1956.

51
BJMC21a Advance Reporting & Editing (Diplomatic Reporting)

Unit 1

The role and importance of diplomatic reporting in journalism and in the media industry. Where
does diplomacy figure in a newspaper? Should newspapers devote space to what is happening
beyond the borders when so much is happening within the border?

Unit 2

How does a newspaper editor choose a diplomatic reporter? What are the basic requirements of a
diplomatic reporter if he/she is looking to cover the foreign news? Does knowledge of foreign
affairs or a degree in international relations a pre-requisite for covering foreign policy?

Unit 3

What are the basic components that a diplomatic reporter is to be aware of? The basics of indian
foreign policy pertaining to the neighborhood having global dimensions. The various facets of
indian diplomacy since independence.

Unit 4

The diplomatic reporter’s knowledge of the structure and functions of the indian bureaucracy
dealing with foreign affairs - the south block, the north block and the prime minister’s office.

Unit 5

The structure and responsibilities of the diplomatic / foreign desk in a newspaper and the role of a
news editor in coordinating foreign news and diplomatic writing.

Suggested readings

1. John Owen and Heather Purdey, International News Reporting: Frontlines and Deadlines
2. Stuart Allen, Reporting War
3. Steve Herder and Judy Ledgerwood, Propoganda, Politics and Violence in Cambodia:
Democratic Transition under United Nations peacekeeping.

52
BJMC21b Advance Page Designing

(To be submitted in due course)


.

53
BJMC21c Lab Newspaper Production

This is a practical module, in which students will be trained to produce a tabloid-size and a
broadsheet newspaper by using QuarkXPress, PageMaker and other software.

54
BJMC21d Advance Content & Technical Writing

Unit 1

Progress reports: functions and contents — timing and format — organizational patterns — project
description — overall appraisal.

Unit 2

Instructions: preliminaries — guidelines — stylistic faults — number of tasks — tables — formats


— audience analysis — revision checklist.

Unit 3

User guides: key components — essential information — initial planning — documentation


proposal and plan — prototype and specifications — template and style catalog — multiple review
drafts.

Unit 4

Policies & procedures: need and scope — resources — procedure manuals — controlled English
— some examples.

Unit 5

Technical reports: feasibility report — recommendation report — evaluation report — typical


contents — discussion and options.

Suggested readings

1. Power Tools for Technical Communication — David A. McMurrey. Thomson


Learning/Heinle Publishers.
2. Online Technical Writing — David A. McMurrey. http://www.io.com/~hcexres/textbook/
3. Good Style — John Kirkman.
4. How To Take The Fog Out Of Your Writing — Robert Gunning.

55
BJMC21e Advance Web Page Designing & Hosting

(To be submitted in due course)

56
BJMC21f Advance Graphics & Animation

(To be submitted in due course)

57
BJMC21g Advance Copy Writing

(To be submitted in due course)

58
BJMC21h Media Management

Unit 1

An overview of newspaper organisations – Forms of ownership – Basic Principles of Management -


Functions and responsibilities of Management – Accounts – Human Resource - Organisational
structure – Registrar of Newspapers for India.

Unit 2

Newspaper income and expenditure: Advertising – Types of Advertising – Advertising agencies -


Circulation –Audit Bureau of Circulation – other incomes.

Unit 3

Expenditure: newsprint, newsprint policy, machinery, and human resources, other expenses,
infrastructure and government. Editorial policy – National Readership Survey (NRS), Indian Reader
Survey (IRS) - Space buying and selling, reach, cost per thousand (CPT) copies.

Unit 4

Newspaper as a product – Advertorials – Sponsorships – Freebies – Analysis advertising and


circulation data. etc.

Unit 5

Radio and FM ownership patterns - Television ownership patterns – management – functions –


accounts – cost centres – income and expenses – licensing authorities.

Suggested Readings

1. The Indian Media Business, Vanita Kohli


2. Newspaper Management in India, Gulab Kothari, Intercultural Open University, The
Netherlands
3. Electronic Media Management, Peter K Pringle / Michael F Starr / William E McCavitt,
Focal Press, Boston.

59
BJMC21i Advertising Practices

(To be submitted in due course)

60
Semester VI

61
BJMC22 Communication Research Methodology

Unit 1

Overview of the field including the variety of theories and approaches.

Unit 2

Structure of Communication Research

Unit 3

Diversities of Communication Research, political and social including the different facets of
political communication.

Unit 4

Political rhetoric and political debate and the extent or limitations of communication research.

Unit 5

International perspectives of communication research and contributions in the field such as in


Europe, Americas and Asia.

Suggested readings

1. Lynda lee kaid, handbook of political communication research


2. Erik bucy and lance holbert, sourcebook for political communications research, routledge
2009
3. John reinard, introduction to communication research (amazon.com)

NOTE: Basic References which will be augmented by latest readings in scholarly journals and
newspapers:

62
BJMC23 Project / Paper

Students are expected to submit a 5,000 to 15,000-worded Projects / Papers. Faculty members will
guide the students in this regard.

63
BJMC24a Lab Newspaper Production

This is a practical module, in which students will be trained to produce a tabloid-size and a
broadsheet newspaper by using QuarkXPress, PageMaker and other software.

64
BJMC24b Advance Content & Technical Writing

Unit 1

Document design: book design — front and back covers — trademarks and warranties — table of
contents — communication statements.

Unit 2

Online writing: understanding new media — hypertext narrative — slow blogging — information
chunking — essential details.

Unit 3

Information structures: technical description — process discussion — causal discussion —


classification — comparisons.

Unit 4

Documentation: number system of documentation — what to document — placing source


indicators — setting up sources list.

Unit 5

Power-revision techniques: structure-level revision — topic sentences and transitions — essential


grammar — stylistic changes.

Suggested readings

1. Power Tools for Technical Communication — David A. McMurrey. Thomson


Learning/Heinle Publishers.
1. Online Technical Writing — David A. McMurrey. http://www.io.com/~hcexres/textbook/
2. Good Style — John Kirkman.
3. How To Take The Fog Out Of Your Writing — Robert Gunning.

65
BJMC24b Advance Advertising Practices

(To be submitted in due course)

66
Ordinances, Rules
& Regulations

67
1. The students must be familiar with the Quality Policy and Quality Objectives of the
university and the goals of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Students
should make all efforts to enable their School to achieve these goals.
2. The following Rules and Regulations based on the present University Regulations will be
followed. The University has the right to change these Rules and Regulations from time to
time.
3. Students should be punctual for lecture and practical classes and submit assignments,
records, homework etc in time.
4. A minimum of 75% of attendance is necessary for each semester / year. For practical
classes students should have completed all experiments/exercises as per schedule
announced in the beginning of each semester.
5. Attendance in tests and model examinations is compulsory and leave of absence will be
granted only in rare cases (for pressing/valid reasons, such as hospitalisation).
6. Students should maintain good academic progress on a continuous basis.
7. Students should maintain satisfactory progress on all fronts.
8. Students should equip themselves with approved note books as and when necessary.
9. Students should maintain good conduct inside and outside the classes.
10. Students should strictly adhere to corrective actions proposed by the School to maintain
academic excellence.
11. Ragging in any form is strictly forbidden and severe action will be taken against those who
indulge in such activities as per the Tamil Nadu Prohibition of Ragging Act No 7 of 1997.
12. It is compulsory that a leave letter in an approved form should be submitted for every
day/period of absence. Repeatedly failing to submit a leave letter could result in
suspension from classes for a period of time.
13. Leave letters should be signed/counter signed by parents/guardians/hostel warden.
Medical leave letters should be submitted along with medical certificates.. For leave,
whenever possible, prior permission must be obtained. A fitness certificate should be
produced while rejoining. Medical Certificates should be submitted immediately upon their
return to the classes.
14. Leave of absence should not exceed three days during a month.
15. Leave on medical ground will be accepted only for genuine reasons. HoDs should use
their discretion in treating such requests. Once a medical leave application is rejected by
the HoD, it will be treated as ordinary leave and will be covered by the previous clause.
16. Leave on medical grounds will not be normally permitted during class tests and model
tests, unless the students are admitted in the hospital or for similar reasons.
17. It is important that all students are present on the reopening day as well as the closing day.
Absence will be permitted only for unavoidable reasons. Fine will be suitably levied for
absence on opening day and closing day of the semester.
18. Students will be ineligible to sit for University Examinations if their performance is found to
be unsatisfactory.
19. Staff members will take attendance for each period at the commencement of the class.
Attendance once recorded will not be corrected later to include those students who report
late.
20. Students are required to wear their identity cards, which should be noticeable, when they
are in the University campus also when they travel using the University transport. It will be
considered as an act of indiscipline if students fail to wear their ID cards.

68
21. All students are expected to fill the students personal and performance record, which will
be supplied to them after they join the University. These cards will form a record of their
progress and achievements throughout their stay in the college.
22. Dress: Gentlemen students to wear trousers and tucked in shirts with collar. T-Shirts of
any kind are prohibited. Lady students are expected to wear sari or any other decent
dress. Half sari, skirts, jeans and frocks are to be avoided. On play fields the standard
attire is shorts and vests or jerseys. Footwear used on the field should be securely
strapped at the heel.
23. Certificates: The original certificates submitted by students at the time of admission to the
School will be returned at the time of their leaving the School on completion of studies or
earlier for other valid reasons. They will be returned on production of a clearance
certificate indicating that the student has no dues to the institution. The
course/conduct/extra-curricular/certificates will also be issued when the students leave the
college.
24. Students are not allowed to use cell phones on the campus.
25. Students admitted to the university hostel, shall abide by the rules and regulations of the
hostel as existing at the time of admission and as amended to from time to time.
26. A student dismissed from the School shall automatically cease to be a member of the
hostel.
27. Discipline: Students must maintain discipline. Those who are found smoking or who
consume alcohol, prohibited drugs etc will be dismissed immediately.
28. Examination and Evaluation: As the School imparts a hands-on training and the
programmes offered are skills-oriented, there is a need to assess / evaluate internally the
performance of the students on a continuously basis. The School, therefore, has adopted
the process of continuous internal assessment. Hence, there is no external evaluation
component.
29. Credits: The School follows the choice-based credit system introduced in the Faculty of
Science and Humanities, SRM University

69
SRM University Regulations applicable to Students admitted in 2003-04 and afterwards.

A. Requirements for completion of a semester

A candidate who has fulfilled the following conditions shall be deemed to have satisfied the
requirements for completion of a semester.

i. He/She secures not less than 75% of overall attendance in the semester taking into
account the total number of periods in all courses put together attended by the candidate
as against the total number of periods in all courses offered during that semester.
ii. Procedure for condonation up to 10%: Condonation on medical grounds will be considered
only if medical certificate is produced and accepted immediately on return to the School
after the medical leave.
Condonation on grounds of sports, games and co-curricular and extra curricular activities
will be considered only if prior approval is obtained.
The above condonation will not be entertained if applied at the end of the semester.
iii. His / Her conduct has been satisfactory throughout the semester.

Any amendment issued by the University concerned will be binding on students. Students
are expected to know the internal assessment from their respective academic regulations.

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EVALUATION PROCEDURE

Particulars Marks
1. Internal examination at the end of each semester 50
2. Class tests (two tests) 20
3. Assignments (three) / quiz 15
4. Seminar (1) 10
6. Attendance 5
Total marks 100
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Students will be bound by all the rules and regulations of the Faculty of Science &
Humanities.

Internal examination: Each paper will be set for 100 marks. The marks obtained by the student
will be converted to the 50-mark scale. A minimum of 75 % attendance is required to appear for the
internal examinations.

Class test: For each paper, there will be three tests. Students can request for make-up tests if
there has been a genuine reason for missing a test. But the question paper for the make-up test
will be based on the entire syllabus.

Assignments: The staff concerned will give at least two assignments. Students who fail to meet
the deadline will lose ½ mark everyday till they submit the assignment.

Quiz: Surprise quizzes will be held in the class to test the student’s general awareness about each
subject.

Seminar: Each student will have to present a paper of duration 10 minutes in each subject.

Lab activity: Students will be taught media-related software. They will be given a number of
exercises.

Concept test: There will be three tests on various concepts related to practical knowledge in their
field of study. Students will have to define and explain the concepts.

Record book: Students are expected to maintain a record of all the lab exercises. The record book
should be submitted to the staff concerned for signature every fortnight.

Lab journal: From the fourth semester, the students will bring out a weekly lab journal. They will
be divided into groups. Each group will be assigned different editorial and reporting tasks for each
issue. The staff will do a post-mortem analysis for each issue.

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Project: Final year students may choose a topic of their choice in any of their subjects and do a
micro-level research in the sixth semester. The project may contain up to 15,000 words. There will
be a maximum of 50 marks for the project and as many marks for the viva voce.

Ethics: All written work by the students must be original. Sources must be acknowledged and
properly cited.

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