Anda di halaman 1dari 60

Paul Schneiderman, Ph.D.

, Professor of Finance & Economics, Southern 
New Hampshire University
©2008 South‐Western
In This Lecture…..

Demand
Absolute Price and Relative Price
Supply
The Market
In This Lecture…..

Consumers’ Surplus, Producers’
Surplus, and Total Surplus
Price Ceilings
Price Floors
Theory
Economists build theories to answer
questions that do not have obvious 
answers.
Cause Effect

Theory is an abstract representation 
of the real world designed with the 
intent to better understand the 
world.
Market
Any place people come together to trade

Trade or exchange
may take place at a
physical or virtual
location
Demand
A Definition

The willingness and ability of buyers:
to purchase different quantities of a good
at different prices during a specific time
period.
Law of Demand
As the price of a good rises, the
quantity demanded of the good falls,
and as the price of a good falls, the
quantity demanded of the good rises,
ceteris paribus

Price Quantity
Ceteris Paribus
A Latin term meaning “all other things
constant” or “nothing else changes.”

Ceteris paribus is an assumption used to
examine the effect of one influence on an
outcome while holding all other influences
Constant.
Demand Schedule

The numerical tabulation of the
quantity demanded of a good at
different prices. A demand schedule is
the numerical representation of the law
of demand.
Downward Slopping Demand 
Curve
The graphical representation of the demand
schedule and law of demand.
Prices
¾Absolute (Money) Price ‐ The price of a
good in money terms.
¾Relative Price (opportunity cost) ‐ The 
price of a good in terms of another good.
Demand
Schedule and Graph
Law of Diminishing
Marginal Utility

For a given time period, the marginal
(additional) utility or satisfaction gained by
consuming equal successive units of a good
will decline as the amount consumed
increases.
Derivation of Market Demand
Schedule
Derivation of Market Demand
Curve
Change in Quantity Demanded
Change in Demand
Increase in Demand
Decrease in Demand
Factors Causing a Shift in the 
Demand Curve

¾Income
¾Preferences
¾Prices of substitute goods
¾Prices of complementary goods
¾Number of buyers
¾Expectations of future prices
Factors Causing a Shift in the 
Demand Curve ‐ Income

Normal Good ‐ A good the demand for
which rises (falls) as income rises (falls).
Inferior Good ‐ A good the demand for
which falls (rises) as income rises (falls).
Neutral Good – A good the demand for 
which does not change as income rises or
falls.
Factors Causing a Shift in the 
Demand Curve ‐ Substitutes 
Substitutes 
Two goods that satisfy similar needs or
desires. If two goods are substitutes,
the demand for one rises as the price
of the other rises (or the demand for
one falls as the price of the other
falls).
Factors Causing a Shift in the 
Demand Curve ‐ Complements

Complements
Two goods that are used jointly in 
consumption. If two goods are
complements, the demand for one rises as 
the price of the other falls (or the demand
for one falls as the price of the other rises).
Effect on Demand if Price 
Increases on a Substitute Good
Effect on Demand if Price 
Increases on a Complementary  
Good
Self Test Questions
1. As Sandi’s income rises, her demand for 
popcorn rises. As Mark’s income falls, his   
demand for prepaid telephone cards 
rises. What kinds of goods are popcorn 
and telephone cards for the people who 
demand each?
2. Why are demand curves downward 
sloping?
3. Give an example that illustrates how to 
derive a market demand curve.
4. What factors can change demand? What 
factors can change quantity demanded?
Supply
The willingness and ability of sellers
to produce and offer to sell different
quantities of a good at different prices
during a specific time period.
Law of Supply
As the price of a good rises, the quantity
supplied of the good rises, and as the price 
of a good falls, the quantity supplied of the
good falls, ceteris paribus.

Price Quantity
Supply Curve
The graphical representation of the law of 
supply, which states that price and quantity
supplied are directly related, ceteris paribus. 
Fixed Supply
Supply Schedule

The numerical tabulation of the
quantity supplied of a good at
different prices.
A supply schedule is the numerical
representation of the law of supply. 
Deriving a Market Supply 
Schedule
Deriving a Market Supply Curve
Factors that Cause the Supply 
Curve to Shift
¾Prices of relevant resources
¾Technology
¾Number of sellers
¾Expectation of future prices
¾Taxes and subsidies
¾Government restrictions
Change in Supply
Change in Supply
Change in Quantity Supplied

A change in quantity supplied refers to a 
movement along a supply curve. The only 
factor that can directly cause a change in 
the quantity supplied of a good is a 
change in the price of the good, or own 
price.
Change in Quantity Supplied
Self Test Questions
1. What would the supply curve for houses (in a 
given city) look like for a time period of (a) the 
next ten hours and (b) the next three months?
2. What happens to the supply curve if each of the 
following occurs? 
a. There is a decrease in the number of sellers.
b. A per‐unit tax is placed on the production of a 
good.
c. The price of a relevant resource falls.
3. “If the price of apples rises, the supply of apples 
will rise.” True or false? Explain your answer.
Putting Supply and Demand
Together
Market Equilibrium
Equilibrium in a market is the price
Quantity combination from which
there is no tendency for buyers or 
sellers to move away. Graphically,
equilibrium is the intersection point of 
the supply and demand curves.
Auction at Work in a 
Market
Supply and Demand at Work
The auctioneer calls out different prices, and 
buyers record how much they are willing and 
able to buy. At prices of $6.00, $5.00, and $4.00, 
quantity supplied is greater than quantity 
demanded. At prices of $1.25 and $2.25, 
quantity demanded is greater than quantity 
supplied. 
Auction at Work in a Market

At a price of $3.10, quantity demanded equals quantity supplied.
Equilibrium
Equilibrium Price (Market‐ Clearing Price)
The price at which quantity demanded
of the good equals quantity supplied 
Surplus and Shortage
Surplus (Excess Supply)
A condition in which quantity supplied is
Greater than quantity demanded. Surpluses
occur only at prices above equilibrium price.
Shortage (Excess Demand)
A condition in which quantity demanded is 
greater than quantity supplied. Shortages
occur only at prices below equilibrium price.
Move to Market Equilibrium
Market Demand and 
Supply
Moving to Equilibrium

Equilibrium
Consumer, Producer and Total Surplus
Consumers’ Surplus (CS) 
CS= Maximum buying price ‐ Price paid
The difference between the maximum price a buyer is
willing and able to pay for a good or service and the price
actually paid. 

Producers’ (Sellers’) Surplus (PS) 
PS = Price received ‐ Minimum Selling price
The difference between the price sellers receive for a good
and the minimum or lowest price for which they would 
have sold the good.

Total Surplus (TS) TS _ CS _ PS
The sum of consumers’ surplus and producers’ surplus. 
Consumer Surplus
Producer Surplus
Total Surplus

Equilibrium
Equilibrium Price and Quantity Effects of 
Supply and Demand Curve Shifts
Self‐Test Questions
1. When a person goes to the grocery store 
to buy food, there is no auctioneer calling 
out prices for bread, milk, and other 
items. Therefore, supply and demand 
cannot be operative. Do you agree or 
disagree? Explain your answer.
2. The price of a given‐quality personal 
computer is lower today than it was five 
years ago. Is this necessarily the result of a 
lower demand for computers? Explain 
your answer.
Self‐Test Questions
(continued)

3. What is the effect on equilibrium price 
and quantity of the following? 
a. A decrease in demand that is greater 
than the increase in supply 
b. An increase in supply            
c. A decrease in supply that is greater 
than the increase in demand 
d. A decrease in demand
Self‐Test Questions
(continued)

4. At equilibrium quantity, what is the 
relationship  between the maximum 
buying price and the minimum selling 
price?
5. If the price paid is $40 and the consumers’
surplus is $4, then what is the maximum 
buying price? If the minimum selling price 
is $30 and producers’ surplus is $4, then 
what is the price received by the seller?
Price Controls
Price Ceiling
A government‐mandated maximum
price above which legal trades cannot
be made.
Price Floor
A government‐mandated minimum
price below which legal trades cannot
be made.
Price Ceiling 
Price Floor
Self Test Questions
1. Do buyers prefer lower prices to higher 
prices?
2. “When there are long‐lasting shortages, 
there are long lines of people waiting to 
buy goods. It follows that the shortages 
cause the long lines.” Do you agree or 
disagree? Explain your answer.
3. Who might argue for a price ceiling? a 
price floor?