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For Public Use and Display

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings:


Operations & Maintenance Rating System
USGBC Member Approved November 2008
The built environment has a profound impact on our natural environment, economy, health, and productivity. Break-
throughs in building science, technology, and operations are now available to designers, builders, operators, and
owners who want to build green and maximize both economic and environmental performance.
Through the LEED® green building certification program, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is transforming
the built environment. The green building movement offers an unprecedented opportunity to respond to the most
important challenges of our time, including global climate change, dependence on non sustainable and expensive
sources of energy, and threats to human health. The work of innovative building professionals is a fundamental
driving force in the green building moment. Such leadership is a critical component to achieving USGBC’s mission of
a sustainable built environment for all within a generation.

USGBC Membership
USGBC’s greatest strength is the diversity of our membership. USGBC is a balanced, consensus based nonprofit
with more than 18,000 member companies and organizations representing the entire building industry. Since its
inception in 1993, USGBC has played a vital role in providing a leadership forum and a unique, integrating force for
the building industry. USGBC’s programs have three distinguishing characteristics:

Committee-based
The heart of this effective coalition is our committee structure, in which volunteer members design strategies
that are implemented by staff and expert consultants. Our committees provide a forum for members to resolve
differences, build alliances, and forge cooperative solutions for influencing change in all sectors of the building
industry.

Member-driven
Membership is open and balanced and provides a comprehensive platform for carrying out important programs and
activities. We target the issues identified by our members as the highest priority. We conduct an annual review of
achievements that allows us to set policy, revise strategies, and devise work plans based on members’ needs.

Consensus-focused
We work together to promote green buildings, and in doing so, we help foster greater economic vitality and
environmental health at lower costs. We work to bridge ideological gaps between industry segments and develop
balanced policies that benefit the entire industry.
Contact the U.S. Green Building Council
2101 L Street, NW
Suite 500
Washington, DC 20037
(800) 795-1747 Office
(202) 828-5110 Fax
www.usgbc.org

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by the U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.
The U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. (USGBC®) devoted significant time and resources to create this LEED® Rating
System. USGBC authorizes individual use of the LEED Rating System. In exchange for this authorization, the user
agrees:
1. to retain all copyright and other proprietary notices contained in the LEED Rating System,
2. not to sell or modify the LEED Rating System, and
3. not to reproduce, display, or distribute the LEED Rating System in any way for any public or commercial
purpose.
Unauthorized use of the LEED Rating System violates copyright, trademark, and other laws and is prohibited.

Disclaimer
None of the parties involved in the funding or creation of the LEED Rating System, including the USGBC, its
members, its members, volunteers, or contractors, assume any liability or responsibility to the user or any third
parties for the accuracy, completeness, or use of or reliance on any information contained in the LEED Rating
System, or for any injuries, losses, or damages (including, without limitation, equitable relief) arising from such use
or reliance. Although the information contained in the LEED Rating System is believed to be reliable and accurate,
all materials set forth within are provided without warranties of any kind, either express or implied, including but
not limited to warranties of the accuracy or completeness of information or the suitability of the information for any
particular purpose.
As a condition of use, the user covenants not to sue and agrees to waive and release the U.S. Green Building Council,
its members, volunteers, and contractors from any and all claims, demands, and causes of action for any injuries,
losses, or damages (including, without limitation, equitable relief) that the user may now or hereafter have a right to
assert against such parties as a result of the use of, or reliance on, the LEED Rating System.
U.S. Green Building Council
2101 L Street, NW
Suite 500
Washington, DC 20037

Trademarks
USGBC®, U.S. Green Building Council® and LEED® are registered trademarks of the U.S. Green Building Council.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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Acknowledgments
The LEED 2009 Rating System has been made possible only through the efforts of many dedicated volunteers,
staff members, and others in the USGBC community. The Rating System improvement work was managed and
implemented by USGBC staff and included review and input by many Technical Advisory Group (TAG) members
with oversight by the LEED Steering Committee. We extend our deepest gratitude to all of our LEED committee
members who participated in the development of this rating system, for their tireless volunteer efforts and constant
support of USGBC’s mission:

LEED Steering Committee


Scot Horst, Chair, LSC Horst, Inc
Joel Ann Todd, Vice-Chair, LSC Joel Ann Todd
Muscoe Martin M2 Architecture
Stuart Carron JohnsonDiversey, Inc.
Holley Henderson H2 Ecodesign, LLC
Christine Magar Greenform
Kristin Shewfelt Architectural Energy Corporation
Jessica Millman Agora DC
Bryna Dunn Moseley Architects
Neal Billetdeaux JJR
Greg Kats Managing Good Energies
Mark Webster Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Bob Thompson EPA Indoor Environment Management Branch
Malcolm Lewis Constructive Technologies Group, Inc.
John Boecker 7Group
Sara O’Mara Choate Construction Company
Alex Zimmerman Rep Canada Green Building Council
Ian Theaker Rep Canada Green Building Council

Sustainable Sites TAG


Bryna Dunn, Chair Moseley Architects
Stewart Comstock, Vice-Chair Maryland Department of the Environment
Michele Adams Cahill Associates
Gina Baker Burt Hill
Ted Bardacke Global Green USA
Stephen Benz Sasaki
Mark Brumbaugh Brumbaugh & Associates
Laura Case Emory University Campus Services
Zach Christeson the HOK Planning Group
Jay Enck Commissioning & Green Building Services
Ron Hand E/FECT. Sustainable Design Solutions
Richard Heinisch Acuity Lighting Group
Michael Lane Lighting Design Lab
Marita Roos HNTB
Zolna Russell Hord Coplan Macht, Inc.
Alfred Vick Ecos Environmental Design, Inc.

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Water Efficiency TAG
Neal Billetdeaux, Chair JJR
John Koeller, Vice-Chair Alliance for Water Efficiency
David Carlson Columbia University
Bill Hoffman H.W. Hoffman and Associates, LLC
Geoff Nara Civil & Environmental Consultants
Stephanie Tanner U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Daniel Yeh University of South Florida
David Bracciano Tampa Bay Water
Robert Rubin NCSU-BAE and McKim & Creed
Winston Huff SSR Engineers
Robert Benazzi Jaros Baum & Bolles
Gunnar Baldwin TOTO USA, INC
Heather Kinkade Forgotten Rain, LLC
Shabbir Rawalpindiwala Kohler Company
Bill Wall Clivus New England, Inc.

Energy & Atmosphere TAG


Greg Kats, Chair GoodEnergies
Marcus Sheffer, Vice-Chair 7group
Drury Crawley US Department of Energy
Jay Enck Commissioning & Green Building Solutions, Inc. 
Ellen Franconi IPMVP and AEC
Mark Frankel New Buildings Institute
Nathan Gauthier Harvard Green Campus Initiative
Rusty Hodapp Dallas/Fort Worth, Energy & Transportation Management
John Hogan City of Seattle Department of Planning & Development
Bion Howard Building Environmental Science and Technology
Dan Katzenberger Engineering, Energy, and the Environment
Bob Maddox Sterling Planet
Brenda Morawa BVM Engineering, Inc.
Erik Ring LPA, Inc.
Michael Rosenberg Oregon Department of Energy
Mick Schwedler Trane
Gord Shymko IPMVP and G.F. Shymko & Associates
Gail Stranske CTG Energetics
Michael Zimmer Thompson Hine LLP

Materials & Resources TAG


Mark Webster, Chair Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Steven Baer, Vice Chair Five Winds International
Paul Bertram NAIMA
Chris Dixon NBBJ
Ann Edminster Design AVEnues
Lee Gros Lee Gros Architect and Artisan, Inc
Theresa Hogerheide-Reusch Reusch Design Services
Nadav Malin BuildingGreen, LLC.

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Nancy Malone Siegel & Strain Architects
Kirsten Ritchie Gensler
Wayne Trusty Athena Sustainable Materials Institute
Denise Van Valkenburg MASCO Retail Cabinet Group
Gabe Wing Herman Miller, Inc.

Indoor Environmental Quality TAG


Bob Thompson, Chair EPA Indoor Environment Management Branch
Steve Taylor, Vice-Chair Taylor Engineering
Nancy Clanton Clanton and Associates
Alexis Kurtz Ove Arup &Partners
George Loisos Loisos+ Ubelohde
Prasad Vaidya The Weidt Group
Daniel Bruck BRC Acoustics & Tech.
David Lubman David Lubman & Associates
Charles Salter Salter Associates
Ozgem Ornektekin DMJM Harris
Jude Anders Shoreline Concepts, LLC
Brian Cloward Mithun Architects+Designers+Planners
Larry Dykhuis Herman Miller, Inc 
Francis (Bud) Offerman Indoor Environmental Engineering
Christopher Schaffner The Green Engineer
Dennis Stanke Trane Company

The LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating System builds on the work of those who
helped create previous version:

LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Core Committee


Stu Carron, Chair JohnsonDiversey, Inc.
Sheila Sheridan, Vice-Chair International Facility Management Association, IFMA
John Adams Georgia Institute of Technology
Steve Ashkin The Ashkin Group
John Beckinghausen HSBC Bank USA, N.A.
Lidia Berger HDR
Gay Bindocci U.S. Department of Interior
Cara Carmichael RMI ENSAR Built Environment
Lance Davis U.S. General Services Administration
George Denise Cushman and Wakefield
Barry Giles Moss Landing Laboratories
Tia Heneghan CTG Energetics
Joe Higgins Fidelity Investments
George Lohnes UNICCO Service Company
Perrin Pellegrin University of California–Santa Barbara
Steve Price Steelcase Inc.
Paul Walitsky The Industrial Ecology Co. LLC
Richard Walker Transwestern

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LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Project
Checklist

Sustainable Sites 26 Possible Points


 Credit 1 LEED Certified Design and Construction 4
 Credit 2 Building Exterior and Hardscape Management Plan 1
 Credit 3 Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control, and Landscape Management Plan 1
 Credit 4 Alternative Commuting Transportation 3-15
 Credit 5 Site Disturbance—Protect or Restore Open Habitat 1
 Credit 6 Stormwater Quantity Control 1
 Credit 7.1 Heat Island Reduction—Nonroof 1
 Credit 7.2 Heat Island Reduction—Roof 1
 Credit 8 Light Pollution Reduction 1

Water Efficiency 14 Possible Points


 Prerequisite 1 Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency Required
 Credit 1 Water Performance Measurement 1-2
 Credit 2 Additional Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency 1-5
 Credit 3 Water Efficient Landscaping 1-5
 Credit 4 Cooling Tower Water Management 1-2

Energy and Atmosphere 35 Possible Points


 Prerequisite 1 Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices—Planning, Documentation,
and Opportunity Assessment Required
 Prerequisite 2 Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance Required
 Prerequisite 3 Fundamental Refrigerant Management Required
 Credit 1 Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance 1-18
 Credit 2.1 Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis 2
 Credit 2.2 Existing Building Commissioning—Implementation 2
 Credit 2.3 Existing Building Commissioning—Ongoing Commissioning 2
 Credit 3.1 Performance Measurement—Building Automation System 1
 Credit 3.2 Performance Measurement—System Level Metering 1-2
 Credit 4 On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy 1-6
 Credit 5 Enhanced Refrigerant Management 1
 Credit 6 Emissions Reduction Reporting 1

Materials and Resources 10 Possible Points


 Prerequisite 1 Sustainable Purchasing Policy Required
 Prerequisite 2 Solid Waste Management Policy Required
 Credit 1 Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables 1
 Credit 2 Sustainable Purchasing—Durable Goods 1-2
 Credit 3 Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions 1
 Credit 4 Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps 1
 Credit 5 Sustainable Purchasing—Food 1

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 Credit 6 Solid Waste Management—Waste Stream Audit 1
 Credit 7 Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables 1
 Credit 8 Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods 1
 Credit 9 Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions 1

Indoor Environmental Quality 15 Possible Points


 Prerequisite 1 Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Required
 Prerequisite 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Required
 Prerequisite 3 Green Cleaning Policy Required
 Credit 1.1 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality Management Program 1
 Credit 1.2 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring 1
 Credit 1.3 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Increased Ventilation 1
 Credit 1.4 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Reduce Particulates in Air Distribution 1
 Credit 1.5 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality Management
for Facility Alterations and Additions 1
 Credit 2.1 Occupant Comfort—Occupant Survey 1
 Credit 2.2 Controllability of Systems—Lighting 1
 Credit 2.3 Occupant Comfort—Thermal Comfort Monitoring 1
 Credit 2.4 Daylight and Views 1
 Credit 3.1 Green Cleaning—High Performance Cleaning Program 1
 Credit 3.2 Green Cleaning—Custodial Effectiveness Assessment 1
 Credit 3.3 Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials 1
 Credit 3.4 Green Cleaning—Sustainable Cleaning Equipment 1
 Credit 3.5 Green Cleaning—Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control 1
 Credit 3.6 Green Cleaning—Indoor Integrated Pest Management 1

Innovation in Operations 6 Possible Points


 Credit 1 Innovation in Operations 1-4
 Credit 2 LEED Accredited Professional 1
 Credit 3 Documenting Sustainable Building Cost Impacts 1

Regional Priority 4 Possible Points


 Credit 1 Regional Priority 1-4
________________________________________________________________________
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
100 base points; 6 possible Innovation in Operations and 4 Regional Priority points

Certified 40–49 points


Silver 50–59 points
Gold 60–79 points
Platinum 80 points and above

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LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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Preface i

Introduction xiii
I. LEED Green Building Rating System
® ™
xiii
II. Overview and Process xv
III. Performance Period xvii
IV. Multitenant Buildings xvii
V. Facility Alterations and Additions xviii
VI. Minimum Program Requirements xviii
VII. Exemplary Performance Strategies xviii

Minimum Program Requirements xx

Sustainable Sites (SS) 1


Credit 1 LEED Certified Design and Construction 1
Credit 2 Building Exterior and Hardscape Management Plan 2
Credit 3 Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control, and Landscape Management Plan 3
Credit 4 Alternative Commuting Transportation 4
Credit 5 Site Development—Protect or Restore Open Habitat 6
Credit 6 Stormwater Quantity Control 7
Credit 7.1 Heat Island Reduction—Nonroof 8
Credit 7.2 Heat Island Reduction—Roof 10
Credit 8 Light Pollution Reduction 12

Water Efficiency (WE) 15


Prerequisite 1 Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency 15
Credit 1 Water Performance Measurement 17
Credit 2 Additional Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency 19
Credit 3 Water Efficient Landscaping 20
Credit 4 Cooling Tower Water Management 22

Energy and Atmosphere (EA) 23


Prerequisite 1 Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices—Planning, Documentation,
and Opportunity Assessment 23
Prerequisite 2 Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance 24
Prerequisite 3 Fundamental Refrigerant Management 26
Credit 1 Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance 27
Credit 2.1 Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis 30
Credit 2.2 Existing Building Commissioning—Implementation 31
Credit 2.3 Existing Building Commissioning—Ongoing Commissioning 32
Credit 3.1 Performance Measurement—Building Automation System 33

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Credit 3.2 Performance Measurement—System-Level Metering 34
Credit 4 On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy 35
Credit 5 Enhanced Refrigerant Management 37
Credit 6 Emissions Reduction Reporting 39

Materials and Resources (MR) 41


Prerequisite 1 Sustainable Purchasing Policy 41
Prerequisite 2 Solid Waste Management Policy 42
Credit 1 Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables 43
Credit 2 Sustainable Purchasing—Durable Goods 44
Credit 3 Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions 45
Credit 4 Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps 48
Credit 5 Sustainable Purchasing—Food 49
Credit 6 Solid Waste Management—Waste Stream Audit 50
Credit 7 Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables 51
Credit 8 Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods 52
Credit 9 Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions 53

Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) 55


Prerequisite 1 Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance 54
Prerequisite 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control 57
Prerequisite 3 Green Cleaning Policy 59
Credit 1.1 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality Management Program 60
Credit 1.2 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring 61
Credit 1.3 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Increased Ventilation 63
Credit 1.4 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Reduce Particulates in Air Distribution 65
Credit 1.5 Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality Management for
Facility Alterations and Additions 66
Credit 2.1 Occupant Comfort—Occupant Survey 68
Credit 2.2 Controllability of Systems—Lighting 69
Credit 2.3 Occupant Comfort—Thermal Comfort Monitoring 70
Credit 2.4 Daylight and Views 71
Credit 3.1 Green Cleaning—High-Performance Cleaning Program 75
Credit 3.2 Green Cleaning—Custodial Effectiveness Assessment 76
Credit 3.3 Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials 77
Credit 3.4 Green Cleaning—Sustainable Cleaning Equipment 79
Credit 3.5 Green Cleaning—Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control 80
Credit 3.6 Green Cleaning—Indoor Integrated Pest Management 81

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Innovation in Operations (IO) 83
Credit 1 Innovation in Operations 83
Credit 2 LEED Accredited Professional
®
84
Credit 3 Documenting Sustainable Building Cost Impacts 85

Regional Priority (RP) 87


Credit 1 Regional Priority 87

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I. LEED® Green Building Rating System

Background on LEED®
Following the formation of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) in 1993, the organization’s members quickly
realized that the sustainable building industry needed a system to define and measure “green buildings.” USGBC
began to research existing green building metrics and rating systems. Less than a year after formation, the members
acted on the initial findings by establishing a committee to focus solely on this topic. The composition of the
committee was diverse; it included architects, real estate agents, a building owner, a lawyer, an environmentalist, and
industry representatives. This cross section of people and professions added a richness and depth both to the process
and to the ultimate product.
The first LEED Pilot Project Program, also referred to as LEED Version 1.0, was launched at the USGBC Membership
Summit in August 1998. After extensive modifications, LEED Green Building Rating System Version 2.0 was released
in March 2000, with LEED Version 2.1 following in 2002 and LEED Version 2.2 following in 2005.
As LEED has evolved and matured, the program has undertaken new initiatives. In addition to a rating system
specifically devoted to building operations and maintenance issues (LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations &
Maintenance), LEED addresses the different project development and delivery processes of the U.S. building design
and construction market through rating systems for specific building typologies, sectors, and project scopes: LEED
for Core & Shell, LEED for New Construction, LEED for Schools, LEED for Neighborhood Development, LEED for
Retail, LEED for Healthcare, LEED for Homes, and LEED for Commercial Interiors.
Project teams interact with the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) for project registration and
certification. GBCI was established in 2008 as a separately incorporated entity with the support of the U.S. Green
Building Council. GBCI administers credentialing and certification programs related to green building practice.
These programs support the application of proven strategies for increasing and measuring the performance of
buildings and communities as defined by industry systems such as LEED.
The green building field is growing and changing daily. New technologies and products are being introduced into
the marketplace, and innovative designs and practices are proving their effectiveness. The LEED rating systems and
reference guides will evolve as well. Project teams must comply with the version of the rating system that is current
at the time of their registration. USGBC will highlight new developments on its website on a continual basis; see
www.usgbc.org.

Features of LEED®
The LEED Green Building Rating Systems are voluntary, consensus-based, and market-driven. Based on existing and
proven technology, they evaluate environmental performance from a whole building perspective over a building’s
life cycle, providing a definitive standard for what constitutes a green building in design, construction, and operation.
The LEED rating systems are designed for rating new and existing commercial, institutional, and residential
buildings. They are based on accepted energy and environmental principles and strike a balance between known,
established practices and emerging concepts. Each rating system is organized into 5 environmental categories:
Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, and Indoor Environmental

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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Quality. An additional category, Innovation in Design (or Operations), addresses sustainable building expertise
as well as measures not covered under the 5 environmental categories. Regional bonus points are another feature
of LEED and acknowledge the importance of local conditions in determining best environmental design and
construction practices.

The LEED Credit Weightings


In LEED 2009, the allocation of points between credits is based on the potential environmental impacts and human
benefits of each credit with respect to a set of impact categories. The impacts are defined as the environmental
or human effect of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the building, such as greenhouse gas
emissions, fossil fuel use, toxins and carcinogens, air and water pollutants, indoor environmental conditions. A
combination of approaches, including energy modeling, life-cycle assessment, and transportation analysis, is used to
quantify each type of impact. The resulting allocation of points among credits is called credit weighting.
LEED 2009 uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s TRACI1 environmental impact categories as the basis
for weighting each credit. TRACI was developed to assist with impact evaluation for life-cycle assessment, industrial
ecology, process design, and pollution prevention.
LEED 2009 also takes into consideration the weightings developed by the National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST); these compare impact categories with one another and assign a relative weight to each.
Together, the 2 approaches provide a solid foundation for determining the point value of each credit in LEED 2009.
The LEED 2009 credit weightings process is based on the following parameters, which maintain consistency and
usability across rating systems:
n All LEED credits are worth a minimum of 1 point.
n All LEED credits are positive, whole numbers; there are no fractions or negative values.
n All LEED credits receive a single, static weight in each rating system; there are no individualized scorecards
based on project location.
n All LEED rating systems have 100 base points; Innovation in Design (or Operations) and
n Regional Priority credits provide opportunities for up to 10 bonus points.
Given the above criteria, the LEED 2009 credit weightings process involves 3 steps:
1. A reference building is used to estimate the environmental impacts in 13 categories associated with a typical
building pursuing LEED certification.
2. The relative importance of building impacts in each category are set to reflect values based on the NIST
weightings.2
3. Data that quantify building impacts on environmental and human health are used to assign points to individual
credits.
Each credit is allocated points based on the relative importance of the building-related impacts that it addresses.
The result is a weighted average that combines building impacts and the relative value of the impact categories.
Credits that most directly address the most important impacts are given the greatest weight, subject to the system
design parameters described above. Credit weights also reflect a decision by LEED to recognize the market
implications of point allocation. The result is a significant change in allocation of points compared with previous
LEED rating systems. Overall, the changes increase the relative emphasis on the reduction of energy consumption
and greenhouse gas emissions associated with building systems, transportation, the embodied energy of water, the
embodied energy of materials, and where applicable, solid waste.

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The details of the weightings process vary slightly among individual rating systems. For example, LEED for Existing
Buildings: O&M includes credits related to solid waste management but LEED for New Construction does not. This
results in a difference in the portion of the environmental footprint addressed by each rating system and the relative
allocation of points. The weightings process for each rating system is fully documented in a weightings workbook.
The credit weightings process will be reevaluated over time to incorporate changes in values ascribed to different
building impacts and building types, based on both market reality and evolving scientific knowledge related to
buildings. A complete explanation of the LEED credit weightings system is available on the USGBC website, at www.
usgbc.org.

Regional Priority Credits


To provide incentive to address geographically specific environmental issues, USGBC regional councils and chapters
have identified 6 credits per rating system that are of particular importance to specific areas. Each regional priority
credit is worth an additional 1 point, and a total of 4 regional priority points may be earned. Upon project registration,
LEED-Online automatically determines a project’s regional priority credits based on its zip code. If the project
achieves more than 4 regional priority credits, the team can choose the credits for which these points will apply. The
USGBC website also contains a searchable database of regional priority credits.

II. Overview and Process


The LEED 2009 Green Building Rating System for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance is a set of
performance standards for certifying the operations and maintenance of existing commercial or institutional
buildings and high-rise residential buildings of all sizes, both public and private. The intent is to promote high-
performance, healthful, durable, affordable, and environmentally sound practices in existing buildings.
Prerequisites and credits in the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating System address
7 topics:
n Sustainable Sites (SS)
n Water Efficiency (WE)
n Energy and Atmosphere (EA)
n Materials and Resources (MR)
n Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ)
n Innovation in Operations (IO)
n Regional Priority (RP)
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certifications are awarded according to the following
scale:
Certified 40–49 points
Silver 50–59 points
Gold 60–79 points
Platinum 80 points and above

GBCI will recognize buildings that achieve 1 of these rating levels with a formal letter of certification.

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When to Use LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance was designed to certify the sustainability of ongoing
operations of existing commercial and institutional buildings. All such buildings, as defined by standard building
codes, are eligible for certification under LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance and include
offices, retail and service establishments, institutional buildings (libraries, schools, museums, churches, etc.), hotels,
and residential buildings of 4 or more habitable stories.
LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance provides owners and operators of existing buildings an
entry point into the LEED certification process and is applicable to the following:
building operations, processes, systems upgrades, minor space-use changes, and minor facility alterations or
n

additions; and
buildings new to LEED certification as well as buildings previously certified under LEED for New
n

Construction, LEED for Schools, or LEED for Core & Shell; these may be either ground up new construction or
existing buildings that have undergone major renovations.
LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance encourages owners and operators of existing buildings
to implement sustainable practices and reduce the environmental impacts of their buildings over their functional
life cycles. Specifically, the rating system addresses exterior building site maintenance programs, water and energy
use, environmentally preferred products and practices for cleaning and alterations, sustainable purchasing policies,
waste stream management, and ongoing indoor environmental quality. LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations
& Maintenance is targeted at single buildings, whether owner occupied, multitenant, or multiple-building campus
projects. It is a whole-building rating system; individual tenant spaces are ineligible.
Many projects neatly fit the defined scope of only 1 LEED rating system; others may be eligible for 2 or more. The
project is a viable candidate for LEED certification if it can meet all prerequisites and achieve the minimum points
required in a given rating system. If more than 1 rating system applies, the project team can decide which to pursue.
For assistance in choosing the most appropriate LEED rating system, please e-mail leedinfo@usgbc.org.

Registration
Project teams interested in earning LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification for
their buildings must first register the project with GBCI. Projects can be registered on the GBCI website (www.gbci.
org). The website also has information on registration costs for USGBC national members as well as nonmembers.
Registration is an important step that establishes contact with GBCI and provides access to software tools, errata,
critical communications, and other essential information.

Certification & Recertification


To earn LEED certification, the applicant project must satisfy all the prerequisites and qualify for a minimum
number of points to attain the established project ratings as listed below. Having satisfied the basic prerequisites of
the program, applicant projects are then rated according to their degree of compliance within the rating system.
Any first-time certification application to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
program is considered an initial LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification. This includes
applications for both buildings never certified under LEED and buildings previously certified under LEED for
New Construction, LEED for Schools, or LEED for Core & Shell. Any LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations
& Maintenance application for a building previously certified using LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations
& Maintenance is considered a LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance recertification. These
buildings can apply for recertification as frequently as each year but must file for recertification at least once every
5 years to maintain their LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance status; if projects do not recertify

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xvi
at the 5 year mark, their next application will be considered an initial certification application. The project must
recertify all prerequisites but may drop previously earned credits or add new credits as desired.
For more information on the LEED certification process including LEED-Online, Credit Interpretation Requests
and Rulings, Certification, Appeals, and Fees please see the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations &
Maintenance, 2009 Edition and visit www.usgbc.org or www.gbci.org.

III. Performance Period


LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification application includes performance data
for the building and site over the performance period—the continuous, unbroken time during which sustainable
operations performance is being measured. The performance period may not have any gaps, defined as any period of
time longer than 1 full week.

Requirements for Initial Certification


Some prerequisites and credits in LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance require that
operating data and other documentation be submitted for the performance period. For the initial LEED for Existing
Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification, the performance period is the most recent period of operations
preceding certification application; it must be a minimum of 3 months for all prerequisites and credits except Energy
and Atmosphere Prerequisite 2 and Credit 1, which have longer minimum durations of 1 year. At the project team’s
option, the performance period for any prerequisite or credit may be extended to a maximum of 24 months preceding
certification application.
Consistent start times and durations of the performance periods for each prerequisite and credit are preferred but
not strictly necessary. However, all performance periods must overlap and terminate within 1 week of each other.

Requirements for Recertification


The performance period for recertification depends on whether the credit is newly pursued. For prerequisites and
all credits earned in the initial LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification, the
performance period is the entire period between the previous certification and the current application. For all credits
not earned in the initial LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification, the performance
period is the same as for initial certification.
The performance period for recertification applications can be as short as 1 year and as long as 5 years.
For more information on the Performance Period requirements, please see the LEED Reference Guide for Green
Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

IV. Multitenant Buildings


LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification applies only to whole buildings.
Multitenant buildings (single buildings that contain floor area under the ownership or tenancy of more than 1 entity)
must meet the LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance minimum program requirements (see
Section IV). That is, the project for a multitenant building must involve at least 90% of the total gross floor space.
Calculate project scope floor space by dividing the project’s floor space by the total gross floor space.
For more information on the Performance Period requirements, please see the LEED Reference Guide for Green
Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xvii
V. Facility Alterations and Additions
Although LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance focuses mainly on sustainable ongoing building
operations, it also embraces sustainable alterations and new additions to existing buildings.
In general parlance, alterations and additions may range from a complete gutting, major renovation, or large new
wing to the replacement of an old window, sheet of drywall, or section of carpet.
In LEED for Existing Buildings: O&M, however, alterations and additions has a specific meaning. It refers to
changes that affect usable space in the building. Mechanical, electrical, or plumbing system upgrades that involve no
disruption to usable space are excluded.
Only alterations and additions within the following limits are eligible for inclusion in LEED for Existing Buildings:
O&M certification:
Maximum. Alterations that affect no more than 50% of the total building floor area or cause relocation of no
n

more than 50% of regular building occupants are eligible. Additions that increase the total building floor area
by no more than 50% are eligible. Buildings with alterations or additions exceeding these limits should pursue
certification under the LEED for New Construction program.
Minimum. Alterations that include construction activity by more than 1 trade specialty, make substantial
n

changes to at least 1 entire room in the building, and require isolation of the work site from regular building
occupants for the duration of construction are eligible. Additions that increase the total building floor
area by at least 5% are eligible. Alterations or additions below these limits are considered repairs, routine
replacements, or minor upgrades and are ineligible to earn points under LEED for Existing Buildings: O&M.
The minimum applies to Materials and Resources (MR) Credits 3 and 9, and Indoor Environmental Quality
(IEQ) Credit 1.5.

VI. Minimum Program Requirements


The LEED 2009 Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) define the minimum characteristics that a project
must possess in order to be eligible for certification under LEED 2009. These requirements define the categories
of buildings that the LEED rating systems were designed to evaluate, and taken together serve three goals: to give
clear guidance to customers, to protect the integrity of the LEED program, and to reduce challenges that occur
during the LEED certification process. It is expected that MPRs will evolve over time along with LEED rating system
improvements. The requirements will apply only to those projects registering under LEED 2009.
To view the list of MPRs, please read the Minimum Program Requirements section of this document.

VII. Exemplary Performance Strategies


Exemplary performance strategies result in performance that greatly exceeds the performance level or expands
the scope required by an existing LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance credit. To earn
exemplary performance credits, teams must meet the performance level defined by the next step in the threshold
progression. For credits with more than 1 compliance path, an Innovation in Operations point can be earned by
satisfying more than 1 compliance path if their benefits are additive.
The credits for which exemplary performance points are available through expanded performance or scope are noted
in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition and in LEED-Online.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xviii
Endnotes
1
Tools for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI). U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development. http:// www.epa.gov/nrmrl/std/sab/
traci/.
2
Relative impact category weights based on an exercise undertaken by NIST (National Institute of Standards and
Technology) for the BEES program. http://www.bfrl.nist.gov/oae/software/bees/.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xix
NOTE: Definitions, exceptions, and more extensive guidance on issues in this document are available in a
separate document titled: ‘LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance’. Terms that are italicized and underlined
here are defined in the Supplemental Guidance document (they are marked as such only the first time that
they appear).
This document identifies the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs), or minimum characteristics that a project
must possess in order to be eligible for LEED Certification. LEED projects must comply with each applicable MPR
described below. These requirements define the types of buildings that the LEED Green Building Rating Systems
were designed to evaluate, and taken together serve three goals: to give clear guidance to customers, to protect the
integrity of the LEED program, and to reduce complications that occur during the LEED Certification process. The
requirements in this document will apply to all those, and only those projects certifying under LEED 2009. Projects
that upgrade to LEED 2009 from earlier versions of LEED are subject to the MPRs. It is expected that MPRs will
evolve over time with the LEED rating system, however only those MPRs in place at the time that a LEED project
registers or upgrades will apply to that project.
LEED for New Construction, Core & Shell, Schools, and Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance were
designed to evaluate commercial, institutional, or high-rise residential buildings; as such, any project applying for
LEED Certification under one of these rating systems must include a building that falls under one of these categories.
LEED for Commercial Interiors was designed to evaluate interior spaces of commercial or institutional buildings; as
such, projects applying for certification under LEED for Commercial Interiors must include a space that falls under
one of these categories.
NOTE: CERTIFICATION MAY BE REVOKED FROM ANY LEED PROJECT UPON GAINING KNOWLEDGE OF
NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ANY APPLICABLE MPR. IF SUCH A CIRCUMSTANCE OCCURS, REGISTRATION
AND/OR CERTIFICATION FEES WILL NOT BE REFUNDED.
All exceptions to MPRs that are not already defined in the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance
document will be considered on a case-by-case basis for special circumstances. Details on the process for
review of MPR clarification requests will be posted in summer 2009.

LEED 2009 Minimum Program Requirements for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
1. Must Comply with Environmental Laws
The LEED project building, all other real property within the LEED project boundary, any project work, and
all normal building operations occurring within the LEED project building and the LEED project boundary must
comply with all applicable federal, state, and local building-related environmental laws and regulations in place
where the project is located. This condition must be satisfied from the start of the LEED project’s first LEED-EB:
O&M performance period through the expiration date of the LEED Certification.

2. Must be a Complete, Permanent Building or Space


All LEED projects must be designed for, constructed on, and operated on a permanent location on already
existing land. No building or space that is designed to move at any point in its lifetime may pursue LEED
Certification.
LEED projects must include at least one existing building in its entirety.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xx
3. Must Use a Reasonable Site Boundary
1. The LEED project boundary must include all contiguous land that is associated with and supports normal
building operations for the LEED project building, including all land that was or will be disturbed for the
purpose of undertaking the LEED project.
2. The LEED project boundary may not include land that is owned by a party other than that which owns the
LEED project unless that land is associated with and supports normal building operations for the LEED project
building.
3. LEED projects located on a campus must have project boundaries such that if all the buildings on campus
become LEED certified, then 100% of the gross land area on the campus would be included within a LEED
boundary. If this requirement is in conflict with MPR #7, Must Comply with Minimum Building Area to Site
Area Ratio, then MPR #7 will take precedence.
4. Any given parcel of real property may only be attributed to a single LEED project building.
5. Gerrymandering of a LEED project boundary is prohibited: the boundary may not unreasonably exclude sections
of land to create boundaries in unreasonable shapes for the sole purpose of complying with prerequisites or
credits.

4. Must Comply with Minimum Floor Area Requirements.


The LEED project must include a minimum of 1,000 square feet (93 square meters) of gross floor area.

5. Must Comply with Minimum Occupancy Rates


Full Time Equivalent Occupancy
The LEED project must serve 1 or more Full Time Equivalent (FTE) occupant(s), calculated as an annual average
in order to use LEED in its entirety. If the project serves less than 1 annualized FTE, optional credits from the
Indoor Environmental Quality category may not be earned (the prerequisites must still be earned).

Minimum Occupancy Rate


The LEED project must be in a state of typical physical occupancy, and all building systems must be operating at a
capacity necessary to serve the current occupants, for a period that includes all performance periods as well as at
least the 12 continuous months immediately preceding the first submission for a review.

6. Must Commit to Sharing Whole-Building Energy and Water Usage Data


All certified projects must commit to sharing with USGBC and/or GBCI all available actual whole-project energy
and water usage data for a period of at least 5 years. This period starts on the date that the LEED project begins
typical physical occupancy if certifying under New Construction, Core & Shell, Schools, or Commercial Interiors,
or the date that the building is awarded certification if certifying under Existing Buildings: Operations &
Maintenance. Sharing this data includes supplying information on a regular basis in a free, accessible, and secure
online tool or, if necessary, taking any action to authorize the collection of information directly from service or
utility providers. This commitment must carry forward if the building or space changes ownership or lessee.

7. Must Comply with a Minimum Building Area to Site Area Ratio


The gross floor area of the LEED project building must be no less than 2% of the gross land area within the LEED
project boundary.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xxi
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

xxii
SS Credit 1: LEED Certified Design and Construction
4 points

Intent
To reward environmentally sensitive building design and construction, thereby enabling high-performance building
operations to be achieved more easily.

Requirements
Choose 1 of the following options:

OPTION 1
Show that the building has previously been certified under LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations.

OR
OPTION 2
Show that the building has been previously certified under LEED for Schools.

OR
OPTION 3
Show that the building has previously been certified under LEED for Core & Shell Development

AND
at least 75% of the floor area has also been certified under LEED for Commercial Interiors.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Pursue and earn LEED certification for new buildings or major renovations.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

1
SS Credit 2: Building Exterior and Hardscape Management Plan
1 point

Intent
To encourage environmentally sensitive building exterior and hardscape management practices that provide a clean,
well-maintained and safe building exterior while supporting high-performance building operations.

Requirements
Employ an environmentally sensitive, low-impact building exterior and hardscape management plan that helps
preserve surrounding ecological integrity. The plan must employ best management practices that significantly
reduce harmful chemical use, energy waste, water waste, air pollution, solid waste and/or chemical runoff (e.g.,
gasoline, oil, antifreeze, salts) compared with standard practices. The plan must address all of the following
operational elements that occur on the building and grounds:
n Maintenance equipment.
n Snow and ice removal.
n Cleaning of building exterior.
n Paints and sealants used on building exterior.
n Cleaning of sidewalks, pavement and other hardscape.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


During the performance period, have in place a low-impact site and green building exterior management plan
that addresses overall site management, chemicals, snow and ice removal, and building exterior cleaning and
maintenance. Include green cleaning and maintenance practices and materials that minimize environmental
impacts. An outline of acceptable material for a low-impact plan is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green
Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Replace conventional gas-powered machinery with electric-
powered equivalents (either battery or corded). Examples include, but are not limited to, maintenance equipment
and vehicles, landscaping equipment, and cleaning equipment.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

2
SS Credit 3: Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control and Landscape
Management Plan
1 point

Intent
To preserve ecological integrity, enhance natural diversity and protect wildlife while supporting high-performance
building operations and integration into the surrounding landscape.

Requirements
Have an environmentally sensitive management plan in place for the site’s natural components. The plan must
employ best management practices that significantly reduce harmful chemical use, energy waste, water waste, air
pollution, solid waste and/or chemical runoff (e.g., gasoline, oil, antifreeze, salts) compared with standard practices.
The plan must address all of the following operational elements:
n Outdoor integrated pest management (IPM), defined as managing outdoor pests (plants, fungi, insects, and/or
animals) in a way that protects human health and the surrounding environment and that improves economic
returns through the most effective, least-risk option. IPM calls for the use of least toxic chemical pesticides,
minimum use of the chemicals, use only in targeted locations, and use only for targeted species. IPM requires
routine inspection and monitoring. The outdoor IPM plan must address all the specific IPM requirements
listed in IEQ Credit 3.6: Green Cleaning: Indoor Integrated Pest Management, including preferred use of
nonchemical methods, definition of emergency conditions and universal notification (advance notice of not
less than 72 hours under normal conditions and 24 hours in emergencies before a pesticide, other than a least-
toxic pesticide, is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds that the building management maintains).
The outdoor IPM plan must also be integrated with any indoor IPM plan for the building, as appropriate.
n Erosion and sedimentation control for ongoing landscape operations (where applicable) and future
construction activity. The plan must address both site soil and potential construction materials. The plan must
also include measures that prevent erosion and sedimentation, prevent air pollution from dust or particulate
matter and restore eroded areas.
Further, the plan must address the following operational elements, if applicable:
n Diversion of landscape waste from the waste stream via mulching, composting or other low-impact means.
n Chemical fertilizer use. The use of artificial chemicals can be minimized by the use of locally adapted plants
that need no fertilizer, less-polluting alternatives to artificial chemicals, or other low-impact maintenance
practices.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


During the performance period, have in place a low-impact site and green building exterior management plan that
addresses overall site management, chemicals, fertilizers, landscape waste and pest management. Include such
green landscape management practices as reducing the use of power equipment, improving stormwater control,
using fertilizer only as needed, composting landscape waste, applying integrated pest management, creating wildlife
habitat, removing or not installing invasive plants, protecting natural areas, and using plants to reduce heating
and cooling needs. Use mulching mowers to significantly reduce yard waste generation, fertilizer needs and water
consumption through retention of organic matter.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

3
SS Credit 4: Alternative Commuting Transportation
3–15 points

Intent
To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use for commuting.

Requirements
Reduce the number of commuting round trips made by regular building occupants using single occupant,
conventionally powered and conventionally fueled vehicles. For the purposes of this credit, alternative
transportation includesincludes at a minimum, telecommuting; compressed workweeks; mass transit; walking;
bicycles or other human-powered conveyances; carpools; vanpools; and low-emitting, fuel-efficient1 or alternative-
fuel vehicles.
Performance calculations are made relative to a baseline case that assumes all regular occupants commute alone
in conventional automobiles. The calculations must account for seasonal variations in the use of alternative
commuting methods and, where possible, indicate the distribution of commuting trips using each type of alternative
transportation.
Points are earned for reductions in conventional commuting trips during the performance period according to the
following schedule:

Demonstrated percentage reduction in


Points
conventional commuting trips
10% 3
13.75% 4
17.50% 5
21.25% 6
25.00% 7
31.25% 8
37.50% 9
43.75% 10
50.00% 11
56.25% 12
62.50% 13
68.75% 14
75.00% 15

1 Low-emitting vehicles and fuel-efficient vehicles are defined as vehicles that are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California
Air Resources Board or that have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy annual
vehicle-rating guide.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

4
Potential Technologies & Strategies
When developing an alternative transportation program, consider the opportunities and limitations of different
options, based on the building’s location.
Provide space and infrastructure features, such as bicycle racks, changing facilities, preferred parking, access to mass
transit or alternative-fuel refueling stations. Offer employees incentives for using alternative transportation, such as
additional vacation days, cash rewards or pretax options. Distribute free or discounted public transportation passes,
bicycling equipment or telecommuting equipment to individuals committed to using them.
Encourage the use of alternative commuting methods by guaranteeing free rides home for employees who must
unexpectedly leave work early or late. Utilize organization resources to communicate with building occupants about
alternative transportation options and benefits, and facilitating communication among building occupants for
coordinating ride sharing.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

5
SS Credit 5: Site Development—Protect or Restore Open Habitat
1 point

Intent
To conserve existing natural site areas and restore damaged site areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Requirements
During the performance period, have in place native1 or adapted vegetation2 covering a minimum of 25% of the total
site area (excluding the building footprint) or 5% of the total site area (including the building footprint), whichever is
greater.
Improving and/or maintaining off-site areas with native or adapted plants can contribute toward earning this credit
provided the improvement and maintenance are documented in a contract with the owner of the off-site area. Every
2 square feet off-site can be counted as 1 square foot on-site.
Other ecologically appropriate features that contribute to this credit are natural site elements beyond vegetation
that maintain or restore the ecological integrity of the site, including water bodies, exposed rock, unvegetated ground
or other features that are part of the historic natural landscape within the region and provide habitat value.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Perform a site survey to identify site elements and adopt a master plan for management of the building site. Activities
may include removing excessive paved areas and replacing them with landscaped areas or replacing excessive turf
grass area with natural landscape features. Work with local horticultural extension services or native plant societies
to select and maintain indigenous plant species for site restoration and landscaping. Coordinate with activities,
technologies and strategies under SS Credit 3: Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control.

1 Native plants are plants indigenous to a locality.


2 Adapted plants are cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

6
SS Credit 6: Stormwater Quantity Control
1 point

Intent
To limit disruption of natural hydrology by reducing impervious cover, increasing on-site infiltration, reducing or
eliminating pollution from stormwater runoff and eliminating contaminants.

Requirements
During the performance period, implement a stormwater management plan that infiltrates, collects and reuses
runoff or evapotranspirates runoff from at least 15% of the precipitation falling on the whole project site both for an
average weather year and for the 2-year, 24-hour design storm.
Implement an annual inspection program of all stormwater management facilities to confirm continued
performance. Maintain documentation of inspection, including identification of areas of erosion, maintenance
needs and repairs. Perform all routine required maintenance, necessary repairs or stabilization within 60 days of
inspection.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Collect and reuse stormwater for nonpotable uses such as landscape irrigation, toilet and urinal flushing, and
custodial uses. During facility or site alterations or additions, specify the use of alternative surfaces (e.g., vegetated
roofs, pervious pavement or grid pavers) and nonstructural techniques (e.g., rain gardens, vegetated swales,
disconnection of imperviousness, rainwater recycling) to improve perviousness, thereby restoring or maintaining
natural stormwater flows. Incorporate stormwater management facilities into routine preventive and corrective
maintenance programs.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

7
SS Credit 7.1: Heat Island Reduction—Nonroof
1 point

Intent
To reduce heat islands1 to minimize impacts on microclimates and human and wildlife habitats.

Requirements
Choose 1 of the following options:

OPTION 1
Use any combination of the following strategies for 50% of the site hardscape (including roads, sidewalks,
courtyards and parking lots):
n Provide shade from the existing tree canopy or within 5 years of landscape installation; landscaping (trees)
must be in place at the time of certification application.
n Provide shade from structures covered by solar panels that produce energy used to offset some nonrenewable
resource use.
n Provide shade from architectural devices or structures that have a solar reflectance index (SRI)2 of at least 29.
Implement a maintenance program that ensures these surfaces are cleaned at least every 2 years to maintain
good reflectance.
n Use hardscape materials with an SRI of at least 29 and implement a maintenance program that ensures these
surfaces are cleaned at least every 2 years to maintain good reflectance.
n Use an open-grid pavement system (at least 50% pervious).

OR
OPTION 2
Place a minimum of 50% of parking spaces under cover3. Any roof used to shade or cover parking must have
an SRI of at least 29, be a vegetated roof or be covered by solar panels that produce energy used to offset some
nonrenewable resource use. Implement a maintenance program that ensures all SRI surfaces are cleaned at least
every 2 years to maintain good reflectance. The top parking level of a multilevel parking structure is included in
the total parking spaces calculation but is not considered a roof and is not required to be an SRI surface.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Employ strategies, materials and landscaping techniques that reduce the heat absorption of exterior materials. Use
shade (calculated on June 21, noon solar time) from native or adapted trees and large shrubs, vegetated trellises or

1 Heat islands are defined as thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas.
2 The solar reflectance index (SRI) is a measure of the constructed surface’s ability to reflect solar heat, as shown by a small temperature rise. It is
defined so that a standard black surface (reflectance 0.05, emittance 0.90) is 0 and a standard white surface (reflectance 0.80, emittance 0.90)
is 100. To calculate the SRI for a given material, obtain the reflectance value and emittance value for the material. SRI is calculated according to
ASTM E 1980. Reflectance is measured according to ASTM E 903, ASTM E 1918 or ASTM C 1549. Emittance is measured according to ASTM E
408 or ASTM C 1371.
3 For the purposes of this credit, under cover parking is defined as parking underground, under deck, under roof, or under a building.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

8
other exterior structures supporting vegetation. Consider using new coatings and integral colorants for asphalt to
achieve light-colored surfaces instead of blacktop. Position photovoltaic cells to shade impervious surfaces.
Consider replacing constructed surfaces (e.g.. roof, roads, sidewalks, etc.) with vegetated surfaces such as vegetated
roofs and open grid paving or specify high-albedo materials, such as concrete, to reduce heat absorption.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

9
SS Credit 7.2: Heat Island Reduction—Roof
1 point

Intent
To reduce heat islands1 to minimize impacts on microclimates and human and wildlife habitats.

Requirements
OPTION 1
Use roofing materials with a solar reflectance index (SRI)2 equal to or greater than the values in the table below
for a minimum of 75% of the roof surface.
Roofing materials having a lower SIR value than those listed below ay be used if the weighted rooftop SRI average
meets the following:

Area Roof Meeting Minimum SRI SRI of Installed Roof


————————————————
Total Roof Area
x ——————————
Required SRI
≥ 75%

Implement a maintenance program that ensures all SRI surfaces are cleaned at least every 2 years to maintain
good reflectance.

OR
OPTION 2
Install and maintain a vegetated roof that covers at least 50% of the roof area.

OR
OPTION 3
Install high-albedo and vegetated roof surfaces that, in combination, meet the following criteria:

Area Roof Meeting Minimum SRI Area of Vegetated Roof


————————————————
0.75
+ ——————————
0.5
≥ Total Roof Area

Roof Type Slope SRI


Low-sloped roof ≤ 2:12 78
Steep-sloped roof > 2:12 29

1 Heat islands are defined as thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas.
2 The solar reflectance index (SRI) is a measure of the constructed surface’s ability to reflect solar heat, as shown by a small temperature rise. It is
defined so that a standard black surface (reflectance 0.05, emittance 0.90) is 0 and a standard white surface (reflectance 0.80, emittance 0.90)
is 100. To calculate the SRI for a given material, obtain the reflectance value and emittance value for the material. SRI is calculated according to
ASTM E 1980. Reflectance is measured according to ASTM E 903, ASTM E 1918 or ASTM C 1549. Emittance is measured according to ASTM E
408 or ASTM C 1371.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

10
Potential Technologies & Strategies
Consider installing high-albedo and vegetated roofs to reduce heat absorption.. Default values are available in
the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Product information is
available from the Cool Roof Rating Council Web site at www.coolroofs.org. Also visit the ENERGY STAR® Web site,
at www.energystar.gov.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

11
SS Credit 8: Light Pollution Reduction
1 point

Intent
To minimize light trespass from the building and site, reduce sky-glow to increase night sky access, improve
nighttime visibility through glare reduction and reduce development impact from lighting on nocturnal
environments.

Requirements
Project teams must comply with the interior lighting requirement

AND
1 of the 3 options for exterior lighting.

INTERIOR LIGHTING
All nonemergency built-in luminaires with a direct line of sight to any openings in the envelope (translucent or
transparent, wall or ceiling) must be automatically controlled to turn off during all after-hours periods during
the performance period. The total duration of all programmed after-hours periods annually must equal or exceed
2,190 hours per year (50% of annual nighttime hours). Manual override capability may be provided for occasional
after-hours use.
Implement a program to ensure that the lighting control system is being properly used to adjust lighting levels
during all after-hours periods.

EXTERIOR LIGHTING
OPTION 1
If the project is certified under LEED for Schools or New Construction, show that SS Credit 8: Light Pollution
Reduction was earned. If the project is certified under LEED for Core & Shell Development and 75% of the floor
area is LEED for Commercial Interiors, show that SS Credit 8: Light Pollution Reduction was earned for both
systems.

OR
OPTION 2
Partially1 or fully shield2 all exterior fixtures 50 watts and over so that they do not directly emit light to the night sky.

OR
OPTION 3
Measure the night illumination levels at regularly spaced points around the perimeter of the property, taking the
1 Partially shielded means exterior light fixtures are shielded so that the lower edge of the shield is at or below the centerline of the light source or
lamp such that light emission above the horizontal plane is minimized.
2 Fully shielded means exterior light fixtures are shielded or constructed so that light rays emitted by the fixture are projected below the
horizontal plane passing through the lowest point on the fixture from which light is emitted.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

12
measurements with the building’s exterior and site lights both on and off. The building’s interior lights must be
in the same state during both measurements. At least 8 measurements are required at a maximum spacing of 100
feet apart, so as to be representative of the illumination levels at the perimeter of the property. The illumination
level measured with the lights on must not be more than 20% above the level measured with the lights off. This
requirement must be met for each measurement point; averaging of all points is prohibited.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Adopt site lighting criteria to maintain safe light levels while avoiding off-site lighting and night sky pollution.
Minimize site lighting where possible, and use computer software to model the site lighting. Technologies to reduce
light pollution include full-cutoff luminaries, low-reflectance surfaces and low-angle spotlights.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

13
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

14
WE Prerequisite 1: Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency
Required

Intent
To reduce indoor fixture and fitting water use within buildings to reduce the burdens on potable water1 supply and
wastewater systems.

Requirements
Reduce potable water use of indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings to a level equal to or below the LEED 2009
for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance baseline, calculated assuming 100% of the building’s indoor
plumbing fixtures and fittings meet the plumbing code requirements as stated in the 2006 editions of the Uniform
Plumbing Code (UPC) or International Plumbing Code (IPC) pertaining to fixture and fitting performance. Fixtures
and fittings included in the calculations for this credit are water closets, urinals, showerheads, faucets, faucet
replacement aerators and metering faucets.
The LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance water use baseline is set depending on the year of
substantial completion of the building’s indoor plumbing system. Substantial completion is defined as either initial
building construction or the last plumbing renovation of all or part of the building that included 100% retrofit of all
plumbing fixtures and fittings as part of the renovation. Set the baseline as follows:
n For a plumbing system substantially completed in 1993 or later throughout the building, the baseline is 120% of
the water use that would result if all fixtures met the codes cited above.
n For a plumbing system substantially completed before 1993 throughout the building, the baseline is 160% of
the water use that would result if all fixtures met the codes cited above.
If indoor plumbing systems were substantially completed at different times (because the plumbing renovations
occurred at different times in different parts of the building), Set a whole-building average baseline by prorating
between the above limits. Prorate based on the proportion of plumbing fixtures installed during the plumbing
renovations in each date period, as explained in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations
& Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Pre-1993 buildings that have had only minor fixture retrofits (e.g., aerators,
showerheads, flushing valves) but no plumbing renovations in or after 1993 may use the 160% baseline for the whole
building.
Demonstrate fixture and fitting performance through calculations to compare the water use of the as-installed
fixtures and fittings with the use of UPC- or IPC-compliant fixtures and fittings, as explained in the LEED Reference
Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.
Develop and implement a policy requiring economic assessment of conversion to high-performance plumbing
fixtures and fittings as part of any future indoor plumbing renovation. The assessment must account for potential
water supply and disposal cost savings and maintenance cost savings.

1 Potable water is defined as water that is suitable for drinking and is supplied from wells or municipal water systems.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

15
Potential Technologies & Strategies
Reduce indoor plumbing fixture and fitting potable water usage through automatic water control systems. Install,
where possible, water-conserving indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings that meet or exceed the UPC 2006 or IPC
2006 fixture and fitting requirements in combination with high-efficiency or dry fixture and control technologies.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

16
WE Credit 1: Water Performance Measurement
1–2 points

Intent
To measure building and subsystem water performance over time to understand consumption patterns and identify
opportunities for additional water savings.

Requirements
OPTION 1. (1 point)
Have in place permanently installed water metering that measures the total potable water1 use for the entire
building and associated grounds. Meter data must be recorded on a regular basis and compiled into monthly and
annual summaries. Applicants are also encouraged to meter gray or reclaimed water supplied to the building.

OR
OPTION 2. (2 points)
Meet the requirements for Option 1 and have in place permanently installed metering for 1 or more of the
following water subsystems:
n Irrigation. Meter water systems serving at least 80% of the irrigated landscape area on the grounds. The
percentage of irrigated landscape area served must be calculated as the total metered irrigated landscape area
divided by the total irrigated landscape area. All landscaping areas fully covered with xeriscaping or native
vegetation that requires no routine irrigation must be excluded from the calculation entirely.
n Indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings. Meter water systems serving at least 80% of the indoor plumbing
fixtures and fittings described in WE Prerequisite 1, either directly or by deducting all other measured water
use from the measured total water consumption of the building and grounds.
n Cooling towers. Meter replacement water use of all cooling towers serving the facility.
n Domestic hot water. Meter water use of at least 80% of the installed domestic hot water heating capacity
(including both tanks and on-demand heaters).
n Other process water. Meter at least 80% of expected daily water consumption for process-type end uses, such
as humidification systems, dishwashers, clothes washers, pools and other systems using process water.
Meters must measure potable water use, but gray or reclaimed water use may also be measured to meet the
requirements of this credit. Metering must be continuous and data-logged to allow for an analysis of time trends. The
project must compile monthly and annual summaries of results for each subsystem metered.
Meters must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

1 Potable water is defined as water that is suitable for drinking and is supplied from wells or municipal water systems

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

17
Potential Technologies & Strategies
Install a building-level water meter to measure and track total potable water consumption in the facility. Install
subsystem-level water metering to measure and track potable water consumption by specific building systems;
prioritize metering for those systems that use the most potable water.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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WE Credit 2: Additional Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency
1–5 points

Intent
To maximize indoor plumbing fixture and fitting efficiency within buildings to reduce the use of potable water1 and
consequent burden on municipal water supply and wastewater systems.

Requirements
During the performance period, have in place strategies and systems that in aggregate produce a reduction in
indoor plumbing fixture and fitting potable water use from the calculated baseline established in WE Prerequisite 1:
Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency.

The minimum water reduction percentage for each point threshold is as follows:
Percentage Reduction Points
10% 1
15% 2
20% 3
25% 4
30% 5

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Reduce indoor plumbing fixture and fitting water usage through automatic controls and other actions. Specify water-
conserving indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings that exceed the Uniform Plumbing Codes 2006 or International
Plumbing Codes 2006 fixture and fitting requirements, in combination with ultrahigh-efficiency or dry fixture and
fitting and control technologies.

1 Potable water is defined as water that is suitable for drinking and is supplied from wells or municipal water systems.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

19
WE Credit 3: Water Efficient Landscaping
1–5 points

Intent
To limit or eliminate the use of potable water1, or other natural surface or subsurface resources available on or near
the project site, for landscape irrigation.

Requirements
Reduce potable water or other natural surface or subsurface resource consumption for irrigation compared with
conventional means of irrigation. If the building does not have separate water metering for irrigation systems,
the water-use reduction achievements can be demonstrated through calculations. The minimum water savings
percentage for each point threshold is as follows:
Percentage Reduction Points
50% 1
62.5% 2
75% 3
87.5% 4
100% 5

For buildings without vegetation or other ecologically appropriate features on the grounds, points can be earned by
reducing the use of potable water for watering any roof and/or courtyard garden space or outdoor planters, provided
the planters and/or garden space cover at least 5% of the building site area (including building footprint, hardscape
area, parking footprint, etc). If the planters and/or garden space cover less than 5% of the building site area, the
project is ineligible for this credit.
Three options are available to demonstrate compliance with the above requirements. Project teams that do not
separately meter their actual irrigation water use during the performance period must choose Option 2.
Choose 1 of the following options:

OPTION 1
Calculate the mid-summer baseline irrigation water use by determining the water use that would result from
using an irrigation system typical for the region and compare this with the building’s actual irrigation potable
water use, which can be determined through submetering. Use the baseline and actual water use values to
calculate the percentage reduction in potable water or other natural surface or subsurface resource use. More
detail about completing this calculation is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations
& Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

1 Potable water is defined as water that is suitable for drinking and is supplied from wells or municipal water systems.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

20
OR
OPTION 2
Calculate the estimated mid-summer irrigation water use by determining the landscape area for the project and
sorting this area into the major vegetation types. Determine the reference evapotranspiration rate (ET0 ) for the
region and determine the species factor (ks ), density factor (kd) and microclimate factor (kmc ) for each vegetation
type. Use this information to calculate the landscape coefficient (KL ) and irrigation water use for the design case.
Calculate the baseline case irrigation water use by setting the above factors to average values representative of
conventional equipment and design practices. Use the estimated and baseline case to determine the percentage
reduction in potable water or other natural surface or subsurface resource use. Factor values and other resources
for completing these calculations are available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations &
Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

OR
OPTION 3
If independent irrigation performance and ranking tools are available from local, regional, state or national
sources, use such tools to demonstrate reductions in potable water or other natural surface or subsurface
resource for irrigation purposes.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Specify water efficient, climate-tolerant native or adapted plantings. Implement or maintain high-efficiency
irrigation technologies, such as microirrigation, moisture sensors or weather data-based controllers. Feed irrigation
systems with captured rainwater, gray water (on-site or municipal), municipally reclaimed water or on-site treated
wastewater. Consider not operating an irrigation system. Consider employing xeriscaping principles in arid climates.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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WE Credit 4: Cooling Tower Water Management
1–2 points

Intent
To reduce potable water1 consumption for cooling tower equipment through effective water management and/or use
of nonpotable makeup water.

Requirements
OPTION 1. Chemical Management (1 point)
Develop and implement a water management plan for the cooling tower that addresses chemical treatment,
bleed-off, biological control and staff training as it relates to cooling tower maintenance.
Improve water efficiency by installing and/or maintaining a conductivity meter and automatic controls to adjust
the bleed rate and maintain proper concentration at all times.

OR
OPTION 2. Nonpotable Water Source Use (1 point)
Use makeup water that consists of at least 50% nonpotable water, such as harvested rainwater, harvested
stormwater, air-conditioner condensate, swimming pool filter backwash water, cooling tower blowdown, pass-
through (once-through) cooling water, recycled treated wastewater from toilet and urinal flushing, foundation
drain water, municipally reclaimed water or any other appropriate on-site water source that is not naturally
occurring groundwater or surface water.
Have a measurement program in place that verifies makeup water quantities used from nonpotable sources.
Meters must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

OR
OPTION 3. (2 points)
Achieve both Options 1 and 2.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Work with a water treatment specialist to develop a water management strategy addressing the appropriate chemical
treatment and bleed-off to ensure proper concentration levels in the cooling tower. Also, develop a biocide treatment
program to avoid biological contamination and the risk of Legionella in the building.
Identify nonpotable water sources that may be suitable for use in the cooling tower makeup water. Ensure that the
water meets the cooling tower manufacturer’s guidelines in terms of water purity and adjust the chemical treatment
program accordingly.

1 Potable water is defined as water that is suitable for drinking and is supplied from wells or municipal water systems.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

22
EA Prerequisite 1: Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices—Planning,
Documentation and Opportunity Assessment
Required

Intent
To promote continuity of information to ensure that energy-efficient operating strategies are maintained and
provide a foundation for training and system analysis.

Requirements
Document the current sequence of operations for the building.
Develop a building operating plan that provides details on how the building is to be operated and maintained. The
operating plan must include, at a minimum, an occupancy schedule, equipment run-time schedule, design set points
for all HVAC equipment, and design lighting levels throughout the building. Identify any changes in schedules or set
points for different seasons, days of the week and times of day. Validate that the operating plan has been met during
the performance period.
Develop a systems narrative that briefly describes the mechanical and electrical systems and equipment in the
building. The systems narrative must include all the systems used to meet the operating conditions stated in the
operating plan, including at a minimum, heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting and any building controls systems.
Create a narrative of the preventive maintenance plan for equipment described in the systems narrative and
document the preventive maintenance schedule during the performance period.
Conduct an energy audit that meets the requirements of the ASHRAE Level I walk-through assessment.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Prepare a building operating plan that specifies the current operational needs of the building and identify building
systems and other practices necessary to meet those needs. Outline the current sequence of operations to identify
and eliminate any inefficiency.
Develop and implement a preventive maintenance program to regularly monitor and optimize the performance of
mechanical equipment regulating indoor comfort and the conditions delivered in occupied spaces.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

23
EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance
Required

Intent
To establish the minimum level of operating energy efficiency performance relative to typical buildings of similar
type to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

Requirements
CASE 1. Projects Eligible for Energy Star Rating
For buildings eligible to receive an energy performance rating using the EPA’s ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager
tool, achieve an energy performance rating of at least 69. If the building is eligible for an energy performance
rating using Portfolio Manager, Option 1 must be used.
Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be
certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for both the
LEED project building(s) and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of continuous
measured energy data is required.
Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

CASE 2. Projects Not Eligible for Energy Star Rating


For buildings not eligible to receive an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, comply with 1 of the
following:

OPTION 1
Demonstrate energy efficiency at least 19% better than the average for typical buildings of similar type by
benchmarking against national average source energy data provided in the Portfolio Manager tool as an
alternative to energy performance ratings. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for
Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

OR
OPTION 2
Use the alternative method described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations &
Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

AND
Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be
certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for
both the LEED project building(s) and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of
continuous measured energy data is required.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

24
Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are
exempt.
Use the Portfolio Manager tool available on the ENERGY STAR website to benchmark the project even if it is
not eligible for an EPA rating: http://www.energystar.gov/benchmark

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Existing building commissioning and energy audits will help identify areas of building operations that are not
efficient. Implement energy-efficient retrofits and energy-saving techniques to reduce the building’s energy use.
Energy-efficient equipment such as office equipment, maintenance equipment and appliances will aid in the
reduction of energy waste. Employ the use of meters on major mechanical systems to effectively monitor the energy
consumption of each.
In addition to efficiency improvements, consider renewable energy options as a way to minimize the building’s
environmental impact.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

25
EA Prerequisite 3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management
Required

Intent
To reduce stratospheric ozone depletion.

Requirements
Zero use of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-based refrigerants in heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration
(HVAC&R) base building systems unless a third-party audit (as defined in the LEED Reference Guide for
Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition) shows that system replacement or conversion is not
economically feasible or it is demonstrated that a phase-out plan for CFC-based refrigerants is in place.
Required economic analysis: The replacement of a chiller is considered not economically feasible if the simple
payback of the replacement is greater than 10 years. To determine the simple payback, divide the cost of
implementing the replacement by the annual cost avoidance for energy that results from the replacement and any
difference in maintenance costs. If CFC-based refrigerants are maintained in the building, reduce annual leakage to
5% or less using EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608 procedures governing refrigerant management and reporting,
and reduce the total leakage over the remaining life of the unit to less than 30% of its refrigerant charge.
Small HVAC&R units (defined as containing less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant), standard refrigerators, small water
coolers and any other cooling equipment that contains less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant are not considered part of
the base building system and are exempt.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Specify only non-CFC-based refrigerants in all new building HVAC&R systems. Identify all existing CFC-based
refrigerant uses and upgrade the equipment if economically feasible and/or develop a phase-out plan that identifies a
schedule for future replacement.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

26
EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance
1–18 points

Intent
To achieve increasing levels of operating energy performance relative to typical buildings of similar type to reduce
environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

Requirements
CASE 1. Projects Eligible for Energy Star Rating
For buildings eligible to receive an energy performance rating using the EPA’s ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager
tool, achieve an energy performance rating of at least 71. If the building is eligible for an energy performance
rating using Portfolio Manager, Option 1 must be used.
The minimum energy cost savings percentage for each ENERGY STAR threshold is as follows:
EPA ENERGY STAR Energy
Points
Performance Rating
71 1
73 2
74 3
75 4
76 5
77 6
78 7
79 8
80 9
81 10
82 11
83 12
85 13
87 14
89 15
91 16
93 17
95 18

Achieve energy efficiency performance better than the minimum requirements listed above; points are awarded
according to the table below.
Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of buildings to be certified.
Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for both the LEED
project and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of continuous measured energy
data is required.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

27
Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

CASE 2. Projects Not Eligible for Energy Star Rating


For buildings not eligible to receive an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, comply with 1 of the
following:

OPTION 1
Demonstrate energy efficiency at least 21% better than the average for typical buildings of similar type by
benchmarking against national average source energy data provided in the Portfolio Manager tool as an
alternative to energy performance ratings. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for
Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

OR
OPTION 2
For buildings not suited for Case 2, Option 1, use the alternative method described in the LEED Reference
Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

AND
Achieve energy efficiency performance better than the minimum requirements listed above; points are
awarded according to the table below.
Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be
certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for
both the LEED project and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of continuous
measured energy data is required.
Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management
organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are
exempt.
Use the Portfolio Manager tool available on the ENERGY STAR website to benchmark the project even if it is
not eligible for an EPA rating: http://www.energystar.gov/benchmark.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

28
Percentile level above the national median
(for buildings not eligible for ENERGY STAR Points
energy performance rating
21 1
23 2
24 3
25 4
26 5
27 6
28 7
29 8
30 9
31 10
32 11
33 12
35 13
37 14
39 15
41 16
43 17
45 18

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Existing building commissioning and energy audits will help identify areas of building operations that are not
efficient. Implement energy-efficient retrofits and energy-saving techniques to reduce the building’s energy use.
Energy-efficient equipment such as office equipment, maintenance equipment and appliances will aid in the
reduction of energy waste. Employ the use of meters on major mechanical systems to effectively monitor the energy
consumption of each.
In addition to efficiency improvements, consider renewable energy options as a way to minimize the building’s
environmental impact.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

29
EA Credit 2.1: Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis
2 points

Intent
Through a systematic process, to develop an understanding of the operation of the building’s major energy-using
systems, options for optimizing energy performance and a plan to achieve energy savings.

Requirements
OPTION 1. Commissioning Process
n Develop a retrocommissioning, recommissioning or ongoing commissioning plan for the building’s major

energy-using systems.
Conduct the investigation and analysis phase.
n

Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.


n

List the operating problems that affect occupants’ comfort and energy use, and develop potential operational
n

changes that will solve them.


List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the
n

cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

OR
OPTION 2. ASHRAE Level II Energy Audit
n Conduct an energy audit that meets the requirements of American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-

Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Level II, Energy Survey and Analysis.


Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.
n

Perform a savings and cost analysis of all practical measures that meet the owner’s constraints and economic
n

criteria, along with a discussion of any effect on operations and maintenance procedures.
List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the
n

cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Based on the building operating plan and systems narrative, confirm that all building systems and equipment are
functioning as appropriate according to the equipment schedule. Conduct testing and analysis to ensure that
building systems and equipment are functioning correctly. Identify opportunities to make no- or low-cost capital
improvements to enhance building performance.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

30
EA Credit 2.2: Existing Building Commissioning—Implementation
2 points

Intent
To implement minor improvements and identify planned capital projects to ensure that the building’s major energy-
using systems are repaired, operated and maintained effectively to optimize energy performance.

Requirements
Implement no- or low-cost operational improvements and create a capital plan for major retrofits or upgrades.
Provide training for management staff that builds awareness and skills in a broad range of sustainable building
operations topics. This could include energy efficiency and building, equipment and systems operations and
maintenance.
Demonstrate the observed and/or anticipated financial costs and benefits of measures that have been implemented.
Update the building operating plan as necessary to reflect any changes in the occupancy schedule, equipment run-
time schedule, design set points and lighting levels.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Implement no- and low-cost operational improvements that will immediately enhance building performance.
Develop a capital plan for the completion of any major retrofits identified through the investigation and analysis
phase.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

31
EA Credit 2.3: Existing Building Commissioning—Ongoing Commissioning
2 points

Intent
To use commissioning to address changes in facility occupancy, use, maintenance and repair. Make periodic
adjustments and reviews of building operating systems and procedures essential for optimal energy efficiency and
service provision.

Requirements
Implement an ongoing commissioning program that includes elements of planning, system testing, performance
verification, corrective action response, ongoing measurement and documentation to proactively address operating
problems.
Create a written plan that summarizes the overall commissioning cycle for the building by equipment or building
system group. The ongoing commissioning cycle must not exceed 24 months. This plan must include a building
equipment list, performance measurement frequency for each equipment item and steps to respond to deviation
from expected performance parameters.
Complete at least half of the scope of work in the first commissioning cycle (as indicated by the percentage of the
plan’s total budget) prior to the date of application for LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance.
Only work completed within 2 years prior to application may be included to show progress in the ongoing
commissioning cycle.
Update the building operating plan and/or systems narrative as necessary to reflect any changes in the occupancy
schedule, equipment run-time schedule, design set points, lighting levels or system specifications.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Develop an ongoing commissioning program that addresses the ongoing changes and maintenance needs in an
existing building.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

32
EA Credit 3.1: Performance Measurement—Building Automation System
1 point

Intent
To provide information to support the ongoing accountability and optimization of building energy performance and
identify opportunities for additional energy-saving investments.

Requirements
Have in place a computer-based building automation system (BAS) that monitors and controls major building
systems, including at a minimum, heating, cooling, ventilation and lighting. Have a preventive maintenance
program in place that ensures BAS components are tested and repaired or replaced according to the manufacturer’s
recommended interval. Demonstrate that the BAS is being used to inform decisions regarding changes in building
operations and energy-saving investments.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Install and/or maintain a BAS to automatically control key building systems. Ensure that relevant staff are adequately
trained to use the system, analyze output, make necessary adjustments and identify investment opportunities to
improve energy performance.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

33
EA Credit 3.2: Performance Measurement—System-Level Metering
1–2 points

Intent
To provide accurate energy-use information to support energy management and identify opportunities for
additional energy-saving improvements.

Requirements
Develop a breakdown of energy use in the building, either through EA Credits 2.1 and 2.2 or by using energy bills, spot
metering or other metering to determine the energy consumption of major mechanical systems and other end-use
applications. This analysis of major energy-use categories must have been conducted within 2 years prior to the date
of application for LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance certification.
Based on the energy-use breakdown, employ system-level metering covering at least 40% or 80% of the total
expected annual energy consumption of the building. Permanent metering and recording are required. All types of
submetering are permitted.
Demonstrate that system-level metering is in place covering the percentage of total expected annual energy
consumption of the building as outlined in the table below.
Demonstrate that the number of the largest energy-use categories from the breakdown report outlined in the table
are covered by at least 80% (i.e., if energy use in the 2 or 3 largest categories is each 100 Btus/year, at least 80 Btu/year
in 1 or 2 of them must be metered).
System Level Metering Requirements
Percentage of Total Annual Energy Number of Largest Energy Use Categories
Points
Consumption to be Metered to be Covered by 80% or more
40% 1 of 2 1
80% 2 of 3 2

Metering must be continuous and data logged to allow for an analysis of time trends. The project team must
compile monthly and annual summaries of results for each system covered. Meters must be calibrated within the
manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter.
Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Identify, through an energy audit, building commissioning or some other means, how the building systems are
consuming energy. Based on the energy-use profile, develop a metering plan to capture the most significant building
loads. Use output from the meters to identify any changes in consumption and opportunities for energy-saving
improvements. Have a plan for periodically inspecting the data.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

34
EA Credit 4: On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy
1–6 points

Intent
To encourage and recognize increasing levels of on and off-site renewable energy to reduce environmental and
economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use.

Requirements
During the performance period, meet some or all of the building’s total energy use with on-site or off-site renewable
energy systems. Points are earned according to the following table, which shows the percentages of building energy
use met by renewable energy during the performance period.
Off-site renewable energy sources are defined by the Center for Resource Solutions Green-e Energy program’s
products certification requirements, or the equivalent. Green power may be procured from a Green-e Energy-
certified power marketer or a Green-e Energy-accredited utility program, or through Green-e Energy-certified
tradable renewable energy certificates (RECs) or the equivalent. For on-site renewable energy that is claimed for
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance credit, the associated environmental attributes must
be retained or retired and cannot be sold.
If the green power is not Green-e Energy certified, equivalence must exist for both major Green-e Energy program
criteria: 1) current green power performance standards, and 2) independent, third-party verification that those
standards are being met by the green power supplier over time.
Up to the 6-point limit, any combinations of individual actions are awarded the sum of the points allocated to
those individual actions. For example, 1 point would be awarded for implementing 3% of on-site renewable energy,
and 3 additional points would be awarded for meeting 50% of the building’s energy load with renewable power
or certificates during the performance period. Projects must submit proof of a contract to purchase RECs for a
minimum of 2 years and must also make a commitment to purchase RECs on an ongoing basis beyond that.
Off-site renewable
On-site renewable energy Points
energy certificates
3% or 25% 1
4.5% or 37.5% 2
6% or 50% 3
7.5% or 62.5% 4
9% or 75% 5
12% or 100% 6

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Design and specify the use of on-site nonpolluting renewable technologies to contribute to the total energy
requirements of the building. Consider and employ solar, geothermal, wind, biomass (other than unsustainably
harvested wood) and biogas technologies.
Purchase renewable energy or tradable renewable energy certificates to meet some or all of the building’s energy
requirements. Review the building’s electrical consumption trends. Research power providers in the area and select

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

35
a provider that guarantees that a portion of its delivered electric power is derived from net nonpolluting renewable
technologies. If the project is in an open-market state, investigate green power and power marketers licensed to
provide power in that state. Grid power that qualifies for this credit originates from solar, wind, geothermal, biomass
or low-impact hydro sources.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

36
EA Credit 5: Enhanced Refrigerant Management
1 point

Intent
To reduce ozone depletion and support early compliance with the Montreal Protocol while minimizing direct
contributions to global climate change.

Requirements
OPTION 1
Do not use refrigerants in base building heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R)
systems.

OR
OPTION 2
Select refrigerants and heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration HVAC&R equipment that
minimize or eliminate the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and climate change. The
base building HVAC&R equipment must comply with the following formula, which sets a maximum threshold for
the combined contributions to ozone depletion and global warming potential:

LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ≤ 100

Calculation definitions for LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ≤ 100


LCODP = [ODPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
LCGWP = [GWPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
LCODP: Lifecycle Ozone Depletion Potential (lbCFC11/Ton-Year)
LCGWP: Lifecycle Direct Global Warming Potential (lbCO2/Ton-Year)
GWPr: Global Warming Potential of Refrigerant (0 to 12,000 lbCO2/lbr)
ODPr: Ozone Depletion Potential of Refrigerant (0 to 0.2 lbCFC11/lbr)
Lr: Refrigerant Leakage Rate (0.5% to 2.0%; default of 2% unless otherwise demonstrated)
Mr: End-of-life Refrigerant Loss (2% to 10%; default of 10% unless otherwise demonstrated)
Rc: Refrigerant Charge (0.5 to 5.0 lbs of refrigerant per ton of gross ARI rated cooling capacity)
Life: Equipment Life (10 years; default based on equipment type, unless otherwise demonstrated)

For multiple types of equipment, a weighted average of all base building HVAC&R equipment must be calculated
using the following formula:

∑ ( LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ) x Qunit


——————————————————————————————
Qtotal ≤ 100

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

37
Calculation definitions for [ ∑ (LCGWP + LCODP x 105) x Qunit ] / Qtotal ≤ 100
Qunit = Gross ARI rated cooling capacity of an individual HVAC or refrigeration unit (tons)
Qtotal = Total gross ARI rated cooling capacity of all HVAC or refrigeration

Small HVAC units (defined as containing less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant), and other equipment such as
standard refrigerators, small water coolers and any other cooling equipment that contains less than 0.5 pounds
of refrigerant are not considered part of the base building system and are not subject to the requirements of this
credit.
Do not operate or install fire suppression systems that contain ozone-depleting substances — such as CFCs,
hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) or halons.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Operate the facility without mechanical cooling and refrigeration equipment. Where mechanical cooling is needed,
use for the refrigeration cycle base building HVAC &R systems that minimize direct impact on ozone depletion and
climate change. Select HVAC&R replacement equipment with reduced refrigerant charge and increased equipment
life. Maintain equipment to prevent leakage of refrigerant to the atmosphere. Use fire-suppression systems that do
not contain HCFCs or halons.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

38
EA Credit 6: Emissions Reduction Reporting
1 point

Intent
To document the emissions reduction benefits of building efficiency measures.

Requirements
Identify building performance parameters that reduce conventional energy use and emissions, quantify those
reductions and report them to a formal tracking program:
Track and record emissions reductions delivered by energy efficiency, renewable energy and other building
emissions reduction measures, including reductions from the purchase of renewable energy credits.
Report emissions reductions using a third-party voluntary reporting or certification program (e.g., U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Climate Leaders, ENERGY STAR or World Resources Institute / World
Business Council for Sustainable Development (WRI/WBCSD)) protocols).

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Address all of the significant types of pollutants reduced by energy efficiency. This is important because negative
health effects and other environmental impacts result from many pollutants, including carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur
dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), mercury (Hg), small particulate matter (PM2.5), large particulate matter
(PM10) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Energy efficiency, renewable energy and other building emissions
reduction measures make important contributions toward improving human and environmental health.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

39
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

40
MR Prerequisite 1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy
Required

Intent
To reduce the environmental impacts of materials acquired for use in the operations, maintenance and upgrades of
buildings.

Requirements
Have in place an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) policy that includes, at a minimum, product
purchasing policies for the building and site addressing the requirements of MR Credit 1: Sustainable Purchasing—
Ongoing Consumables. This policy must adhere to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
policy model (see Introduction). At a minimum, the policy must cover those product purchases that are within the
building and site management’s control.
Additionally, extend the EPP policy to include product purchasing policies for the building and site addressing
the requirements of at least 1 of the credits listed below. This extended policy must also adhere to the LEED 2009
for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model and specifically address the goal, scope and
performance metric for the respective credit:
n MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing—Durable Goods
n MR Credit 3: Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions
n MR Credit 4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps
This prerequisite requires only policies, not ongoing actual sustainable performance.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Evaluate the items that are purchased for the building, identify more environmentally friendly alternatives and
establish a policy to purchase these alternatives when economically feasible. Work with suppliers to identify
environmentally preferable products that meet the needs of the building.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

41
MR Prerequisite 2: Solid Waste Management Policy
Required

Intent
To facilitate the reduction of waste generated by building occupants that is hauled to and disposed of in landfills or
incineration facilities.

Requirements
Have in place a solid waste management policy for the building and site addressing the requirements of the waste
management credits listed below as well as recycling of all mercury-containing lamps. This policy must adhere to the
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model (see Introduction). At a minimum, the
policy must cover the waste streams that are within the building and site management’s control.
MR Credit 7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables
n

MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods


n

MR Credit 9: Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions


n

This prerequisite requires only policies, not ongoing actual sustainable performance.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Evaluate the building’s waste stream and establish policies to divert materials from disposal in landfills or
incineration facilities by encouraging the reuse and recycling of items, where possible.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

42
MR Credit 1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables
1 Point

Intent
To reduce the environmental and air quality impacts of the materials acquired for use in the operations and
maintenance of buildings.

Requirements
Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and
replaced through the course of business. These materials include at a minimum, paper (printing or copy paper,
notebooks, notepads, envelopes), toner cartridges, binders, batteries and desk accessories. Food and beverages
are excluded from this credit but are covered under MR Credit 5. Sustainable Purchasing - Food. . For materials
that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credit 2), the project team is free to
decide which category to put them in as long as consistency is maintained with MR Credit 2, with no contradictions,
exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 7.
A template calculator for MR Credit 1 is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations &
Maintenance, 2009 Edition. One point is awarded to projects that achieve sustainable purchases of at least 60%, of
total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases are those that meet one or more of
the following criteria:
n Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
n Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable materials.
n Purchases contain at least 50% materials harvested and processed or extracted and processed within 500 miles
of the project.
n Purchases consist of at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)–certified paper products.
n Batteries are rechargeable.
Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10%
postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the
calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).
Ongoing consumables must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


When purchasing materials, supplies or equipment, specify those that meet one or more of the criteria.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

43
MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing—Durable Goods
1–2 Points

Intent
To reduce the environmental and air quality impacts of the materials acquired for use in the operations and
maintenance of buildings.

Requirements
Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering items available at a higher cost per unit and durable goods that
are replaced infrequently and/or may require capital program outlays to purchase. Materials that may be considered
either ongoing consumables (see MR Credit 1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables) or durable goods,
can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 1, with no contradictions,
exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—
Durable Goods.

OPTION 1. Electric-Powered Equipment (1 point)


Achieve sustainable purchases of at least 40% of total purchases of electric-powered equipment1 (by cost) during
the performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 of the following criteria:
n The equipment is ENERGY STAR® qualified (for product categories with developed specifications).
n The equipment (either battery or corded) replaces conventional gas-powered equipment2 .

OR
OPTION 2. Furniture (1 point)
Achieve sustainable purchases of at least 40% of total purchases of furniture (by cost) during the performance
period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:
n Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
n Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
n Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and
equipment reuse program.
n Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable material.
n Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified wood.
n Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within 500 miles
of the project.

1 Electric-powered equipment include at a minimum, office equipment (computers, monitors, copiers, printers, scanners, fax machines),
appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers, water coolers), external power adapters, and televisions and other audiovisual equipment.
2 Gas-powered equipment include at a minimum, maintenance equipment and vehicles, landscaping equipment and cleaning equipment.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

44
Each furniture purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains
both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts
twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).
Durable goods must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

OR
OPTION 3. Combination (2 points)
Achieve the requirements of both Option 1 & Option 2.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


When purchasing materials, supplies or equipment, specify products that meet 1 or more of the criteria. This credit
is eligible for exemplary performance if the project team uses Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tools
(EPEAT)-rated desktop computers, monitors and notebooks.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

45
MR Credit 3: Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions
1 Point

Intent
To reduce the environmental and air quality impacts of the materials acquired for use in the upgrade of buildings.

Requirements
Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials for facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new
construction additions. This applies only to base building elements1 permanently or semipermanently attached to
the building itself. Materials considered furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building
elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items
such as elevators are also excluded from this credit.
A sample calculaton for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations
& Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Achieve sustainable purchases of 50% of total purchases (by cost) during the
performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:
n Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
n Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
n Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and
equipment reuse program.
n Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable material.
n Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.
n Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within 500 miles
of the project.
n Adhesives and sealants have a VOC content less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast
Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168, or sealants used as fillers meet or exceed the
requirements of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51.
n Paints and coating have VOC emissions not exceeding the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s
Standard GS-11 requirements.
n Noncarpet finished flooring is FloorScore-certified and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor
area.
n Carpet meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program.
n Carpet cushion meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Testing Program.
n Composite panels and agrifiber2 products contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.

1 Base building elements include ,at a minimum, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation, doors, windows), panels, attached
finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material, adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings.
2 Composite wood and agrifiber products are defined as particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board
(OSB), wheatboard, strawboard, panel substrates and door cores.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

46
Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10%
postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the
calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).
Materials for alterations or additions must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


When purchasing materials, supplies or equipment, specify products that meet one or more of the criteria.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

47
MR Credit 4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps
1 Point

Intent
To establish and maintain a toxic material source reduction program to reduce the amount of mercury brought onto
the building site through purchases of lamps.

Requirements
Develop a lighting purchasing plan that specifies maximum levels of mercury permitted in mercury-containing lamps
purchased for the building and associated grounds, including lamps for both indoor and outdoor fixtures, as well as
both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The purchasing plan must specify a target for the overall average of mercury
content in lamps of 90 picograms per lumen-hour or less. The plan must include lamps for both indoor and outdoor
fixtures, as well as both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The plan must require that at least 90% of purchased lamps
comply with the target (as measured by the number of lamps). Lamps containing no mercury may be counted toward
plan compliance only if they have energy efficiency at least as good as their mercury-containing counterparts.
Implement the lighting purchasing plan during the performance period such that all purchased mercury-containing
lamps comply with the plan. One point is awarded to projects for which at least 90% of all mercury-containing lamps
purchased during the performance period (as measured by the number of lamps) comply with the purchasing plan
and meet the following overall target for mercury content of 90 picograms per lumen-hour.
A template calculator to aid in documenting performance for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for
Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.
Exception: Screw-based, integral compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) may be excluded from both the plan and the
performance calculation if they comply with the voluntary industry guidelines for maximum mercury content
published by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), as described in the LEED Reference Guide
for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Screw-based, integral CFLs that do not comply with
the NEMA guidelines must be included in the purchasing plan and the performance calculation.
Performance metrics for lamps — including mercury content (mg/lamp), mean light output (lumens) and rated life
(hours) — must be derived according to industry standards, as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green
Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Mercury values generated by toxicity characteristic leaching
procedure (TCLP) tests do not provide the required mercury information for LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings:
Operations & Maintenance and cannot be used in the calculation.
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance addresses only the lamps purchased during the
performance period, not the lamps installed in the building. Similarly, LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations
& Maintenance does not require that each purchased lamp comply with the specified mercury limit; only the overall
average of purchased lamps must comply.
Mercury-containing lamps (or their high-efficiency counterparts) must be purchased during the performance period
to earn points in this credit.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Establish and follow a lamp-purchasing program that sets a minimum level of mercury content and life for all
mercury-containing lamp types. Work with suppliers to specify these requirements for all future purchases.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

48
MR Credit 5: Sustainable Purchasing—Food
1 Point

Intent
To reduce the environmental and transportation impacts associated with food production and distribution.

Requirements
Achieve sustainable purchases of at least 25% of total combined food and beverage purchases (by cost) during the
performance period. Sustainable purchases are those that meet 1 or both of the following criteria:
n Purchases are labeled USDA Organic, Food Alliance Certified, Rainforest Alliance Certified, Protected Harvest
Certified, Fair Trade or Marine Stewardship Council’s Blue Eco-Label.
n Purchases are produced within a 100-mile radius of the site.
Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that is both USDA Organic
and is produced on a farm within 100 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of
sustainable purchasing).
Food or beverages must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


When purchasing food and beverages, specify that the items meet 1 or both criteria in this credit. Consider using
catering companies that purchase locally grown and/or organic foods.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

49
MR Credit 6: Solid Waste Management—Waste Stream Audit
1 Point

Intent
To facilitate the reduction of ongoing waste and toxins generated by building occupants and building operations that
are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

Requirements
Conduct a waste stream audit of the building’s entire ongoing consumables waste stream (not durable goods
or construction waste for facility alterations and additions). Use the audit’s results to establish a baseline that
identifies the types of waste making up the waste stream and the amounts of each type by weight or volume. Identify
opportunities for increased recycling and waste diversion. The audit must be conducted during the performance
period.

Potential Technologies and Strategies


Understanding waste production patterns in a building is an important first step to waste reduction. Work with your
waste hauler or service provider to collect and analyze information on the amounts and types of waste generated by
the facility.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

50
MR Credit 7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables
1 Point

Intent
To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of ongoing consumable products by building
occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

Requirements
Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that addresses materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly
used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include at a minimum, paper, toner cartridges,
glass, plastics, cardboard and old corrugated cardboard, food waste, and metals. Materials that may be considered
either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods) can
be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 8, with no contradictions,
exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credits 1: Sustainable Purchasing—
Ongoing Consumables and 5: Sustainable Purchasing—Food.
Reuse, recycle or compost 50% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).
Have a battery recycling program in place that implements the battery recycling policy adopted in MR Prerequisite 2:
Solid Waste Management Policy. The program must have a target of diverting at least 80% of discarded batteries from
the trash, and actual diversion performance must be verified at least annually. The program must cover all portable
dry-cell types of batteries, including single-use and/or rechargeables used in radios, phones, cameras, computers and
other devices or equipment.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that addresses materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly
used and replaced through the course of business. Encourage a high level of recycling by building occupants.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

51
MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods
1 Point

Intent
To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of durable goods by building occupants and
building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

Requirements
Maintain a waste reduction, reuse and recycling program that addresses durable goods (those that are replaced
infrequently and/or may require capital program outlays to purchase). Durable goods include at a minimum, office
equipment (computers, monitors, copiers, printers, scanners, fax machines), appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers,
water coolers), external power adapters, televisions and other audiovisual equipment. Materials that may be
considered either ongoing consumables (see MR Credit 7. Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables) or
durable goods can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 7, with no
contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 2: Sustainable
Purchasing.
Reuse or recycle 75% of the durable goods waste stream1 (by weight, volume or replacement value) during the
performance period.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Maintain a waste reduction, reuse and recycling program that addresses durable items that are replaced infrequently
and/or may require capital program outlays to replace. Consider taking part in a leasing or donation program to help
maintain waste reduction. In addition to any statewide electronic recycling efforts, consider using StEP (http://www.
step-initiative.org/) for guidance in disposing of electronic waste or for manufacturer and provider takeback options.

1 Durable goods waste stream is defined as durable goods leaving the project building, site and organization that have fully depreciated and
reached the end of their useful lives for normal business operations. Durable goods that remain useful and functional and are moved to another
floor or building, etc. do not qualify. Leased durable goods returned to their owner at the end of their useful lives for normal business operations
do qualify.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

52
MR Credit 9: Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions
1 Point

Intent
To divert construction and demolition debris from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. Redirect recyclable
recovered resources back to the manufacturing process and reusable materials to appropriate sites.

Requirements
Divert at least 70% of waste (by volume) generated by facility alterations and additions from disposal to landfills
and incineration facilities. This applies only to base building elements permanently or semipermanently attached to
the building itself that enter the waste stream during facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction
additions. Base building elements include at a minimum, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation,
doors, windows), panels, attached finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material,
adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings. Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building
elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items
such as elevators are also excluded.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Maintain waste management policies applicable to any facility alterations and additions occurring on the site.
Identify licensed haulers and processors of recyclable materials. Identify markets for salvaged materials. Employ
deconstruction, salvage and recycling strategies and processes. Document the cost for recycling, salvaging and
reusing materials. Make source reduction on the job site an integral part of the plan to reduce solid waste. Investigate
salvaging or recycling lighting fixture pans when retrofitting.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

53
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

54
IEQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance
Required

Intent
To establish minimum indoor air quality (IAQ) performance to enhance indoor air quality in buildings, thus
contributing to the health and well-being of the occupants.

Requirements
CASE 1. Projects Able to Meet ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2007
Modify or maintain each outside air intake, supply air fan and/or ventilation distribution system to supply at least
the outdoor air ventilation rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2007 Ventilation Rate Procedure (with errata
but without addenda1) under all normal operating conditions.

CASE 2. Projects Unable to Meet ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2007


If meeting ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2007 ventilation rates (with errata but without addenda1) is infeasible because
of the physical constraints of the existing ventilation system, modify or maintain the system to supply at least
10 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outdoor air per person under all normal operating conditions. Demonstrate
through design documentation, measurements or other evidence that the current system cannot provide the flow
rates required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 under any operating condition even when functioning properly.
Each air-handling unit in the building must comply with either Case 1 or Case 2. If some air-handling units can
provide the outside air flow required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda1) and
others cannot, those that can must do so. Buildings must provide at least 10 cfm per person of outside air at each
air-handling unit under all normal operating conditions to earn this prerequisite.

AND
n Show compliance with the applicable requirement above (Case 1 or Case 2) through measurements taken at

the system level (i.e., the air-handling unit). For variable air volume systems, the dampers, fan speeds, etc.
must be set during the test to the worst-case system conditions (minimum outside air flow) expected during
normal ventilation operations. Each air-handler must be measured; sampling or grouping of air-handlers is
prohibited.
n Implement and maintain an HVAC system maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and
maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to outdoor air introduction and exhaust.
n Test and maintain the operation of all building exhaust systems, including bathroom, shower, kitchen and
parking exhaust systems.
Naturally ventilated buildings must comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, paragraph 5.1(with errata but without
addenda1).

1 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be
applied consistently across all LEED credits.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

55
Potential Technologies & Strategies
Conduct a visual inspection of outside air vents and dampers and remove any outside air vent or louver obstructions
that restrict full outside air capacity from entering the distribution system. Conduct airflow monitoring to document
outside air cubic feet per minute (cfm). Compare measured flow with designed flow for each unit. Test the operation
of each exhaust fan and verify that exhaust airflow meets design requirements or intentions. EPA’s “Guidelines for
HVAC System Maintenance” provides guidance on developing, implementing and maintaining an HVAC system
maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to IAQ.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

56
IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control
Required

Intent
To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and systems to environmental tobacco
smoke (ETS).

Requirements
CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects
OPTION 1
n Prohibit smoking in the building.

Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.
n

OR
OPTION 2
n Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking rooms and establish negative pressure in the

rooms with smoking.


Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of building entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.
n

Locate designated smoking room(s) to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS from the building.
n

At a minimum, the smoking room must be directly exhausted to the outdoors, away from air intakes
and building entry paths, away from air intakes and building entry paths, with no recirculation of ETS-
containing air to the nonsmoking area of the building; enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck partitions.
Operate exhaust sufficient to create a negative pressure differential with the surrounding spaces of at least
an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches water gauge) and a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches water gauge)
when the doo(s to the rooms are closed.
Verify performance of the smoking room differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of
n

measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the
smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to
the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions for
transport of air from the smoking room (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces.

CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects


n Reduce air leakage between smoking and nonsmoking areas.

n Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.


n Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of building entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows
opening to common areas.
n Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual residential units by sealing penetrations
in walls, ceilings and floors in the residential units and by sealing adjacent vertical chases adjacent to the units.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

57
Weather-strip all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways to minimize leakage from
n

outdoors.
Demonstrate acceptable sealing of residential units by a blower door test conducted in accordance with ASTM-
779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization, AND use the progressive
sampling methodology defined in Chapter 7 (Home Energy Rating Systems, HERS Required Verification and
Diagnostic Testing) of the California Residential Alternative Calculation Method Approval Manual. Residential units
must demonstrate less than 1.25 square inches of leakage area per 100 square feet of enclosure area (i.e., the sum of all
wall, ceiling and floor areas).

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Prohibit smoking in the building or provide negative-pressure smoking rooms. For residential buildings, a third
option is to provide very tight construction to minimize the transfer of ETS among dwelling units.

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IEQ Prerequisite 3: Green Cleaning Policy
Required

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment.

Requirements
Have in place a green cleaning policy for the building and site addressing the following green cleaning credits and
other requirements:
n Purchase sustainable cleaning and hard floor and carpet care products meeting the sustainability criteria
outlined in IEQ Credit 3.3: Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials.
n Purchase cleaning equipment meeting the sustainability criteria outlined in IEQ Credit 3.4: Green Cleaning—
Sustainable Cleaning Equipment.
n Establish standard operating procedures addressing how an effective cleaning and hard floor and carpet
maintenance system will be consistently utilized, managed and audited. Specifically address cleaning to
protect vulnerable building occupants.
n Develop strategies for promoting and improving hand hygiene, including both hand washing and the use of
alcohol-based waterless hand sanitizers.
n Develop guidelines addressing the safe handling and storage of cleaning chemicals used in the building,
including a plan for managing hazardous spills or mishandling incidents.
n Develop requirements for staffing and training of maintenance personnel appropriate to the needs of the
building. Specifically address the training of maintenance personnel in the hazards of use, disposal and
recycling of cleaning chemicals, dispensing equipment and packaging.
n Provide for collecting occupant feedback and continuous improvement to evaluate new technologies,
procedures and processes.
This policy must adhere to theLEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model (see
Introduction). At a minimum, the policy must cover the green cleaning procedures and materials that are within the
building and site management’s control.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


During the performance period, establish a written green cleaning policy addressing SOPs, sustainable products and
equipment, chemical handling and storage, and staff training.

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IEQ Credit 1.1: Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality
Management Program
1 point

Intent
To enhance indoor air quality (IAQ) by optimizing practices to prevent the development of indoor air quality
problems in buildings, correcting indoor air quality problems when they occur and maintaining the well-being of the
occupants.

Requirements
Develop and implement on an ongoing basis an IAQ management program based on the EPA Indoor Air Quality
Building Education and Assessment Model (I-BEAM), EPA Reference Number 402-C-01-001, December 2002,
available at http://www.epa.gov/iaq/largebldgs/i-beam/index.html.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Operate a program to enhance IAQ by optimizing practices to prevent the development of IAQ in buildings and
maintain the well-being of the occupants. Survey and evaluate building systems to identify potential IAQ problems
and implement an ongoing program to prevent these problems from occurring and to maintain a high level of
IAQ. Include in the program a plan for preventing moisture accumulation and mold in the building. For additional
information, see the EPA Web site on IAQ, www.epa.gov/iaq/largebldgs/baqtoc.html.

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IEQ Credit 1.2: Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Outdoor Air
Delivery Monitoring
1 point

Intent
To provide capacity for ventilation system monitoring to help sustain occupant comfort and well-being.

Requirements
Install permanent, continuous monitoring systems that provide feedback on ventilation system performance to
ensure that ventilation systems maintain minimum outdoor airflow rates under all operating conditions

AND
CASE 1. Mechanical Ventilation Systems
Provide an outdoor airflow measurement device capable of measuring (and, if necessary, controlling) the
minimum outdoor airflow rate at all expected system operating conditions within 15% of the design minimum
outdoor air rate. Monitoring must be performed for at least 80% of the building’s total outdoor air intake flow
serving occupied spaces.
The outdoor airflow measurement device(s) must take measurements at the system level (i.e., the air-handling
unit). The device must be monitored by a control system that is configured to trend outdoor airflow in intervals
no longer than 15 minutes for a period of no less than 6 months. The control system must be configured to
generate an alarm visible to the system operator if the minimum outdoor air rate falls more than 15% below the
design minimum rate.
All measurement devices must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval.

CASE 2. Mechanical Ventilation Systems that Predominantly Serve Densely Occupied Spaces1
Have a CO2 sensor or sampling location for each densely occupied space and compare it with outdoor ambient
CO2 concentrations. Each sampling location must be between 3 and 6 feet above the floor.
Test and calibrate CO2 sensors to have an accuracy of no less than 75 parts per million (ppm) or 5% of the reading,
whichever is greater. Sensors must be tested and calibrated at least once every 5 years or per the manufacturer’s
recommendation, whichever is shorter.
Monitor CO2 sensors with a system configured to trend CO2 concentrations in intervals no longer than 30
minutes. The system must generate an alarm visible to the system operator and, if desired, to building occupants
if the CO2 concentration in any zone rises more than 15% above that corresponding to the minimum outdoor air
rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda2) (see IEQ Prerequisite 1: Energy
Efficiency Best Management Practices).

1 Densely occupied space is defined as an area with a design occupant density of 25 people or more per 1,000 square feet (40 square feet or
less per person). If the total square footage of all dense space is less than 5% of total occupied square footage, the project is exempt from the
requirements of this section. Rooms smaller than 150 square feet are also exempt.
2 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be
applied consistently across all LEED credits.

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CO2 sensors may be used for demand-controlled ventilation provided the control strategy complies with
ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 (see IEQ Prerequisite 1: Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices, including
maintaining the area-based component of the design ventilation rate.

CASE 3. Natural Ventilation Systems


Locate CO2 sensors in the breathing zone of every densely populated room and every natural ventilation zone.
CO2 sensors must provide an audible or visual alarm to the occupants in the space and to the system operator if
CO2 conditions are greater than 530 ppm above outdoor CO2 levels or 1,000 ppm absolute. The alarm signal must
indicate that ventilation adjustments (e.g. opening windows) are required in the affected space.
All monitoring devices must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval.
Permanently open areas must meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2007, Section 5.1 (with errata but without
addenda2).
Exemptions: If the total square footage of all space served by natural ventilation systems is less than 5% of total
occupied square footage, the project is exempt from the requirements of this section. Rooms smaller than 150
square feet are also exempt.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Install and maintain permanent ventilation monitoring systems that provide feedback on system performance to
ensure minimum ventilation rates.

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IEQ Credit 1.3: Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Increased
Ventilation
1 point

Intent
To provide additional outdoor air ventilation to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) for improved occupant comfort,
well-being and productivity.

Requirements
CASE 1. Mechanically Ventilated Spaces
Increase outdoor air ventilation rates for all air-handling units serving occupied spaces by at least 30% above the
minimum required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda1).

CASE 2. Naturally Ventilated Spaces


Design natural ventilation systems for occupied spaces to meet the recommendations set forth in the Carbon
Trust “Good Practice Guide 237” (1998). Determine whether natural ventilation is an effective strategy for the
project by following the flow diagram process in Figure 2.8 of the Chartered Institution of Building Services
Engineers (CIBSE) Applications Manual 10: 2005, Natural Ventilation in Non-domestic Buildings

AND
OPTION 1
Use diagrams and calculations to show that the design of the natural ventilation systems meets the
recommendations set forth in CIBSE Applications Manual 10: 2005, Natural Ventilation in Non-domestic
Buildings

OR
OPTION 2
Use a macroscopic, multizone, analytic model to predict that room-by-room airflows will effectively naturally
ventilate, defined as providing the minimum ventilation rates required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007
Chapter 6 (with errata but without addenda), at least 90% of occupied spaces.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


For mechanically ventilated spaces, design ventilation systems to provide ventilation rates at least 30% above the
minimum rates prescribed by the referenced standard. Ensure that the additional ventilation rate does not adversely
affect building humidity control during all expected operating conditions.

1 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be
applied consistently across all LEED credits.

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For naturally ventilated spaces, follow the 8 design steps described in the CIBSE Good Practice Guide 237:
Develop design requirements.
n

Plan airflow paths.


n

Identify building uses and features that might require special attention.
n

Determine ventilation requirements.


n

Estimate external driving pressures.


n

Select types of ventilation devices.


n

Size ventilation devices.


n

Analyze the design.


n

Use public domain software, such as NIST’s CONTAM, Multizone Modeling Software, along with LoopDA, Natural
Ventilation Sizing Tool, to analytically predict room-by-room airflows.

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IEQ Credit 1.4: Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Reduce
Particulates in Air Distribution
1 point

Intent
To reduce exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous particulate
contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building systems and the environment.

Requirements
Have in place filtration media with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 13 or greater for all outside air
intakes and inside air recirculation returns during the performance period. Establish and follow a regular schedule
for maintenance and replacement of these filtration media according to the manufacturer’s recommended interval.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Install and maintain filtration media with a particle removal effectiveness of MERV 13 or greater for all outside air
intakes and returns for the recirculation of inside air. Establish and follow a regular schedule for maintenance and
replacement of these filters.

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IEQ Credit 1.5: Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices—Indoor Air Quality
Management for Facility Alterations and Additions
1 point

Intent
To prevent indoor air quality (IAQ) problems resulting from any construction or renovation projects to help sustain
the comfort and well-being of construction workers and building occupants.

Requirements
Develop and implement an IAQ management plan for the construction and occupancy phases:
n During construction, meet or exceed the recommended control measures of the Sheet Metal and Air
Conditioning National Contractors Association (SMACNA) IAQ Guidelines for Occupied Buildings Under
Construction, 2nd Edition 2007, ANSI/SMACNA 008-2008 (Chapter 3).
n If the building undergoes a tenant improvement, develop and implement an IAQ management plan for the
preoccupancy phases. Perform a flush-out procedure as follows: After construction ends and all interior
finishes have been installed, install new filtration media and flush out the affected space. The flush out
must be done by supplying a total outdoor air volume of 14,000 cubic feet per square foot of floor area while
maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60° F and maintaining a relative humidity no higher than 60%
where cooling mechanisms are operated. The affected space may be occupied only after the delivery of at least
3,500 cubic feet of outdoor air per square foot of floor area and the space has been ventilated at a minimum rate
of 0.30 cfm per square foot of outdoor air or the design minimum outside air rate (whichever is greater) for
at least 3 hours prior to occupancy until the total of 14,000 cubic feet per square foot of outdoor air has been
delivered to the space. The flush-out may continue during occupancy.
n Protect stored on-site or installed absorptive materials from moisture damage.
n If permanently installed air-handlers must be used during construction, filtration media with a minimum
efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 8 must be used at each return air grille, as determined by ASHRAE
Standard 52.2-1999 (with errata but without addenda1). Replace all filtration media immediately prior to
occupancy.
n Upon the completion of construction, HVAC and lighting systems must be returned to the designed or
modified sequence of operations.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Specify containment control strategies that include protecting the HVAC system, controlling pollutant sources,
interrupting pathways for contamination, enforcing proper housekeeping and coordinating schedules to minimize
disruption.
Specify the construction sequencing to install absorptive materials after the prescribed dry or cure time of wet
finishes to minimize adverse impacts on IAQ materials that are susceptible to microbial contamination and are

1 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be
applied consistently across all LEED credits.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

66
directly exposed to moisture through precipitation, plumbing leaks or condensation from the HVAC system.
Sequence the application of building materials such that any significant sources of contaminants (e.g., composite
wood products, adhesives, paints and coatings, glazing) dissipate most emissions prior to the introduction of
products that would absorb or trap contaminants (e.g., carpet and padding, fabric wall covering, acoustic tiles,
upholstered furniture). Where protection cannot be provided by sequence of installation, protect absorbing surfaces
with vapor barriers and provide air exchange through temporary or permanent ventilation systems.
Appoint an IAQ manager with owner’s authority to inspect potential problems and require mitigation, as necessary.

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IEQ Credit 2.1: Occupant Comfort—Occupant Survey
1 point

Intent
To provide for the assessment of building occupants’ comfort as it relates to thermal comfort, acoustics, indoor air
quality (IAQ), lighting levels, building cleanliness and any other comfort issues.

Requirements
Implement an occupant comfort survey and complaint response system to collect anonymous responses
n

about thermal comfort, acoustics, IAQ, lighting levels, building cleanliness and other occupant comfort issues.
The survey must be collected from a representative sample of building occupants making up at least 30% of
the total occupants, and it must include an assessment of overall satisfaction with building performance and
identification of any comfort-related problems.
Document survey results and corrective actions to address comfort issues identified through the surveys.
n

Conduct at least 1 occupant survey during the performance period.


n

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Conducting an occupant survey is a valuable tool for identifying and addressing occupants’ comfort and building
performance issues. Develop a plan for corrective action to address any identified problems or concerns. Alternative
survey ideas are available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

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IEQ Credit 2.2: Controllability of Systems—Lighting
1 point

Intent
To provide a high level of lighting system control by individual occupants or groups in multi-occupant spaces (e.g.,
classrooms or conference areas) to promote the productivity, comfort and well-being of building occupants.

Requirements
For at least 50% of building occupants, use lighting controls that enable adjustments to suit the task needs and
preferences of individuals for at least 50% of individual workstations, and for groups sharing a multioccupant space
or working area for at least 50% of multi-occupant space in the building.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Implement system and occupant control of ambient and task lighting to suit individual preferences and the needs of
specific tasks.

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IEQ Credit 2.3: Occupant Comfort—Thermal Comfort Monitoring
1 point

Intent
To support the appropriate operations and maintenance of buildings and building systems so that they continue to
meet target building performance goals over the long term and provide a comfortable thermal environment that
supports the productivity and well-being of building occupants.

Requirements
Have in place a system for continuous tracking and optimization of systems that regulate indoor comfort and
conditions (air temperature, humidity, air speed and radiant temperature) in occupied spaces. Have a permanent
monitoring system to ensure ongoing building performance to the desired comfort criteria as determined ASHRAE
Standard 55-2004, Thermal Comfort Conditions for Human Occupancy (with errata but without addenda1).
The building must establish the following:
n Continuous monitoring of, at a minimum, air temperature and humidity in occupied spaces. The sampling
interval cannot exceed 15 minutes.
n Periodic testing of air speed and radiant temperature in occupied spaces. Using handheld meters is permitted.
n Alarms for conditions that require system adjustment or repair. Submit a list of the sensors, zone set-points
and limit values that would trigger an alarm.
n Procedures that deliver prompt adjustments or repairs in response to problems identified.
All monitoring devices must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Implement systematic monitoring of the actual performance of the building to the comfort criteria defined by
ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 (with errata but without addenda1).
As appropriate, monitoring may include measurement and trending of temperatures, relative humidity, air speed and
radiant temperatures at locations selected according to their variability and effect on occupants’ comfort.

1 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be
applied consistently across all LEED credits.

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IEQ Credit 2.4: Daylight and Views
1 point

Intent
To provide building occupants with a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors through the introduction
of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

Requirements
Project teams must achieve the performance thresholds in either the daylight or views requirements below :

OPTION 1. Daylight
PATH 1. Simulation
Demonstrate through computer simulations that 50% or more of all regularly occupied spaces areas achieve
daylight illuminance levels of a minimum of 25 footcandles (fc) and a maximum of 500 fc in a clear sky
condition on September 21 at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.; areas with illuminance levels below or above the range do
not comply. However, designs that incorporate view-preserving automated shades for glare control may
demonstrate compliance for only the minimum 25 fc illuminance level.

OR
PATH 2. Prescriptive
Use a combination of side-lighting and/or top-lighting to achieve a total daylighting zone (the floor area
meeting the following requirements) that is at least 50% of all the regularly occupied spaces.
For the Sidelighting Daylight Zone (see diagram below):
n Achieve a value, calculated as the product of the visible light transmittance (VLT) and window–to-
floor area ratio (WFR) of daylight zone, of between 0.150 and 0.180. The window area included in the
calculation must be at least 30 inches above the floor.

0.150 < VLT x WFR < 0.180

n The ceiling must not obstruct a line in section that:


• Joins the window-head to a line on the floor that is parallel to the plane of the window ;
• Is twice the height of the window-head above the floor in distance from the plane of the glass as
measured perpendicular to the plane of the glass
n Provide sunlight redirection and/or glare control devices to ensure daylight effectiveness.

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71
H
ine
hisL
eT
bov
lingA
Cei

2H

For Toplighting Daylight Zone (see diagram below):


n The daylight zone under a skylight is the outline of the opening beneath the skylight, plus in each direction
the lesser of:
• 70% of the ceiling height

OR
• 1/2 the distance to the edge of the nearest skylight, or the distance to any permanent opaque
partition (if transparent show VLT) farther away than 70% of the distance between the top of the
partition and the ceiling.
n Achieve skylight roof coverage between 3% and 6% of the roof area with a minimum 0.5 VLT for the
skylights.
n The distance between the skylights must not be more than 1.4 times the ceiling height
n A skylight diffuser, if used, must have a measured haze value of greater than 90% when tested according to
ASTM D1003. Avoid direct line of sight to the skylight diffuser.
Exceptions for areas where tasks would be hindered by the use of daylight will be considered on their merits.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

72
35° 35°

Permanent
Partition

Hx0.7

Daylit Area

OR
PATH 3. Measurement
Demonstrate through records of indoor light measurements that a minimum daylight illumination level of 25
fc has been achieved in at least 50% of all regularly occupied areas. Measurements must be taken on a 10-foot
grid for all occupied spaces and must be recorded on building floor plans.
Only the square footage associated with the portions of rooms or spaces meeting the minimum illumination
requirements can be counted in the calculations.
For all projects pursuing this path, provide daylight redirection and/or glare control devices to avoid high-
contrast situations that could impede visual tasks. Exceptions for areas where tasks would be hindered by
daylight will be considered on their merits.

OR
PATH 4. Combination
Any of the above calculation methods may be combined to document the minimum daylight illumination in at
least 50% of all regularly occupied spaces. The different methods used in each space must be clearly recorded
on all building plans.
In all cases, only the square footage associated with the portions of rooms or spaces meeting the requirements
may be applied toward the 50% of total area calculation required to qualify for this credit.
In all cases, provide glare control devices to avoid high-contrast situations that could impede visual tasks.
Exceptions for areas where tasks would be hindered by the use of daylight will be considered on their merits.

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OPTION 2. For Views
Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches
above the finished floor for building occupants in 45% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with
direct line of sight by totaling the regularly occupied square footage that meets the following criteria:
n In plan view, the area is within sight lines drawn from perimeter vision glazing.
n In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn from the area to perimeter vision glazing.
The line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entire square footage of the office
can be counted if 75% or more of the area has a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. For multioccupant
spaces, the actual square footage with a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing is counted.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Achieve a minimum daylight factor of 2% (excluding all direct sunlight penetration) in space occupied for visual
tasks.
Design alterations or additions to maximize interior daylighting. Strategies to consider include building orientation,
shallow floor plates, increased building perimeter, exterior and interior permanent shading devices, high-
performance glazing, and high ceiling reflectance values; additionally, automatic photocell-based controls can help
reduce energy use. Predict daylight factors via manual calculations or model daylighting strategies with a physical or
computer model to assess footcandle levels and daylight factors achieved.
Design alterations or additions to maximize daylighting and outdoor view opportunities. Strategies to consider
include lower partition heights, interior shading devices, interior glazing and automatic photocell-based controls.

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IEQ Credit 3.1: Green Cleaning—High-Performance Cleaning Program
1 point

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment.

Requirements
Have in place during the performance period a high-performance cleaning program, supported by a green cleaning
policy (IEQ Prerequisite 3: Green Cleaning Policy), that addresses the following:
n Provide an appropriate staffing plan.
n Implement a training of maintenance personnel in the hazards, use, maintenance, disposal and recycling of
cleaning chemicals, dispensing equipment and packaging.
n Use chemical concentrates with appropriate dilution systems to minimize chemical use wherever possible.
n Use sustainable cleaning materials, products, equipment, janitorial paper products and trash bags (including
microfiber tools and wipes).
n Use sustainable cleaning and hard floor and carpet care products meeting the sustainability criteria outlined in
IEQ Credits 3.3: Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials.
n Use cleaning equipment meeting the sustainability criteria outlined in IEQ Credit 3.4: Green Cleaning—
Sustainable Cleaning Equipment.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Have in place during the performance period a high-performance cleaning program, supported by policy, staffing
plans, standard operating procedures and storage procedures that address sustainable and effective cleaning and
hard floor maintenance.

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IEQ Credit 3.2: Green Cleaning—Custodial Effectiveness Assessment
1 point

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment, by implementing, managing and auditing cleaning procedures and processes.

Requirements
Conduct an audit in accordance with APPA Leadership in Educational Facilities’ (APPA) “Custodial Staffing
Guidelines” to determine the appearance level of the facility.
The facility must score 3 or less.
n

More information about the audit procedures is provided in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building
Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Designate an individual or team to conduct a walk-through inspection of a sample of rooms in the building to
evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning program. Identify areas that fall below the owner’s expected standard and
make improvements to the cleaning program accordingly.

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IEQ Credit 3.3: Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and
Materials
1 point

Intent
To reduce the environmental impacts of cleaning products, disposable janitorial paper products and trash bags.

Requirements
Implement sustainable purchasing for cleaning materials and products, disposable janitorial paper products and
trash bags. Cleaning product and material purchases include items used by in-house staff or outsourced service
providers. One point is awarded if 30% of the total annual purchases of these products (by cost) meet at least 1 of the
following sustainability criteria:
n The cleaning products meet 1 or more of the following standards for the appropriate category:
• Green Seal GS-37, for general-purpose, bathroom, glass and carpet cleaners used for industrial and
institutional purposes.
• Environmental Choice CCD-110, for cleaning and degreasing compounds.
• Environmental Choice CCD-146, for hard surface cleaners.
• Environmental Choice CCD-148, for carpet and upholstery care.
n Disinfectants, metal polish, floor finishes, strippers or other products not addressed by the above standards meet 1
or more of the following standards for the appropriate category:
• Green Seal GS-40, for industrial and institutional floor care products.
• Environmental Choice CCD-112, for digestion additives for cleaning and odor control.
• Environmental Choice CCD-113, for drain or grease traps additives.
• Environmental Choice CCD-115, for odor control additives.
• Environmental Choice CCD-147, for hard floor care.
• California Code of Regulations maximum allowable VOC levels for the specific product category.
n Disposable janitorial paper products and trash bags meet the minimum requirements of 1 or more of the following
programs for the applicable product category:
• Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines for Janitorial Paper and
Plastic Trash Can Liners.
• Green Seal GS-09, for paper towels and napkins.
• Green Seal GS-01, for tissue paper.
• Environmental Choice CCD-082, for toilet tissue.
• Environmental Choice CCD-086, for hand towels.

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77
• Janitorial paper products derived from rapidly renewable resources or made from tree-free fibers.
n Hand soaps meet 1 or more of the following standards:
• No antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other
regulations (e.g., food service and health care requirements).
• Green Seal GS-41, for industrial and institutional hand cleaners.
• Environmental Choice CCD-104, for hand cleaners and hand soaps.
The materials and products described above must be purchased during the performance period to count toward the
credit.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


When purchasing materials or supplies, specify that they meet 1 or more of the sustainability criteria.

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IEQ Credit 3.4: Green Cleaning—Sustainable Cleaning Equipment
1 point

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants that adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment, from powered cleaning equipment.

Requirement
Implement a program for the use of janitorial equipment that reduces building contaminants and minimizes
environmental impact. The cleaning equipment program must require the following:
n Vacuum cleaners are certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute “Green Label” Testing Program for vacuum
cleaners and operate with a sound level of less than 70dBA.
n Carpet extraction equipment used for restorative deep cleaning is certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute’s
“Seal of Approval” Testing Program for deep-cleaning extractors.
n Powered floor maintenance equipment, including electric and battery-powered floor buffers and burnishers, is
equipped with vacuums, guards and/or other devices for capturing fine particulates and operates with a sound
level of less than 70dBA.
n Propane-powered floor equipment has high-efficiency, low-emissions engines with catalytic converters and
mufflers that meet the California Air Resources Board (CARB) or Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
standards for the specific engine size and operate with a sound level of less than 90dBA.
n Automated scrubbing machines are equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and on-board chemical
metering to optimize the use of cleaning fluids. Alternatively, the scrubbing machines use only tap water with
no added cleaning products.
n Battery-powered equipment is equipped with environmentally preferable gel batteries.
n Powered equipment is ergonomically designed to minimize vibration, noise and user fatigue.
n Equipment is designed with safeguards, such as rollers or rubber bumpers, to reduce potential damage to
building surfaces.
Keep a log for all powered cleaning equipment to document the date of equipment purchase and all repair and
maintenance activities and include vendor specification sheets for each type of equipment in use.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Develop, implement and maintain a policy for the use of low-impact powered cleaning equipment. Evaluate the
powered cleaning equipment currently being used and make a plan for upgrading to powered cleaning equipment
that reduces building contaminants and minimizes environmental impact.

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IEQ Credit 3.5: Green Cleaning—Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control
1 point

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants, that adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment.

Requirements
Employ permanent entryway systems (grilles, grates, mats) at least 10 feet long in the primary direction of travel
to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at all public entry points, and develop the associated cleaning
strategies to maintain those entryway systems as well as exterior walkways. Public entryways that are not in use or
serve only as emergency exits are excluded from the requirements, as are private offices.
Provide containment drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of hazardous liquid wastes in places where water and
chemical concentrate mixing occurs for laboratory purposes.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Use grills, grates or mats to catch and hold dirt particles and prevent contamination of the building interior. Design
exterior stone, brick or concrete surfaces to drain away from regularly used building entrances.
At public building entrances, install low-maintenance vegetation within the landscape design and avoid plants,
including trees and shrubs that produce fruit, flowers or leaves that are likely to be tracked into the building. Select
plants based on an integrated pest management (IPM) approach to eliminate pesticide applications that could be
tracked into the building.
Provide a water spigot and electrical outlet at each public building entrance for maintenance and cleaning.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

80
IEQ Credit 3.6: Green Cleaning—Indoor Integrated Pest Management
1 point

Intent
To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical,
biological and particulate contaminants that adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building
systems and the environment.

Requirement
Develop, implement and maintain an indoor integrated pest management (IPM) plan, defined as managing indoor
pests in a way that protects human health and the surrounding environment and that improves economic returns
through the most effective, least-risk option. IPM calls for using least-toxic chemical pesticides, minimum use of
chemicals, use only in targeted locations and use only for targeted species. IPM requires routine inspection and
monitoring. The plan must include the following elements, integrated with any outdoor IPM plan used for the site as
appropriate:
n Integrated methods, site or pest inspections, pest population monitoring, evaluation of the need for pest
control and 1 or more pest control methods, including sanitation, structural repairs, mechanical and living
biological controls, other nonchemical methods, and if nontoxic options are unreasonable and have been
exhausted, a least-toxic pesticide.
n Specification of the circumstances under which an emergency application of pesticides in a building or on
surrounding grounds being maintained by building management can be conducted without complying with
the earlier provisions.
n A communications strategy directed to building occupants that addresses universal notification, which
requires advance notice of not less than 72 hours before a pesticide under normal conditions and 24 hours
after application of a pesticide in emergencies, other than a least-toxic pesticide, is applied in a building or on
surrounding grounds that the building management maintains.
Any cleaning products included in the integrated pest management policy must meet the requirements for IEQ
Credit 3.3: Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Use IPM, a safer and usually less costly option for effective pest management. An IPM program employs
commonsense strategies to reduce sources of food, water and shelter for pests in buildings and on the grounds and
minimizes the use of pesticides.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

81
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

82
IO Credit 1: Innovation in Operations
1–4 points

Intent
To provide building operations, maintenance and upgrade teams with the opportunity to achieve additional
environmental benefits achieved beyond those already addressed by the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings:
Operations & Maintenance Rating System.

Requirements
Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in Operations and Exemplary Performance paths
as described below:

PATH 1. Innovation in Operations (1-4 points)


Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using an operations, maintenance or system upgrade
strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating System.
One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 4 points under IDc1 may be earned through
PATH 1—Innovation in Operations.
Identify following in writing:
The intent of the proposed innovation credit
n

The additional environmental benefits delivered


n

The proposed requirements for compliance


n

The proposed performance metrics to demonstrate compliance and the approaches (strategies) used to
n

meet the requirements


The proposed requirements met during the performance period
n

PATH 2. Exemplary Performance (1-3 points)


Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green
Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving
double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit
in LEED.
One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IDc1 may be earned
through PATH 2— Exemplary Performance.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Implement and maintain during the performance period actions that provide added environmental benefits.
These can be either actions that substantially exceed an existing LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations
& Maintenance performance credit requirement or actions not addressed in LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings:
Operations & Maintenance that provide substantial added environmental benefits.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

83
IO Credit 2: LEED® Accredited Professional
1 point

Intent
To support and encourage the operations, maintenance, upgrade and project team integration required by LEED to
streamline the application and certification process.

Requirements
At least 1 principal participant of the project team shall be a LEED Accredited Professional (AP).

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Engage a LEED AP within the organization.
Have someone in your organization study the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating
System and LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition and successfully
complete the LEED Professional Accreditation exam.
Hire a LEED AP to support the project. Consider selecting a LEED AP experienced with sustainable best practices in
the operations and maintenance of existing buildings.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

84
IO Credit 3: Documenting Sustainable Building Cost Impacts
1 point

Intent
To document sustainable building cost impacts.

Requirements
Document overall building operating costs for the previous 5 years (or length of building occupancy, whichever is
shorter) and track changes in overall building operating costs during the performance period. Document building
operating costs and financial impacts of all aspects of LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
implementation on an ongoing basis.
Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009
Edition.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Track building operating costs to identify any positive impacts related to the sustainable performance improvements
to the building and its operations.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

85
LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

86
RP Credit 1: Regional Priority
1–4 Points

Intent
To provide an incentive for the achievement of credits that address geographically specific environmental priorities.

Requirements
Earn 1 of the 6 Regional Priority Credits (credits identified by the USGBC Regional Councils and Chapters as having
additional regional environmental importance). A database of Regional Priority Credits and their geographic
applicability is available on the USGBC Web site, www.usgbc.org.
One point is awarded for each Regional Priority credit achieved. No more than 4 credits identified as Regional
Priority credits may be earned. Projects outside of the U.S. are not eligible for Regional Priority credits.

Potential Technologies & Strategies


Determine and pursue the prioritized credits for the project’s location.

LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

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LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

88