Anda di halaman 1dari 259

TAOSHOBUDDHA WAY

Volume 2
Cooking for the transformation of human consciousness is
Cooking Taoshobuddha Way for Buddhas
Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

FOOD IS CONSCIOUSNESS
ANDYOU ARE THE EMBODIMENT OF
THISCONSCIOUSNESS

The uniqueness of Indian Cuisine lies in its special blend of


spices that release fragrant aroma in the atmosphere. The
aroma and the finishing look become more attractive than
a beautifully dressed beauty. This creates an enticing
ambiance in the surroundings.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 2


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 3


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

MEDITATION LEADS TO ULTIMATE FLOWERING

COOKING – TAOSHOBUDDHA WAY Vol. 2

Daal – Rice – Roti and Combinations

© 2011, Taoshobuddha,

All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be


reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form
or by any means, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise,
without prior written permission of the original publisher
TAOSHOBUDDHA MEDITATIONS.

Printed and Published by:

TAOSHOBUDDHA MEDITATIONS

Cover design and graphics: Anand Neelamber

Photography: Taoshobuddha

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 4


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 5


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

I –

Cooking Taoshobuddha way


Cooking lovingly,
Cooking meditatively!

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 6


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

TAOSHOBUDDHA

The word Taoshobuddha comes from three words, ‘tao,’


‘sho,’ and ‘Buddha’. The word Tao was coined by the
Chinese master, Lau Tzu. It means that which is and
cannot be put into words. It is unknown and unknowable.
It can only be experienced and not expressed in words. Its
magnanimity cannot be condensed into finiteness. The
word Sho implies, that which is vast like the sky and deep
like an ocean and carries within its womb a treasure. It
also means one on whom the existence showers its
blessings. And lastly the word Buddha implies the
Enlightened One; one who has arrived home.

Thus, Taoshobuddha implies one who is existential, on


whom the existence showers its blessings and one who
has arrived home. The Enlightened One!

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 7


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

CONTENTS

1. Preface 11

2. Measurements 17

SECTION 1

DAALS

1. Daal Makhani 20

2. Daal Maharani 23

3. Shahi Lentils 27

4. Shahi Rajma 30

5. Daal Pakhtooni 33

6. Rajma Jugalbandi 36

7. Daal Taduka 39

8. Sambhar Daal 41

9. Chana Dal with Dhudi 45

10. Panch mela Daal 53

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 8


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

SECTION 2

RICE AND ROTIS


1. Peas Pulao 58
2. Mixed Vegetable Pulao 61
3. Cauliflower and Broccoli Pulao 64
4. Biryani 67
5. Vegetable Biryani 73
6. Exotic Hydrabadi Biryani 77
7. Whole-wheat Puri 88
8. Daal Kachori 92
9. Chapatti 97
10. Parantha 101
11. Aloo Parantha 107
12. Mirchi Roti 110
13. Puran Polis 112
14. Bhakri 117
15. Paneer Parantha 124
16. Palak Paneer Parantha 127
17. Gobhi Parantha 130
18. Mooli-Redish Parantha 134
19. Lachcha Parantha 143
20. Left over Daal-Methi Parantha 150
21. Onion and Paneer Kulcha 153
22. Onion Kulcha 163
23. Kashmiri Roti 166
24. Khasta Kachori 169
25. Aloo Kachori 175
26. Luchi 179

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 9


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

27. Naan 181

SECTION 3

COMBINATIONS and
ACCOMPANIMENTS

1. Sambhar Idli 187

2. Masala Dosa 209

3. Dahi Vada 220

4. Cucumber Raita 227

5. Other Raitas 229

6. Chutneys 236

7. Fruit Salad or Chaat 247

8. Samosa Chaat 249

9. Chole Bhatura 251

10. Advantages of Crystal Salt 256

11. Image Guyanese and Trinidad Parantha 257

12. Image Bengali Parantha 258

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 10


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Cooking lovingly! Cooking meditatively! Cooking for


Buddhas! Cooking for the transformation of human consciousness is what
Taoshobuddha means by cooking. And this is the central theme of ‘Cooking
Taoshobuddha way or Buddha Way!’

It is indeed cooking for Buddhas. A strange, yet still a meaningful title for a
cook Book!

Cooking lovingly! Cooking meditatively! Cooking for Buddhas! Cooking


Taoshobuddha way or Buddha way or cooking for Buddhas means the same
thing. It is indeed a strange yet still a meaningful title for a cook book.

It says a lot. And this is the beauty of it. First let me explain something of
the title. Taoshobuddha is an enlightened master. Very rarely a master goes
into cooking or does something like this. Although each master remains
particular about eating food cooked by each and every one yet no effort was
ever made in the past in this direction. When I asked Taoshobuddha about
this, very pleasantly in his usual manner he said something that reveals the
compassion of a master, his insights into cooking and its relation to human
consciousness. Only an enlightened one can say such a thing. This is what
he said:

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 11


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

“Cooking Taoshobuddha means ‘Cooking for Buddha’; ‘Cooking


lovingly’; ‘Cooking meditatively’.

Only then there can be total transformation of human consciousness. Only


then we can create a new man who is balanced both inner and outer. WE go
on speak of spirituality and we propagate spiritual growth. However the
question remains unanswered if we really understand what spiritual growth
really means.

Life is a journey of transcendence. It is a moment to moment journey of


awareness. As such man exists at three planes. In ordinary human being
these planes remain muddled. And because of this there is no clarity and
inward journey gets impeded.

In case of an enlightened one the planes remain the same. However these
exist in their right perspective and pristine clarity. Also these do not overlap
one another in an enlightened one.

These three planes are:

1. The plane of silence the unheard the uncreated one. This is the plane
where the master or the enlightened one dwells. He prefers to remain there.
But from this plane the transformation cannot happen. Very unlikely you will
find aspirants who are at this plane. However when the aspirant is within the
energy field of the enlightened one he is touched by this state of awareness
at times. Still this state is not permanent. This is the plane where I dwell. I
would not like to come out of this state. But then I will be failing in my
responsibilities for the birth of a new human being. One who is beyond
dualities and conflicts? He is religious beyond the dimensions of all the
religions and narrowness.

2. The second is the plane of intellect. Vast majority are there at this
plane. Or think that from this plane they can understand the deeper aspects
of inwards journey at least intellectually. Again they are mistaken. At this
plane people give their own meaning to the words and message. Still it is a
plane from where one can communicate to all those who are at this plane to
varying degrees. For these people I have made myself available through
scores of books, and other materials, audio and video talks internationally.
Also I have weekly meditations in Boston, Sweden, Vancouver, Florida,
Miami, Trinidad, India and New York. These I conduct from here.

In addition there are three books published from Sterling Publishers, New
Delhi India. And there are 18 E-books and Monthly E magazine

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 12


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

‘MEDITATION TIMES’ published from EBook Mall.Com Michigan. Late


last year in 2010 18 Titles were published from IProclaim Book Store a
subsidiary of Dorrance Publishing House of Pitts Burg PA. Also 20
Titles were published from Create Space.Com a Subsidiary of
Amazon.Com. These are available for sale worldwide through
Amazon.Com. And this year 2011 31 Books were published as
Digitized Editions from Kindle Store of Amazon.Com.

In addition there are over 300 long and short documents, MEDITATION
TIMES a monthly Magazine; and INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF
NAQSHBANDI TATIQAT – a Quarterly Publication. All these are
available FREE.

Meditation talks are uploaded as VIDEOS on YOU TUBE. COM and many
related sites that have embedded these Videos to their sites. All these are
for the second plane.

3. And last is the most common plane where you will find vast majority of
humanity even those who are on the second plane are to certain varying
degrees remain mixed up with this third plane. This is the plane that relates
to food sheath. Food is necessary for the survival of the body.

We quote the Scriptures ‘Annm! b&hm!’ Food is consciousness. But do not


understand the essence of this.

The people who are at this plane are the ones who have suppressed sex.
Also they lack the understanding of this biological energy. There is not only
misunderstanding instead lack of awareness as well. All those who have
suppressed sex get interested in food. India has suppressed sex down the
ages for various reasons and the outcome is so many spicy and pungent
dishes. Nowhere else so many dishes have developed as in India.
West has been slightly different. Sex is not suppressed. But there is no
fulfillment. One can suppress sex that India did, or what the West did still it
lacks fulfillment. Suppression and un-fulfillment are two sides of the same
coin.

This problem has to be addressed. In the past masters have taken notice of
this and abstained eating food from others. But they have done nothing to
offset this problem. Without this new man cannot take birth out of you.
Without this all rituals, worship etc. remains meaningless.

I have taken to cooking and thus bring my awareness to the vast majority
who are not interested in things at higher rungs. Whether they are

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 13


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

interested in meditation, or discourses they will definitely be interested in


food. How to reach these persons was on my mind. This life I have chosen to
work at all the planes.

Quite naturally food is cooked with physical ingredients that we use in the
cooking. However in addition to these there are many subtle ingredients like
the emotional state of the cook, the state of inner development, awareness,
understanding of the mystical essence, and psychology. We do not consider
such things important.

I have heard once Nanak was invited by a rich Village Chief who was having
prayers at his home for food. Nanak did not go. He was staying at the house
of a poor man named Laloo.

The Chief sent for Nanak through the messengers. And finally he came to
call Nanak. The Chief said, ‘You have been rejecting my pure food cooked
with holy Ganges water. All the cooks are of high Brahman class. They have
entered the Kitchen after taking a bath. The entire cooking is done under the
chanting of sacred Mantras. And you are staying with person Laloo who is of
low class.’

When the Chief insisted so much Nanak went and he asked Laloo to
accompany along with his dry roti without and y vegetables. On reaching the
Chief’s place Nanak held the food from the prayer house in one hand and in
the next hand held the food from Laloo. And when Nanak squeezed the two
foods from the prayer food the drops of blood oozed while from the food of
Laloo drops of Milk oozed.

Nanak told the congregation it does not matter how the food is cooked.
What matters is the inner state of the person and his awareness.

Most of the times unknowingly we put so many ingredients like anger,


frustration, jealousy, greed, enmity etc. All these are subtle vibrations. Food
must work at all the levels, physical, mental, intellectual, spiritual and the
bliss sheaths. The food that we eat nourishes our physical cells first and then
other sheaths are nourished. When food lacks love and awareness it is
empty and therefore cannot help in the transformation of human
consciousness.

Through my awareness I am fulfilling the missing dimension in the life of


those who are either suppressed or unfulfilled as far as the sex is concerned.
When I looked into the lives of all those who are interested in food
somewhere or the other this needs to be fulfilled. Direct involvement method
cannot be used. I have to devise system and methods that can be utilized
with effective results. I have devised certain meditations as well to

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 14


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

transform negativities at personal and cosmic levels. These incorporate


breathing at body level, introspection at mental level and compassion at the
level of the being.

So this is what ‘COOKING TAOSHOBUDDHA WAY’ means.

Because of my ethnicity and understanding of East Indian Cuisine I have


ventured into this field.

The uniqueness of Indian Cuisine lies in its special blend of spices that
release fragrant aroma in the atmosphere. The aroma and the finishing look
become more attractive than a beautifully dressed young girl. This creates
an enticing ambiance in the surroundings.

Just a few mouthwatering varieties of Indian dishes can provide an excellent


decoration for any occasion. The basic recipe ranges from snacks,
appetizers, soups, drinks, chaat specials to main course fine dining items to
suit any occasion from an ordinary get together to a gala feast of a
presidential dinner occasion for any dignitary. Indian cuisine is as diverse as
its people and geography. Indian cuisine represents unity in diversity at the
grossest level. Let us enter into this festivity if culinary delights as presented
through this volume.

‘Cooking Taoshobuddha Way Volume 1’ was the beginning of a new


trend wherein the energy that was lost begins surfacing. Still the cry is from
far. And now with ‘Cooking Taoshobuddha Way Volume 2’ the
blossoming of consciousness has begun. More and more interest is being
generated among the readers world over. Volume 1, when published was
embedded by many sites.

I am confident that this Volume 2 will even create greater impact the flower
has blossomed. The nectar is oozing. Bees are flocking to gather this nectar.
The fragrance and the beauty is creating intoxicating ambiance.

In preparing this volume certain recipes have been shown through all the
detailed steps required for cooking that dish. Many new recipes were also
developed. Also certain recipes have been included for those suffering from
Celiac Patients who are Gluten Intolerant. My emphasis has been on using
naturally hydrogenated oils where strong double carbon bond exists. Most of
the oils are injurious to health. There are partially hydrogenated oils that are
even more harmful.

I emphasize the use of Coconut oil, Butter and Ghee as these have stronger
double carbon bond. These are naturally hydrogenated. The stone grind
whole wheat flour that is full of nutrients. Unlike All-Purpose white flour that

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 15


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

is beached in the process of milling for whole wheat flour wheat does is not
beached and no bran added to it because it naturally contains bran. In
addition I have emphasized the use of Millet Flour, Rice Flour, Jwar or
Sorghum Flour, Buckwheat Flour. Recipes have been given.

Most important of all is the use of ROCK SALT instead of Sea Salt. Our seas
are polluted with nuclear toxic waste, and other wastes. To remove the
effects many chemicals are used in the process of refining that in the
process natural minerals, nutrients, and trace elements are lost. And then
chemically produced nutrients are substituted. As compared to sea salt the
natural elements are preserved in rock salt. While sea salt causes blood
pressure, Rock Salt does not.

For your reference a document is added as supplementary at the end of this


volume.

In the preparation of this volume comments came from professionals in the


field of cooking and medicine. Thanks to all those lovely ones.

Two special recipes of Puran Polis and Bhakris have been included in the
volume. These two recipes are the expressions of my gratitude for two
families from Maharashtra in India. During my visit to the family in January
this year I was served with Puran Polis – a kind of flatbread, and Bhakri
another flatbread made with Sorghum, Millet, and Rice flours.

The family of my coauthor Hemant Moghe his two daughters Riddhi and
Siddhi and wife Medha served with these dishes smeared with their
love. Many thanks for their hospitalities that shall linger in my being
erelong. Another coauthor Anil Sohoni and his wife from Pune in
India left no stone unturned in serving Puran Polis. Anil Ji and
Hemant ji these recipes I have included in this volume for a wider
cross section world over. And the overflow of love and gratitude will
continue in the next volume as well.

The choice of herbs and spices, their blends all provide an excellent recipe
for you to use.

Bonne Appetite!

Love!!!

Taoshobuddha
COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 16
Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Measurement is an important aspect of any discipline.


Various units are used for measurement. For instance the metric system is
used in India. In Europe and North America we use pound system. Whatever
be the system used by an individual it is imperative that we understand not
only the system of measurement instead we understand the conversion of
measurement from one system to another. Sometimes we come across a
recipe where a different system of measurement is used.

We have undertaken to make cooking an experience of joy and benediction


as a result we give various systems of measurement with possible yet simple
way of conversion.

Cooking Measurement Equivalents


TABLE 1

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 17


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

CONVERSION DRY INGREDIENTS CUP – SPOONS

1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 3 teaspoons (tsp)

1/16 cup = 1 tablespoon


1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons
1/6 cup = 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 6 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons
1 cup = 48 teaspoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons

TABLE 2

FLUID CONVERSION TABLE

8 fluid ounces (fl oz) = 1 cup


1 pint (pt) = 2 cups
1 quart (qt) = 2 pints
4 cups = 1 quart
1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts
16 ounces (oz) = 1 pound (lb)

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 18


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

SECTION 1

DAALS

11. Daal Makhani 20

12. Daal Maharani 23

13. Shahi Lentils 27

14. Shahi Rajma 30

15. Daal Pakhtooni 33

16. Rajma Jugalbandi 36

17. Daal Taduka 39

18. Sambhar Daal 41

19. Chana Dal with Dhudi 45

20. Panch mela Daal 53

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 19


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dal Makhani is a delicacy originated from Punjab filled


with rich proteins and fiber. By far Dal Makhani adorns the menu cards of
the Restaurants where East Indian Cuisine is served all over the World. And
it is the favorite of many. The beauty of Indian Culinary is the Aroma and
the Color combination and finally the presentation of the dish. All this
together adds the aesthetic sense and elegance to the dish.

Traditionally lentils and red beans are generally soaked overnight or for at
least 8 hours and gently simmered on low heat along with ginger, garlic and
a few other spices (garam masala).These are then combined with a tangy
masala base which includes onions, tomatoes (chopped or puree) or dried
mango powder or even pomegranate seeds. Spoonsful of fresh cream and
butter provide for the rich finishing touch. Garnished with finely chopped
coriander leaves and fresh cream it is indeed a delight. Dal Makhani takes
longer to cook than the split dals, but the result is worth it.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 20


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:

1. Whole Urad or black gram lentil 1cup


2. Kidney beans( Rajma or red beans) 1/3cup
3. Grated ginger 1tbs
4. Coarsely ground fennel seeds 2tsp
5. Red Chilli powder ( to taste)
6. Turmeric powder 1tsp
7. Ghee or clarified butter or oil 3-4tbs
8. Cumin seeds 1tsp
9. Hing a large pinch of
10. Ginger, garlic and onion paste 3-4tbsp
11. Onion (thinly chopped, optional) 1 medium
12. Tomatoes, finely chopped 2-3 medium
13. Garam Masala ½ tsp
14. Fresh cream ½ cup
15. Chopped coriander leaves (optional) 2 tbs
16. Salt to taste

NOTE: You can use the ready Masala mixture DAL MAKHANI. Various
brands are available. However I prefer SHREEGUN brand for the
quality, flavor and fragrance.

Methodology:

1. Wash and soak black Urd whole and rajma overnight together or
separately.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 21


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Cook the soaked Dal and Rajma in 5-6 cups of water with salt, red chili
powder, fennel seeds powder, turmeric, and grated ginger till Dal and Rajma
are done and are soft. You can use pressure cooker using your culinary
expertise of time required in cooking.

3. Lightly mash Dal and Rajma mixture, keep aside.

4. Heat oil or butter in a thick bottomed pan. Add cumin seeds and Hing,
let it crackle.

5. Add ginger, garlic, chopped onions, and cook till light golden brown in
color.

6. Add Garam masala and chopped tomatoes.


7. Sauté till tomatoes are well mashed and fat starts to leave the Masala.

8. Add mashed Dal and Rajma to this mixture and little water (desired
consistency). Correct seasoning, and

9. Simmer at very slow flame for 15-20 minutes.

10. Add fresh cream and let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.
Garnish with coriander leaves before serving.

Serve hot with Naan or Parantha or even with rice.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 22


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dal Maharani is a delicacy originated from


Punjab filled with rich proteins and fiber as a result of human ingenuity. A
woman is never satisfied with a few cosmetics or ornaments. Each time she
goes for shopping she has to buy such items. She must have matching
jewelry, cosmetics, shoes to match each outfit and the occasion. So too the
human imagination and inventiveness goes on exploring new dishes and
combinations each day. This has made the food a very rich variety.

Dal Maharani is one such invention. There is a slight variation from daal
makhani. Some chefs make a new dish just by varying the cooking method
or add more butter and cream or add another ingredient. This dish has such
saga.

Some have added chana daal to this recipe along with regular red beans and
urd. Now, this item adorns the menu cards of the Restaurants where East
Indian Cuisine is served all over the World. And it is the favorite of many.
The beauty of Indian Culinary is the Aroma and the Color combination and
finally the presentation of the dish. All this together adds taste, aroma, the
aesthetic sense and elegance to the dish.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 23


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Traditionally lentils and red beans are generally soaked overnight or for at
least 8 hours and gently simmered on low heat along with ginger, garlic and
a few other spices (garam masala).These are then combined with a tangy
masala base which includes onions, tomatoes (chopped or puree) or dried
mango powder or even pomegranate seeds. Spoonsful of fresh cream and
butter provide for the rich finishing touch. Garnished with finely chopped
coriander leaves and fresh cream it is indeed a delight. Dal Makhani takes
longer to cook than the split dals, but the result is worth it.

Chana Daal Urd and Red Beans

NOTE: You can use the ready Masala mixture DAL MAKHANI. Various
brands are available. However I prefer SHREEGUN brand for the
quality, flavor and fragrance.

Ingredients:
1. Whole Urad or black gram lentil ¼ cup
2. Kidney beans( Rajma or red beans) ¼ cup
3. Chana Daal ¼ Cup
4. Grated ginger 1tbs
4. Coarsely ground fennel seeds 2tsp
5. Red Chilli powder ( to taste)
6. Turmeric powder 1tsp
7. Ghee or clarified butter or oil 3-4tbs
8. Cumin seeds 1tsp

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 24


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

9. Hing a large pinch of


10. Ginger, garlic and onion paste 3-4 tbsp
11. Onion (thinly chopped, optional) 1 medium
12. Tomatoes, finely chopped 2-3 medium
13. Garam Masala ½ tsp
14. Fresh cream ½ cup
15. Chopped coriander leaves (optional) 2 tbs
16. Salt to taste

Methodology:

1. Wash and soak black Urd whole, chana daal and rajma overnight
together or separately.

2. Cook the soaked Dal and Rajma in 5-6 cups of water with salt, red chili
powder, fennel seeds powder, turmeric, and grated ginger till Dal and Rajma
are done and are soft. You can use pressure cooker using your culinary
expertise of time required in cooking.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 25


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Lightly mash Dal and Rajma mixture, keep aside.

4. Heat oil or butter in a thick bottomed pan. Add cumin seeds and Hing,
let it crackle.

5. Add ginger, garlic, chopped onions, and cook till light golden brown in
color.

6. Add Garam masala and chopped tomatoes.

7. Sauté till tomatoes are well mashed and fat starts to leave the Masala.

8. Add mashed Dal and Rajma to this mixture and little water (desired
consistency). Correct seasoning, and

9. Simmer at very slow flame for 15-20 minutes.

10. Add fresh cream and let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.
Garnish with coriander leaves before serving.

Serve hot with Naan or Paratha or even with rice.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 26


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Shahi Lentils is a delicacy originated from Punjab


filled with rich proteins and fiber. Unlike Dal Makhani Shahi Lentils does not
adorn the menu cards of the Restaurants where East Indian Cuisine is
served all over the World. Yet still it is the favorite of almost everyone who
tastes it even for the first time. And it is the favorite of many. The beauty of
Indian Culinary is the Aroma and the Color combination and finally the
presentation of the dish. All this together adds the aesthetic sense and
elegance to the dish.

Lentils being a softer bean do not require the usual overnight soaking unlike
other beans. You can soak for two hours. Also you can cook even without
prior soaking. Gently cook in a pressure cooker along with ginger, garlic and
a few other spices (garam masala).These are then combined with a tangy
masala base which includes onions, tomatoes (chopped or puree) or dried
mango powder or even pomegranate seeds. Spoonsful of fresh cream and
butter provide for the rich finishing touch. Garnished with finely chopped
coriander leaves and fresh cream it is indeed a delight. Unlike Dal Makhani,
Lentils takes less time to cook.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 27


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:
1. Whole lentil 2 cup
2. Grated ginger 1tbs
3. Coarsely ground fennel seeds 2tsp
4. Red Chilli powder ( to taste)
5. Turmeric powder 1tsp
6. Ghee or clarified butter or oil 3-4 tbs
7. Cumin seeds 1tsp

8. Hing a large pinch


9. Ginger, garlic and onion paste 3-4tbsp
10. Onion (thinly chopped, optional) 1 medium
11. Tomatoes, finely chopped 2-3 medium
12. Garam Masala ½ tsp
13. Fresh cream ½ cup
14. Chopped coriander leaves (optional) 2 tbs
15. Salt to taste
NOTE: You can use the ready Masala mixture KITCHEN QUEEN.
Various brands are available. However I prefer SHREEGUN brand for
the quality, flavor and fragrance.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 28


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:

1. Wash and soak whole Lentils if you care to or cook straight away after
washing
2. Cook the soaked Lentils in 5-6 cups of water with salt, red chili
powder, fennel seeds powder, turmeric, and grated ginger till it is done soft.
You can use pressure cooker using your culinary expertise of time required
in cooking.

3. Lightly mash Lentils and keep aside.

4. Heat oil or butter in a thick bottomed pan. Add cumin seeds and Hing,
let it crackle.

5. Add ginger, garlic, chopped onions, and cook till light golden brown in
color.

6. Add Garam masala and chopped tomatoes.


7. Sauté till tomatoes are well mashed and fat starts to leave the Masala.

8. Add mashed Lentils to this mixture and little water (desired


consistency). Correct seasoning, and

9. Simmer at very slow flame for 10-15 minutes.

10. Add fresh cream and let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.
Garnish with coriander leaves before serving.

Serve hot with Naan or Paratha or even with rice.

QUALITY SPICE AVAILABE NEARBY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 29


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Shahi Rajma as the name suggests, is a royal delicacy


originally enjoyed by the Mughal emperors. It is a delectable dish comprised
of red kidney beans, tomatoes, onions and spices. It is slow cooked over a
slow fire to retain its rich flavor, and is served with rice and Indian breads.

Shahi Rajma is a delicacy originated from Punjab and Northern part of India.
It is filled with rich proteins and fiber. By far Shahi Rajma adorns the menu
cards of the Punjabis and other Northern Indian homes within the country
and world over. Wherever East Indian lives this Cuisine is cooked at homes
and even served on special occasions all over the World. And it is the
favorite of many. The beauty of Indian Culinary is the Aroma and the Color
combination and finally the presentation of the dish. All this together adds
the aesthetic sense and elegance to the dish.

Traditionally red beans are generally soaked overnight or for at least 8 hours
and gently simmered on low heat along with ginger, garlic and a few other
spices (garam masala).These are then combined with a tangy masala base
which includes onions, tomatoes (chopped or puree) or dried mango powder
or even pomegranate seeds. Spoonsful of fresh cream and butter provide for
the rich finishing touch. For everyday use cream butter is not used. It is
served garnished with finely chopped coriander leaves and fresh cream it is

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 30


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

indeed a delight. Shahi Rajma takes longer to cook than the split dals, but
the result is worth it.

Ingredients:

1. Kidney beans( Rajma or red beans) 2cup


2. Grated ginger 1tbs
3. Coarsely ground fennel seeds 2tsp
4. Red Chilli powder ( to taste)
5. Turmeric powder 1tsp
6. Ghee or clarified butter or oil 4tbs
7. Cumin seeds 1tsp
8. Hing a large pinch of
9. Ginger, garlic and onion paste 3-4tbsp
10. Onion (thinly chopped, optional) 1medium
11. Tomatoes, finely chopped 2-3 medium
12. Garam Masala ½ tsp
13. Fresh cream ½ cup
14. Chopped coriander leaves (optional) 2 tbs
15. Salt to taste

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 31


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

NOTE: You can use the ready Masala mixture Dal Makhani. Various
brands are available. However I prefer SHREEGUN brand for the
quality, flavor and fragrance.

Methodology:

1. Wash and soak Rajma overnight.

2. Cook the soaked Rajma in 5-6 cups of water with salt, red chili
powder, fennel seeds powder, turmeric, and grated ginger till Dal and Rajma
are done and are soft. You can use pressure cooker using your culinary
expertise of time required in cooking.

3. Lightly mash Rajma mixture, keep aside.

4. Heat oil or butter in a thick bottomed pan. Add cumin seeds and Hing,
let it crackle.

5. Add ginger, garlic, chopped onions, and cook till light golden brown in
color.

6. Add Garam masala and chopped tomatoes.

7. Sauté till tomatoes are well mashed and oil starts to leave the Masala.

8. Add mashed Rajma to this mixture and little water (for desired
consistency).

9. Simmer at very slow flame for 15-20 minutes or until done.

10. Add fresh cream and let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.
Garnish with coriander leaves before serving.

Serve hot with Naan or Paratha or even with rice.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 32


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dal Phaktooni is a delicious dal (curry) recipe


from North-West Frontier Province of undivided India which is now known as
Afghanistan. This dal is very similar to Dal Makhani. Lots of butter and
pureed tomatoes give creamy texture to this dal. This is why it goes very
well with a large variety of Rice dishes and rotis. Try this easy recipe at
home and serve to your family and closed ones. You will definitely receive lot
of compliments for such a delicious food.

Dal Phaktooni is a delicacy filled with rich proteins and fiber popular world
over. By far Dal Phaktooni adorns the menu cards of the Restaurants where
East Indian Cuisine is served all over the World. And it is the favorite of
many. The beauty of Indian Culinary is the Aroma and the Color combination
and finally the presentation of the dish. All this together adds the aesthetic
sense and elegance to the dish.

This recipe is made with Whole Urd. Compared to other beans Urd is
relatively softer bean therefore the usual overnight soaking is optional. The
bean is soaked overnight or 3-4 hours and then simmered with garlic-ginger
paste and a blend of spices. These are then combined with a tangy masala
base which includes onions, tomatoes (chopped or puree) or dried mango
powder or even pomegranate seeds. Spoonsful of fresh cream and butter

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 33


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

provide for the rich finishing touch. Garnished with finely chopped coriander
leaves and fresh cream it is indeed a delight not only to each but pleasant to
watch as well. Dal Pakhtooni takes longer to cook than the split dals as it is
cooked rich and thick, but the result is worth it.

Ingredients:

1. Whole Urd or black gram 2cup


2. Grated ginger 1tbs
3. Coarsely ground fennel seeds 2tsp
4. Red Chilli powder ( to taste)
5. Turmeric powder 1tsp
6. Ghee or clarified butter or oil 8tbs
7. Cumin seeds
8. Hing - asafetida a large pinch
9. Ginger, garlic and onion paste 3-4tbsp
10. Onion (thinly chopped, optional) 1 medium
11. Tomatoes, finely chopped 2-3 medium
12. Garam Masala ½ tsp
13. Fresh cream ½ cup
14. Chopped coriander leaves (optional) 2 tbs
15. Salt to taste

NOTE: You can use the ready Masala mixture Dal Makhani. Various
brands are available. However I prefer SHREEGUN brand for the
quality, flavor and fragrance.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 34


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:

1. Wash and soak black Urd overnight or 3-4 hours

2. Cook the soaked Urd in 5-6 cups of water with salt, red chili powder,
turmeric, and grated ginger till bean is done soft. You can use pressure
cooker using your culinary expertise of time required in cooking.

3. Lightly mash Urd mixture, keep aside.

4. Heat butter in a thick bottomed pan. Add cumin seeds and Hing, let it
crackle.

5. Add ginger, garlic, chopped onions, and cook till light golden brown in
color.

6. Add Garam masala and chopped tomatoes and tomatoes puree.

7. Sauté till tomatoes are well mashed and fat starts to leave the Masala.

8. Add mashed Cooked Urd to this mixture and little water (desired
consistency).

9. Simmer at very slow flame for 15-20 minutes.

10. Add fresh cream and let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.
Garnish with coriander leaves before serving.

Serve hot with Naan or Paratha or even with rice.

QUALITY SPICE AVAILABE NEARBY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 35


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Jugalbandi or jugalbandhi (Devanagari: जुगलबंधी,


Urdu: ‫دئ‬ ) is a word imported from music. Traditionally Jugalbandi refers
‫ﺟﮕﻠﻧ‬
to performance in Indian classical music that features a duet of two solo
musicians. The word jugalbandi means, literally, ‘entwined twins.’ The duet
can be either vocal or instrumental.

Often, the musicians will play different instruments, as for example the
famous duets between sitarist Ravi Shankar and sarod player Ali Akbar
Khan, who played the format since the 1940s. More rarely, the musicians
(either vocalists or instrumentalists) may be from different traditions as well.

What defines jugalbandi is that the two soloists be on an equal footing. In


jugalbandi, both musicians act as lead players, and a playful competition
often ensues between the two performers.

The culinary experts have inducted this word to create Jugalbandi in the
preparation of dishes. The two beans are capable to maintaining their
separate entities however in Jugalbandi the two different beans are cooked
together. Chana Daal or Toor Daal melts much easier while Rajma grains
remain. This makes the dish look very attractive, and tasty.

Ingredients:
1. Red beans 3 cups

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 36


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Chana or Toor daal 1½ cup

3. Onion/garlic/ginger paste 3-4 tbs

4. Tomato Puree ¾ cup

SAVAOURY RAJMAH JUGALBANDI

5. Rajmah or Kitchen queen Masala 3-4 tsp

6. Garam Masala ¼ tsp

7. Chopped Corainder ¼ cup

8. Butter/coconut oil 2-3tbs

9. Fresh Cream 2tbs

10. Salt to taste

Methodology:
1. Soak red beans overnight after picking and washing

2. Pick, wash and soak chana daal 3-4 hours

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 37


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Pressure cook red beans soft

4. Cook chana daal until soft set aside

5. Mix seasoning paste, spice and ½ tomato puree and soak in water for
5-10 mins

6. In a deep pan or skillet heat oil add the above mixture and allow
cooking on medium heat until oil separates from the mixture. Keep stirring.
If burning lower heat and a few dash of water.

7. Add red beans and chana daal. Allow to boil. And simmer.

8. Add remaining tomato puree and cook on low heat. Stirring


occasionally. Make sure the consistency remains steady.

9. Transfer in serving dish. Sprinkle garam masala sparingly.

10. Garnish with fresh cream and coriander leaves.

Serve with choice of rice plain or biryani or with roti of choice. You can use
this as accompaniment with any paneer or other vegetable as complete
dinner menu.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 38


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Daal Taduka is common yet favorite daal cooked in Indian


homes. The word ‘Taduka’ actually implies the way daal is given the finishing
touch and it gets ready for serving.

This daal is also served in restaurants all over the world.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 39


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients
1. Toor Daal 1 cup
2. Tomato diced 1 Large
3. Turmeric powder ¼ Tsp
4. Asafoetida - hing a pinch
5. Amchoor - dry mango powder or chaaat masala ½ tsp
6. Sugar - a pinch (optional)
7. Salt - to taste

For Tempering or Taduka:


1. Onion diced fine ¼ cup
2. Garlic crushed or diced fine 2-3 cloves
3. Jeera whole 1 tsp
4. Dry red chilies 3-4 halved
5. Mustard seeds ¼ tsp
6. Ghee 2 tbs

For Garnishing:
Chopped fresh coriander leaves

Methodology:
1. Cook the dal, tomatoes and turmeric powder with 3 cups water in
pressure cooker. 3 whistles should usually be enough.

2. If you do not have a pressure cooker, then cook in a closed, thick-


bottomed pan for about 20-30 mins until the Daal is cooked soft.

3. Heat oil in a pan and add all the ingredients for tempering. Once the
mustard seeds start to pop and the onions turn transparent, add the cooked
dal.

4. Next, add salt, hing, sugar and amchoor or chaat Masala and mix well.
If the daal is too thick, add some water. If too watery, let it remain on fire
for longer until the desired consistency is reached.

5. Garnish with coriander leaves and serve with steamed white rice,
papad and pickles.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 40


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Sāmbhar is a vegetable stew or chowder based on a broth


made with tamarind and toor dal. Or in simple words it is tangy and spicy
daal cooked with vegetables and blend of special spices. It is very popular
in South India especially in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka and Andhra
Pradesh. Each state in the South prepares it with a typical variation, adapted
to its taste and environment. Now it has become popular not only all over in
India instead throughout the world. Besides being a popular South Indian
combination it is being served as Daal stew in restaurants as well.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 41


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Sambar or sambhar is known by different names in different regions and


languages. In Tamil Nadu it is known as Sambaaru -Tamil: சா பார. Called
by different names in Kannada – ಾಂ ; Malayalam: സാ
ಾರು ാ , and Telugu -
ాంబ ,ర Sāmbhar is common in South India and Sri Lankan Tamil cuisines,
made of toor dal. Still there is a variation of Sāmbhar called Pappuchaaru
or Telugu: పప Itర is. more common in Andhra Pradesh.
The origin of this dish is quite uncertain though legends have it that it
originated in the kitchen of Thanjavur Marathas ruler Shahuji, during the
18th century from the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Verily it is believed
that Shahji had a liking for a dish called amti which had kokum as one of
its main ingredients. However once the kokum which was imported from the
Maratha homeland ran out of supply and someone suggested to him that the
locals used tamarind pulp for sourness. Shahji then tried the dish with the
toor dal, vegetables, spices and the tamarind pulp served his coterie and his
cousin, Sambhaji who was visiting him. Everyone liked the dish and thus it
was named Sāmbhar after the guest of the day, Sambhaji.

The cooked Sāmbhar is typically eaten with a garnish, which is an oil-fried


spice mixture containing items such mustard seeds, urad dal, dried red
chillies, curry leaves, fenugreek seeds, coriander seeds, and asafoetida.
Fresh curry leaves or coriander leaves may be added at the very end to
enhance the flavor. Curry leaves in particular are an essential element of

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 42


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

authentic Sāmbhar; their aroma and flavor provide Sāmbhar with a distinct
and pleasant herbal essence.

Sāmbhar is reflective of a broad and ancient tradition of dal-based vegetable


stews in South India. Many regions and families of the Indian subcontinent
have developed and maintained their own adaptations of a dal and vegetable
stew, and similar preparations are evident in such dishes known in local
languages as rasam, charu, saaru, and pappu pulusu.

Most of these use toor dal, tamarind, vegetables, Sāmbhar powder, and an
oil-fried spice seed seasoning as important ingredients. The taste of the
Sāmbhar is derived from the spices added to it.

Ingredients:

1. Arahar -Toor Dal 1 cup


2. Carrot diced fine ½ cup
3. Green chilli chopped 1 tbs
4. Okra chopped thin 1 inch size 5
5. Eggplant - Baingan cut into 1 inch size 3 small
6. Pumpkin diced 1 inch piece ½ cup
7. Tomato chopped 1
8. Green peas ¼ Cup
9. Ginger chopped ½ inch
10. Coriander leaves, chopped 1 Tbs
11. Curry leaves (curry patta) 8-10
12. Lemon/Lime juice 1 tsp
13. Tamarind pulp 1 tsp
14. Salt to taste
15. Red chili powder 1 tsp
16. Coriander powder 1 tsp
17. Cummin seeds ½ tsp
18. Coriander seeds ½ tsp
19. Hing (Asafoetida) powder 1 Large pinch
20. Mustard seeds ½ tsp
21. Fenugreek (Methi) seeds 1 tsp
22. Coconut oil 3 tsp

Methodology:

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 43


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Cook dal eggplant and pumpkin in a pressure cooker with 2 cups water
and 1 tsp salt. Cook until done.

2. Patch methi seed dry until the smell becomes stronger. Cool and grind
to a fine powder. This is an important ingredient for sambhar. These days
there are various brands of sambhar masalas. These are very good and can
replace the large number of spices.

3. In a deep skillet take 2 tsp oil and put on medium heat. When the oil
gets hot, first add cummin seeds and mustard seeds. When the seeds pop
up, add all the spices including methi powder and Sāmbhar Masala. Fry the
spices for a while and add all the vegetables including coriander leaves and
curry leaves. Stir for 2-3 minutes. Add 2 cup water. Boil for 10 minutes. Now
simmer and add dal of step 1 and diced carrot and peas mix well and
simmer.

4. As option you can add desiccated coconut however the original recipe
does not call for it. In regions that grow coconuts, notably Kerala, coastal
Karnataka (Udupi, Mangalore) and Tamil Nadu, Sāmbhar is also made with a
paste of ground coconuts and spices. Grated coconut is roasted with lentils,
cumin, few grains of rice, fenugreek, and red chillies. It is then ground into a
fine paste, added to the vegetables and tamarind juice, and then cooked.

Use SHREEGUN Sāmbhar masala. This blend gives pleasant flavour and
authenticity to the dish.
Serve with plain rice or Dosa or Idli.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 44


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Black Chana is very nutritious. It is used as feed for


horses. The dehusked split daal is known as chana daal. It is an important
ingredient for besan and a large variety of sweets. Besan is also widely used
in Indian Cooking as an important ingredient.

In the subsequent pages we give step by step chana daal recipe. We are
cooking daal with dhudi or white guard or lauki and tomatoes.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 45


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:
1. White-Gourd diced ½” cubes 1 cup
2. Chana Dal - Bengal Gram 1 Cup
3. Red Chili Powder 1Tbsp
4. Turmeric Powder ½Tbsp
5. Lemon Juice 1Tbsp
6. Salt to taste

For Temper:
1. Coconut Oil or Ghee 1Tbsp
2. Cumin Seeds ½Tsp
3. Dry Red Chilies 2
4. Garlic Red Chili Paste 1Tbsp

Methodology:

This is an important yet less known daal in the west especially in non- Indian
homes. Here in Trinidad we only know and cook one daal – the split peas
which a variety of daal. As a result we are presenting the recipe in steps.
This is just to create interest among the people to add variety to their
menus.

Step 1: Wash the dal in a few changes of water and soak for 15 minutes.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 46


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 2: Add 3- cup water and cook up to 3 whistles in cooker.

Step 3: Let it be cool for 5 minutes and after that mix to blend with big
spoon or swizzle stick.
Step 4: Peel the white-gourd and cut into small pieces.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 47


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 5: Heat the oil in a frying pan add cumin seeds and dry red chilies.

Step 6: Sauté on medium flame for few seconds, when seeds are in brown
color add finely chopped white-gourd with turmeric powder.

Step 7: Cook on medium flame until it becomes soft.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 48


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 8: Then add garlic-red chili past in low flame. Take care of red color of
paste is not change.

Step 9: Pour the Chana daal and continue stirring briskly so that it does not
stick.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 49


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 10: Cook until the daal is boiled.

Step 11: Then add red chili powder, turmeric powder and salt to taste.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 50


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 12: Mix well and cook another 5 minutes on low flame and add lemon
juice to taste.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 51


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 14: Turn off the flame and garnish with coriander leaves. It is ready to
serve.

Serve with plain rice or chapatti, or parantha along with any vegetable and
chutney or pickle. What a meal is this – Vou!

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 52


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Rajsthan is the North West state of India. Culturally it is


very traditional and rich state. Colorful clothes, jewelry, compliments the
rich taste in foods. Rajsthani Panch-Mela Daal is the multi protein filled
Rajasthani Dal recipe. It’s very nutritious and protein rich. The word Panch
means number 5 and mel implies mix. This is one of the most popular dal of
Rajasthan. Not only it is popular it is delicious and nutritious as well.

Traditionally, 5 dals are used and hence the name –‘Panch mela’ dal. The dal
is made relatively thick and can be eaten with Chapati, Roti, Parantha or
jeera rice.

The first time I ate this dal in Jaipur, India at Laxmi Misthan Bhandar
(LMB) the authentic vegetarian restaurant that does not even use onion and
garlic and then at another time in Hyderabad, India at Dhola-ri-Dhani (An
Ethentic Rajasthani resort) where authentic Rajasthani cuisine is served. The
taste and ambiance of the Daal appealed to me most. And since then I have
included this recipe in my home and cooking class menus. The taste of this
spicy dal is so appealing that even if someone is eating for the first time will
certainly like. However maintaining the original recipe I have made it even
more protein rich by adding four more daal and beans.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 53


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Traditionally it is made by combining fie different daals - Chana, Tovar or


Toor, Masoor, Moong with skin and wash Urad dals. However to make
it even more protein rich I add green peas daal, chick peas – chana, and
Rajma.

Chana, rajma, and chana daal are soaked overnight and then all nine daals
and beans are pressure cooked and whisked to a smooth consistency. A
lovely paste of the masalas and tamarind pulp is cooked in hot Ghee before
the dal mixture is added to it. A tangy, spicy dal that will leave you very
pleased!

Ingredients
1. Moong dal (split green gram with skin) ¼ cup
2. Red masoor dal (red lentils) ¼ cup
3. Arhar/ toovar dal (split pigeon peas) ¼ cup
4. Chana dal (split Bengal gram) ¼ cup
5. Dhuli urad dal (split black gram) ¼ cup
6. Rajma ¼ cup
7. Green split peas daal ¼ cup
8. Chana white ¼ cup
9. Turmeric powder ½ tsp
10. Paneer ¼ Cup

Tadka (tempering)

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 54


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Cumin seeds ½ tsp


2. Hing (asafetida) a pinch
3. Green chilies chopped 2
4. Ginger finely chopped 1 inch
5. Tomatoes finely diced 2 medium
6. Coriander powder 2 tsp
7. Laung (cloves) 4
8. Tej patta (bay leaves) 2
9. Red ilaichi (big cardamoms) 2
10. Pure ghee (clarified butter) 2-3tbsp
11. Onions diced fine 2 medium
12. Fresh Cream 1/3 cup
13. Mustard seeds 3 teaspoon
14. Kalonji ( black onion seeds ) ½ teaspoon
15. Garlic, crushed 4 cloves
16. Chaat Masala 1 tablespoon
17. Red chilli powder 1 teaspoon
18. Salt to taste

Methodology:

1. Mix all beans chana and rajma wash and soak overnight

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 55


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Mix the above dals and wash them. Soak them for at least 1 hour.
3. Boil all daals and beans in a pressure cooker with enough water,
turmeric powder, salt and half of chopped ginger till cooked.
4. When pressure drops, open cooker and mash the dals with potato
masher or wooden swizzle stick.
5. Mash Paneer to fine crumbs
6. For tadka, heat ghee in a pan and add cumin seeds. When they
change color, add hing, cloves, bay leaves and big cardamoms. Fry for a
minute.
7. Add green chilies and remaining ginger. Sauté the mixture for a few
seconds. Add Chaat masala, coriander powder and tomatoes. Cook till
tomatoes are soft and pulpy.
8. Add mashed paneer and you can also use broken cashew nuts and
cook until blended properly.
9. Immediately add the tadka to the boiled dal and cover.
10. Let the simmering spices seep through the panchmel dal maintaining
the consistency. Let the dal simmer for 5 minutes. Garnish panchmel
dal with fresh cream and coriander leaves.

Serve with plain rice or chapatti or naan accompanied with gravy of your
choice.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 56


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

SECTION 2

RICE AND ROTIS


1. Peas Pulao 58
2. Mixed Vegetable Pulao 61
3. Cauliflower and Broccoli Pulao 64
4. Biryani 67
5. Vegetable Biryani 73
6. Exotic Hydrabadi Biryani 77
7. Whole-wheat Puri 88
8. Daal Kachori 92
9. Chapatti 97
10. Parantha 101
11. Aloo Parantha 107
12. Mirchi Roti 110
13. Puran Polis 112
14. Bhakri 117
15. Paneer Parantha 124
16. Palak Paneer Parantha 127
17. Gobhi Parantha 130
18. Mooli-Redish Parantha 134
19. Lachcha Parantha 143
20. Left over Daal-Methi Parantha 150
21. Onion and Paneer Kulcha 153
22. Onion Kulcha 163
23. Kashmiri Roti 166
24. Khasta Kachori 169
25. Aloo Kachori 175
26. Luchi 179
27. Naan 181

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 57


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Pea Pulao is also known as Yellow Rice. It is a great


alternative to plain boiled rice. It serves as great accompaniment for any
main course, be it vegetarian or meat-based. Basically it is considered as
home recipe. Normally because of its simplicity it not preferred in
restaurants.

This is very simple dish to prepare. Paneer butter masala or any paneer dish
makes a good combination with peas pulao. This is an easy dish which can
be prepared in a matter of minutes because it does not need much
chopping.

It is a mildly flavored with Indian spices and is versatile because it can be


served along with any kind of side dish from exotic chicken or paneer curry
to simple raita. It is perfect item for home and all occasions.

Ingredients:
1. Basmati Rice 1 cup
2. Peas 1 cup
3. Onions 1

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 58


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Ginger chopped finely 1inch piece


5. Green Chillies 2
6. Salt to taste
7. Cinnamon 1 piece
8. Cloves 2-3
9. Bay leaf 2
10. Coriander for garnish
11. Ghee 2 tbsp
12. Cashew nuts 1/4 cup
13. Black peppers whole 6-8

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 59


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:
1. Wash and soak the rice for 30 minutes.

2. Grind the garlic and the ginger to a very fine paste.

3. Heat the remaining ghee in a medium sized hundi or pressure cooker

4. Add whole grain cumin seeds

5. Fry the sliced onions in a little in ghee till golden brown.


6. Add all other spice cinnamon, clove, black pepper, bay leaf and garlic –
ginger paste and fry for 2 minutes over a low flame.

7. Add the drained rice and the shelled or frozen peas.

8. Fry for 2 minutes.

9. Add 2 cup of stock or water and cook for one whistle and let the
pressure drop itself.

10. Serve on a tray and remove the whole spices if you wish.

11. Serve garnished with coriander leaves and fried cashewnuts.

You can keep the fried onion separate and use as garnish as is done in
biryani. Serve as accompaniment with other dishes for any occasion.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 60


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Pea Pulao is also known as Yellow Rice. It is a great


alternative to plain boiled rice. It serves as great accompaniment for any
main course, be it vegetarian or meat-based. Basically it is considered as
home recipe. Normally because of its simplicity it not preferred in
restaurants.

This is very simple dish to prepare. Paneer butter masala or any paneer dish
makes a good combination with peas pulao. This is an easy dish which can
be prepared in a matter of minutes because it does not need much
chopping.

It is a mildly flavored with Indian spices and is versatile because it can be


served along with any kind of side dish from exotic chicken or paneer curry
to simple raita. It is perfect item for home and all occasions.

Ingredients:
1. Basmati Rice 1 cup
2. Peas ½ cup
3. Cauliflower cut into florets ½ cup
4. Small green pepper, cut into long strips 1
5. Carrots, finely sliced ¼ Cup
6. Sweet corn ¼ Cup

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 61


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

7. Sliced mushrooms ¼ cup


8. Onions sliced 1
9. Ginger chopped finely 1 inch piece
10. Green Chillies 2
11. Salt to taste
12. Cinnamon 1 piece
13. Cloves 2-3
14. Bay leaf 2
15. Coriander for garnish
16. Ghee 2 tbsp
17. Cashew nuts ¼ cup
18. Black peppers whole 6-8
19. Turmeric 1/4 tsp

Methodology
1. Wash and soak the rice for 30 minutes.
2. Grind the garlic and the ginger to a very fine paste.
3. Heat the remaining ghee in a medium sized hundi or pressure cooker
4. Add whole grain cumin seeds
5. Fry the sliced onions in a little in ghee till golden brown.
6. Add all other spice cinnamon, clove, black pepper, bay leaf and garlic –
ginger paste and fry for 2 minutes over a low flame.
7. Add the drained rice and the shelled or frozen peas and all other
vegetables.
8. Fry for 2 minutes.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 62


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

9. Add 2 cup of stock or water and cook for one whistle and let the
pressure drop itself
10. Serve on a tray and remove the whole spices if you wish.
11. Serve garnished with coriander leaves and fried cashewnuts.
You can keep the fried onion separate and use as garnish as is done in
biryani. Serve as accompaniment with other dishes for any occasion.

Serve with Raita

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 63


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Pea Pulao is the most common pulao home dish. It is a


great alternative to plain boiled rice. It serves as great accompaniment for
any main course, be it vegetarian or meat-based. Basically it is considered
as home recipe. Normally because of its simplicity it not preferred in
restaurants.

This dish can be made with several variations to cater for individual taste
and variety. Like mixed vegetable pulao this is another variation. The dish is
very simple dish to prepare. Paneer butter masala or any paneer dish makes
a good combination with cauliflower and broccoli pulao. This is an easy dish
which can be prepared in a matter of minutes.

This can be made mildly flavored with Indian spices or really spicy
depending on your choice. The dish is versatile because it can be served
along with any kind of side dish from exotic chicken or paneer curry to
simple raita. It is perfect item for home and all occasions.

Ingredients:
1. Basmati Rice 1 cup
2. Peas ½ cup
3. Cauliflower cut into florets ½ cup

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 64


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Broccoli cut into small florets 1cup


5. Onions sliced 1
6. Ginger chopped finely 1 inch piece
7. Green Chillies 2
8. Salt to taste
9. Cinnamon 1 piece
10. Cloves 2-3
11. Bay leaf 2
12. Coriander for garnish
13. Ghee 2 tbsp
14. Cashew nuts ¼ cup
15. Black peppers whole 6-8
16. Turmeric 1/4 tsp

Methodology:
1. Wash and soak the rice for 30 minutes.

2. Grind the garlic and the ginger to a very fine paste.

3. Heat the remaining ghee in a medium sized hundi or pressure cooker.

4. Add whole grain cumin seeds.

5. Fry the sliced onions in a little in ghee till golden brown.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 65


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

6. Add all other spice cinnamon, clove, black pepper, bay leaf and garlic –
ginger paste and fry for 2 minutes over a low flame.

7. Add the drained rice and cauliflower and broccoli florets

8. Fry for 2 minutes.

9. Add 2 cup of stock or water and cook for one whistle and let the
pressure drop itself

10. Serve on a tray and remove the whole spices if you wish.

11. Serve garnished with coriander leaves and fried cashewnuts.

You can keep the fried onion separate and use as garnish as is done in
biryani. Serve as accompaniment with other dishes for any occasion.

Serve with Raita

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 66


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

The Exotic complete Gourmet Meal

Biryani is complete traditional meal of carbohydrates, proteins,


and vegetables. And to compliment the dish is served with fresh salads,
pickles and yogurt in the form of Raitas as well as plain. Also the dish is
served with korma, curry or a sour dish of eggplant.

Biryani is very popular dish in the Indian Subcontinent especially in


PAKISTAN and India where it is usually made with rice and chicken and
vegetables. Biryani is the most popular dish of Saudi Arab, United Arab
Emirates Middle Eastern, South Asia. There the dish is made from a mixture
of spices, rice (usually basmati), meat and or vegetables and yogurt. Nearly
65% of the Export of India’s Basmati rice is consumed in Saudi Arab.

As far as the types of biryani are concerned, there are many different types
of biryanis and each kind has its uniqueness. Pre-mixed biryani spices from
different commercial names are also available in markets these days in the
sub-continent. These reduce the preparation time though the taste differs
considerably.

The spices and condiments used in biryani are what primarily contribute to
the taste. Basically clove, cardamom, cinnamon, wasabi (a plant whose root
is ground to make wasabi powder or paste. It is native to: Asia. Latin name:
Eutrema wasabi), bay leaves, coriander and mint leaves, apart from ghee,
ginger, onions, garlic and yogurt are used in varying proportions to make
biryani. The premium varieties of biryani include saffron.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 67


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

For a non-vegetarian biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the


spices is chicken, goat, lamb, shrimp, or sometimes beef, though vegetable
biryani varieties are very popular.

History of Biryani:
Biryani originated in Persia and might have taken couple of different routes
before arriving in India and the Indian Sub-continent.

Biryani is derived from the Farsi or Persian word ‘Birian’. The Biryani comes
from the root that means “fried.” The origins of the dish are unclear, since
multiple nations make a number of variations on it. In biryani, the rice is
traditionally fried in Ghee before it is cooked. This creates a characteristic
texture, aroma, and taste. The rice is usually seasoned with saffron or other
aromatic spices as well. Once the rice is mixed with food cooked with biryani
spice blend and then once again the mixture is slowly cooked, the result is a
complex, multilayered dish which is ideal for special occasions.

Based on the name, and cooking style (Dum), one can conclude that the
dish originated in Persia and or Arabia. ‘DUM’ implies cooking on low heat
with mouth sealed to conserve all aromas. It seems Biryani could have come
from Persia via Afghanistan to North India. It could have also been brought
by the Arab traders via Arabian Sea to Calicut. From there it could have
settled in Hyderabad.

We know the history little better during 1800 to 1900. During Mogul empire,
Lucknow (the capital city of Uttar Pradesh) was known as Awadh. There
originated ‘Awadhi Biryani’.

In 1856, British deposed Nawab Wajid Ali Shah in Calcutta. This gave rise to
Calcutta Biryani. Mougal Emperor Aurangzeb installed Nizam-ul-mulk as
the Asfa Jahi ruler of Hyderabad, as well as a ‘Nawab of Arcot’ to
oversee Aaru Kaadu region (Six Forests) south of Hyderabad. These moves
gave rise to Hyderabadi Biryani and Arcot Biryani. The Biryani reached
Mysore by Tipu Sultan of Carnatic. Needless to say it was a royal dish for
Nawabs and Nizams. They hired vegetarian Hindus as bookkeepers leading
to the development of Tahiri Biryani.

Besides the historical facts, the story gets little fuzzy with legends.

One legend has it that Timor, the lame brought it down from Kazakhstan
via Afghanistan to Northern India. According to another legend, Mumtaz
Mahal (the beauty queen of Shahjehan, in whose memory the famous Taj
Mahal was built) invented biryani as a ‘complete meal’ to feed the army.
Yet, some say the dish really originated in West Asia. The Nomads would

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 68


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

burry an earthen pot full of meat, rice and spices in a pit, eventually the pot
was dug up and there was the Biryani.

With human ingenuity each country and place has added new dimension to
the original recipe. Also it is called by different names in different territories.
Some of the famous names to remember are: Turkish Pilaf, Iranian
Biryani, Quaboli, Malaysian Biryani, Indonesian Biryani, Sindhi
Biryani, Idiyappam Biryani from Sri Lanka, and Kashmiri Yakhni
Biryani.

What is a Rice Pilaf?


Long grain rice is soaked in water. In the meanwhile, the meat fried in Ghee
and cooked with aromatic spices in a plenty of water. After the meat is
cooked you have plenty of Shorba (broth). More water and pre-soaked rice
are added. It is boiled and heat turned down to simmer. The rice is basically
cooked in meat broth. Nuts like Almonds, Cashews, dried fruits like raisins or
apricots may be added. The aromatic spices especially Cinnamon, Nutmeg,
Cloves and Bay-leaves are used. This dish is known as RICE PILAF or PULAO
or PULAV.

What is Biryani?
The word biryani comes from Farsi - Persian, Birian means ‘Fried before
Cooking’.

In the olden days, rice was fried (without washing) in Ghee (Clarified
butter). It did two things:

1. It gave the rice a nutty flavor

2. It burned the outside starch layer gelatinizing it. After the rice is stir-fried,
it was boiled in water with spices till half cooked.

Preferred choice for meat is leg of Telangana goat. The meat is marinated in
a paste made from Papaya, whole-milk yogurt and spices. Thereafter, the
meat may be cooked.

In an earthen pot called Handi, the rice and meat are layered; bottom and
top layer are always rice. An interlayer of some condiments may be
introduced between the meat and the rice. Cardamom, Mace, Screw pine
essence, rose water may be added to give flowery and herbal aroma. The
Handi is sealed and put on the coal embers to cook. For Calicut Biryani,
the Handi is placed on the embers produced by coconut shell. The
seal is broken only when ready to serve.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 69


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Biryani, Pulao and Tahiri:


Pulao is made by first frying the rice in Ghee so that each individual rice
kernel is coated and then rice is steamed with other ingredients like nuts or
raisins. It can have a slightly sweet taste, not very spicy.

Biryani on the other hand does not involve frying the rice first. Also crucial
to biryani is the fact that meat and rice are layered on top of each other.
Biryani is usually made with meat especially goat meat, although there are
so called vegetable biryanis as well. Also Hyderabadi biryani is made by
cooking the whole thing – meat and rice in a tightly sealed with dough – it is
a form of the so-called dum method. Biryani is usually quite spicy.

Tahiri is made using potato, beans and rice. Other vegetables may be
added. A garnish layer is added to the top. You can add paneer or meats as
well as well. This is the most common home recipe and cooks very fast. For
this we add spices like turmeric, coriander powder and chilli powder in
addition to the aromatic spices.

Type of rice and Biryani:


Historically, long-grain brown rice was used in North India; while, short grain
Zeera Samba rice was used in South India. In Bangladesh, puffed rice is
used. Parboiled long grain rice has following advantages:

1. Long grain rice has low Amylopectin starch, making it less sticky.

2. Parboiling makes the starch gelatinized making it further less susceptible


to being sticky.

3. The brownness of the rice is due to the bran on the rice. The bran gives
the 'chewy' texture to the grain.

However the most common rice used today, is White Basmati Rice.

Meat and Biryani:


Traditionally, the leg of goat was used to make Biryani. However now a
days, depending on the region and restaurant, one can find Biryani made
with Mutton, Lamb, Beef, Chicken, Fish, and Prawns.

Vegetables and Biryani:


In Calcutta region, potatoes are the most common ingredient. Cauliflower,
carrots, peas, bell peppers and green beans are traditional ingredient as
well. New items include Jack fruit, Bottle gourd, and white chickpeas or

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 70


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Garbanzo beans. Cashew nut, almonds, pistachios are widely used to make
the dish balanced one.

Types of Meat Biryani Cooking Style:


Basically there are two basic types of Biryani:

1. Kutchi or raw Biryani: Kutchi Biryani does not meet the strict
meaning of Biran in Farsi meaning ‘Fried before Cooking’; For Kutchi
Biryani, raw marinated meat is layered with raw rice. And then the dish is
cooked. Hyderabadi Biryani is a form of Kutchi Biryani.

2. Pukki or cooked Biryani: In case of Pukki Biryani meat is cooked


first. For Pukki Biryani, cooked meat and cooked rice are layered and then
put in Handi for the finish and the final product. Lucknowi Biryani is a
type of Pukki Biryani.

Though there are several methods of preparing biryani, the Hyderabadi


Biryani is by far the most popular version, especially in Southern India. Now
Hyderabadi biryani is eaten in all parts of India and forms an integral part of
Indian cuisine. Historians claim that the earlier Nawabs of Punjab wore a
matching turban for each variety of biryani. The Nizam’s kitchen boasted of
49 kinds, which included biryani made from fish, quail, shrimp, deer and
hare. The Sindhi variety of biryani is very popular in Pakistani cuisine.
However biryani of all types is eaten in all parts of Pakistan. Another popular
form of biryani is the Awadhi biryani. This comes from Lucknow and is also
known as Lucknowi Biryani.

In Pakistan, Soudi Arab, United Arab Emirates, and England biryani enjoys
substantial popularity. This is especially the case in Karachi, where the
chicken version is popular with both young and old alike as a dish of choice.
This is related to Awadhi biryani but combines elements of Bombay
biryani and includes potatoes. In Punjab part of Pakistan the Anarkali
Bryani is also very popular.

Tehri is the name given to the vegetarian version of the dish and is very
popular in Indian homes.

The vegetarian version might have some textured vegetable protein based
protein balls to present the impression of a meat-based dish for vegetarians.
The difference between biryani and pulao (another popular rice dish in
Pakistan) is that while biryani may be made by cooking the items together,
pulao is used to denote a dish where the rice is cooked separately from the
other ingredients.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 71


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Bangladeshi biryani, is the well-known variety of biryani in countries


outside Asia, (especially Great Britain) and has attained the status of an
integral part of any ceremonial meal. Weddings in Dhaka usually end up with
serving of this popular dish.

As now you have been well-aware of biryani types, I will share with you
some popular biryani recipes no

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 72


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

With a detailed explanation about Biryani I will


now share two versions of vegetable biryani. However I have not included
any non-vegetarian dishes although a brief mention is made for those who
prefer the meat dishes. For me meat eating is the loss of Aesthetic Sense.
Also human intestine are not made suitable for meat consumption. And
there is no other reason.

Ingredients:

1. Basmati rice 2 cups


2. Cauliflower cut into flowerets 1 cup
3. Green peas, shelled ¾ cup
4. Carrots cut into 2.5 cm. Long pieces ½ cup
5. French beans, cut into diamond shaped pieces ½ cup
6. Potatoes, cut into ½ inch pieces each 3
7. Paneer ½ cup
8. Black cardamoms 3
9. Green cardamoms 4
10. Cinnamon 1 stick
11. Cloves 4-6
12. Peppercorns 8
13. Shahjeera 1 tsp

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 73


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

14. Bay leaves 3


15. Few strands saffron

Masala for the vegetables:

1. Onions sliced 1 cup

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 74


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Yogurt ¾ cup
3. Chilli powder 4 tsp
4. Ginger-garlic paste 3 tsp
5. Mint paste 2 tsp
6. Garam masala powder 1 ½ tsp
6. Coriander-cummin powder 1 ½ tsp
7. Salt to taste
8. ghee or more 3 tbsp
9. Ghee for deep frying onions

In place of garam masala , coriander and cumin powder you can use and
available biryani masala mix. I use and recommend SHREE GUN brand for
quality, fragrance and taste.

For the garnish:


1. Tomatoes, sliced 2
2. Capsicums, sliced 3 tbsp
3. Onions fried crisp 3 tbsp
4. Few mint leaves

Methodology:

To prepare the vegetables:

1. Wash the vegetables and dry them well.


2. Mix all the ingredients for the masala, well except the ghee, and marinate
the vegetables and paneer in it for one hour.
3. Heat ghee and deep fry the onions till golden brown and crisp. You need
to be patient and this is done by regulating heat from medium to low
4. When cool, grind to a paste.
5. Wash and cook the rice in double the quantity of water. When done,
remove the rice and spread it in a plate.
6. Keep aside to cool.

To prepare the rice:


1. Lightly roast the turmeric powder and sprinkle over the rice.

2. Heat ghee in a kadai and season it with the whole spices.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 75


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Add the vegetables and saute for five minutes.

4. Add a little water and cook the vegetables till done and almost dry.

5. In a baking dish arrange alternate layers of rice and the prepared

vegetables.

6. Top with garnish and bake in a moderately hot oven for 20 minutes.

Serve hot with raita, pickle and papad

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 76


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Enough has been spoken on Biryani earlier in


this section. Hyderabadi Biryani is known as Katchi Biryani because the
ingredients are used uncooked. However I am cooking the dish as pukki
biryani.

Ingredients:

For The Rice:

1. Basmati rice 1½ cup


2. Green cardamoms 2
3. Black cardamoms 2
4. Cloves 2
5. Cinnamon of 1 inch
6. Bay leaf 1
7. Mace strands 2
8. Salt

The Vegetable Gravy:

1. Cauliflower, florets 2 cups


2. Carrot, diced ½ cup

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 77


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Potato, cubed 1 medium


4. Chopped french beans 1 cup
5. Frozen or fresh peas ½ cup
6. Paneer cubes 1 cup
7. Onion, finely sliced 2 medium
8. Green chili, slit 1
9. Julienned ginger 2 tbsp
10. Chopped garlic 1 tbsp
11. Green cardamom 2
12. Black cardamoms 2
13. Cloves 2
14. Cinnamon of 1 inch
15. Bay leaf 1
16. Mace strands 2
17. yogurt whisked ½ cup
18. Turmeric powder ½ tsp
19. Red chili powder/cayenne pepper ½ tsp
20. Cashewnuts 2-3 tbsp
21. Sultanas/raisins 1 tbsp
22. Almonds, blanched, peeled and sliced 2 tbsp
23. Ghee 3 tbsp
24. Salt

Herbs and Spices for the assembling:

1. Chopped fine coriander - cilantro leaves ½ cup


2. Mint leaves ½ cup
3. Yogurt whisked curd ½ cup
4. Saffron strands a few
5. Milk 2 tbsp

Methodology:
Cooking the Rice:

1. Pick and clean the rice in running water. Soak the rice in water for 30
minutes.
2. Now you can pressure cook the rice. Or cook rice in a deep thick-
bottomed pan on high heat. Make sure water level above the rice is not
more than one length space on your index finger. When rice begins to boil
lower the heat to lowest. Cook the rice till its ¾ done. The rice should not
be fully cooked instead almost cooked.
3. Spread on a flat tray and leave covered
4. If you care to have biryani multi colored then divide rice in four portion

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 78


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Leave one white


6. In the next mix saffron strands soaked in warm milk for lemon color
you can sprinkle turmeric powder sparingly
7. In the third portion sprinkle degi or Kashmiri chili powder sparingly for
red colored rice. Kashmiri pepper is not very bitter yet it has rich red color
8. In the last portion mix thick spinach puree for green color
9. I use nature colors rather using food colors that are chemically
prepared

Biryani preparation steps:

Uncooked and cooked rice

Sliced seasoning and whole spices

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 79


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Cashew nuts and raisins and golden crispy onio

Cut vegetables and whisked yogurt

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 80


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Cooked vegetable and vegetables smeared with yogurt

Vegetables smeared with yogurt and cooking in fluid

Vegetables still cooking and finished with raisins and cashew

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 81


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Saffron yogurt and rice smeared with ghee ready for layering

Assembly in layers top layer being rice smeared with garnishing

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 82


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Traditional clay handi display of dish

Finished Biryani ready for serving

Making the Vegetable Gravy:

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 83


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Traditionally biryani is made in clay pots, known as handis. If you have


a clay pot, you could use it. In the west in baking dish in the oven. Now
stainless steel handi shaped pots are available. But I have a pressure cooker
shaped like a handi, so I used it.

2. Heat ghee in the handi.

3. Add all whole garam masala: cardamoms, mace, cloves, cinnamon,


bay leaves. Fry the garam masala till they crackle.

4. Now add the onions. Fry the onions till golden brown.

5. Add the green chilli, ginger and garlic. Fry for a minute.

6. Add the turmeric and red chili powder.

7. Give the mixture a stir.

8. Now add the vegetables and stir for a minute.

9. Add the yogurt.

10. Stir and then add ¾ cup water plus salt. Stir the mixture well.

11. If using a pressure cooker for cooking the vegetables then cover the
cooker with a lid and pressure cook for 2 minutes.

12. If not using a pressure cooker, then bring the entire vegetable mixture
to a boil. Then simmer until the vegetables are cooked. Add the dry fruits –
almonds, raisins and cashew nuts to the vegetable gravy.

13. Check the salt. Add more if required.

Assembling the Biryani and slow cooking it on Dum:

Now we come to the final part of biryani – the exotic gourmet meal

1. Warm the milk. Add saffron to it. Let this saffron-milk mixture cool.
Add the curd to this mixture and mix well.
2. Use the same handi or oval or rectangular baking casserole dish with
cover. Start layering with first and the last layer being rice. Alternate the
color rice. Separate each colored rice layer with white layer. Now average

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 84


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

the portion and accordingly use rice layer, vegetables, sprinkle a portion
each of saffron-flavored yogurt, mint and coriander leaves.
3. Continue layering until done
4. Sprinkle rose water. This is optional and you could skip it.
5. Cover with a moist cloth on top.
6. This is one technique that you could use for dum cooking if you do not
have the wheat flour dough to seal.
7. Place the sealed handi on the gas stove at low fire or you can place
thick pre heated iron tawa – girdle direct on the fire and place your handi or
casserole dish or thick bottomed pot on the preheated girdle to maintain
minimum heat and moisture inside. Also with this rice will not burn or stick
to the bottom.
8. Cook for 20-25 minutes more.
9. For the first 15 minutes, I dum cooked the biryani on direct low flame
and for the next 10 minutes, I place the handi on the pre heated tava and
cook on a low flame.
10. You could also preheat the oven to 190 degree celsius and then bake
the biryani in the oven for 15-20 minutes. Please remember to use an oven
proof utensil like the pyrex for baking in the oven. You will have to assemble
the biryani as mentioned above in the oven proof utensil and then bake it.
11. While serving, make sure you equally serve the vegetables as well as
rice.
Final Biryani Dum Cooking:

Biryani cooking dum preparation

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 85


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Biryani dum cooking

Biryani dum cooking

Serve the exotic Vegetable Biryani with your choice of raita, onion-mint
salad-kuchumber, mango pickle, roasted papad and chutney. You can also
serve any paneer gravy with it although biryani is complete meal of
carbohydrates, proteins, and vegetables.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 86


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

EXOTIC HYDERABADI VEGETABLE BIRYANI READY FOR SERVING

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 87


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Puri is most commonly served at breakfast. It is also served


at special or ceremonial functions as part of ceremonial rituals along with
other vegetarian food offered in prayer as ‘prasadam’. The name Puri comes
from the Sanskrit word pUirka (pūrikā).

The word Puri spealt as poori is also called boori. In different regional
languages it is written differently. In Hindi - pUrI (pūrī); Oriya - ପୁରି (pūrī);
Bengali: পুির (pūrī); Urdu: ‫ ﺑ;ی ور‬Tamil (pūri); Kannada ಪ (pūri);
Telugu ప (pūri)); Turkish: Puf böreği is an unleavened Pakistani and
Indian bread. Commonly it is consumed in India, Pakistan, Turkey,
Bangladesh and Nepal. It is consumed for breakfast, as a snack or light meal

Puri is prepared with wheat flour (either atta - whole-wheat flour, or maida -
refined wheat flour, or Sooji – coarse wheat flour). Dough of flour and salt is
either rolled out in a small circle or rolled out and cut out in small circles and
deep fried in ghee or vegetable oil. While deep frying, it puffs up like a
baloon. When it is golden-brown in color, it is removed and may be served
hot.

Puri can be served halwa, korma, chana masala, dal (lentil soup), potato
based curries (eg: Saagu, bhaji, bhujia), Shrikhand, and Basundi. In some

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 88


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

parts of India, Puri is also served with a mixed vegetable dish that is
prepared during puja, and with a dessert prepared with rice, milk and sugar.

Kneading the flour and almost ready dough

Rolling and frying the puris

Ingredients

28. Whole wheat flour 2-3 cups


29. Salt to taste optional
30. Ghee or Coconut oil for shortening 2Tbs

Methodology
1. Take the flour in a medium mixing bowl. Slowly add about ¾ cup
warm water, just enough to form a firm dough. Continue to knead till the
dough is smooth yet firm.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 89


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Cover, let rest at least ½ hour, and knead again briefly. If resting
more than 1 hour, punch and knead dough again before rolling out.

3. Divide into small balls about golf-ball size, and cover them with damp
cloth before rolling out into 6” rounds on an oiled surface or dusting the dry
powder. Heat vegetable oil in a wok or saucepan.

4. Add a little salt to the oil to keep it from smoking. Fry the puri one at a
time, holding them under the oil on the first side until they puff. Turn and fry
till light brown; drain and set aside.

5. This should take only a few seconds. Flip the poori over and cook the
other side until golden brown.

Serve the puri hot with pindi choley or other vegetables of your choice as
soon as possible. These are not as good later.

Puris are traditionally served with any or all of the following: Chana, Black-
eyed Pea Curry, Spinach Dal, Potato Curry, Brussels Sprouts, and anything
with yogurt in it.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 90


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

For spicy puris:

When making the dough, add to the dry ingredients pinches of salt, chilli
powder, chaat masala and ajwain - carum seeds and continue as above.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 91


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dhal Puris or kachoris are very popular dish in major parts of


North India and Gujrat. This item is not served in restaurants. Yet still it is
very popular during festivals and special occasions. There are a number of
small snack shops all over that offer this dish in many variations.

For instance, the kachori in Agra, Mathura, Vrindaban, Lucknow and Kanpur
differ significantly. Still it is favorite dish wherever one buys from. In some
communities, people undergo rigorous fasts during the Hindu festival of
Navratri that lasts for all the nine days of the festival. The festival of Navratri
culminates in Navami – the birth of Hindu God –Sri Rama. On this day, as a
mark of respect for the Goddess food is offered in large variety, including
poori, channa, kachori and Halwa.

Ingredients:

1. Split black gram (urd dhal,) 1 cup


2. Chapati flour 2 cups
3. Ghee (clarified butter) 5 tbsp
4. Chilli pepper, finely chopped 1 green

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 92


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Coconut Oil or ghee to fry


6. Salt to taste
7. Coriander seeds 1 tbsp
8. Fennel seeds 1 tbsp
9. Cumin seeds 1 tsp
10. Finely chopped ginger 1 tbsp

Methodology:

1. Rinse split gram or Urd dhal in running water until you get clear water.
Drain and soak in a bowl of cold water for 4 hours. This can be done
overnight as well.

2. Once the dhal has finished soaking, place in the food processor with a
little cold water and process briefly until they form a coarse, thick puree and
set aside.

3. Heat a non-stick frying pan. Add coriander seeds, fennel seeds and
cumin seeds and dry roast for 30 seconds over a moderate heat, stirring
continuously. Remove from the heat; grind the seeds finely in a spice mill or
coffee grinder fine. Pass the mixture through a fine sifter to obtain a really
fine quality powder.

4. Heat the remaining ghee in a large frying pan and fry the chopped
chilli pepper and ginger gently over a low heat for 2 - 3 minutes, stirring
continuously; add the lentil puree and 1/2 tsp salt and the Masala mixture.
Cook, stirring over a slightly higher heat for a few minutes, until the puree

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 93


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

darkens and thickens further. Remove from the heat and leave to cool
before stirring in the garam masala.

5. Sift whole wheat flour into a large mixing bowl, add ½ tsp salt, 2
tbsp hot ghee and stir in, gradually adding just enough cold water to make a
firm dough. Knead for 10 minutes then shape into a ball, wrap in cling film
and leave to rest for at least 30 minutes.

6. Start making the puris about 30 minutes before you plan to serve
them. Knead the dough for 2 - 3 minutes and divide into 10 pieces of even
size; shape these into balls between your palms and drop them into a large
bowl; remove 2 and cover the bowl with a moist muslin cloth to prevent the
dough from drying out.

7. Flatten the first ball with your palms and then roll out on a lightly
floured pastry board with a floured rolling pin and fill the dhal mixture and
roll back and again roll to a 4-5 inch diameter to form a thin. Roll out all the
puris before frying.

8. Heat oil in a very large frying pan or deep-fryer and when hot but not
smoking, place the puris in the pan and fry until they puff up and are pale
golden brown. Gently stroking with the spatula the very hot oil over the
exposed surfaces of the puris. Drain and keep hot while you fry the
remaining.

Serve at once, with vegetable of choice a bowl of raita made by mixing the
yogurt with a pinch of salt and with the finely sliced spring onion or
cucumber, or diced boiled potato or besan boondi.

Variation:
Instead of filling the dhal mixture you can knead the raw dhal mixture along
with all spices into the flour and then make the puris in a normal way. This
will be slightly thinner than the filled ones.

Serve with dry vegetable or lightly gravy potato and peas, or pumpkin or the
vegetable of your choice or all as accompaniment along with raita and fresh
mint or coriander chutney and pickle.

Easy Pani Puri or Pani Poori which ... and easy way to prepare puri of
pani puri recipe. Ingredients for puri of Pani Puri Take 6 measures of soji,
One measure of maida, One measure of wheat flour and follow the steps as

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 94


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

in this or puri recipe. These are then served as chaat along with boiled
chickpeas, boiled potato cubes garnished with tamarind chutney, yogurt
strands of carrot, cilantro, salt, chilli powder, and groung roast jeera.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 95


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Sev or Dahi Puri

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 96


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Chapattis are one of the most common forms in which


wheat, the staple of northern South Asia, is consumed. Chapatti is a form of
roti (bread). The words are often used interchangeably. While roti refers to
any flat unleavened bread, chapatti is a roti made of whole wheat flour and
cooked on a tava - flat skillet. Usually it is made with whole wheat flour. To
roll the chapattis thin needs practice in the beginning.

The word ‘chapatti’ is considered of Dravidian origin, from chappa meaning


‘flattened’ and attai or paathi. Chapatti is mentioned in Ain-i-Akbari, a
16th century document, by Mughal Emperor, Akbar’s vizier – high ranking
government officer, Abu’l-Fazl ibn Mubarak.

Chapattis are the most common form of staple wheat bread consumed
throughout Indian communities. In different regins it is known by differently
(Hindi: cpatI, Bengali: চাপা , Tamil: ச பா ,திKannada: ಚ ಾ , Malayalam:
ച ാ ി, Telugu: చ ా , Urdu: ‫ی ﺎت‬,‫ ﭼﭘ‬Marathi: पोळी, Punjabi: ਚਪਾਤੀ
[pronounced as tʃəpɑt̪i]; Turkmen: Çapady). It is an unleavened flatbread
(also known as roti) from the Indian subcontinent. Versions of it are found in
Turkmenistan and in East African countries Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. In
China there is also a similar type of flatbread called Laobing.

Chapattis are made from a firm but pliable dough made from flour (whole
grain common wheat), ‘atta’ in Urdu/Hindi/Punjabi/Bengali, and water.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 97


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Some people also add salt and/or oil to the dough. Small portions of the
dough are rolled out into discs much like a Mexican tortilla, using a rolling
pin. The rolled-out dough is thrown on the preheated dry skillet and cooked
on both sides. In some regions it is only partly cooked on the skillet, and
then put directly on a high flame, which makes it blow up like a balloon. The
hot air cooks the chapatti rapidly from the inside. In some parts of northern
India (e.g. Punjab) and Pakistan, this is called a phulka because of its
inflated shape.

Often, the top of a chapatti is smeared with butter or ghee - clarified butter.
A piece of chapatti is torn off and used to pick up the meat or vegetable dish
or dishes known as subjis that make the complete meal. It is folded into a
sort of loose cone and used as a scoop to eat the more liquid dishes at a
meal like dal, paneer, or chola.

Chapatti sizes its diameter and thickness varies from region to region and
kitchen to kitchen. In Gujarat, for example, the chapatti is called a ‘rotli’ and
can be as thin as tissue paper. Chapattis made in domestic kitchens are
usually not larger than 15–18 cm in diameter since the 'tava' on which they
are made comes in sizes that fit comfortably on a domestic stove top.

Tavas were traditionally made of unglazed earthenware, but are now


typically made from metal such as iron. There are also electric tavas
manufactured in India. The shape of the rolling pin also varies from region to
region. Some households simply use a kitchen counter top as a sort of
pastry board, but homes have round flat-topped ‘boards’ specifically for
rolling out chapattis that may be made of wood or stone. There are press
available in the market wherein the portion of the dough is placed between
two surfaces and then pressed to obtain a rolled chapatti. However these do
not roll bigger than 6” in diameter.

Flat unleavened breads in South Asia come in many forms. The chapatti is
only one of them. A roti, made of dough similar to that used to make
chapattis and cooked in an tandoor – clay oven, is a ‘tandoori roti’.

The combination of wheat flour with one or more flours e.g. chickpea, maize,
or millet will produce a ‘missi roti’. Rotis made with pearl millet (bajra) or
maize (makka) or (jowar) flour usually carry the name of the flour, as in
‘bajra roti’ or ‘makke ki roti’ (or ‘bhakri’ in Marathi).

Flat breads like chapatti and roti are traditionally a food of northern South
Asia. The peninsular south, the east and northeast and the Kashmir valley
are primarily rice-eating cultures. In southern India, there is a distinction
made between a ‘chapatti’ and its layered fried version the ‘paratha’.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 98


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

‘Parathas’ may be plain as well as a filling inside, such as spinach, cooked


radish, potato, paneeer, and onion. Also now the ‘tandoori roti’ is to be
found in the smallest towns.

Ingredients
1. Whole wheat flour 2 cups
2. Salt optional
3. Ghee optional

Methodology:
1. Sift the flour flour in mixing bowl, reserving about half cup for dusting
while rolling chapattis. Mix salt through the flour in the bowl, and then rub in
ghee or oil, if used. The salt and ghee are optional for chapattis.

2. Add water in small streams and mix to a firm but not stiff dough.
Knead dough until the dough is smooth. Normally the dough is kneaded for
at least 10 minutes. Well kneaded dough makes lighter chapattis.

3. Divide dough into small tennis ball size. Cover with clear plastic wrap
and stand for 1 hour or longer and if left overnight, the chapattis will be very
light and tender.

4. Roll out each one on a lightly floured board using reserved flour to a
circular shape as thin as a French crepe. After rolling out chapattis, heat a
griddle plate or heavy-based frying pan until very hot, and cook the
chapattis, starting with those that were rolled first.

5. Place chapatti on griddle and leave for about 1 minute. Turn and cook
on the other side a further minute, pressing lightly around the edges of the
chapatti with a folded tea towel or an egg slice. This encourages bubble to
form and make the chapattis light. This is the method of puffing the
chapattis of the tava itself.

6. However there is another way to puff chapattis. Chapatti, after it is


cooked on both sides is placed direct on the flame to puff like a balloon. This
requires practice as chapattis cannot be left on the open flame longer. This
is to be done quickly using the tong or salad server to hold the chapatti
while baking on the open flame.

7. As each one is cooked, wrap in a clean tea towel until all are ready.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 99


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Serve immediately smeared with butter along with dry curries or vegetable
dishes, daal, rice, salad, chutney or pickle. A complete platter includes
chapattis, daal, rice, vegetable dry or with gravy, chutney, salad, pickle or
any yogurt dish.

CHAPATTIS

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 100


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Parantha is flaky and somewhat more elaborate than


chapattis or rotis. The dough is rolled out and brushed with ghee or oil
folded and brushed with ghee or oil again and folded again to form a layered
slice.

Paranthas are usually stuffed with vegetables such as boiled potatoes, leaf
vegetables, radishes or cauliflower, paneer. A paranthas (especially a stuffed
one) can be eaten simply with a blob of butter spread on top or chutney, a
spicy sauce made from yogurt and fresh herbs, but it is best served with
pickles and yogurt, or thick spicy curries of meat and vegetables. Some
people prefer to roll up the paranthas into a tube and eat it with tea, often
dipping the paranthas into the tea.

The paranthas can be round, heptagonal, square or triangular. In the


former, the stuffing is mixed with the kneaded flour and the paranthas is
prepared as roti is, but in the latter two, the peda (ball of kneaded flour) is
flattened into a circle, the stuffing is kept in the middle and the flatbread is
closed around the stuffing like an envelope. The latter two also vary from
the first in that, while the former is like a thick (in terms of width) version of
the roti with filling inside, the latter two have discernible soft layers if one
‘opens’ the crispier shell layers.

This is then rolled out again. Parantha is then put on a hot griddle and
brushed with oil. The heat makes the layers of dough swell and puff,
resulting flaky, pastry like flat breads. They may also be used as snacks,
lunch-box favorites, light brunch items or traveling munching companions.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 101


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

In New Delhi – Chandni Chowk where a particular lane is known as


‘Paranthas wali Gali’ – the Paranthas lane. There plain paranthas are
shallow cooked in oil in a shallow frying pan and served with range of dry
vegetables, yogurt raita and chutnies. This is a very popular dish.

Ingredients:
1. Flour for dusting 2½ cup
2. Ghee for smearing ½ cup

Methodology:

1. Place flour in a large bowl. Shorten the flour with ghee. This is
optional. However shortened dough makes softer Paranthas.

2. Make a hole in the middle and pour in a stream of water in the


center. Use one hand to mix the flour and water in a rotating motion from
the center of the bowl outward, until the dough is moist enough to be
gathered into a rough mass. Wet hands and continue until the mixture
cleans the sides of the bowl and has become non-sticky, kneadable dough.

3. When the dough is kneaded, it will be elastic and silky smooth. To test
the dough, press it lightly with a fingertip. If it springs back, it is ready to be
rested. Resting the dough is the last step and allows the dough to relax and
absorb the water and kneading.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 102


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Rest the dough for ½ hour in warm climates and 1.5 hours in cold
climates. Cover with a wet towel so the dough does not dry out. The rested
dough gets light and springy, less resistant to being rolled out into the thin
rounds.

5. To make triangular-shaped layered paranthas, divide the dough into


peach-size balls. With a rolling pin, roll out 1 ball to a circle 5 inches in
diameter. Brush the circle of dough with ghee, and fold in half to from a
crescent then brush again with ghee and fold into a triangle. Seal the edges
well.

6. Dust the parantha with finely sieved whole wheat flour and roll into a
large, flat triangle or round parantha. Try to make the edges slightly thinner
to ensure uniform cooking. Rather than shaping all the paranthas at one
time, cook each one as the next one is rolled out.

7. Preheat a cast-iron tawa over medium heat. Place the rolled dough on
the palm of one hand and flip it over on to the tawa. When the color changes
on the top and bubbles appear, brush ghee over the surface of the
paranthas and turn it over. Repeat the process brushing the paranthas on
the other side. Keep flipping it over till both sides are browned and spots
appear on the paranthas.

8. With experience the paranthas will puff on the tawa.


To keep the paranthas warm as they are cooked, place them in a towel-lined
bowl and fold over the sides of the towel. Serve hot.

There are wide variety of stuffing that is used to make paranthas. And each
paranthas is named differently based on the filling used to make this. Some
of the most common vegetarian and non- vegetarian paranthas are given
here. Once you know the basic recipe you can make any of the varieties.
Season the filling to your liking and continue.

1. Plain paranthas (layered roti without any stuffing except ghee & baked
with ghee - popular in Uttar Pradesh)

2. Qeema Paranthas (Paranthas stuffed with seasoned minced meats,


usually mutton mostly available in Punjab, India and Pakistan)

3. Mooli Paranthas (Raddish stuffed paranthas, popular in Uttar Pradesh


and the Punjab region of Pakistan and India.)

4. Boondi Paranthas (stuffed with salty boondi & baked with ghee)

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 103


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Gobhi paranthas (stuffed with seasoned cooked minced cauliflower)

6. Aloo paranthas (stuffed with spicy boiled potato and onions mix)

7. Tomato paranthas (stuffed with tomatoes)

8. Channa Dal paranthas (stuffed with channa dal)

9. Paneer paranthas (stuffed with seasoned spicy cottage cheese)

10. Dal paranthas (stuffed with boiled and mashed spicy seasoned dal)

11. Sattu paranthas (stuffed with spiced sattu - roasted gram flour popular
in Easter Uttar Pradesh and Bihar)

12. Kerala paranthas (popular version popular in Kerala pronounced


‘porotta’)

13. Roti paranthas (Singapore, Malaysia, Guyana and Trinidad - highly


variable)

14. Sugar paranthas (layered with caramelized sugar, usually after a meal or
as dessert

15. Lachha paranthas - Tandoori (Punjabi in origin. Round in shape with


multiple layers traditionally prepared in a tandoor)

16. Lachha paranthas - Tawa wali (Popular in eastern India, triangular in


shape with multiple layers interspaced with ghee)

17. Keema paranthas - (also called Kheema paranthas) (stuffed with


flavored seasoned minced meat. Popular in Punjab)

18. Anda paranthas (stuffed with egg)

19. Podeena paranthas (laced with dry mint)

20. Ceylon paranthas (from Sri Lanka)

21. Ajwain paranthas (layered paratha laced with ajwain

22. Pyaz ka paranthas (stuffed with onion)

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 104


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

23. Mughlai paranthas (a deep fried stuffed paratha filled with egg and
minced meat)

24. Mattar paranthas (stuffed with boiled, mashed and flavoured green peas)

25. Jaipuri paranthas

26. Chili paranthas / or Mirchi Paranthas (small, spicy shredded pieces)

27. Methi wala paranthas (stuffed with fenugreek leaves). There is yet
another version of it known as Methi Nu Thepla – popular in Gujrat.

28. Band gobi wala ir cabbage paranthas (stuffed with cabbage)

29. Meetha Paranthas (Stuffed with sugar)

30. Palak Paranthas

31. Tandoori Paranthas – cooked in tandoor

32. Putthay taway ka Paranthas

33. Bal wala Paranthas

34. Parton wala Paranthas layered one

35. Chicken Paranthas

36. Pork Paranthas

37. Mutton Paranthas

38. Shrimp (large) Paranthas

39. Shrimp (small) Paratha

40. Paranthas Pizza Pops (Invented in Cleveland, Paranthas stuffed with


pizza sauce, cheese and toppings)

41. Loki Paranthas

42. Batuha Paranthas

43. Gajar or carrot Paranthas

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 105


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

44. Dhaniya Paranthas

45. Chena Paranthas chena is the softer paneer or it is the initial stage of
paneer

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 106


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Paranthas are sometimes stuffed with herbed potatoes,


shredded radishes and cauliflower with its water squeezed out, peas and
even sugar or dried fruit pastes. When cut into wedges, they are excellent
finger foods for parties. These paranthas are served with yogurt raita and
Indian pickles. Panjabis serve aloo – potato with a stick of butter.

Ingredients:
1. Whole-wheat flour 2cups
2. Potatoes - boiled, peeled, mashed 2 medium
3. Coriander powder 1 tsp
4. Cumin powder 1 tsp
COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 107
Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Amchoor powder or Chaat Masala ½ tsp


6. Green chili minced (optional) 1
7. Chilli powder ½ Tsp
8. Lime/lemon juice 1 tsp
9. Salt to taste
10. Finely chopped cilantro
11. Ghee for shortening and smearing

Methodology:
1. Mix mashed potatoes, coriander powder, cumin powder, mango
powder or Chaat Masala, chopped green chilies, salt, cilantro, lime juice and
chili powder. You can also add fried onion as this gives great taste.

2. Make small balls of the mixture.

3. Knead the flour as in the recipe of Paranthas with shortening

4. Take a ball of dough slightly thicker than chapatti (large egg size or
peach size) and roll it to a circle 4-5 inches in diameter.

5. Place Potato mixture on it and again make it into a ball.


Seal the edges completely so that the stuffing does not come out.

6. Flatten these balls and roll into a 6 inch circle.

7. Pre-heat the griddle (tawa). Turn it and spread little ghee or butter and
cook over low heat.

Turn it again and spread ghee on the other side.

Cook both sides till golden brown.

Serve with chutney, yogurt, steamed vegetable and Indian pickles, butter or
gravy of your choice

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 108


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

ALOO PARANTHAS

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 109


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

It is also a very popular variety of Parantha. Because of it


hot spicy taste it is very popular. It is made as the plain Paranthas or any
other stuffed variety of paranthas.

Ingredients:

1. Wheat Flour 1½ Cups


2. Gram Flour ½ Cups
3. Chilli Powder 1½ Tsp
4. Oil 1 Tbsp
5. Salt To Taste
6. Turmeric Powder ½ Tsp
7. Asafaetida 2-3 Pinches
8. Cummin Seeds ½ Tsp
9. Oregano Seeds ½ Tsp
10. Finely Chopped Coriander

Methodology:
1. Sieve Aata, Besan along with salt and red chili powder and add enough
water and knead into stiff dough, cover with wet cloth.

2. Divide into equal pieces and make small potato sized balls.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 110


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Roll to 5-5 mm thickness. Cook on tawa as for phulka or chapattis.

4. After brown spots appear place direct on gas flame and puff, with help
of tongs.

5. Phulka also may be done similarly if puffing with cloth, feels difficult.
You can cook like paranthas as well smearing ghee while cooking.

Apply ghee or butter and serve hot with sweetened mango preserve
(chunda) or yogurt or jam.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 111


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Poran Polis a traditional sweet prepared in Maharashtra,


Gujarat, Goa and South India. Poran Poli is a dessert served during
auspicious occasions and during important festivals such as Holi, Diwali, and
Ugadi. Although it resembles a roti, a Poli is actually very different. The
making of the Poli begins with preparing the stuffing, which may be one of
three traditional options.

However Puran Poli or Puranachi Poli remains associated with Maharashtra


and is its most popular dish. It is made mostly during holi when the bonfire
is lit.

The stuffing is known as puran and the outer cover is known as poli.

The puran is made by boiling chickpea daal with a pinch of turmeric for
color. When the daal are cooked and soft, the broth is removed and kept
aside. Jaggery or gur is added to the chickpeas and cooked till they are soft.
Then the stuffing is removed and sieved through a utensil made specifically
for puran to achieve a smoother consistency. Saffron, cardamom, and
nutmeg is added for additional flavor. The outer cover is made by making
dough by mixing refined flour, milk and ghee.

Equal number of balls is made of the dough as well as the stuffing. The
puran is stuffed inside the dough and then rolled out flat using a rolling pin.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 112


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

The poli is then coked on a hot griddle and served with ghee and a soup
made from the lentil broth called as katachi amti.

Poran Poli is also the famous dish in many different states in India. As a
result it is known by different names Kannada: Holige, ೋ orೆ ಒಬ ಟು
Obbattu/Hollige; Marathi and Konkani: परु णपोळी or परु णाची पोळी; Gujarati: પોળ ;
Tamil: ஒ /ஒ ப , Kongu Nadu or ேபாள Poli; Telugu: Bobbattlu
బ బ టor Poleylu, or Bhakshalu, or Oligalu.

The basic ingredients are Channa dal - yellow gram, Jaggery Card,
Cardamom powder, Ghee and Plain flour. There are other variations as well
that too make the dish very savory.

Tenkai poornam or Kaayi Holige is another stuffing made of grated


coconut and jaggery. Fresh coconut is grated and the jaggery is broken into
small pieces. In a heavy-base vessel, some ghee is heated and some finely
chopped cashew-nuts are roasted. Into this ghee, the grated coconut and
jaggery are added together. On a medium flame, the vessel is stirred so
often, until the jaggery melts and melds the coconut into a rough mass.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 113


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Powdered cardamom and some saffron soaked for a few minutes in milk are
added to this mixture to impart further fragrance and flavor.

Parappu poornam or Hoorna Holige is yet another stuffing made using


boiled lentils instead of the coconut. Chickpea lentils are boiled to a soft
consistency. It is blended with jaggery and aromatic spices like cardamom
and nutmeg in exactly the same method as described above. The stuffing is
cooled to room temperature. Meanwhile, the actual dough is prepared. Very
soft, rubbery dough is prepared by kneading polished wheat-flour with a
little water and a large amount of ghee as shortening. This is left soaked in
oil for a few hours.

Once both the dough and the stuffing are ready, the puran poli can be rolled
out. A plantain leaf is greased thoroughly on one side with ghee to turn out a
fine poli. On the greased plantain leaf, a handful of the dough is patted by
hand into a mid-sized circle. A small amount of stuffing is placed at the
center of this dough, which is wrapped around the stuffing to make a ball.
This ball is then rolled carefully using a rolling pin into a large, thin circular
pancake shape.

Meanwhile, a griddle is heated over a medium flame and greased. The


plantain-leaf bearing the poli is inverted over the griddle. The Poli tends to
adhere to the griddle, since the latter is hot. Using a spatula, the edge of the
poli is held down on to the griddle, while the plantain-leaf is peeled away by
hand. This leaves the poli on the hot griddle, where it is turned over
repeatedly, if required, until both faces of the poli are roasted to a golden
burnish and a fragrant aroma is released. The poli is now ready to be eaten.

Kadale Bele Obbattu (Chana Dal Obbattu) The poli is in itself a delicious
sweetmeat and is often eaten as such. It may be served with a spoonful of
ghee. Poli is often served with milk, which may be sweetened or flavored
with almonds and pistachio. In certain areas, polis a tangy, tamarind-based
sauce is served with the poli, to enhance the experience by combining very
disparate flavors. In Maharashtra, the tangy sauce is called katachi amti or
raw mango.

In the Vidarbha region of eastern Maharashtra, the puran polis is soft, since
the stuffing is made with jaggery. In western Maharashtra, the powdered
white-sugar version is preferred, resulting in a crunchy puran poli.

Also, sometimes white flour can be converted into bread rolls with jaggery
filling inside it for a variation.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 114


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:

For the filling

1. Toovar (arhar) or channa dal 1 cup


2. Sugar or jaggary 1 cup
3. Saffron (kesar) strands a few
4. Cardamom (elaichi) powder ½ tsp
5. Nutmeg (jaiphal) powder ¼ tsp
6. Mace (javantri) powder pinch
7. Ghee 2 tbsp

For the dough

Whole wheat flour (gehun ka atta) 2 cups


Coconut Oil 2 cups

For the serving

Ghee

Methodology:
For the filling

1. Wash and pressure cook the dal in 1 ½ cups of water.


2. Drain any excess water grind and keep aside.
3. Heat the ghee in a pan and add the dal and sugar or jaggary and cook
till the mixture thicken, stirring continuously.
4. Dissolve the saffron in a little water or warm milk by rubbing.
5. Add the cardamom and nutmeg powders, mace powder, and saffron
liquid and mix well.
6. Cool, divide into 12 to 15 portions and keep aside.

For the dough

1. Combine the flour and oil and knead into a soft dough using water.
2. Divide into 12 to 15 portions and keep aside.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 115


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

The Final assembly

1. Roll out one portion of the dough into a (3’’) diameter circle.
2. Place a portion of the filling mixture and fold the edges of the dough
over the filling.
3. Pinch the edges together to seal the filling in.
4. Flatten the dough and roll again into a (4’’) diameter circle.
5. Cook on a tava over a medium flame till golden brown in color on both
sides.
6. Repeat for the remaining dough and filling.
7. Smear with ghee and serve hot.

Poran Polis

Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated as the birthday of Lord Ganesha across India.


This festival is very popular in Maharashtra. According to Indian traditions,
dishes such as halwa and puri must to be added in the menu of the birthday
celebrations. Same is the case with the birthday of other Gods. Ganesh
Chaturthi celebration witnesses with the preparation of lots of delicious
dishes and one of them is Puran Poli. It is very famous dish of Maharashtra
and is specially cooked on the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 116


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Bhakri is round flat unleavened bread often used in the cuisine


of western and central India, especially in the states of Gujarat and
Maharastra. Typically bhakri is accompanied by various curries, chutney
(thecha - a thick paste of really hot green or red chilies) and raw onion.

Bhakri is a type of Maharashtrian flatbread or roti which can be made using


rice flour, sorghum flour, pearl millet flour or a combination of various
flours. This type of flatbread is thicker and has a more coarse texture than
chapatti or roti. Bhakri is also very high in dietary fiber and more easily
digestible. It is also made using absolutely no oil so it is much healthier as
well. The rice, sorghum and pearl millet flours can easily be found in any
Indian grocery store or organic - health food places.

Bhakri (-akrI bhākrī or Dhebra) is a round flat unleavened bread often used
in the cuisine of western and central India, especially in the states of
Maharashtra, Gujarat, northern Karnataka and Goa. It is coarser than a
Chapatti and slightly harder because of the gluten free flours used in the
recipe. It can be compared to a British biscuit with respect to hardness.
Bhakri is part of a traditional Indian meal. Bhakri (grey flatbread) is served
with vegetables and rice. Like breads around the world, bhakri is a staple
food. It is made mostly from wheat flour, jowar flour, bajra flour, nachni (or
finger millet) flour and even rice flour (in the Konkan region). Bhakris are
made primarily with oil, water, and flour. It has traditionally been the
farmer’s food which would be carried to the farm at the crack of dawn and
make up for both breakfast and lunch.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 117


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Traditional Bhakri meal with different vegetables etc

In the fields, bhakri even used to serve as a plate, in which chutney or


thecha(chutney made up of green chillies and pea nuts) was served and
eaten together.
In modern days, bhakri has been replaced by rotis and phulkas but still
enjoys its own fan-following. Typically bhakri is accompanied by pitla (a
stew of gram flour) but it may also be served with curry, garlic chutney,
thecha (a thick paste of green or red chilies), green leafy vegetables and raw
onion. In some parts of North Karnataka it is served with stuffed brinjal
curry.
Bhakri has dietary advantages. Being made from cereals, it is high in protein
and fibre but at the same time very easy to digest.[citation needed] It is
made of comparatively coarse flour and hence more nutritious than the fine
flour.[citation needed] Although roti is now more commonly eaten, bhakri is
still used for traditional Indian meals.

Sorghum Flour:
Sorghum grains have been used for centuries around the world. And now
these are becoming increasingly popular as food sources among health
conscious in the United States as well. However in India this flour is widely
used in cooking. This particular recipe of BHAKRI uses Sorghum flour made
from these grains as one of the ingredients. It provides specific nutritional
qualities in addition to adding variety and texture to standard baked
products.
Sorghum or Jwar is a very common grain used in Africa and India
throughout history. Now sorghum is also grown in the United States and is
becoming more widely available for consumers through Indian and Health
Food Stores.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 118


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Sorghum or Jwar

According to the U.S. Grains Council, sorghum is the third most important
cereal crop nationally and the fifth most important around the world.
Sorghum has long been used in the United States as a grain feed for animals
but is now viewed as an alternative grain for human consumption. The whole
grain kernel is ground into flour that can be used for cooking and baking. It
is also known as milo flour.

Nutritional Benefits

One of the major reasons why sorghum flour has entered the health food
spotlight is because it is gluten-free. Gluten is a protein found in many
grains such as wheat, barley, rye and oats. Now many people choose to eat
gluten-free foods because of gluten intolerance. This type of diet is essential
for those who have Celiac Disease.
Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by a reaction to gluten
that can result in the mal-absorption of nutrients as well as severe
abdominal pain and related symptoms.
People with celiac disease must eat a gluten-free diet. This makes sorghum
flour ideal for cooking and baking. Sorghum has a similar nutritional makeup
to corn although it is higher in protein and fat and lower in vitamin A.
The so-called educated world over consider Indian population to be
nutritionally ignorant. In reality it is not so. India uses a wide range of food
items as part of its daily meals. What the West is now being aware of Indian
vast uneducated or less educated population has been using these products
for ages. As a result I am making such recipes available for wider cross
section of nutritionally conscious people.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 119


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Uses for Sorghum Flour

Traditionally this flour has been used as a cereal food to create pancakes
and fermented and unfermented porridges and flatbreads throughout
different cultures, such as the Jowar Roti and Bhakri in India. In the
United States, it is becoming more common to use sorghum flour in baked
goods. It can be added or substituted in any recipe that calls for flour such
as cakes, cookies, breads and muffins.
While using Sorghum flour certain considerations have to be given. The flour
has a bland flavor therefore it can be beneficial for baking because it would
not add an unfamiliar or distinctive taste. However, because of its lack of
gluten, it does have an influence on the texture of baked items.
Gluten acts as a binder in foods, therefore an alternative binder such as
cornstarch is added to recipes when using sorghum flour. In addition,
sorghum often produces a drier, crumbly final product. Adding extra oil or
another fat source and eggs can improve the texture, and adding a
leavening agent such as baking powder or baking soda will help the dough
rise.
Sorghum flour can be found in many specialty health food stores in the same
section as other grains and flours. You might also find it in the gluten-free
section if the store has one. It can also be found at ethnic food markets. It
may be listed under another name. For example, in the Indian culture
Sorghum Flour is referred to as Jowar Atta.
Now coming back to our Bhakri recipe

Ingredients:
1. Sorghum flour (Jowar Flour) 1 cup
2. Pearl millet (Bajri Flour) 1 cup
3. Salt optional
4. Rice flour as needed

The flour has to be very fresh or else the Bhakri will crack and will not be
soft. Also the flour if stored for a long time turns bitter.

Methodology:
1. Never knead the entire dough. Always make dough for one Bhakri
at a time until you have mastered the art.
3. Boil the water and set aside until needed.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 120


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Using a clean working surface, mix the flours together and make a
hole in the center. Add the salt.

5. Add hot water slowly and carefully, as needed. It is recommended to


use a fork to combine the flour and water together in a motion very similar
to scrambling an egg.

6. Now using your hands, knead the dough well for a few minutes until it
comes together easily into soft pliable dough. This process of kneading the
dough is quite important. Bhakris will be soft if the dough is well kneaded.
So using your hand and knuckles knead it nicely for 8-10 minutes. The
dough should be soft and elastic.

7. Sprinkle the work surface (and your hands) with a little rice flour to
prevent the dough from sticking.

8. Make small dough balls (golf ball size). Now using your palms, first
flatten the dough and start pressing the dough until you get a round circular
shaped flatbread about 6-7 inches in diameter.

9. Gently pick up the bhakri and flip it onto the hot griddle. Let it cook for
1 minute or so. Sprinkle the topside with a few drops of water and then flip
the bhakri over. Let it cook for an additional minute or two and then
carefully transfer it to an open burner or flame on low heat for a just a few
seconds. Use tongs to flip it over and be careful not to burn yourself.

10. You should get a few black spots on each side and a delicious toasty
aroma. Obviously this step works best if you have a gas stove but this can
also be just as easily done on an electric stove. If you feel uncomfortable,
you may omit this step altogether and just cook it a few minutes longer on
the griddle. Serve it with a little ghee or butter along with any traditional
Indian meal

11. Take a golf sized round ball from the dough and flatten it with both
your hands in the steps shown below:

12. The bhakri should also be uniformly thick in size (about 1/8 inch
thick). You can also use a rolling pin if you wish, but traditionally bhakri is
made using your hands.

13. In the meantime heat a griddle or tawa on medium high heat. A cast
iron pan works really well but if you do not have any of these, you can
always use a regular frying pan.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 121


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

14. On a flat surface sprinkle some dry jowar flour, keep the flat ball on it,
apply some Jowar flour to your hand and with the palm of your hand spread
the dough into a thin circle. Take care that the dough does not stick at the
bottom and should move freely with your hands.

15. Carefully lift this dough with both your hands and place it on a hot iron
griddle (tava).

16. Spread a little water with your hands on the surface of the Bhakri and
then turn the Bhakri to the other side. Cook on high flame till some brown
spots appear on the lower surface of the Bhakri.

17. Remove it from the tava, turn it upside down and gently put it directly
on the flame. It should blow like a balloon.

18. Add dry jowar flour to the remaining kneaded dough and knead well.
Repeat the above procedure to make another Bhakri. Once you have
mastered the art of making Bhakri, you can save time by kneading the
dough for the next Bhari while still roasting the first!

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 122


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Bhakri is usually served with Pithla1 (Curry made from gram flour), Thecha
(spicy green and garlic chilly chutney) or any leafy green vegetable.

Remove from flame and serve hot.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 123


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Paneer Paranthas are very nutritious and easy to make. For


vegetarians this is the excellent source of high protein dish. There are
various other paranthas as well. Earlier I have mentioned 45 types of
paranthas. Here I am giving a simple yet easy to work recipe.

Ingredients:

For Stuffing

1. Grated Paneer 1 cup


2. Finely chopped Onion optional 1
3. Coriander leaves finely chopped
4. Small piece of Ginger (grated) ½ Tsp
5. Finely chopped green Chilies 1 or 2
6. Salt to taste
7. Red Chili powder
8. Graram masala ½Tsp
9. Chaat Masala ½Tsp
10. Kastoori methi 1 Tsp

For Dough

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 124


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Whole meal flour 3 cup


2. Ajwain (optional) ½ tsp
3. Ghee 2 tbsp
4. Salt to taste

Methodology:

1. Prepare the stuffing by mixing paneer, coriander, onion, green chillies,


chaat masala, garam masala, kastoori methi and salt and set aside

2. Sift the flour. Add ghee to the flour and salt.

3. Add water occasionally to make dough.

4. Knead the dough properly to make the dough as you would do for any
paranthas or roti.

5. Divide and roll out 10-12 balls.

6. Take a ball and flatten it. Put 1 tbsp of stuffing mixture in the center.

7. Draw up the edges towards the center to cover the mixture properly.

8. Again flatten it on a floured board to give the shape of a roti.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 125


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

9. Put the parantha on a preheated griddle.

10. Turn after cooking for 1-2 minute. After a minute apply ghee around
the edges and turn again.

11. Fry till the brownish spots appear on both sides

12. Paneer Parantha is ready.

Serve it with fresh yogurt or raita and chutney, or pickle enjoy.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 126


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

The uniqueness of Indian Cuisine lies in its special blend of


spices that release fragrant aroma in the atmosphere. The aroma and the
finishing look become more attractive than a beautifully dressed beauty. This
creates an enticing ambiance in the surroundings.

Stuffed Parathas are quite popular because of the varied aromatic flavors.
This is variation of Paneer parantha wherein in the flour spinach or palak is
mixed before making the dough. Thus the dough gets dark green color.
Palak Paneer parantha is one of the favorite Indian stuffed paranthas. Palak
Paneer parantha has high nutrition value, as palak (spinach) is a great
source of iron and paneer is the source of protein. The combination of
parantha along with yogurt is very rich in protein and tasty as well.

Palak Paneer paranthas taste great with yogurt and Aam Ka Achaar (mango
pickle) or any other pickle. These are suitable for any occasion from
elaborate breakfast to exotic dinner.

Ingredients:

For Stuffing

1. Grated Paneer 1 cup


2. Finely chopped Onion optional 1
3. Coriander leaves finely chopped
4. Small piece of Ginger (grated) ½ Tsp

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 127


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Finely chopped green Chilies 1 or 2


6. Salt to taste
7. Red Chili powder
8. Graram masala ½Tsp
9. Chaat Masala ½Tsp
10. Kastoori methi 1 Tsp

For Dough

1. Whole meal flour 3 cup


2. Palak frozen 1Cup
3. Fresh Palak finely cut ¼ Cup
4. Ajwain (optional) ½ tsp
5. Ghee 2 tbsp
6. Salt to taste

Methodology:

1. Prepare the stuffing by mixing paneer, coriander, onion, green chillies,


chaat masala, garam masala, kastoori methi and salt and set aside

2. Blanch the frozen spinach and make a puree with gree chilly, ginger,
garlic and set aside

3. Sift the flour. Add ghee to the flour, pich of heing, cut spinach and
salt. Mix well

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 128


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Add water occasionally to make dough.

5. Knead the dough properly to make the dough as you would do for any
paranthas or roti rather slightly stiff.

6. Divide and roll out 10-12 balls.

7. Take a ball and flatten it. Put 1 tbsp of stuffing mixture in the center.

8. Draw up the edges towards the center to cover the mixture properly.

9. Again flatten it on a floured board to give the shape of a roti.

10. Put the parantha on a preheated griddle.

11. Turn after cooking for 1-2 minute. After a minute apply ghee around
the edges and turn again.

12. Fry till the brownish spots appear on both sides

13. Paneer Palak Parantha is ready.

Serve it with fresh yogurt or raita and chutney, or pickle enjoy.

Palak-Paneer Parantha with Cucumber Raita

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 129


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

The uniqueness of Indian Cuisine lies in its special blend of


spices that release fragrant aroma in the atmosphere. The aroma and the
finishing look become more attractive than a beautifully dressed beauty. This
creates an enticing ambiance in the surroundings.

Stuffed Parathas are quite popular because of the varied aromatic flavors.
This is a variation where instead of Paneer we are using Gobhi or Cauliflower
as the filling. Gobhi is well known for its exotic taste and freshness. This is
purely a vegetable stuffed Parantha.

The combination of parantha along with yogurt is favorite morning breakfast


and tasty as well whose taste lingers in the mouth even afterwards and
whenever the thought of Gobhi Parantha comes the mouth begins to
produce digestive juices.

Gobhi paranthas taste great with yogurt and Aam Ka Achaar (mango pickle)
or any other pickle. These are suitable for any occasion from elaborate
breakfast to exotic dinner.

Ingredients:

For Stuffing

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 130


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Cauliflower finely grated 1½ cup


2. Red chilli powder 1 Tsp
3. Coriander finely chopped few sprigs 

4. Jeera powder (roasted) 1 Tsp
5. Green chilli (chopped) 1 Tsp
6. Small piece of Ginger (grated) ½ Tsp
7. Salt to taste
8. Chaat Masala ½Tsp
9. Kastoori methi 1 Tsp

For Dough

1. Whole meal flour 3 cup


2. Ajwain (optional) 1 Tsp
3. Salt to taste

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 131


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:

1. Prepare the stuffing by mixing finely grated gobhi, coriander, onion,


green chillies, chaat masala, garam masala, kastoori methi and salt and set
aside. You may also sauté it as well. However this is optional

2. Sift the flour. Add ghee, pinch of heing, and salt. Mix well

3. Add water occasionally to make dough.

4. Knead the dough properly to make the dough as you would do for any
paranthas or roti rather slightly stiff.

5. Divide and roll out 10-12 balls.

6. Take a ball and flatten it. Put 1 tbsp of stuffing mixture in the center.

7. Draw up the edges towards the center to cover the mixture properly.

8. Again flatten it on a floured board to give the shape of a roti.

9. Put the parantha on a preheated griddle.

10. Turn after cooking for 1-2 minute. After a minute apply ghee around
the edges and turn again.

11. Fry till the brownish spots appear on both sides

12. Gobhi Parantha is ready.

Serve it with fresh yogurt or raita and chutney, or pickle enjoy.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 132


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 133


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Mooli Paranthas is another favorite parantha recipe from


the land of Punjab. Paranthas or Parathas are served as breakfast with
butter and lassi in North India. The method of making any stuffed parantha
remains basically the same. The only difference remains the preparation of
the stuffing. Once you know your ingredients and the art of cooking you can
easily adapt to a large variety of Paranthas. Also you can make many
different varieties. In this section I have included the most popular varieties.

Ingredients:
1. Radish with or without leaves 1 large
2. Green chilly finely chopped (optional) 1
3. Chili powder ½Tsp
4. Salt to taste
5. Wheat flour dough 3 Cups
6. Ghee
7. White butter

Methodology:
1. Prepare the dough as earlier and keep it aside. Make the dough
slightly stiffer.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 134


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Grate the radish and keep aside. Many people add salt to the radish
and keep it for some minutes and later squeeze the water from it. This is
done so that the mooli parathas do not break while rolling the dough. I do
not do this technique as the salt extracts the water from the radish and
many water soluble vitamins and minerals are lost in the process.

3. Just grate the radish. Add chopped green chili to it. Do not add salt to
it.

4. Now take a medium sized ball of dough on the rolling board dusted
with wheat flour. Roll the dough in to a disc of 5-6 cms diameter.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 135


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Take 3 tsp of grated radish in a small bowl or plate. Add a pinch or two
each of red chili powder, garam masala powder, salt.

6. Mix well and put this stuffing onto the rolled dough. In the meantime,
heat the griddle or tava.

7. Now quickly cover the filling by bringing together all the edges of the
dough and join them.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 136


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

8. Roll the dough into the size of a parantha. Care should be taken while
rolling the dough as the parantha may break. We added salt to the radish
and thus as a result water will start oozing out from the radish.

9. To make paranthas by this method is a little tricky but with practice


you will be able to make excellent paranthas. One has to be quick enough
while using this method. Or else there is another alternative. Do not use the
salt in the filling and instead add extra salt in the dough or salt your yogurt.
I have found even leaving the filling salt free makes the excellent taste.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 137


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Still if this technique is difficult, you can add salt to the radish, keep it for
half an hour in an air-tight container, as the odor of radish which is too
pungent starts to release and your whole kitchen will have the smell of
radish. After 30 minutes or so, squeeze the water from the radish and then
use it in making the paranthas. This way your mooli paranthas will not
break, however nutrients will be lost.

10. Now place the parantha on the tava keeping the flame medium so that
the paranthas come out excellant.

11. After a minute, turn it over and cook the other side of the parantha.
Apply ghee on the top and sides. The quantity of ghee to be used depends
upon you. If you like the paranthas to be less oily, then use less ghee and
vice-versa.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 138


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

12. Flip the parantha on the next side and again apply ghee on the other
side. The side which we applied ghee the first time goes down facing the
tava.

13. Now flip for the third time. Press the edges of the parantha with the
spatula while frying the parantha. This helps in ballooning of the parantha.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 139


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

14. Flip once more so that the parantha gets cooked evenly from all the
sides.

15. Remove from the griddle when the parantha looks cooked, crisp and
well fried.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 140


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Now the Paranthas are ready stock them dividing into pieces ready for
serving. Serve the paranthas hot with butter, yogurt, and pickle. However in
a Punjabi home it is accompanied with a tall glass of lassi – yogurt drink.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 141


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 142


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Lachcha Paratha is a popular parantha from North


India. It is made from whole wheat flour. It is also called as paratwala
paratha or layered parantha.

In Punjabi “parat” means layer and layers can be seen on the paratha when
it gets cooked. Its South Indian counterpart is the parota which is made
from white flour and eggs.

Usually, plain Paranthas can be made using two methods. First is this
technique, for Lachcha paranthas. This is also known as Amritsari Lachcha
Parantha. And the other is the folding technique. This technique is used in
the Caribbean especially Trinidad where I live now. Here big paranthas are
made using the while flour, margarine, baking powder as ingredients. These
use the folding method of coning the dough after it is smeared with ghee.
The dough is then allowed to rest for a while before the parantha is rolled
and cooked on large griddle or tava almost 48” in diameter. Using the large
wooden spatulas the parantha is beaten from the two sides and the top
before storing for serving. In Trinidad it is called Buss-up-Shut. It is
common for weddings, religious and all other occasions.

Lachcha Parantha is an easy to make. There are a few other techniques as


well used for making these paranthas besides the domestic way of folding. I

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 143


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

usually make the Lachcha Paranthas using this Amritsari technique. It is


simple and easy.

Ingredients:
1. Wheat flour 2 cups
2. Ghee 2 tsp
3. Salt to taste
Methodology:
1. Sift the dry ingredients for the dough. Add water, ghee and form
smooth dough. Add more water if required for the dough. Cover the dough
and keep aside for 15 minutes.

2. Divide into medium sized ball of dough and keep covered. Roll it into 5-
6 inch diameter disc on a dusted rolling board.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 144


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Apply ghee on the parantha disc.

4. From the edge fold the parantha as shown below. This is the Amritsari
way of folding

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 145


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Again keep on folding it like shown in the picture image or you can also
fold it like a paper fan. Continue untill you come to the end.

6. Applying slight pressure and roll the folded dough with the fingers of both
hands you may use the palm as well till the length of the roll increases.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 146


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

7. Using the folded roll encircle it to obtain the peda.

8. Join the edge of the roll to the center of the circle and press it.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 147


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

8. Now roll into parantha to required size.

9. Heat the tava to medium heat and place the parantha on the tava.

10. Turn the parantha when one side is partly cooked. Apply ghee on
this side. Continue cooking on this side for a minute.

11. Now turn again and apply ghee on the other side.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 148


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

12. Flip again for a couple of times to make sure the two sides of the
paranthas are browned evenly and well cooked. Press the sides with the
spatula while frying the paranthas.

13. Alternatively, you can also add some ghee on the tava and then fry the
lachcha paranthas.

14. Serve the paranthas hot with any curried vegetable or paneer dish,
raita and pickles.

Amritsari Lachcha Parantha

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 149


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Paranthas are widely used and favorites of almost every


one. In Indian homes Paranthas are most common breakfast because
paranthas can be eaten with raita or plain yogurt. Also these are made with
whole what flower. On the contrary chapattis need vegetables to eat with.

In every home daal and vegetables are left over. And no one likes the left
over items. Left over daals and vegetables can be used this way.

Once I was staying with my two younger brothers and one day a friend came
over to stay. Next morning many chapattis were left over. My friend said he
does not eat left over food next day. Food was so much that it could not be
thrown.

I cooked left over daal and vegetables with sauted onion, jeera, tomatoes
and sprinkled cilantro. This was used as filling. Then I prepared a barter of
besan, cilantro, green peppers, ajwain, and chaat masala. I filled the
chapattis with the filling, fold into half and dipping in the besan barter
shallow cooked in a skillet. This made a tasty breakfast. And I had to save a
few pieces for me. Even to this date my friend talks about that breakfast but
still he does not know how it was prepared.

This chana dal methi parathas are made with leftover chana dal and freshly
chopped fenugreek leaves. Methi is all time favorite and it lends a beautiful
flavor and taste to the paranthas or recipe it is added.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 150


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

This recipe is different from the Gujarati version of Methi Theplas. It does
not even taste like theplas. In fact the Dal Methi parathas taste better than
theplas. It does not use besan flour and yogurt which are used in theplas.

I always use leftover cooked chana dal for this recipe. If you are making
these for breakfast, you can knead the dough, the night before and keep it
overnight in the refrigerator.

Fresh methi leaves are always better to use as fresh methi leaves lends a
unique taste to this dish which is not possible if you use dried fenugreek
leaves. However if fresh methi is not available then you can us ethe dried
kastoori methi.

Ingredients:
1. Leftover chana dal ½ - ¾ cup
2. Freshly chopped methi leaves ½ cup
3. Green chili finely chopped 1
4. Ajwain - carom seeds ¼ tsp
5. Jeera ¼ tsp
6. Whole wheat flour 1½ cup
7. Salt to taste
8. Ghee ½ tsp

Methodology:
1. Knead the whole wheat flour with the leftover chana dal, methi, salt,
ghee, green chili, ajwain and jeera. Add water if required. You may not need
to add the water if the leftover dal has enough liquid and is not dry. If the
leftover dal dish is dry, then you will have to add water.

2. Knead into soft dough just like the dough for chapattis or paranthas.
3. On a dusted rolling board, take a big lemon sized ball of the dough.
Roll the dough ball with a rolling pin and make a circle of the dough of about
2 inch diameter.
4. Apply ghee on surface of the rolled paratha
5. Fold the paratha lengthwise twice.
6. Again apply ghee on the surface.
7. Again fold it twice.
8. Now roll this folded dough in dry flour.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 151


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

9. With the rolling pin, roll out the paranthas with approx 5-6 inch
diameter
10. Heat a flat griddle or tava. Place the parantha on the griddle. When
partly cooked on one side, flip the parantha to the other side.
11. Apply ghee on the partly cooked side. In the meantime the other side
is getting cooked.
12. Now flip it again. Now apply ghee on the other side. Cook until the
either side is crisp and browned.
13. Flip again and cook the second side till browned and crisp.
14. While cooking press the edges of the paranthas so that they do not
remain undercooked.

Chana Daal and Methi Parantha

Serve paranthas hot with homemade butter or regular in a true Punjabi


style. This is how the paranthas are eaten by the Punjabi with lots and lots
of butter.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 152


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Everyone loves Kulchas! I just can’t get enough of


them! A large variety Kulchas are available with different are available. The
variety of Indian flatbreads with different filling is mind boggling to say the
least. Kulchas are a sister’s variety of Naan. The only difference between the
two is while Naan is made with yeast, Kulchas are made with Baking
powder.

Kulcha is Indian flat bread, similar to naan. It is typically eaten with chole, a
spicy chickpea dish. It is most popular in northern India, where it is usually
eaten for breakfast or stuffed with different fillings for lunch or dinner. While
easy to make, kulcha is best cooked in a clay oven.

It is traditionally made from a mix of maida flour, yogurt, baking soda,


baking powder and salt. Once the dough is made, it is allowed to rest from
two to four hours before being rolled into flat disks and baked in a clay oven.
The reaction between the lactic acid in the yogurt and the baking soda
allows the dough to rise without yeast. Once the kulcha is cooked, it is
brushed with either butter or ghee, which is a clarified butter often used in
Indian cooking

For nutrition reasons especially when one is vegetarian we have to make


protein dishes. Paneer is an excellent source of protein. Therefore I use
paneer to stuff kulcha. For this little I use grated paneer which is added to
the onions mixture and that makes all the difference to these kulchas.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 153


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Kulchas are immensely fluffy, soft and has bready texture. These are
suitable for any occasion. Kulchas are served along with any spicy or light
side dish as gravy. Kulcha and chole make a favorite and tasty combination.

Ingredients:
For the dough

1. all-purpose flour (maida) 3 cups


2. Baking powder ½ tsp
3. Baking Soda 1/8 tsp
4. sugar 1 tbsp
5. salt to taste ¼ cup
6. Yogurt ½ cup
7. Ghee 1 tbsp

For the filling

1. Red onion (gives a great color) 1


2. Green chilies, thinly sliced 2-3
3. Carom seeds (ajwain) ¼ tsp
4. Grated ginger ½ tsp
5. Cumin ¼ tsp
6. Fennel (optional) ¼ tsp
7. Paneer 1 cup
8. Few sprigs of cilantro, chopped finely
9. Salt to taste

Methodology:
1. Place all the dry ingredients for the dough together in a bowl and mix
well.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 154


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Now add the wet ingredients to the dry mixture.

3. Mix well for all the dry and wet ingredients to mix well.

4. Place this mixture on a lightly floured surface.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 155


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Continue to knead well for few minute more to obtain smoothness.


This is done on the surface.

6. Continue working until it becomes a smooth pliable dough.

7. When the dough gets smooth place it in a bowl, cover and allow it sit
for 1-2 hours.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 156


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

8. In the meantime mix all the ingredients for the filling together in
another bowl.

9. After the dough has been sitting for 2 hours, take a small ball and
using a rolling pin roll into a very small circle 4-5” in diameter.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 157


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

10. Make a small ball of the filling, smaller than the dough circle so that it
can fit within the dough after enclosing.

11. Bring all the sides of the dough together to the top, covering the
filling.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 158


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

12. Bunch it up together all the edges from each side, pinch it to close
completely.

13. Now press down the dough lightly using your palm.

14. You will see that the seam has almost disappeared.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 159


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

15. Using a rolling pin, very gently roll the filled dough.

16. Roll it out very lightly to a desired thickness making sure that you do
not press it too hard. Pressing hard while rolling will cause the filling does
not come out of the dough.

17. Now place this on a greased nonstick or iron tava on medium heat and
cook until browned on both the sides.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 160


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

This way continues to make all the Kulcha and store for serving. These taste
good when hot or warm depending on individual taste. My sun takes out the
food on the plate and keeps in the friz for the food to cool before consuming.

Best are when served warm. You see the soft and bready texture of the
kulchas in the picture below? These look fantastic and mouthwatering. If
you cannot serve them immediately, then stack them up and cover them
with aluminum foil and re heat them in an oven when ready. Serve them
with Channa Masala which is usually what Kulchas are enjoyed with. But I
have also enjoyed them with Channa Palak, Saag Paneer, Dal Makhani etc.
Any spicy gravy based dish goes well with Kulchas.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 161


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Kulcha Chole

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 162


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Kulcha (Hindi: कुलचा; Punjabi: ਕੁਲਚਾ) kulcā is a type of


an Indian flatbread made from Maida flour. It is particularly popular in
Pakistan, north India and is usually eaten with chole.

Kulcha is a typical Punjabi recipe, originating in Punjab. Amritsar is known


for its Amritsari kulchas or Amritsari naan. Flour dough, mashed potatoes,
onion (optional) and lots of spices are rolled into a flat round shape and
baked in an earthen clay oven until golden brown. When baked, it is rubbed
with butter and then eaten with spicy chole (chickpea curry).

Kulcha, is a type of Indian bread quite similar in looks and appearance to a


naan (another very famous Indian bread). However Kulcha does not have
the elongated shape and are much softer. It can be made on a tawa or
griddle, as opposed to naan, which is better baked in a hot tandoor or oven
only, to get the desired effect. The steps to make Kulcha remain as earlier.

Ingredients:
For Dough
1. Whole wheat flour 5 cups

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 163


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

ONION KILCHA

For the stuffing


1. Onions finely chopped - minced 3
2. Green Chilies 2tbs
3. Coriander leaves 2tbsp
4. Mint leaves 1tsp
5. Ginger-chopped 2tsp
6. Carom seeds (ajwain) 1tsp
7. Red Chili powder 1tsp
8. Coarsely ground pomegranate seeds 1tsp
9. Coarsely ground coriander seeds 1tsp
10. Salt to taste

Methodology:

1. Prepare dough by adding ajwain seeds and pinch of salt to taste and
mix well.

2. Add water to the flour in little by little as required. Make sure the
dough is somewhat hard. Allow to rest for an hour covered with damp cloth.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 164


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. Divide the dough into six equal parts and make round balls using dry
flour.

4. To prepare the stuffing, mix chopped onions, green chilies, coriander


and mint leaves in a bowl and add seasoning. Mix well and set aside.

5. Stuff each ball of dough with a portion of the filling in the middle. Fold
the filled balls of dough and pinch (with fork) the edges to seal the dough.

6. Roll out the kulcha with a rolling pin.

7. Cook until done on medium girdle or oven on both sides. Traditionally


it is made in Tandoor – the clay oven for this purpose

8. Smear with clarified butter or ghee and serve with any paneer or any
other such dish. This makes a special dinner compliment for any occasion.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 165


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

This is very delicious item in the section of Roti –


Parantha originating from the northern mountain regions of Kashmir. It is
considered a specialty. Wheat flour is combined with aromatic spices to
make these delicious rotis. The whole spices used for this roti are roasted
and coarsely ground to enhance the individual flavor of each and every spice
used.

These rotis are so scrumptious that they can be eaten on their own or with a
sweet and sour tomato pickle. And with Dal Makhani and Vegetable gravy its
taste enhances.

During my visit to the Kashmir valley we used to buy these rotis from the
market and prepare vegetables and other accompaniments ourselves for
daily dinners. It was such a treat.

Ingredients:

1. Wheat flour 3cup


2. Black pepper freshly ground 1 tsp
3. Fennel seeds coarsely crushed 1/2 tsp

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 166


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

4. Cumin seeds 1/2 tsp

5. Ajwain seeds (omum) 1/4 tsp


6. Asafetida 4 -5 pinches
7. Butter 1 tbsp
8. Salt to taste
9. Ghee for shallow frying
10. Warm milk to knead dough

Methodology:

1. Roast lightly the fennel seeds, cumin seeds, ajwain and peppercorns on a
tava or in fry pan. Coarsely grind the roasted ingredients in a mortar and
pestle or coffee grinder.

2. Combine the wheat flour (always sift flour before using), pounded
ingredients, asafetida, ghee for shortening and salt and add enough milk to
make firm dough. Knead well.

3. Divide the dough into 8 equal portions.

4. Roll out each portion with the help of a little flour into a circle of 5-6’’
diameter. Prick with a knife or fork all over.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 167


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Cook each roti on a hot tava (griddle), using a little ghee until both sides
are golden brown. Shallow fry both sides till crisp and golden spots appear.

Serve hot, with dals or vegetables, as desired.

Paneer Makhani, Daal Bokhara and Kashmiri Parantha

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 168


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Khasta Kachauri or Kachori is very popular snack in North


India especially in Agra, Vrindabana, Mathura etc. It is served breakfast time
and also for festivals and weddings feasts. These are ‘khasta’ (crisp) and
savory like pastry shells. They have a spicy filling made of coarsely ground,
skinless green gram dal - dhuli moong dal or skinless black urad dal or a mix
of both. They can be made well in advance and kept in airtight containers
and will retain crispness for weeks.

This is a specialty from the north India. More so this is quite famous in the
land of Krishna, Agra, Mathura, and Vrindavan. In these cities there is
particular combination for breakfast. As this is a recipe from the land of Braj
which is famous for Krishna and stories of butter steeling, milk etc. Milk and
yogurt is an important combination for breakfast.

The early morning breakfast combination includes;

1. Savory tasty saffron or cardamom flavored hot milk served in clay


cups

2. Khasta Kachori served with the potato vegetable and chutney, and

3. Piping hot jalebi

Out of this combination I give you the recipe of Khasta Kachori and
vegetable.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 169


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

KHASTA KACHORI:

Ingredients:

1. Refined or all-purpose flour 2 cups


2. Salt to taste
3. Baking soda ½tsp
4. Oil for shortening 5-6tbs
5. Ajwain or carom seeds ½Tsp
6. Coconut oil for frying

For filling
1. Washed split Urd dal - dhuli Urd dal) ¾ cup
2. Ginger finely chopped 1 inch
3. Green chilies 1
4. Cashewnuts optional 6-8
5. Clarified butter 3tbs
6. Asafetida pinch
7. Coriander powder 2 tsp
8. Red chili powder 1tsp
9. Fennel seed ground 1tsp
10. Salt to taste
11. Oil for deep fry

Methodology:

For Shells

1. Sift the flour, salt, and baking soda together. Add oil and mix well.
Now knead into a medium soft dough and cover with moist cloth.
2. Wash and soak dal for 1 hour. Drain and grind coarsely using less
water.
3. Heat oil in a wok like pot. Add ghee, chopped ginger, and dal. Keep
stirring. Add chili and all other spices, salt etc. Cook on medium heat till all
moisture dries up, and there is no rawness. This takes some time and
patience
4. Set aside for cooling and divide in 16 portions

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 170


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Divide dough in 16 portions as well


6. Roll each portion of the dough into 4-5 inch size round. Make sure it is
rolled thin at ends and thick in the center. (Note: These pictures are only to
show the steps required. The Dough used is not exactly for this recipe.
These are rolled 1/8 inch thick)

7. Now add one portion of the mixture prepared for this recipe in the
center. (Here the mixture is different as these are the only images available)

8. Bring the edges from all sides to form a ball.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 171


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

9. Then flatten slightly to the size of small burger

10. Make all kachories as in the picture and set aside

11. Heat oil in a shallow frying pot and fry these flattened balls or
kachories on a very low heat until golden brown. This way these cook inside
and maintain the crispy texture.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 172


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

12. Allow these to cool and serve with tamarind chutney or any other
chutney of your choice. However here we are using this item as a
combination with vegetable.

These make excellent serving for any occasion.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 173


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COMPLEMENTARY POTATO VEGETABLE:

Ingredients:

1. Potatoes boiled and diced ½” cubes 4 medium


2. Cumin seed 1tsp
3. Salt to taste
4. Oil 1tbs
5. Coriander powder 1tsp
6. Chopped ginger ½tsp
7. Pav bhaji masala 1tsp
8. Green chilli 1tsp
9. Chilli podwer ½tsp
10. Dry mango powder / tamarind pulp ½tsp

Methodology:

1. Wash peel and cut potato into ½ inch cubes


2. Heat oil in a frying pan crackle cumin seed and ginger
3. Add potato and cook adding water until tender
4. Now add all spices, salt and cook until done. This is done relatively
dry.

How to serve:

1. You can serve the khasta kachori plain with tamarind and or mint
chutney

2. Serve with a portion of potato vegetable and chutney

3. Make a hole in the center of the kachori and fill 1-2 spoon full of
potato vegetable, garnish with chutnies and smooth yogurt. There are many
way of serving.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 174


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

(Deep Fried Potato Puffs)

Kachori or Kachauri or Kachodi or Katchuri - Oriya


କେଚାଡ଼ି is a spicy snack popular in various parts India and Pakistan. In India
there are very popular in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Delhi,
Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, and Punjab. These are equally
popular in Punjab region of Pakistan. The popularity is ‘too difficult to put
into words but [is] recommended.’

There are many variations in cooking and serving style. A kachori served in
New Delhi, India differs significantly from Kachoris of Uttar Pradesh and
Rajasthan. All varities are extremely well known and popular. It is supposed
to have originated in one of these states.

In Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh it is usually a round flattened ball made of


fine flour filled with a stuffing of shallow fried mixture of yellow moong dal
and/or Urad Dal, besan, black pepper, red chilli powder, salt and other
spices.

Additionally in Rajasthan, the Pyaaz ki Kachori (Onion Kachori) is very


famous.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 175


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

In Gujarat, it is usually round ball made of flour and dough filled with a
stuffing of yellow moong dal, black pepper, red chilli powder, and ginger
paste.

In Delhi it is often served as a chaat. Also Delhi has has another kind of
kachori called as ‘Khasta kachori’ or ‘Raj Kachori’.

A variant includes ‘Sweet Upwas - Fast Kachori’. These are made with sweet
potato, coconut, and sugar. Kachoris are often served with a chutney, often
made from tamarind, mint, or coriander. Another variant is fried and stuffed
with pulses (urad and moong especially) and it is generally found in Kutch
region in Gujarat.

Some of the variants popular in North India includes a version similar to the
Rajasthan version accompanied with a curry made of potatoes and varied
spices or even chana (chole), similar to one served in Chole Bhature

Kachoris filled with seasoned spicy potato are very popular as home
recipes as well as these are available in the market.

Ingredients:

For Stuffing:

1. Boiled Potatoes 2
2. Finely Chopped Green Chillies 3-4
3. Ginger Garlic Paste 1tsp
4. Finely Chopped Coriander Leaves 1tbsp
5. Lemon Juice 1tsp
6. Salt to Taste

Shell:

The shells are made exactly as in case of the last recipe Khasta Kachoris.

1. Wheat Flour or all-purpose flour 2 Cups


2. Salt to Taste
3. Oil for Deep Frying and for filling
4. Oil for Shortening 1Tbs

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 176


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:

1. Mix salt and small amount of oil in a wheat flour very well.

2. Then add some water and knead the dough. Dough should be just like
chapatti dough. Cover this dough and keep aside for a while.
3. Then grate or mash boiled potatoes. Add all other ingredients of
stuffing in potatoes. Mix this stuffing mixture very well.

4. Make small ball of dough. Apply some oil on both palms & flatten the
ball to form a 3-4 inch disc. Take small portion of stuffing and wrap that
stuffing in each disc and roll into a small ball. Roll this ball to form a 3-4 inch
round kachori. Follow the steps of the last recipe.

5. Heat the oil in kadhai. Now lift the rolled kachori and carefully slip it
into the hot oil.

6. Immediately start flickering hot oil over the top of it with a spatula so
that it will swell up. Flip the kachori and cook both sides till it become golden
brown. Take out and keep on paper towel to absorb additional oil.

Serve this hot kachori with any chutney or Aloo Sabji (see Khasta Kashori
recipe) and yogurt.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 177


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Jodhpuri onion Kachori

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 178


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Luchi is a deep-fried flatbread made of wheat flour that


is typical of Oriya, Assamese and Bengali cuisine. In Orissa it is known as -
Oriya: ଲୁ ଚି; Assamese: লুিচ; and Bengali: লুিচ.

To make luchis, dough is prepared by mixing fine maida flour with water and
a spoonful of ghee, which is then divided into small balls. These balls are
flattened using a rolling-pin and individually deep-fried in cooking oil or
ghee. A typical luchi will measure 4-5 inches in diameter. They are usually
served with curries or gravies. If maida is substituted with atta, it is called a
Poori.

The stuffed Luchi is called kochuri. Kochuri stuffed with mashed peas is one
notable variety. It is called Koraishutir Kochuri.

Ingredients:

1. All-purpose flour 2 cups


2. Oil for shortening
3. Oil for frying
4. Salt to taste

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 179


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology:

1. Sift all-purpose flour and salt. Add ½tbsp oil. Knead lightly. Add water
and knead well till becomes soft. Water should be added gradually.

2. Keep aside covered for about 20 minutes for the dough to settle.

3. Divide into about 20 portions. Roll out each portion into a round size of
about 4-5 inch diameter ¼ inch thick.

4. Heat oil to very hot in a deep frying pan. Fry one at a time with light
tapping so that it puffs, turn over till light golden. Drain and remove.

5. Serve hot with any curry or can be taken as it is.

Tip: Too much kneading with oil will make very crunchy luchis. But luchis
should be soft and puffed. Oil should be very hot otherwise it will not puff. It
takes only about 30 to 35 seconds for each luchi to puff up. When these are
made with whole wheat flour (atta), these are called Puris. Also these can be
made by mixing the two flours in equal proportion of Maida and atta.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 180


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Naan is a leavened, oven-baked flatbread. It is


also one of the most popular varieties of South Asian bread and is
particularly popular in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, the Xinjiang
Autonomous Region of China. Furthermore these are served in Indian and
Pakistani restaurants in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, the United
States of America, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. Influenced by the
large influx of Pakistani, Afghan and Indian labor, Naan has also become
popular in Saudi Arabia and other Persian Gulf states as well. It is considered
a typical bread of the northern Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan.

Originally, naan is a generic term for various flatbreads from different parts
of the world. In Turkic languages, such as Uzbek, Kazakh and Uyghur, the
flatbreads are known as Nan. The name stems from (New) Persian, a generic
word for bread. In Burmese, flatbreads are known as Nan Bya which is
pronounced as nàɴbjá. In South Asian languages, naan appears as nan in
Hindi; ‫ ﺎن‬i‫ﻧ‬n Urdu –Persian; ਨਾਨ in Punjabi. It is known to the Chinese as
náng (馕).

The most familiar and readily available varieties of ‘Naan’ in Britain and
other Western countries are the South Asian varieties. In Iran, from
where the word ultimately originated, nān (‫ ﻧ ) ﺎن‬does not carry any special

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 181


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

significance. There it is merely the everyday word used for any kind of
bread.

On the other hand, Naan in South Asia usually refers to a specific kind of
thick flatbread - another well-known kind of flatbread is chapatti. Generally,
it resembles pita bread. Alike pita bread, it is usually leavened with yeast.
Unleavened dough - similar to that used for roti is also used.

Naan is cooked in a tandoor, or clay oven, from which tandoori cooking


takes its name. This distinguishes it from roti, which is usually cooked on a
flat or slightly concave iron griddle called a tava.

Modern recipes sometimes substitute baking powder for the yeast. Milk or
yoghurt may also be used to give greater volume and thickness to the naan.
Typically, it is served hot and brushed with ghee or butter.

Another variation is Peshwari or Peshawari naan. Peshawari naan and


Kashmiri naan are filled with a mixture of nuts and raisins; in Pakistan, the
most famous naan variety is the Roghani Naan which is sprinkled with
sesame seeds.

Kulcha is another type. Amritsari naan popularly known as Amritsari


Kulcha is stuffed with mashed potatoes, onion (optional) and lots of spices.
Possible seasonings in the naan dough include cumin and nigella – onion -
kalonji seeds.

A typical naan recipe involves mixing white flour with salt, a yeast culture,
and enough yogurt to make a smooth, elastic dough. The dough is kneaded
for a few minutes, then set aside to rise for a few hours. Once risen, the
dough is divided into balls - about 100 grams or 3.5Oz each. The dough balls
are then flattened and cooked.

In Pakistani cuisine, Naans are typically graced with fragrant essences, such
as rose, khus or vetiver, with butter or ghee melted on them. Nigella seeds
are commonly added to naan as cooked in Indian restaurants throughout the
UK.

Naan can also be covered with various toppings of meat, vegetables, and or
cheese. This version is sometimes prepared as fast food. It can also be
dipped into such soups as dal, and goes well with vegetable gravies.

Naans are traditionally cooked in a Tandoor or earthern oven but can also be
made in your oven at home. Serve this delicious bread hot, with popular

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 182


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

dishes like Tandoori Chicken or kebabs of different kinds. The dough for
Naans needs to be made in advance.

Ingredients:

1. Dry yeast 1½tsps


2. Warm water 1 cup
3. Sugar 1½tsps
4. All-purpose flour 3 cups
5. Salt To Taste
6. Ghee - Clarified Butter 6Tbsps
7. Yoghurt 3Tbsps
8. Onion seeds 3 teaspoons

Methodology:

1. Add the dry yeast and sugar to the warm water and stir till the yeast is
dissolved. Cover and leave aside for 10 minutes or until the mixture begins
to froth. This indicates the yeast is active. Keep aside.

2. Mix the flour and salt to taste and sift through a very fine sieve. Put it
into a large mixing bowl and now add the yeast mixture, 3tbsps of ghee and
the entire yogurt.

3. Use your fingertips to mix all this into soft dough. Once mixed, flour a
clean, flat surface like kitchen counter and knead the dough till it is smooth
and stretchy elastic like.

4. Grease a large bowl with a few drops of cooking oil and put the dough
in it. Cover and allow to rest for about 90 minutes or till the dough doubles
in volume.

5. Punch the dough down and knead again for 10 minutes.

6. Equally divide the dough and roll between your palms to form 8” round
balls.

7. Lightly flour the same surface on which you kneaded the dough and
roll out each ball until you have a circle, 7-8 inches in diameter
approximately ½ thick. Gently pull on one edge of the circle to form the
Naan into a teardrop shape. Do not pull too hard or you may tear the Naan.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 183


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Instead of rolling the dough out with a rolling pin you can also pat it into a
circle with your hands. This is how it is done by the professional chefs.

8. Preheat your oven 200 C or 400 F or Gas Mark 6.

9. Lay a piece of aluminum foil in an oven tray (to cover) and grease it
lightly with a few drops of cooking oil.

10. Place as many Naans as will fit without touching each other, on the
tray.

11. Brush each Naan with some ghee and sprinkle a pinch of onion seeds
all over its surface.

12. Put the tray into the oven and cook till the Naan begins to puff out and
get lightly brown. Flip the Naan and repeat the process on the other side.

13. Remove from oven and serve hot in a foil-lined basket with choice of
gravy and daals.

Note: There are certain recipes that use egg and baking powder and baking
soda instead in yeast. However for vegetarian I use yeast. Both baking
powder and baking soda destroy the nutrients. Also the naan gets harder
when cold. With yeast the softness is maintained even after the naan gets
cold.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 184


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 185


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

SECTION 4

COMBINATIONS and
ACCOMPANIMENTS

1. Sambhar Idli 187


2. Masala Dosa 209
3. Dahi Vada 220
4. Cucumber Raita 227
5. Other Raitas 229
6. Chutneys 236
7. Fruit Salad or Chaat 247
8. Samosa Chaat 249
9. Chole Bhatura 251
10. Advantages of Crystal Salt 256
11. Image Guyanese and Trinidad Parantha 257
12. Image Bengali Parantha 258

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 186


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Rice dishes are served across India, but idlis are a


typically southern Indian food. Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, and
Tamil Nadu are the four states that make up south India. South Indian
cuisine is known for being lighter, spicier, and less oily than northern Indian
dishes. Each state has different specialties and variations

Idli is a typical south Indian savory dish made of fermented rice and urd dall
barter steamed and served with tangy Sāmbhar and chutney. Idlis come in
the category of Fermented Foods. The fermentation process breaks
down the starches so that they are more readily metabolized by the
body - hence very light.

Now Idli and Dosa can be found not only across India instead in the major
cities world over. Such dishes are not only favorites of Indian but people of
other nationalities and backgrounds as well.

Made by steaming a fermented combination of rice and washed split Urd


daal, these white spongy breakfast cake like items serve as a starch. They
are generally presented alongside tangy daal and vegetable preparation
called Sambhar, and other chutneys and sauces.

Most often Idli is eaten at breakfast or as a snack. There are two ways to
serve. These are served separate leaving the choice of eating for the

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 187


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

individual. Often these are served immersed in Sambhar. It is a matter of


choice.

They can be dipped into these sauces, sprinkled with spices, or eaten alone.
Variations of idli exist beyond the standard size and accompaniments.

Mini or large idlis can be soaked in sambar or stuffed with a masala mixed
vegetable filling or grated coconut, green chillies, cilantro, and grated carrot.

Rava idli uses semolina instead of rice as a base for the batter. Malli idli is a
dish in which idlis are fried with coriander and curry leaves. No matter what
variation, however, they are generally served alongside a liquid base daal
such as sambar, coconut chutney, and tomato chutney. I have used left over

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 188


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

idlis fried with mustard seeds, curry leaves, tomatoes, green chilies, and
onion. This makes the idli even more savory.

Variations of cooking traditional idlis also exist. The original recipe was
purported to be made only with black lentil. It is assumed that rice was later
added to speed the fermentation process. Yogurt can now be added to
create the sour taste when sufficient time to ferment the batter is not there.
Wheat or parboiled rice batters also decrease time and the requirement of
fermentation.

The word Idli is pronounced as ‘ɪdli’. It is Romanized as ‘idly’ or ‘iddly’.


The plural is ‘idlis’. In different languages and cultures it is called differently
in Kannada: ಇ ; Tulu ಇ ; Tamil: இ லி ; Telugu: ఇ , ఆ క డ (Aviri-

Kudumu); Malayalam: ഇ . Beyond doubts Idli remains a south Indian
ലി
savory cake popular throughout India and the world over.

The Idli cakes are usually two to three inches in diameter and are made by
steaming a batter consisting of fermented black lentils (de-husked) and rice.

The fermentation process breaks down the starches so that they are
more readily metabolized by the body. Steamed idli in India may have
been an imported idea from Indonesia. The earliest mention of idli in India
occurs in Kannada writing of Shivakotiacharya in 920 CE.

Most often eaten at breakfast or as a snack, idlis are usually served in pairs
with chutney, sambar, or other accompaniments. Mixtures of crushed dry
spices such as milagai podi are the preferred condiment for idlis eaten on
the go.

Idli and the process of steaming were known in India by as early as 700 CE.
The process of steaming was influenced from Indonesia subsequently
between 800-1200 CE, giving rise to the modern day Idli. Earliest mention of
the term ‘Idli’ occurs in the Kannada writing of Shivakotiacharya in 920
AD, and it seems to have started then as a dish made only of fermented
black lentil.

Chavundaraya II, the author of the earliest available Kannada


encyclopaedia, Lokopakara (c. 1025), describes the preparation of idli by
soaking urad dal (black gram) in butter milk, ground to a fine paste and
mixed with the clear water of curd, and spices.

The Kannada king and scholar Someshwara III, who reigned in the area
now called Karnataka, included an idli recipe in his encyclopedia - The

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 189


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Manasollasa, written in Sanskrit ca. 1130 A.D. However there is no known


record of rice being added until later in the 17th century.

Later it was discovered that the rice helped in speeding the fermentation
process. Although the ingredients used in preparing idli have changed, but
the preparation process and the name still remained the same.

To make Idli batter is poured into the round indentations of the idli pans
and placed into a pressure cooker. To make idli, place two parts uncooked
rice to one part split black lentil (minapa pappu, urad dal) in a pan and soak.
Grind the lentils and rice to a paste in a heavy stone grinding vessel called
rolu-rokali, oralu kallu in the South.

The paste is then left to ferment overnight, until it has expanded to about
2½ times its original volume. In the morning, put the idli batter into the
ghee-greased molds or indentations of an idli tray or ‘tree’ for steaming. The
perforated molds allow the idlis to be cooked evenly. The tree holds the
trays above the level of boiling water in a pot, and the pot is covered until
the idlis are done. The steaming process takes about 10–25 minutes
depending on size and the flame. The idli is somewhat similar to the attu,
dosa, a fried preparation of the same batter.

In the olden days, when the idli mold cooking plates were not popular or
widely available, the thick idli batter was poured on a cloth tightly tied on
the mouth of a concave deep cooking pan or tava half filled with water. A
heavy lid was placed on the pan and the pot kept on the boil until the batter
was cooked into idli. This was often a large idli depending on the
circumference of the pan. It was then cut into bite-size pieces and served.

Idlis are usually served in pairs with kobbari pachadi - coconut chutney,
sambar, karampodi with ghee. Kobbari pachadi and Karampodi are first
used to eat in combination of idlis in Andhra Pradesh, specifically in Kostha
Andhra Districts.

Allam Pachadi chutney made of Ginger and available in both the sweet and
spicy varieties also goes very well with Idlis and Dosas.

Contemporary Idlis and variations

Rave idli, is a specialty of Karnataka. South Indians have brought the


popular idli wherever they have settled throughout the world. Cooks have
had to solve problems of hard-to-get ingredients, and climates that do not
encourage overnight fermentation. This has resulted in variations in the use
of ingredients of idlis.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 190


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Newer ‘quick’ recipes for the idli can be rice - or wheat-based (rava idli).

Parboiled rice reduce the soaking time considerably. Store-bought ground


rice is available, or Cream of Rice may be used. Similarly, semolina or
Cream of Wheat may be used for rava idli. Yogurt may be added to provide
the sour flavor for unfermented batters. Prepackaged mixes allow for almost
instant idlis. However, the additional health benefits of fermentation process
will be lacking in such products.

Idli Burger is another variation that can be made easily. This I have found
very easy .and tasty. I will give you the recipe of this variation in this
chapter on Idli as well

Besides the microwave steamer, electric idli steamers are also available,
with automatic steam release and shut-off for perfect cooking. Both types
are non-stick, so a fat-free idli is possible. Table-mounted electric wet
grinders are now taking the place of floor-bound attu kal. With these
appliances, even the classic-traditional idlis can be made more easily.

Beyond doubt the plain rice - black lentil idli continues to be the most
popular version. However it may also incorporate a variety of extra
ingredients, savory or sweet. Mustard seeds, fresh chili peppers, black
pepper, cumin, coriander seed and its fresh cilantro, fenugreek seeds, curry
leaves, fresh ginger root, sesame seeds, nuts, garlic, scallions, coconut, and
the unrefined sugar jaggery are all possibilities. Filled idlis contain small
amounts of chutneys, sambars, or sauces placed inside before steaming.
Idlis are sometimes steamed in a wrapping of leaves such as banana leaves
or jackfruit leaves.

A variety of nontraditional idlis exist these days, namely, standard idli, mini
idlis soaked in sambar, rava idli, Kancheepuram idli, stuffed idli with a filling
of potato, beans, carrot and masala, ragi idli, pudi idli with the sprinkling of
chutney pudi that covers the bite-sized pieces of idlis, malli idli shallow-fried
with coriander and curry leaves, and curd idli dipped in masala yogurt.

South Indian temple town Madurai in Tamilnadu is very popular for idlis.
Madurai is famous for its overnight idli shops and one can have hot and soft
idlis even at 2 AM. Recently on my visit to India while travelling on New
Delhi - Chandigarh Highway we had idlis and Dosa at 4 AM in a 24/7
street side restaurant with a seating capacity of over 1000 people and
serving a wide range of Indian Cuisines. AT that hour the restaurant was full
to capacity.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 191


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

These idlies are served with sambar and also with more than three varieties
of chutney like coconut chutney, cilantaro chutney, onion chutney, tomato
chutney, and mint. The softness of these idlis lies in the selection of rice and
black gram (black lentil).

Other temple towns in Tamilnadu like Kancheepuram and Tanjore are also
famous for the tasty idlis. Most of the people in south India take ildi as the
breakfast. Idly an easily disgestible food taken with sambar provides a mix
of proteins and carbohydrates to the body. Apart from sambar idly is also
taken with brinjal/tomato kothsu (a south Indian side dish), puli milagai( a
gravy made of tamarind, chilly and onion), vadai curry etc., Idly with vadai
curry combination is most popular in Chennai.

Idly goes very well with Idly powder Milagai podi - Chilli powder in Tamil.
Many varieties of idly powder exist; the most popular ones include the
powders made of black lentil - chana dal and Ellu podi made of sesame
seed and dried red chili.

Apart from many other variations of Idlis in Karnataka, the people of


Karnataka can be found continuing the 1100 – year - old traditional way
of making the idli as mentioned in the works of Shivakotiacharya or
Chavundaraya. The finished product is called Uddina idli, with the main
ingredient remaining Urad dal (black lentil).

Ramasseri idli comes from Ramasseri, an offbeat village in Palakkad is


known all over Kerala for the idlis. It makes—the delicious Ramasseri Idli.
Spongy and soft, Ramasseri Idli is slightly different in shape from the
conventional idlis. It is a little flat and round. Ramasseri Idli is eaten with
Podi – chili mixed in coconut oil. The beginning was from a Mudaliar
family living near Mannath Bhagavathi Temple in Ramasseri near Elappully.

The recipe of Ramasseri idli dates back to about one century, which again is
a trade secret. The Muthaliyar family had migrated to Palakkad from
Kanchipuram in Tamil Nadu. The new generation in the profession says
that the secret of the recipe and taste were handed down to them from the
older women of the community. Now the idli business is confined to only four
families in Ramasseri. Selection of rice is very important in making
Ramasseri idli. Usually the varieties of rice used are Kazhama,
Thavalakannan, Ponni etc.

The taste depends on the boiling of the patty itself. Drying and dehusking
are also important and need to be done in a particular way. The combination
of rice and black gram is also equally important. For 10 kg of rice, one kg of
black gram is used. Idli is made only after four hours of fermentation.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 192


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Steaming of the idli is done on a cloth covered on the mud pot using
firewood. This allegedly provides a special taste to the preparation. Leftover
Idli can be torn into crumbs and used for preparing dishes such as Idli fry
and Idli Upma.

Spicy Idli and Sāmbhar different ways of serving

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 193


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:

1. Rice White 3 cups


2. Urd Dal (Split black gram) 1 cup
3. Par Boiled rice 1 Cup
4. Coconut oil 1Tbsp

Methodology:

1. Wash rice and soak in water for 8-10 hours.


2. Wash dal and Soak in water for 8-10 hours.
3. Grind rice to a smooth paste adding water adding a tea spoon of
methi seeds
4. Drain all the water from the dal and grind along with rice mixture to
get a fine thick paste.
5. Transfer the mixture of step 4 to a deep skillet, whose size should be
such that its more than half portion remains empty. You can take mixture in
two skillets of smaller size. Cover the skillet with a plate.
6. Place the skillet in a warm place for 8-10 hours to let the mixture
ferment. The mixture will raise and fill the skillet. In winter, you can place it
in oven (switched off).
7. Grease the idli maker moulds with the oil and fill with the mixture of
step 7. Cook for about 10 minutes.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 194


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

8. You can add grated carrot, and chopped sweet pepper and chillies
pieces in between the mixture as layer.

Sāmbhar:

1. Arahar/Toor Dal 1 cup


2. Carrot diced fine ½ cup
3. Green chilli chopped 5
4. Okra chopped thin 1 inch size 5
5. Eggplant (Baingan) 1 inch size 3 small
6. Pumpkin diced 1 inch piece ½ cup
7. Tomato chopped 1
8. Green peas ¼ Cup
9. Ginger chopped ½ inch
10. Coriander leaves, chopped 1 Tbs
11. Curry leaves (curry patta) 8-10
12. Lemon/Lime juice 1 tsp
13. Tamarind pulp 1 tsp
14. Salt to taste
15. Red chili powder 1 tsp
16. Coriander powder 1 tsp
17. Cummin seeds ½ tsp
18. Coriander seeds ½ tsp
19. Hing (Asafoateda) powder 1 Large pinch
20. Mustard seeds ½ tsp
21. Fenugreek (Methi) seeds 1 tsp
22. Coconut oil 3 tsp

Methodology:

1. Cook dal eggplant and pumpkin in a pressure cooker and add 2 cups
water and 1 tsp salt. Cook until done.

2. Patch methi seed dry until the smell becomes stronger. Cool and grind
to a fine powder. This is an important ingredient for Sāmbhar. These days
there are various brands of Sāmbhar masalas. These are very good and can
replace the large number of spices. I have mentioned the traditional and the
other method as well.

3. In a deep skillet take 2 tsp oil and put on medium heat. When the oil
gets hot, first add cummin seeds and mustard seeds. When the seeds pop

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 195


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

up, add all the spices including methi powder. Fry the spices for a while and
add all the vegetables including coriander leaves and curry leaves. Stir for 2-
3 minutes. Add 2 cup water. Boil for 10 minutes. Add dal of step 1 and add
diced carrot and peas mix well and simmer.

4. As option you can add desiccated coconut however the original recipe
does not call for it.

5. Serve Idli and sambhar hot.

Tips

1. Fermentation is the key steps. The softness of idlis (like sponge)


depends on proper fermentation. After fermentation, the dal-rava mixture
should increase to at least double the volume. The fermentation is slow in
winter and quick in summer.

2. Ferment only the required quantity of dal-rava mixture and store the
rest in the refrigerator. Take it out 4 hours before putting for fermentation.

3. The typical flavour of sambhar will come from methi powder.

4. If you have made too many idlis, store them in the refrigerator. When
required, take out and microwave them for a few seconds to get idlis as
good as fresh and serve with hot Sāmbhar or you can steam to get
freshness. Actually nobody will know that they are not freshly made.

5. It is a good idea to make methi powder in advance and keep it in air


tight bottle.

Spicy Idli

1. In the mixture add chilli powder, green chillies, diced onion, dash of
grated carrot and diced sweet pepper and make regular idlies

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 196


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Coconut chutney

Ingredients:

1. Desiccated coconut 1 Cup


2. Curry leaves few strands
3. Coriander leaves ½ Cup
4. Green Chillies 5
5. Yogurt plain 1Cup
6. Salt to taste
7. Roasted Channa Daal 1Tbs
8. Mustard seeds 1tsp
9. Tamarind pulp 1tsp
10. Red chillies 2
11. Coconut oil 1Tbs

Methodology:

1. Heat oil and crackle mustard seeds and red chilli

2. Grind all ingredients together into a smooth fine paste

3. You can add crackled mustard seeds and chilli. However I like to grind
thses together with other ingredients.

A step by step photographic methodology of


Idli Recipe

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 197


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 1 Soaking Rice-Daal–Methi seeds

Step 2: Grinding the mixture to a smooth paste

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 198


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 3: Fermenting the mixture

Step 4: Pouring the mixture in idli molds

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 199


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 5: Steamed Idli taken out from the steamer

Step 6: Stocking idlis in the container

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 200


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 7: Sambhar Masala

Step 8: Cut Vegetables

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 201


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 9: Steamed Vegetables

Step 10: Frying the Masala for Sambhar

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 202


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 11: Adding Onion and Curry Leaves

Step 12: Adding the steamed Vegetables

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 203


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 13: Adding the pre boiled daal-eggplant and pumpkin mix

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 204


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 14: Adding the Sambhar Masala

Step 15: Ground Coconut-Chilies-Curry Leaves-Cilantro-Chana Daal

etc

Step 16: Preapering the tempering for chutney

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 205


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 17: Adding the tempering to the chutney mix

Step 18: Sāmbhar

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 206


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Step 18: Serving Idli-Sambhar-Chutney

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 207


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 208


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dosa the crispy savory pancakes from South India is a


staple food in its home region. In the rest of the country too, Dosas are very
popular. Dosas or Dosai are southern Indian pancakes, cooked on an oiled
tawa – griddle. There are many variations of dosa. The basic batter is made
from rice and dehusked, split urad dal which have been soaked overnight
and wet-ground into a creamy batter. Dosa is served filled with special
potato mixture along with Sāmbhar and coconut and tomato chutnies.

Dosa is called differently in different cultures. In Kannada: ೋ; Malayalam:



േദാശ; Tamil: ேதாைச; Telugu: ో ; Tulu: ೋ. Itೆ is a fermented crepe or
pancake made from rice batter and black lentils. It is indigenous to and is a
staple food in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka,
Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.

It is common dish for breakfast or dinner and is rich in carbohydrates and


protein. Dosa is a thin south Indian pancake made from fermented lentils
and rice blended with water. It is made crispy and typically served with
chutney and Sāmbhar.

It is a typical dish in South Indian cuisine and Konkan. It is called as Polle


in Konkan and Amboli in Marathi). It is eaten for breakfast or dinner, and is
rich in carbohydrates and protein.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 209


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Although dosa appears similar to a pancake yet it is a crispy golden brown


on one side. Served folded crispy side out, the inside remains white, soft and
doughy which acts as a contrast to the outside. A well-cooked dosa should
never have the floppy consistency of a pancake and should have a slightly
crisp texture. The Dosa itself has a plain but pleasant savory taste but is
served with tangy Sāmbhar and chutneys.

The origins of Dosa have been widely discussed in literature and books. First
reference to Dosa occurs in the Tamil Sangam Literature from around 6th
century AD. The Sanskrit classic Manasollasa written in 1051 AD by Western
Chalukya king Somesvara III describes Dosai.

Modern writers have conflicting views on the origin of Dosa. The English food
writer Pat Chapman and Lisa Rayner as well as Indian writer Thangappan
Nair state in their works that Dosa originated in Udupi, Karnataka. Their
works do not mention the reference to Dosa in Tamil Sangam literature.

Eminent food scientist K. T. Achaya said that Dosa has a history of two
thousand years in Tamil-speaking regions.

Edward Farnworth mentions the first reference to Dosa in Tamil Sangam


literature in the sixth century A.D.

A thin layer of the batter is then ladled onto a hot griddle - a tava greased
with oil or ghee. It is spread out evenly with the base of a ladle or bowl to
form a pancake. It is flipped to heat both crusts and removed from the
griddle when the crust becomes dry. Dosa are served hot, either folded in
half or rolled like a wrap.

Dosa can be stuffed with fillings of vegetables, meats and sauces to make a
quick meal. They are typically served with a side dish which varies according
to regional and personal preferences. Common side items are:

Ingredients for dosa:

1. Rice 3 Cups
2. Skinless Split Urad Daal 1 Cup
3. Fenugreek Seeds ¾Tsp
4. Salt To Taste
5. Vegetable coconut cooking oil or ghee

Methodology:
COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 210
Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

1. Wash the rice and urad daal well. Add the fenugreek seeds to the mix
and fill enough water in the rice-daal bowl to cover them about 2” deep.
Soak overnight.

2. The next morning, drain all the water from the rice and Urd daal. Now
put some in a food processor and grind - adding very little water if necessary
- to a smooth yet slightly grainy paste.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 211


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

3. When all the rice-daal mix is ground like this, put it into a large mixing
bowl and add enough water to make a batter. The consistency of the batter
should be such that it thickly coats a spoon dipped in it.

4. Now add salt to taste and keep the Dosa batter aside in a warm, dark
spot, covered, for 6-8 hours. After this fermentation, stir the batter well. It
is now ready to make Dosas.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 212


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

5. Put some cooking oil in a small bowl and keep ready. You will also
need a bowl of ice cold water, a large, flat nonstick pan, 2 sheets of paper
towel, a ladle, a spatula and a basting brush.

6. Fold one sheet of paper towel into a wad and dip lightly into the bowl
of cooking oil. Squeeze out any excess and then rub the paper towel all over
the surface of the pan to grease. The correct amount of oil is such that it is
barely visible on the pan. Now turn on the heat at medium high.

7. Fill the ladle up to the ¾ level with Dosa batter. Gently pour this batter
onto the center of the pan - just as you would for a pancake - till the ladle is
empty.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 213


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

8. Now begin to spread the batter in sweeping circular motions to form a


pancake of roughly 8” diameter. Do not be alarmed if the Dosa develops tiny
holes as you spread the batter. This is normal.

9. As soon as you have finished spreading the batter out on the pan, dip
the basting brush in cooking oil and drizzle the oil all over the surface of the
dosa and also around its edges. Now hold the pan by its handle, lift up and
swirl it so as to make the drizzled oil spread all over the Dosa.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 214


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

10. When the upper surface begins to look cooked (it will no longer look
soft or runny), flip the Dosa. By this time, ideally, the surface that was
underneath should be light golden in color. Allow to cook for 1 minute after
flipping.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 215


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

11. The Dosa is almost done. Fold it in half and allow to cook for 30
seconds more.

12. Serve the ready Dosa with side dishes like Sāmbhar and Coconut
chutney. I like to make and serve Dosas immediately while I cook as this
means they are crisp and fresh when eaten. This, however, is not absolutely

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 216


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

necessary. You can also make, stack and serve the Dosas later. Just ensure
you keep them warm till serving time by placing them - just like with
pancakes - in a closed dish.

13. Before you start making the next Dosa, fold another sheet of paper
towel into a wad and dip it in ice cold water. Squeeze the wad to remove
excess water and then rub it all over the surface of the pan to cool it slightly.
This ensures your next Dosa will spread evenly and not break because the
pan is too hot. Now proceed as you did for the last Dosa.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 217


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Alternate ways of serving

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 218


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 219


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Dahi Vada a great starter or a cold appetizer is a


most popular North Indian street food fare. Basically, dahi vadas are black
gram - Urd dal based savory balls which are smothered with frothy fresh
yogurt and sprinkled with spices like chili and cumin powder, chaat masala
or black salt and liberally doused with tangy-sweet tamarind chutney
garnished with cilantro.

The name Dahi vada itself is enough to bring water in mouth. In this hot
summer days, it is one of the few chaat which is served chilled. This is
absolutely lip smacking snack and as you bite into a soft, melt-in-the-mouth,
delicious vada, it gives immense pleasure to your mouth and stimulate your
appetite for more. It can be served as a great starter or a cold appetizer.
Dahi vadas are lentil (urad dal) based savory balls which are covered with
frothy fresh curds and sprinkled with spices like chili pwd, roasted cumin
pwd, chaat masala, black salt and garnished with Sweet Tamarind chutney.

Another version of this yogurt based snack, known as Perugu garellu in


Telugu and Thayir Vada in Tamil is prepared almost on the same lines as
the Dahi Vada. Perugu Garellu, a popular snack in Andhra is prepared by
dunking black gram lentil vadas in yogurt and pouring a seasoning of
mustard seeds, black gram dal and curry leaves over them.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 220


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:

For Vadas

1. Urd daal without skin 1 cup


2. Moong daal (yellow split) ½ cup
3. Ginger chopped fine 1 inch piece
4. Green chilies chopped finely 3
5. Curry leaves chopped few
6. Salt to taste
7. Pepper to taste
8. Finely chopped cilantro
9. Coconut oil to fry

Yogurt sauce:

1. Yogurt thick 2 cups


2. Milk ½ cup
3. Water as required for the consistency
4. Green chilies 2
5. Coconut shredded 2tbsp
6. Salt to taste
7. Cumin powder to sprinkle on top
8. Chili powder to sprinkle on top
9. Tamarind date chutney optional
10. Cilantro chopped 2tbsp

Tamarind chutney:

1. Seedless tamarind ½ cup


2. Dates (pitted) 50gms
3. Jiggery or brown sugar ¾ cup
4. Fennel seeds 1tsp
5. Cumin seeds (roasted) 1tsp
6. Salt to taste
7. Red chili powder as per taste

Methodology:

1. Wash & soak both daals together for about 2 -3 hours and grind to a
thick paste with as little water as possible till light. Continue whipping for the

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 221


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

barter to get light and fluffy. Add some salt towards the end so it gets mixed
uniformly if needed.

2. Add chopped ginger, green chilies and curry leaves and mix
thoroughly.

3. Heat oil in a shallow wok shape pot to medium flame. And deep fry
the batter in the shape of small pakoras. This can be done using the fingers
or a spoon to drop the barter in hot oil. Make sure the oil temperature does
not drop. This will cause the vadas not to puff. The flame between medium
to high is most suitable.

4. Keep some warm water on the side in a basin. And immerse the vada
once they are cooked into this water. This will enable them to get soft and
will remain that way when put in the yogurt sauce later. Also this helps in
removing excess oil from vadas that vadas usually absorb in the process of
cooking. Take them out after a few minutes. Squeeze gently to remove
excess water.

5. Grind green chilies and coconut to a smooth paste. Pass the yogurt
through a strainer to get smoothness. Mix milk, yogurt, and water as
required & salt to form a smooth, thick liquid. Soak the vadas in this blend
for at least 2-3 hours - the longer the better.

6. Just before serving, sprinkle the top with chili powder, cumin powder,
and tamarind-date chutney and coriander leaves and enjoy this tasty treat.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 222


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

A sweeter dahi is preferred in some places in India, especially in


Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same. In
Gujarat a combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as
garnish in addition to those mentioned above. They are mainly popular in
south of India especially Tamil Nadu and Chennai. Dhai vada has many
different spices on top to be garnished. At the end the texture is very good it
looks very appealing to eat. That is why everyone likes and it popular in any
part of the region of India and world over.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 223


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 224


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 225


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 226


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Raita (Hindi: rayta rāytā) is a Pakistani and Indian


condiment made with yoghurt (dahi) and used as a sauce or dip. It is served
as side dish as well. Indian food being spicy, raita acts as cooling provided
you do not add too much chili powder.

The yoghurt may be seasoned with coriander - cilantro, cumin powder, mint,
cayenne pepper, and other herbs and spices. It is prepared by frying cumin
(zīrā) along with black mustard (rāī), and these mixtures are mixed into the
yoghurt.

Minced, raw vegetables or fruits—such as cucumber, onion, or carrot,


pineapple, or papaya—are mixed into the yoghurt. Raw ginger and garlic
paste, green chili paste, and sometimes mustard paste, are used to enrich
flavor.

A popular variety of raita of Northern India is boondi raita. It is made with


tiny balls of fried gram flour (chickpea flour), which may taste salty or tīkhā
(spicy). The mixture is served chilled. Raita may cool the palate when eating
spicy Indian dishes. Raita is also eaten with kebabs.

Serve this cooling dish with practically anything! It tastes especially good
with stuffed Paranthas, Biryanis and Pulaos (rice dishes).

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 227


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Ingredients:
1. Thick yogurt, whisked till smooth 2 cups
2. Mint leaves chopped fine ½ cup
3. Cucumber grated or diced 1 large
4. Cumin powder 3/4 tsp
5. Red chilli powder 1/4 tsp
6. Sugar 1/2 tsp
7. Salt to taste

Methodology:
1. Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl and blend till mixed
well.
2. Chill and serve

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 228


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Raita (Hindi: rayta rāytā) is a Pakistani and Indian condiment


made with yoghurt (dahi) and used as a sauce or dip. It is served as side
dish as well. Indian food being spicy, raita acts as cooling provided you do
not add too much chili powder.

The yoghurt may be seasoned with coriander - cilantro, cumin powder, mint,
cayenne pepper, and other herbs and spices. It is prepared by frying cumin
(zīrā) along with black mustard (rāī), and these mixtures are mixed into the
yoghurt.

Minced, raw vegetables or fruits—such as cucumber, onion, or carrot,


pineapple, or papaya—are mixed into the yoghurt. Raw ginger and garlic
paste, green chili paste, and sometimes mustard paste, are used to enrich
flavor.

A popular variety of raita of Northern India is boondi raita. It is made with


tiny balls of fried gram flour (chickpea flour), which may taste salty or tīkhā
(spicy). The mixture is served chilled. Raita may cool the palate when eating
spicy Indian dishes. Raita is also eaten with kebabs.

Serve this cooling dish with practically anything! It tastes especially good
with stuffed Paranthas, Biryanis and Pulaos (rice dishes).

Raita being the most common and widely favored accompaniment or side
dish many varieties are available. Whatever be the ingredients the

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 229


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

methodology remains the same. It does not matter if it is ONION RAITA,


TOMATO-MINT RAITA, POTATO RAITA, and BOONDI RAITA.

The images of some of the most common ones are given here for
familiarity.

ALOO RAITA

TOMATO RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 230


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

CUCUMBER RAITA

FRUITS RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 231


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

BOONDI RAITA

ONION RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 232


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

POTATO-TOMATO RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 233


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

CARROT RAITA

MINT RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 234


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

FRUITS AND NUTS RAITA

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 235


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Chutney - Hindi: cqnI is a word of Hindi-Urdu connotation.


The Hindi word chutney implies ‘to crush’ the ingredients ‘to make chutney’.
This signifies the process by which chutney is made. Often the ingredients
are crushed together with a stone. The word Chutney was subsequently
incorporated into English to describe a tasty sauce in South Asia and other
South Asian cuisines. The word chutney is derived from the East Indian word
Chatni.

The word finds its roots from caṭnī - Marathi:cq[I’ Tamil: ச ன; Kannada:

ಚ ; Hindi: cqnI; Urdu: ‫ن‬ ‫ﭼﭨ;ی‬Malayalam: ച ; ിand Telugu: పచ . It is a


term for a class of spicy preparations used as an accompaniment for a main
dish. Chutneys usually contain an idiosyncratic but complementary spice and
vegetable mix of herbs.

Chutneys can be wet or dry, with a coarse to fine texture. The Indian word
refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves
often sweetened. At least several Northern Indian languages use the word
for fresh preparations only.

Chutney is similar in consistency to jelly, salsa or relish, and is used as a


sweet and sour condiment. Usually made fresh, chutney contains fruit and
sugar to give it a sweet taste, and almost all chutney contains vinegar, lime
or lemon juice or dry mango powder and perhaps onions to give it a
corresponding sour flavor. The ingredients are mixed together and then

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 236


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

simmered slowly. While chutney is primarily sweet and sour, there can also
be many variations of spices, often giving it a hot and spicy flavor.

Originating in India, chutney was imported from India to Western Europe in


the 17th century. European reproductions of chutney were often called
‘mangoed’ fruits and vegetables, as one of the most common fruits used in
the making of chutney is the mango.

However a different word of Indian origin is Pickle or achār – in Hindi: Acar


verily refers to to preserves that often contain oil but are rarely sweet.
Vinegar or citrus juice may be added as preservatives, or fermentation in the
presence of salt may be used to create acid.

In the past, chutneys were ground with a mortar and pestle made of stone
or an ammikkal (Tamil). Nowadays, electric blenders replace the stone
implements. Various spices are added and ground, usually in a particular
order; the wet paste thus made is sauteed in vegetable oil.

Types of chutneys:

There is virtually no limit to the number of chutneys as it can be made from


virtually any vegetable, fruit, herb, spices or a combination of them.
Chutneys come in two major groups, sweet and hot. Both forms usually
contain various spices, including chili. However each one of these differs by
their main flavor. Chutney types and their preparations vary widely across
India, Pakistan and world over. Now a days various companies are
marketing these commercially as well.

1. Coriander – Cilantro chutney


2. Mint chutney
Both Coriander and mint chutneys are often called Hari chutney – green
ones.
3. Tamarind chutney - Imli chutney. It is often called Meethi chutney or
sweet and sour.
4. Sooth (or Saunth) chutney, made with dates and ginger
5. Coconut chutney
6. Onion chutney
7. Prune chutney
8. Tomato chutney
9. Red Chili chutney
10. Green Chili chutney

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 237


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

11. Mango chutney (made from raw, green mangoes)


12. Lime chutney (made from whole, unripe limes)
13. Garlic chutney made from fresh garlic, coconut and groundnut
14. Green tomato chutney. Common English recipe to use up unripe
tomatoes
15. Peanut chutney (shengdana chutney in Marathi)
16. Ginger chutney, mostly used in Tamil cuisine and Udupi cuisine to be
eaten with Dosa
17. Yogurt chutney, may be as simple as mixing yogurt, red chili powder,
and salt, eaten with a variety of foods
18. Tomato Onion chutney
19. Cilantro Mint Coconut chutney

However the main ingredients in chutneys are salt, chilies both green and
dry red, tamarind, coriander leaves, tomatoes, mint leaves, onion, ginger
Chutneys originated in India – the name derived from the Hindu word chatni
– but are now a very popular preserve all over the world.

They are made from fruits or vegetables, or a mixture of the two, which are
chopped, cooked, mixed with spices, vinegar and other ingredients and
reduced to a smooth pulp. Unlike jam making, windfall apples, green
tomatoes and other end-of-season fruit such as rhubarb can be used as
there is no worry about the setting qualities. Dried fruit, especially grapes, in
the form of raisins (dried white grapes usually of the variety ‘Muscatel’)
sultanas (small raisins that are seedless, sweet, pale golden in color) and
currants (dried, black, seedless grapes) are commonly used.

The scope of chutneys is endless and the combinations and permutations


can be varied according to personal taste and the ingredients available. They
can be sweet, sour, hot or mild.

A big advantage to both fruit and vegetable chutneys is that they improve
with age and, if properly stored, will remain in good condition for years.

Equipment Required for Making Chutney:


1. A stainless steel or enamel-lined pan that is large enough to contain all
the ingredients if you are also a big jam maker it may be well worth in
investing in a preserving pan. Brass, copper or iron pans should not be used
as they react with the vinegar and give a metallic flavor to the chutney.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 238


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

2. Long-handled wooden spoon – this should be reserved for chutney-


making only as the wood becomes impregnated with the spiciness of the
chutney and will taint other recipes.

3. Sieves – stainless steel or nylon

4. Heat proof jug or wide necked stainless steel funnel - a heat proof
glass, stainless steel or enamel jug is useful for pouring the chutney into the
jars. Alternatively a wide necked stainless steel funnel or a large ladle can be
used.
5. Muslin or cotton squares – to tie up whole spices needed for flavorings.

6. Scales – preferably dual marked in metric and imperial.

7. Chopping boards and stainless steel knife.

8. Heat proof jars of assorted sizes. These should be clean, dry, sterilized
and warm before pouring in the chutney. To sterilize the jars just before
filling, put into a cool oven, Gas Mark 1 (140°C/275°F), for a few minutes.

9. Covers – these are most important. Vinegar corrodes metal, so use


plastic screw or snap-on type or plastic preserving skin. Specialist preserving
or bottling jars are suitable, either with screw-on or clip-on lid, providing the
lid is made of glass.

10. Labels – For the front of the jars to identify the chutney and the date
made.

Ingredients - Vinegar, Sugar and Spices:


1. Vinegar – is one of the most important ingredients in successful
chutney-making. This must be of good quality and have an acetic content of
at least 5%. Malt, white or wine vinegar can be used. However Apple cider
vinegar is the best.

2. Sugar - granulated or brown. Brown sugar gives a darker color to the


chutney that is often preferred. Prolonged cooking of any sugar does,
however, have a darkening effect on the chutney and, if a lighter color is
required, the sugar should only be added when the fruit and or vegetables
are already soft and mushy.

3. Spices – generally whole spices are preferable in chutney-making than


ground ones which can give a muddy appearance to the chutney. Bruise

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 239


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

these and tie them up in a muslin bag and cook with the other ingredients.
However, some recipes call for a mixture of both whole and ground spices to
give the best flavor.

Tips for things that go wrong in making chutney:


1. Tough or fibrous fruit and vegetables such as onions, apples and
gooseberries, should be softened in a small amount of water in a covered
pan. The remainder of the cooking should be done in an open pan as
evaporation of the liquid is an important part of the cooking process.

2. The success of good chutney is that it should be relatively smooth in


texture and have a rich mellow flavor. To achieve this it requires long, slow
cooking and then, ideally, it should be left to mature for at least three
months.

3. If the chutney has shrunk in the jar, the cover is not airtight and
moisture has evaporated.

4. If loose liquid has collected on the top of the chutney, it has not been
cooked sufficiently. It may be possible to rescue the chutney by tipping it
back into the pan, bringing it to the boil again and cooking until the liquid
disappears.

This was about the commercial chutney making. However for home purpose

take the ingredients – for instance for mint chutney you require:

1. Mint 1Cup
2. Green Chilies to taste 2-3
3. Mango pealed ½ Cup
4. Onion Diced ½ cup
5. Garlic 2-3 cloves
6. Ginger ½ inch piece
7. Salt to taste
8. Chaat Masala

Grind all these ingredients to a smooth paste. Bottle or keep refrigerated for
longer life.

In the same way you can make other chutneys of your choice.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 240


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Tamarind Sweet – Sour Chutney:


1. Deseeded tamarind ½ cup
2. Mint leaves ½ cup
3. Red chili powder to taste
4. Salt to taste
5. Chaat Masala 2Tsp
6. Cumin powder 2Tsp
7. Sugar or Jaggary or brown sugar to taste
8. Raisins ¼ cup
9. Pitted dates ¼ cup

Soak tamarind to get the pulp. Wash and soak rasins and dates. Grind all
the ingredients to a smooth pure. Place on the medium flame for a boil and
then simmer for 4-5 minutes. Sugar need not be grinded instead add while
boiling. Jaggary is far better than sugar. The boiling helps in shelf life. Bottle
when cool and store refrigerated.

In the subsequent pages I give the images of chutneys:

COCONUT CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 241


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COCONUT AND CILANTRO

MINT CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 242


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

TOMATO CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 243


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

ROASTED PEANUT AND CORIANDER CHUTNEY

ROASTED PEANUT AND TOMATO CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 244


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

TAMARIND CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 245


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

TOMATO CHUTNEY

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 246


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Chaat (Hindi: चाट) is plate of savoury snacks,


typically served at road-side tracks from stalls or carts in India and
Pakistan. And these items are served world over in restaurants or
chaat caffes. With its origins in Northeast India, chaat has become
immensely popular in the rest of India and the rest of South Asia. The
word derives from Hindi cāṭ - caq - tasting, a delicacy, and from cāṭnā

caqna - to lick. These dished are so savory that one is tempted to lick.
It does not matter if it is served on a leaf or leafy bowl or glass plate
or bowl.

India being hot counrty more water intake is need during summar as
water evaporates through profus eperspiration thse dishes require
extra water intake because of variety of salts and savory pepper
contents.

Fruit salad or fruit chaat can be served with all the seasonal fruits cut
into bitr size and the sprinkled with salt, pepper, chaat masala, and
drops of lemon or lime.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 247


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

FRUIT SALAD OR CHAAT


There are many variations in it. You can take boiled chickpeas, and other
beans along with sprouted beans. Toss all these and fresh seasonal fruits,
green chili. Sprinkle with salt, chili powder, and lemon juice before serving.

You can use your imagination and with permutation and combination you
can create your variety of dishes.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 248


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Samosa Chaat as is evident from the name it is an


adaptation of regular samosa into a savory samosa chaat dish. As compared
to ordinary samosa the chaat dish looks more attractive, presentable,
savory, nutritious, mouthwatering and filling.

Ingredients:
1. Samosas 2
2. Chole or boiled chickpeas 2Tbs
3. Thick yogurt 2Tbs
4. Tamarind chutney
5. Mint Chutney
6. Finely chopped mint and cilantro 1Tbs
7. Chaat Masala to taste
8. Salt to taste
9. Chili powder to taste
10. Cumin powder ¼tsp
11. Grated Carrot few strands
12. Besan sev ( from any indian Store optional)
13. Diced onion optional 1Tsp

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 249


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Serving:
On a large serving plate place the two samosas sliced mashed of pressed
with hand. You can also drop a few oil and crackle cumin add mashed chole
or chana sauté for a few minutes. Add mashed samosa. Continue to sauté
this mix for 1-2 minutes. Place the mixture on the plate. Sprinkle tamarind
chutney, beaten yogurt, mint chutney, condiments and garnishing. The
Samosa Chaat is ready to serve as a savory dish presented in
mouthwatering presentation.

SAVORY AND EXOTIC SAMOSA CHAAT

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 250


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Chole – Bhatura is exotic and popular dish from


Punjab. From street food to restaurants chole - bhatura is served and is a
favorite food. I have not come across who doeas not like this dish.

Ingredients:

For Bhaturas

1. All-purpose flour 2½ cups


2. Whole-wheat flour ½ cup
3. Semolina optional ½ cup
4. Yogurt ½ cup
5. Salt 3/4Tsp
6. Sugar 1/2Tsp
7. Baking powder 1tsp
8. Coconut oil for frying

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 251


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Methodology Bhatura:

1. In a large mixing bowl sift flours, semolina, salt, and baking powder
2. Add yogurt, sugar and 1tbs oil. Mix and the knead soft dough using
lukewarm water.
3. Cover and place the dough in a dark closed place for2-3 hours. Oven is
usually the ideal place
4. Heat the oil in a wok or karadhi at medium flame
5. Take one table spoonful dough. Make round ball. Flatten and the ball
and roll 4-5’’ disc. Pulling one end make a tear drop shape.
6. Gently slip into hot oil and allow it to puff by simply patting with the
spatula.
7. When cooked golden take out and place on paper towel
Bhaturas are ready to serve with chole, cilantro chutney, and pickle.

Ingredients for Chole:

1. White chickpeas 1cup


2. Diced tomatoes 3-4 medium
3. Finely chopped green chilies 2-3
4. Finely chopped ginger 1” piece
5. Cumin seed 1tsp
6. Coarsely ground coriander seed 1tbs
7. Red chili powder ½ tsp
8. Garam Masala ¼ tsp
9. Salt to taste

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 252


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

10. Pav bhaji Masala 2tsp


11. Cilantro finely chopped ½ cup
12. Finely chopped onion ½ cup

Methodology for chole:

1. Pick, wash and soak chana overnight


2. Boil chana in a pressure cooker for 3-4 whistles. Turn off the heat and
allow the pressure to drop
3. Heat oil in a pan over medium flame. Add oil and when oil is hot add
cumin. Allow to crackle. Add onion, ginger, and green chilies and chili
powder
4. Add diced tomatoes, masalas and allow to cook until oil floats on the
surface
5. Add boiled chana and allow cooking on low flame and then allowing
simmering for next 5 minutes.
6. Turn off heat.

Serve chole garnished with cilantro, and hot bhaturas, chutney, raw onion
and pickles.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 253


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 254


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 255


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

H imalayan Mountain range is famous for many Life Giving, Life Preserving
and many other natural, pure and organic herbs and substances from times
immemorial. Of these we find mention in Atherva Veda, Sushruta Samhita and
other ancient treatise. The salt contains from these mountain ranges contain all of
the 84 elements found in human body. Following are the benefits of Natural
Crystal Salt grown in Himalayan range:

1. The salt regulates the water content throughout your body.

2. It promotes a healthy pH balance in your cells, particularly your brain


cells.

3. It promotes blood sugar health and thus helps to reduce the signs of
aging.

4. It helps in generating Hydroelectric Energy in cells in your body.

5. It helps in the absorption of food particles through your intestinal tract.

6. It supports the respiratory health.

7. It promotes the sinus health.

8. It prevents the muscle cramps.

9. It promotes bone strength.

10. Regulating your sleep - it naturally promotes sleep.

11. It supports your libido.

12. Promoting vascular health.

13. In conjunction with water it is actually essential for the regulation of


your blood pressure.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 256


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

PARANTHA GUYANESE AND TRINIDAD STYLE

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 257


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

STUFFED PARANTHA BENGALI STYLE

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 258


Cooking Taoshobuddha way volume 2 2011

Cooking Taoshobuddha Way Volume 2


Cooking for the transformation of human consciousness is
Cooking Taoshobuddha Way for Buddhas

The uniqueness of Indian Cuisine lies in its special blend of spices


that release fragrant aroma in the atmosphere. The aroma and the
finishing look become more attractive than a beautifully dressed
beauty. This creates an enticing ambiance in the surroundings.

Cooking lovingly! Cooking meditatively! Cooking for Buddhas!


Cooking for the transformation of human consciousness is what
Taoshobuddha means by cooking. And this is the central theme of
‘Cooking Taoshobuddha way or Buddha Way!’

It is indeed cooking for Buddhas. A strange, yet still a meaningful


title for a cook Book!

Cooking lovingly! Cooking meditatively! Cooking for Buddhas!


Cooking Taoshobuddha way or Buddha way or cooking for
Buddhas means the same thing. It is indeed a strange yet still a
meaningful title for a cook book.

It says a lot. And this is the beauty of it. First let me explain
something of the title. Taoshobuddha is an enlightened master.
Very rarely a master goes into cooking or does something like
this. Although each master remains particular about eating food
cooked by each and every one yet no effort was ever made in the
past in this direction. When I asked Taoshobuddha about this,
very pleasantly in his usual manner he said something that
reveals the compassion of a master, his insights into cooking and
its relation to human consciousness. Only an enlightened one can
say such a thing. This is what he said:

“Cooking Taoshobuddha means ‘Cooking for Buddha’; ‘Cooking


lovingly’; ‘Cooking meditatively’.

Only then there can be total transformation of human


consciousness. Only then we can create a new man who is
balanced both inner and outer. WE go on speak of spirituality and
we propagate spiritual growth. However the question remains
unanswered if we really understand what spiritual growth really
means.

COOKING – DAALS – RICE- AND COMBINATIONS Page 259