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A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON EMPLOYEE

ATTRITION AND RETENTION AT SUSEE GROUP

OF COMPANIES
(With Special Reference to Madurai)

A Final Project Report

Submitted By,

MURALIDHARAN.G

(9909115070)

IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF

MR.M.SHANMUGASUNDRAM MBA

KALASALINGAM UNIVERSITY

ANAND NAGAR,

KRISHNANKOVIL – 626 190

MAY 2011
CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

In a human resources context, turnover or staff turnover or labor turnover or


attrition is the rate at which an employer gains and loses employees. Simple ways to
describe it are "how long employees tend to stay" or "the rate of traffic through the
revolving door." Turnover is measured for individual companies and for their industry as
a whole. If an employer is said to have a high turnover relative to its competitors, it
means that employees of that company have a shorter average tenure than those of other
companies in the same industry. High turnover can be harmful to a company's
productivity if skilled workers are often leaving and the worker population contains a
high percentage of novice workers.

Employee retention refers to the efforts by which employers attempt to retain


employees in their workforce. In a business setting, the goal of employers is to decrease
employee turnover, training costs, and loss of talent. By implementing lessons learned
from key organizational behavior concepts employers can improve retention rates and
decrease the associated costs of high turnover.

The study entitled “A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON EMPLOYEE


ATTRITION & RETENTION AT SUSEE GROUP OF COMPANIES” was conducted
during the period of January 3rd to April 22nd at Susee Automobiles Private Limited,
Kappalur & kalavasal [Madurai]. The main motive behind the study is to find the future
needs and aspirations of employees in the organization and about the satisfaction level of
employees in the organization. The project is done for the benefit of Susee Automobiles
who have the dealership for the Mahindra. A survey was conducted to collect data from
the respondents using structured interview schedule. After the survey a careful analysis is
made on the respondent’s opinion. The study also includes the findings and suggestions
for the successful implementation of various retention strategies for Susee group of
companies.
CHAPTER 2

INDUSTRY AND COMPANY PROFILE

2.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE-AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

The history of the automobile begins as early as 1769, with the creation of
steam-powered automobiles capable of human transport. In 1806, the first cars powered
by internal combustion engines running on fuel gas appeared, which led to the
introduction in 1885 of the ubiquitous modern gasoline- or petrol-fueled internal
combustion engine. Cars powered by electricity briefly appeared at the turn of the 20th
century but largely disappeared from commonality until the turn of the 21st century,
when interest in low- and zero-emissions transportation was reignited. As such, the early
history of the automobile can be divided into a number of eras based on the prevalent
method of automotive propulsion during that time. Later periods were defined by trends
in exterior styling and size and utility preferences.

Eras of Invention

Pioneer inventors

German engineer Karl Benz, inventor of numerous car-related technologies,


is generally regarded as the inventor of the modern automobile. The four-stroke petrol
(gasoline) internal combustion engine that constitutes the most prevalent form of modern
automotive propulsion is a creation of German inventor Nicholas Otto. The similar four-
stroke diesel engine was also invented by a German, Rudolf Diesel. The hydrogen fuel
cell, one of the technologies hailed as a replacement for gasoline as an energy source for
cars, was discovered in principle by yet another German, Christian Friedrich Schönbein,
in 1838. The battery electric car owes its beginnings to Hungarian Ányos Jedlik, one of
the inventors of the electric motor, and Gaston Planté, who invented the lead-acid battery
in 1859.
Early automobiles

Steam automobiles

Ferdinand Verbiest, a member of a Jesuit mission in China, built the first steam-
powered vehicle around 1672, designed as a toy for the Chinese Emperor, it being of
small scale and unable to carry a driver or passenger but, quite possibly, the first working
steam-powered vehicle ('auto-mobile').

Electric automobiles

In 1828, Ányos Jedlik, a Hungarian who invented an early type of electric motor,
created a tiny model car powered by his new motor. In 1834, Vermont blacksmith
Thomas Davenport, the inventor of the first American DC electrical motor, installed his
motor in a small model car.

Veteran era

The first production of automobiles was by Karl Benz in 1888 in Germany and,
under license from Benz, in France by Emile Roger.

Brass or Edwardian era

Named for the widespread use of brass in the United States, the Brass (or
Edwardian) Era lasted from roughly 1905 through to the beginning of World War I in
1914. 1905 was a signal year in the development of the automobile, marking the point
when the majority of sales shifted from the hobbyist and enthusiast to the average user.

Vintage era

The vintage era lasted from the end of World War I (1919), through the Wall
Street Crash at the end of 1929. Three years later, Hermann Rieseler of Vulcan Motor
invented the first automatic transmission, which had two-speed planetary gearbox, torque
converter, and lockup clutch it never entered production.
Pre-WWII era

The pre-war part of the classic era began with the Great Depression in 1930,
commonly placed at 1948. It was in this period that integrated fenders and fully-closed
bodies began to dominate sales.

Modern era
The modern era is normally defined as the 25 years proceeding the current year.
However, there are some technical and design aspects that differentiate modern cars from
antiques.

After 1880 and Before 1990

• About hundred years ago the first motorcar was imported. Import duty on
vehicle was introduced. Indian great royal road was conceived.
• First car brought in India by a princely ruler in 1898.
• Simpson and company established in 1840.
• They were the first to build a stem car and stem bus to attempt motorcar
manufacture, to build and operate petrol driver passenger service and to
import American chassis in India.

In 1980’s

• The period of liberalized policy and intense completion.


• First phase of liberalization announced.
• Unfair practices of monopoly, oligopoly etc slowly disappeared.
• Liberalization of the protectionism policies of the government.
• Lot of new foreign collaborations came up in the eighties. My company
went in for Japanese collaborations.
• Andhra Pradesh scooters entered into collaboration with piggio for
manufacture of vesper model
• Hindustan motors Ltd., Inc collaboration with Isuzu of Japan, introduced
in Isuzu truck in early eighties.
• All entered into collaboration with Leyland vehicles ltd., for development
of integral busses and with Hino motors of Japan for the manufacturer of
W series of Engines.
• TELCO after the expiry of its contract with Daimler Benz indigenously
improved the same Benz model and introduced it in market.
• Government approved four new firms in the LCV market, namely, DCM,
Eicher, Searaj, and allwyn; they had collaborations with Japanese
companies namely, Toyota, Mitsubishi, Mazda and Nissan respectively.
• The two-Wheeler market increased, since 1982 the government had
permitted foreign collaborations for the manufacturing of two wheelers up
to 100cc engine capacity. Foreign equity up to 4% was also allowed.
• In 1983 Maruti udyog Ltd was started in collaboration with Suzuki, a
Japanese firm.
• Other three cars manufactures namely, Hindustan motors Ltd, Premier
automobiles Ltd, Standard motor production of Indian Ltd, also introduced
new models in the market.
• At that time there were five passenger car manufacturers in India Maruti
Udyog Ltd., Hindustan motors Ltd, premier automobiles ltd., standard
motors production of India Ltd, Sipani automobiles.
• Ashok Leyland Ltd and TELCO were strong players in the commercial
vehicles sector.
• In 1983-84 Bajaj Tempo Ltd. , entered into collaboration with Daimler
Benz of Germany for manufacture for LCV’s
• Important policy changed like relaxation in MRTP and FERA deli censing
of some ancillary products, broad banding of the products, modifications
in licensing policy, concessions to private sector and foreign collaboration
policy etc., resulted in higher growth/better performance of the industry
than in the earlier decades.
• Lohia Machines Ltd., entered in collaboration with piggio of Italy.
• Kinetic Engineering Ltd entered in to financial and technical collaboration
with Honda motor company of Japan for 100cc scooters.
• In the motorcycle segment firms had shifted their emphasis from heavier
models to lighter and fuel-efficient models. Indian market was flooded
with new 100cc models manufactured by different firms with Japan
technology.
• In moped segment there were 23 firms engaged in their production but the
virtual oligopoly of kinetic Engineering Ltd., SCL and Majestic Auto
remind intact. This segment had less collaboration

2.2 MAHINDRA & MAHINDRA LIMITED

Mahindra & Mahindra Limited is the flagship company of the Mahindra


Group, a multinational conglomerate based in Mumbai, India. The company was set up in
1945 in Ludhiana as Mahindra & Mohammed by brothers K.C. Mahindra and J.C.
Mahindra and Malik Ghulam Mohammed. After India gained independence and Pakistan
was formed, Mohammed immigrated to Pakistan where he became the nation's first
finance minister. The company changed its name to Mahindra & Mahindra in 1948.
Mahindra & Mahindra was set up as a steel trading company in 1945. It soon expanded
into manufacturing general-purpose utility vehicles, starting with assembly under license
of the iconic Willys Jeep in India. Soon established as the Jeep manufacturers of India,
M&M later branched out into the manufacture of light commercial vehicles (LCV’s) and
agricultural tractors.
Today, M&M is the leader in the utility vehicle segment in India with its
flagship UV Scorpio and enjoys a growing global market presence in both the automotive
and tractor businesses. Over the past few years, M&M has expanded into new industries
and geographies. They entered into the two-wheeler segment by taking over Kinetic
Motors in India. M&M also has controlling stake in REVA Electric Car Company and
acquired South Korea's SsangYong Motor Company in 2011. The US based Reputation
Institute recently ranked Mahindra among the top 10 Indian companies in its 'Global 200:
The World's Best Corporate Reputations' list.Mahindra & Mahindra is a major
automobile manufacturer of utility vehicles, passenger cars, pickups, commercial
vehicles, and two wheelers. Its tractors are sold on six continents it has acquired plants in
China and the United Kingdom, and has three assembly plants in the USA. M&M has
partnerships with international companies like Renault SA, France and International
Truck and Engine Corporation, USA. M&M has a global presence and its products are
exported to several countries. Its global subsidiaries include Mahindra Europe Srl. based
in Italy, Mahindra USA Inc., Mahindra South Africa and Mahindra (China) Tractor Co.
Ltd.M&M made its entry into the passenger car segment with the Logan in April 2007
under the Mahindra Renault joint venture. M&M will make its maiden entry into the
heavy trucks segment with Mahindra Navistar, the joint venture with International Truck,
USA.

M&M's automotive division makes a wide range of vehicles including


MUVs, LCV’s and three wheelers. It offers over 20 models including new generation
multi-utility vehicles like the Scorpio and the Bolero. It formerly had a joint venture with
Ford called Ford India Private Limited to build passenger cars. At the 2008 Delhi Auto
Show, Mahindra executives said the company is pursuing an aggressive product
expansion program that would see the launch of several new platforms and vehicles over
the next three years, including an entry-level SUV designed to seat five passengers and
powered by a small turbo diesel engine. True to their word, Mahindra & Mahindra
launched the Mahindra Xylo in January 2009, and as of June 2009, the Xylo has sold
over 15000 units. Also in early 2008, Mahindra commenced its first overseas CKD
operations with the launch of the Mahindra Scorpio in Egypt, in partnership with the
Bavarian Auto Group. This was soon followed by assembly facilities in Brazil. Vehicles
assembled at the plant in Bramont, Manaus, include Scorpio Pick Ups in single and
double cab pick-up body styles as well as SUVs.Mahindra & Mahindra has controlling
stakes in Reva electric and has submitted letter of Intent for South Korea's SsangYong
Mahindra plans to sell the diesel SUVs and pickup trucks starting in late 2010 in North
America through an independent distributor, Global Vehicles USA, based in Alpharetta,
Georgia. Mahindra announced it will import pickup trucks from India in knockdown kit
(CKD) form to circumvent the Chicken tax. CKDs are complete vehicles that will be
assembled in the U.S. from kits of parts shipped in crates. On 18 October 2010, however,
it was reported that Mahindra had indefinitely delayed the launch of vehicles into the
North American market, citing legal issues between it and Global Vehicles after
Mahindra retracted its contract with Global Vehicles earlier in 2010, due to a decision to
sell the vehicles directly to consumers instead of through Global Vehicles. However, a
November 2010 report quoted John Perez, the CEO of Global vehicles USA, as
estimating that he expects Mahindra’s small diesel pickups to go on sale in the U.S. by
spring 2011, although legal complications remain, and Perez, while hopeful, admits that
arbitration could take more than a year. Later reports suggest that the delays may be due
to a Mahindra scrapping the original model of the truck and replacing it with an upgraded
one before selling them to Americans.

In 2010, India's Mahindra & Mahindra Limited was named as the


preferred bidder to acquire the bankruptcy-protected SsangYong Motor Company.
Mahindra is expected to gain a controlling stake in the company by March 2011 and the
planned acquisition has been approved by South Korea's Free Trade Commission.M&M
is one of the leading tractor brands in the world by volume. It is also the largest
manufacturer of tractors in India with sustained market leadership of over 25 years. It
designs, develops, manufactures, and markets tractors as well as farm implements.
Mahindra Tractors (China) Co. Ltd. manufactures tractors for the growing Chinese
market and is a hub for tractor exports to the USA and other nations. M&M has a 100%
subsidiary, Mahindra USA, which assembles products for the American market.

Banking & Finance

Kotak Mahindra Bank


The Kotak Mahindra group is a financial organization established in 1985
in India. It was previously known as the Kotak Mahindra Finance Limited, a non-banking
financial company. In February 2003, Kotak Mahindra Finance Ltd, the group's flagship
company was given the license to carry on banking business by the Reserve Bank of
India (RBI). Kotak Mahindra Finance Ltd. is the first company in the Indian banking
history to convert to a bank. The bank is headed by K.M. Gherda as Chairman and Uday
Kotak as Executive Vice Chairman & Managing Director. Shankar Acharya is the
chairman of board of Directors in the company. The Bank has its registered office at
Nariman Bhavan, Nariman Point, and Mumbai.

Mahindra Financial Services


Mahindra & Mahindra Financial Services Ltd (Mahindra Finance) is one
of 's leading non-banking finance companies focused on providing finance for utility
vehicles, tractors and cars in the rural and semi-urban sector.Mahindra Finance currently
has the largest network of over 436 branches . It has entered into more than 600,000
customer contracts and has disbursements of around Rs. 21000crore since inception.

Information Technology
Tech Mahindra and Mahindra Satyam
Tech Mahindra specializes in solutions for communications industry is telecom-focused
system integration and IT Solutions Company from India.Mahindra Satyam is a leading
global business and information technology services company
Bristlecone. It provides a range of services focused on the entire supply chain spectrum,
including strategy and process consulting, systems implementation and business process
outsourcing, to leading companies globally. Mahindra is generally a low base company it
gets his roots from the Asian companies

Mahindra Navistar
Mahindra Navistar Automotives Ltd is a joint-venture between Navistar International (49%) of
the United States and Mahindra & Mahindra (51%).Mahindra Navistar has started its full-fledged
manufacturing activities for the entire spectrum of commercial vehicles ranging from 3.5 – 49
tons GVW/GCW. Huge investments are being made in product development and in setting up of
a Greenfield manufacturing facility at Chakan near Pune, India. The products of MNAL are
currently sold under the trademark of Cabking, Loading and Tourister.

About Navistar
Navistar International Corporation is a U.S. holding company which owns the
manufacturer of International brand commercial trucks, MaxxForce brand diesel engines,
IC Bus School and commercial buses, Workhorse brand chassis for motor homes and step
vans, and are a private label designer and manufacturer of diesel engines for the pickup
truck, van and SUV markets. The company is also a provider of truck and diesel engine
parts and service.

The company's products, parts, and services are sold through a network of nearly 1,000
dealer outlets in the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Mexico and more than 60 dealers
in 90 countries throughout the world. The company also provides financing for its
customers and distributors principally through its wholly owned subsidiary, Navistar
Financial Corporation.

2.3 COMPANY PROFILE

The Susee Group of Companies is a family owned business house with


interests in Automobiles, IT and Finance. The groups are on the anvil of celebrating
about four decades of successful business operations. The name "Susee" is a combination
of the Tamil Initials "Su" {Subramanian} and "See" {Seeniyammal} of the founding
parents of the Family. A customer is the most important visitor on our premises. He is not
dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption in our work - he is
the purpose of it. We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing us a favor by
giving us the opportunity to serve him.

2.4 VISION & MISSION

"@ ur service... always"

Susee automobiles Pvt Ltd., is an automobile retailer and their vision is that they
will be in the service of customers always. Their motto is service the customer always.

“To provide the best quality of service at affordable prices, in a timely manner
using a sustainable and profitable way”
The mission of Susee automobiles is to provide the service to the customer at
reasonable price. In the automobiles industry the service after sales is very important. So
Susee automobiles are concentrating on service keenly. Thus they kept their mission as to
provide the sales at affordable price so that the entire customer can take the service with
reasonable cost in the timely manner and profitable way.

2.5 HISTORY

As early as in the 1930's, the founding parents of the group were involved in the
trade of Pulses and Grains in Thirumangalam, Madurai and Tuticorin. From humble
beginnings, the group has come a long way with the Automotive Business covering
almost every spectrum of transport. The IT business is a BPO unit. The Finance business
has a strong and healthy portfolio. The group has its roots spread across the state of
Tamilnadu with aggressive growth plans. The third generation entrepreneurs are now at
the helm of affairs and are poised to be assisted by the fourth generation family members
in making strong strides towards expansion and growth opportunities. The group is
currently focused on growth engines to drive the business to multiply manifold.

2.6 MANAGEMENT TEAM

Mr.Jeyabalan has a plethora of experience in the automotive business and is a


doyen in the Automotive Sector of Tamilnadu. Having played a pivotal role in the
families’ automotive business, he now dons the mantle of Chairman and has also been
elected as the President of the Tamilnadu Chamber of Commerce and Industry for the
year 2008-2009.

Mr. Rajiv is an aggressive leader with a vision to grow the business manifold. He
has spread the roots of the business to include interests in Information Technology and
Retail. He has strong global exposure and is widely traveled. He has been instrumental in
growing the business more than fivefold in the past decade.

Mr. Thenappan is the Chief Operations Officer and has been in the Automotive
Industry for well over a decade holding various responsibilities varying from OEM
suppliers to Automotive Dealerships across several verticals. He has an Electronics
Engineering Degree from National Institute of Technology [Formerly Known as REC
Surat]. He is a dynamic leader with hands on approach towards business. He holds
operational responsibility for the Group's Automotive Business.

Mr. J.S. Dominique is a Chartered Accountant with over 20 years of experience in


the field of Accounts, Corporate Finance, Project Finance, Textile and Power Projects.
He is the Vice President of Finance for the Susee Group. He is responsible for Financial
Planning, Accounts, MIS, Audit/Taxation and Fund Management. As head of the Finance
and Accounting Function, he controls the fiscal functions of the Susee Group.

MILESTONES

 1944 Salt, Pulses and Grains


 1955 Tobacco/FMCG Distribution
 1966 Gas Stations
 1969 Automobiles
 1991 Finance
 2002 IT/ITES

2.7 AUTOMOBILES

SPARES

Spares - Two Wheeler

They are the authorized genuine spare parts sellers for the following leading two
wheeler brands

Spares - Three Wheeler


They are the authorized genuine spare parts sellers for the following leading three
wheeler brands

Spares - Four Wheeler

They are the authorized genuine spare parts sellers for the Mahindra brands

Spares - Trucks & Multiaxle

They have the exclusive dealer for AMW having good population of vehicle. We
have all frequent genuine parts availability and we got good relationship with
vendor products like Fleet guard, Hyvafilters, Volvo line oil etc... We got all spares
readily available.

2.8 FINANCE - RETAIL

Susee Finance & Leasing Company private ltd, is an NBFC incorporated in the
year 1991, is part of the Susee Group of Companies. The company caters to the
financial needs of middle income/lower income group in respect of automotive hire
purchase finance. The company has its operations at several locations in Tamilnadu
and is based in Madurai. The salient features of our Non-Banking Finance
Company are:

• Registered NBFC with RBI.


• Hassle free financing.
• Spot sanctioning of loans to eligible customers.
• Easy terms of repayment at competitive interest rates.
• Collection of monthly /weekly installments at the doorstep of
customers.

2.9 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


• SUSEE ISYS AT A GLANCE

Susee iSys has been involved in service delivery for domestic and international
clients for a variety of services with one common underlying building block.”
Providing Efficient, Cost effective and sustainable Business Process Outsourcing
and Information Technology Enabled Services". Our range of services focuses on
finding value in Archiving Data for our clients and we focus on releasing the full
value of archived Data. We are involved in Data Archiving, Conversion and E-
Publishing. We are based in Madurai with satellite offices across the state of
Tamilnadu.

2.10 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

 The Susee Group provides support to the M.S.Chellamuthu Trust and Research
Foundation in various methods including providing employment opportunities for the
differently abled, procuring of products created by the differently abled and providing
resources to the various institutes of the Chellamuthu Group. The M.S.Chellamuthu
Trust and Research Foundation were established with "Srishti", a half-way home for
people with psychiatric disabilities, in September 1992. It now houses 60 residents.

 Today the Trust runs half-a-dozen other projects:

Retreat : A long term care centre with 50 beneficiaries.


Bodhi : A Half Way Home with 40 beneficiaries.
Sakthi : A rehabilitation home.
Aakaash : A special school for 60 mentally retarded rural children.
Vriksha : A rehabilitation home for 30 women; a home for 60 adults.
Trishul : A de-addiction and after care centre with 30 beneficiaries.
CHAPTER 3

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Introduction

Employee turnover is a much studied phenomenon. There is a vast literature on the


causes of voluntary employee turnover dating back to the 1950s. By developing
multivariate models that combine a number of factors contributing to turnover and
empirically testing the models researchers have sought to predict why individuals leave
organizations. Many studies are based on only a small number of variables which often
only explain a small amount of variability in turnover. Another criticism of turnover
studies is that they do not adequately capture the complex psychological processes
involved in individual turnover decisions. A recent study of turnover by Boxall et al
(2003) in New Zealand confirmed the view that motivation for job change is
multidimensional and that no one factor will explain it.

However, over time there have been a number of factors that appear to be
consistently linked to turnover. An early review article of studies on turnover by Mobley
et al (1979) revealed that age, tenure, overall satisfaction, job content, intentions to
remain on the job, and commitment were all negatively related to turnover (i.e. the higher
the variable, the lower the turnover). In 1995, a meta-analysis of some 800 turnover
studies was conducted by Hom and Griffeth, which was recently updated (Griffeth et al,
2000). Their analysis confirmed some well-established findings on the causes of
turnover. These include: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, comparison of
alternatives and intention to quit. These variables are examined in more detail below, as
are a number of other factors where the evidence on the link to turnover is less
conclusive.
Comparison of alternatives

Aggregate level economic studies provide consistent and significant evidence


of the impact of labour market conditions on turnover rates at an aggregate level. As
Mobley
et al (1979) pointed out, at an aggregate level the relationship between economic factors
such as employment levels or job vacancies and turnover has been well established. At an
individual level, the labour market approach emphasizes expected utility and rational
economic choice among employees and the perceived availability of alternative job
opportunities.

The relationship between alternatives and turnover on an individual level has


been researched widely since March & Simon’s 1958 seminal work on ease of
movement. Much of the subsequent research focused on the link between job satisfaction,
perceived alternative opportunities and turnover. Later, researchers began to focus on the
role of both actual and perceived opportunities in explaining individual turnover
decisions.

Subsequent research has indicated that actual alternatives are a better


predictor of individual turnover than perceived opportunities. Research on the impact of
unemployment rates as a proxy for actual opportunities in employee turnover revealed
that unemployment rates affected the job-satisfaction/turnover intent relationship but not
actual turnover (Kirshenbaum & Mano-Negrin, 1999). They concluded that macro level
analysis predicted turnover patterns but perceptions of opportunities did not. This point
was reinforced in their study on medical centers in various locations used measures of
perceived and objective opportunities in internal and external labour markets.

The authors concluded that objectives opportunities were a better set of


explanations of actual turnover behaviour than either perceived internal or external labour
market opportunities. Nevertheless, while actual alternatives appear to be a better
predictor of turnover, there is also well-established evidence of the link between
perceived alternatives and actual turnover. In their most recent meta-analysis, Griffeth et
al (2000) confirmed that perceived alternatives modestly predict turnover.

Intentions to quit

Much of the empirical research on turnover is based on actual turnover,


although some studies are based on intentions to quit. Apart from the practical difficulty
in conducting turnover research among people who have left an organization, some
researchers suggest that there is a strong link between intentions to quit and actual
turnover. Mobley et al (1979) noted that the relationship between intentions and turnover
is consistent and generally stronger than the satisfaction-turnover relationship, although it
still accounted for less than a quarter of the variability in turnover. Much of the research
on perceived opportunities has been found to be associated with intentions to leave but
not actual turnover (Kirshenbaum & Mano-Negrin, 1999). One of the possible reasons is
that intentions do not account for impulsive behaviour and also that turnover intentions
are not necessarily followed through to lead to actual turnover.

Organizational commitment

Many studies have reported a significant association between organizational


commitment and turnover intentions (Lum et al, 1998). Tang et al’s (2000) study
confirmed the link between commitment and actual turnover and Griffeth et al’s (2000)
analysis showed that organizational commitment was a better predictor of turnover than
overall job satisfaction. Researchers have established that there are different types of
organizational commitment. Allen & Meyer (1990) investigated the nature of the link
between turnover and the three components of attitudinal commitment: affective
commitment refers to employees’ emotional attachment to, identification with and
involvement in the organization; continuance commitment refers to commitment base on
costs that employees associate with leaving the organization; and normative commitment
refers to employees’ feelings of obligation to remain with the organization. Put simply,
employees with strong affective commitment stay with an organization because they
want, those with strong continuance commitment stay because they need to, and those
with strong normative commitment stay because they feel they ought to. Allen and
Meyer’s study indicated that all three components of commitment were a negative
indicator of turnover. In general, most research has found affective commitment to be the
most decisive variable linked to turnover.

Job satisfaction

The relationship between satisfaction and turnover has been consistently


found in many turnover studies (Lum et al, 1998). Mobley et al 1979 indicated that
overall job satisfaction is negatively linked to turnover but explained little of the
variability in turnover. Griffeth et al (2000) found that overall job satisfaction modestly
predicted turnover. In a recent New Zealand study, Boxall et al (2003) found the main
reason by far for people leaving their employer was for more interesting work elsewhere.
It is generally accepted that the effect of job satisfaction on turnover is less than that of
organizational commitment.

The link between satisfaction and commitment

Some researchers have established a relationship between satisfaction,


organizational commitment and turnover. Lum et al’s (1998) study of pediatrics nurses
suggested that organizational commitment has the strongest and most direct impact on the
intention to quit whereas job satisfaction has only an indirect influence. They suggested
that satisfaction indirectly influences turnover in that it influences commitment and hence
turnover intentions. (Mueller & Price, 1990 cited in Lum).

Elangovan (2001) noted that the notion of job satisfaction and organizational
commitment being causally related has not been incorporated in most turnover models.
His study indicated there were strong causal links between stress and satisfaction (higher
stress leads to lower satisfaction) and between satisfaction and commitment (lower
satisfaction leads to lower commitment). He further noted a reciprocal relationship
between commitment and turnover intentions (lower commitment leads to greater
intentions to quit, which in turn further lowers commitment). In summary, only
commitment directly affected turnover intentions.

Characteristics of employees

Despite a wealth of research, there appear to be few characteristics that


meaningfully predict turnover, the exceptions being age and tenure. Age is found to be
negatively related to turnover (i.e. the older a person, the less likely they are to leave an
organization). However, age alone explains little of the variability in turnover and as age
is linked to many other factors, alone it contributes little to the understanding of turnover
behaviour.Tenure is also negatively related to turnover (the longer a person is with an
organization, the more likely they are to stay). Mangione in Mobley et al concluded
That length of service is one of the best single predictors of turnover. Griffeth et al also
found that age and tenure have a negative relationship to turnover.

There is little evidence of a person’s sex being linked to turnover. Griffeth et


al’s 2000 meta-analysis re-examined various personal characteristics that may be linked
to turnover. They concluded that there were no differences between the quit rates of men
and women. They also cited evidence that gender moderates the age-turnover relationship
(i.e. women are more likely to remain in their job the older they get, than do men). They
also found no link between intelligence and turnover, and none between race and
turnover.

Wages and conditions

The research conducted on the link between dissatisfaction with pay and
voluntary turnover appears to be inconclusive. Mobley et al (1979) concluded that results
from studies on the role of pay in turnover were mixed but that often there was no
relationship between pay and turnover. Other studies found no significant relationship.
On the other hand Campion (1991) cited in Tang suggests that the most important reason
for voluntary turnover is higher wages/career opportunity. Martin (2003) investigates the
determinants of labour turnover using establishment-level survey data for the UK. Martin
indicated that there is an inverse relationship between relative wages and turnover (i.e.
establishments with higher relative pay had lower turnover).

Pay and performance

Griffeth et al (2000) noted pay and pay-related variables have a modest effect
on turnover. Their analysis also included studies that examined the relationship between
pay, a person’s performance and turnover. They concluded that when high performers are
insufficiently rewarded, they leave. They cite findings from Milkovich and Newman
(1999) that where collective reward programs replace individual incentives, their
introduction may lead to higher turnover among high performers.

Flat-rate versus piece-rate pays systems

Taplin et al (2003) conducted a large-scale turnover study in the British clothing industry.
Two factors emerged as the most significant reasons for employees leaving the industry.
One was the low level of wage rates in the clothing industry relative to other
manufacturing sectors. The other reason referred to industry image with staff leaving
because of fears relating to the long-term future of clothing manufacture in the UK. In
this study, turnover rates were highest among the most skilled workers.

The study also examined the role of payment systems in turnover. The researchers found
that where there were flat-rate payment systems alone, average turnover exhibited a
statistically significant difference from the industry mean (i.e. they were 4.5 per cent
lower). However, most firms in the clothing industry adhered to piece rate payment
systems finding it to be the most effective way of regulating the effort-bargain. This is, in
the authors’ view, despite anecdotal evidence that many skilled workers dislike its
unpredictability and new entrants to the workforce lack the skills to maximize their
earnings potential.

Attitudes to money

For some individuals pay will not be the sole criterion when people decide to
continue within an existing job. In their study of mental health professionals, Tang et al
(2000), Examined the relationship between attitudes towards money, intrinsic job
satisfaction and voluntary turnover. One of the main findings of this study is that
voluntary turnover is high among employees who value money (high money ethic
endorsement), regardless of their intrinsic job satisfaction. However, those who do not
value money highly but who have also have low intrinsic job satisfaction tended to have
the lowest actual turnover. Furthermore, employees with high intrinsic job satisfaction
and who put a low value on money also had significantly higher turnover than this second
group. The researchers also found that placing a high value of money predicted actual
turnover but that withdrawal cognitions (i.e. thinking about leaving) did not.

Training and career development

Martin (2003) detected a complex relationship between turnover and training.


He suggested that establishments that enhance the skills of existing workers have lower
turnover rates. However, turnover is higher when workers are trained to be multi-skilled,
which may imply that this type of training enhances the prospects of workers to find
work elsewhere. The literature on the link between lower turnover and training has found
that off-the-job training is associated with higher turnover presumably because this type
of training imparts more general skills (Martin, 2003).

Impact of training on mobility

Shah and Burke (2003) reviewed some of the literature on the relationship
between turnover and training. In a British study examining the impact of training on
mobility, Green et al (2000) concluded that, in aggregate, training has on average no
impact on mobility. However, training that is wholly sponsored by the individual (or their
families) is on balance likely to be a prelude to job search. In contrast, when employers
pay for training the downward effect on mobility is more likely.

Lynch (1991, 1992) concluded that both on-the-job and off-the-job training have a
significant effect on job mobility. While formal on-the-job training reduces the likelihood
of mobility, particularly for young women, off-the-job training increases the likelihood of
mobility. In a study of six local labour markets in Britain, Elias (1994) found that women
who received employer-provided and job-related training had a lower probability of
changing employer or making the transition to non-employment, but for men training
made no significant difference to this type of turnover.

Effect of vocational training

In a study examining the effect of apprenticeships on male school leavers in


the UK, Booth and Satchell (1994) found that completed apprenticeships reduced
voluntary job-to-job, voluntary job-to-unemployment and involuntary job termination
rates. In contrast, incomplete apprenticeships tended to increase the exit rate to these
destinations relative to those who did not receive any training. Winkelmann (1996)
reported that in Germany apprenticeships and all other types of vocational training reduce
labour mobility in spite of the fact that the German apprenticeship training is intended to
provide general and thus more transferable training.

Career commitment

Chang (1999) examined the relationship between career commitment,


organizational commitment and turnover intention among Korean researchers and found
that the role of career commitment was stronger in predicting turnover intentions. When
Individuals are committed to the organization they are less willing to leave the company.
This was found to be stronger for those highly committed to their careers. The author also
found that employees with low career and organizational commitment had the highest
turnover intentions because they did not care either about the company or their current
careers.

Individuals with high career commitment and low organizational commitment


also tend to leave because they do not believe that the organization can satisfy their
career needs or goals. This is consistent with previous research that high career
committers consider leaving the company if development opportunities are not provided
by the organization. However, this group is not apt to leave and is likely to contribute to
the company if their organizational commitment is increased. Chang found that
individuals become affectively committed to the organization when they perceive that the
organization is pursuing internal promotion opportunities, providing proper training and
that supervisors do a good job in providing information and advice about careers.

Rural or remote areas and lifestyle factors

A 2001 study of the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of


nurses in rural and remote areas in Queensland found that overall work-related factors
were considered to be more important in decisions by nurses to leave rural and remote
nursing practice. The five major factors influencing decisions to leave rural or remote
area nursing practice were management practices, emotional demands of work, workable
communication, management recognition of work and family responsibilities.

The findings regarding lifestyle factors appear to be mixed. On the one hand,
‘rural lifestyle’ was ranked as the third most important factor for staying in rural and
remote practice and, similarly, ‘sense of belonging to the community’ was ranked fifth.
However, when respondents were asked to identify the most important factors that
influenced them to leave rural and remote health services, just fewer than 40 per cent of
respondents cited issues related to the isolation caused by distance from basic amenities
as one inducement for them to resign. These issues included traveling long distances to
basic social and commercial activities, distance from family, friends and medical
specialists, the comparatively high cost of living and a lack of communication facilities
such as the Internet, which would mitigate personnel and professional isolation.

The employment difficulties of non-metropolitan life were also a contributing reason for
nurses’ decisions to leave practice. For example, unavailability of suitable employment or
career development opportunities for their spouse was cited by 21 per cent of
respondents. Some respondents with children (16 per cent) also identified access to
suitable education, childcare facilities and specialist medical expertise, which are not
usually available outside densely populated areas, as factors influencing leaving
decisions.

Other factors contributing to turnover

Turnover studies have highlighted the relationship between turnover and a


range of other factors. Some of these findings are presented briefly below.

The role of ‘shocks’

Lee & Mitchell’s (1994) ‘unfolding model’ of employee turnover represented


a significant departure from the previous labour market- and psychological-oriented
turnover literature. This model is based on the premise that people leave organizations in
very different ways and it outlines four decision pathways describing different kinds of
decisions to quit. A notable feature of the unfolding model is its emphasis on an event or
‘shock’ (positive or negative) that prompts some decisions to quit.

Morrell et al (2004) tested the unfolding model by studying the voluntary


turnover of nurses in the UK. Their findings indicated that shocks play a role in many
cases where people decide to leave. Furthermore, they found that shocks not only
prompted initial thoughts about quitting but also typically had a substantial influence over
the final leaving decision. They also noted that decisions to quit prompted by a shock are
typically more avoidable. The authors suggest that their research illustrates the
importance for managers of understanding avoid ability i.e. the extent to which turnover
decisions can be prevented.
Organizational size

Kirshenbaum & Mano-Negrin (1999) indicated that turnover is affected by


organizational size, with size being the key mediator of an organization’s internal labour
market. They suggest that organizational size impacts on turnover primarily through
wage rates but also through career progression paths. Developed internal organizational
labour markets produce lower departure rates since promotion opportunities have a strong
negative influence on departures for career-related reasons.

Unionisation

Martin (2003) looked at the effect of unions on labour turnover and found
clear evidence that unionism is associated with lower turnover. He suggested that lower
turnover is a result of the ability of unions to secure better working conditions thus
increasing the attractiveness for workers of staying in their current job. According to
Martin, the relationship between lower turnover and unionizations has been well
established by researchers using both industry-level and individual data.

Influence of co-workers

A 2002 study by Kirschenbaum and Weisberg of 477 employees in 15 firms


examined employees’ job destination choices as part of the turnover process. One of their
main findings was that co-workers’ intentions have a major significant impact on all
destination options - the more positive the perception of their co-workers desire to leave,
the more employees themselves wanted to leave. The researchers suggest that a feeling
about co-workers’ intentions to change jobs or workplace acts as a form of social
pressure or justification on the employee to make a move.

Supervision/management

Mobley et al (1979) concluded that a number of studies offered moderate


support for a negative relationship between satisfaction with supervision and turnover
(i.e. the higher the satisfaction with supervision, the lower the turnover).
Retention strategies

IDS (2004) suggest that where there is a general turnover problem within the
organization, companies often takes a holistic approach aimed at fully engaging with
staff. This may encompass a wide range of measures such as:

• improving recruitment procedures to ensure candidates receive a realistic impression of


the company and the job

• supporting new recruits during the critical first few weeks in the job

• providing clear career paths, interesting work and support for personal development

• considering work-life balance issues

• keeping pay in line with appropriate market rates

• offering an attractive employee benefits package

• creating a pleasant working environment

• communicating and consulting effectively with employees.

Examples of such measures are illustrated in more detail in the industry and
organizational studies below.

Industry studies

Clothing industry

In Taplin et al’s (2003) study of the British clothing industry, employer


initiatives to reduce turnover included a range of measures. Improving remuneration
packages was the single most common initiative with changes to the payments systems
made so that workers could increase their earnings. Also important were more rigorous
screening procedures for new hires, and improved training programs designed to bring
new workers up to speed so that they could maximize their piece rate earnings potential.
Various quality of working life initiatives were introduced, such as flexible working
hours and forms of employee participation (e.g. works councils).
Accommodation industry

A recent study (Davies et al, 2001) examined the effect of three human
resource strategies (performance appraisal, salary and benefit strategies), and training and
development initiatives in the Western Australian accommodation industry. The authors
concluded that only training and development indicated a reduced turnover of employees.

Mining

A study of turnover in ‘Fly-In Fly-Out’ (FIFO) mining operations in Australia


(Beach et al 2003) showed that turnover rates between mines operating within the same
general labour market varied considerably, suggesting that the main drivers of turnover
were often internal, rather than external to mine sites. In terms of managing turnover,
sites which had lower turnover, was attributed to a combination of four factors: equitable
remuneration; commitment to training and skills development; good management; and
developing and maintaining a positive organizational culture. Managers at some sites
indicated they tried to control turnover by recruiting for a good ‘person-organization’ fit.

Case studies of organizations

The retention strategies outlined here are based on organizational-specific


initiatives. One of the problems with organizational-case studies is that their experience
may not be general sable, given that the causes of turnover and the resulting strategies are
likely to be specific to a particular organization, a site or even a particular group of
Employees. Another problem is that where a combination of measures are used (which is
often the case) it is very difficult to attribute success to one particular element of the
strategy. Nevertheless, some common practices can be drawn from these experiences that
appear to be successful in helping to improve retention.

The first two examples are academic studies while the following table summarizes the
main features of the retention strategies adopted by a range of UK organizations to
successfully improve retention.
Hospital

A Canadian study by Lum et al (1998) assessed the impact of certain pay policies upon
the turnover intentions of pediatrics nurses. Two types of salary supplements were
introduced – bonuses to intensive care nurses only and a 5 per cent salary differential for
all staff nurses – to reduce turnover. The supplements were structured in such a way as to
have the most favorable influence on the senior staff nurses who were presumed to be the
most experienced and those most valuable employees. Satisfaction with pay had both
direct and indirect effects on turnover intent. They found that although pay satisfaction
(unlike job satisfaction) was significantly associated with reducing intended turnover, its
indirect effect upon turnover intent, mediated through job satisfaction and organizational
commitment was weaker. In particular, nurses with greater experience were more
satisfied with their pay and were less likely to leave, which was the anticipated effect of
the salary supplements. The anecdotal evidence showed that the senior nurses perceived
the pay supplements to be an important recognition of their contribution to the
organization.

Department store

In a study of retail salespeople (Firth et al, 2003) found that job stressors (e.g. work
overload, job ambiguity) are the factors that trigger the chain of psychological states that
lead to intention to quit. They suggested that supervisor support can reduce the impact of
stressors on psychological states and intentions to quit. Monitoring workloads and
supervisor-subordinate relationships by management may not only reduce stress but
increase job satisfaction and commitment to the organization.
CHAPTER 4

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

4.1 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

1) To fulfill the future needs and aspirations of employees in the organization.

2) To identify the satisfaction level of employees in the organization.

3) To ensure co-ordination between the employees and the organization.

4) To protect the interest of the employees in the organization.

5) To bring out proper framework between employees and organization to improve the
company’s image.

4.2 METHODOLOGY

4.2.1 COVERAGE

This research covers the employees of Susee group at Madurai.

4.2.2 DATA COLLECTION METHOD

The data are collected via survey. In these surveys, the respondents respond to a
series of question based around a number of key

4.2.3 DATA ANALYSIS

The process of data collection and the sampling technique used in the study are given.
The data obtained from the respondents need to be analyzed to understand the underlying
structure of inter-relationships among variables. The software used is SPSS.
4.2.4 SPSS

 SPSS is short for Statistical Product and Service Solutions. In the current study the
statistical tools used are:
 Frequency analysis
 Cross tabulation
 Chi square
 Correlation
 One way annova
 Reliability analysis.

CHAPTER 5

RESEARCH DESIGN

5.1 INTRODUCTION

The research design that is adopted in this study is descriptive design.


Descriptive research is used to obtain information concerning the current status of the
phenomena to describe, "What exists" with respect to variables or conditions in a
situation. Thus it involves Statement of the problem, Identification of information
needed to solve the problem, Selection or development of instruments for gathering the
information, Identification of target population and determination of sampling procedure,
Design of procedure for information collection, Collection of information, Analysis of
information, Generalizations and/or predictions.

5.2 SAMPLING DESIGN

5.2.1POPULATION

The population for this study is the employees of SUSEE GROUP, [MADURAI-kappalur
& kalavasal]

5.2.2 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE


The sampling technique used is census survey method. The sample frame for this study is
the employees of SUSEE GROUP OF COMPANIES who are working at Madurai
(Mahindra –prosper and commercial vehicle segment)

5.2.3 POPULATION & SAMPLE SIZE

The population and sample size for this study is 300 employees of Susee group of
companies.

5.2.4 SOURCES OF DATA

Data were collected through both primary and secondary data sources. Primary data was
collected through questionnaires. The research was done in the form of direct personal
interviews.

5.2.4.1 PRIMARY DATA

A primary data is a data, which is collected afresh and for the first time, and thus
happen to be original in character. The primary data with the help of questionnaire were
collected from various clients.

5.2.4.2 SECONDARY DATA

Secondary data consist of information that already exists somewhere, have been
collected. Secondary data is collected from company websites, other websites, company
fact sheets, magazines and brochures.

5.3 QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN

Proper care has been taken to ensure that the information needed match the
objectives, which in turn match the data collected through the questionnaire. The basic
cardinal rules of Questionnaire design like using simple and clear words, the logical and
sequential arrangement of questions has been taken care of.
5.4 STATISTICAL TOOLS

The statistical tools used for this analysis are:

 Simple Percentage analysis:

Percentages are calculated and in certain cases percentages along with cross tabulation
has been calculated.

 Cross tabulation:

The Cross tabs procedure forms two-way and multi way tables and provides a variety of
tests and measures of association for two-way tables. The structure of the table and
categories are ordered determine what test or measure to use.

 Correlation Analysis

Bivariate correlation analysis has been conducted to ascertain the relationship


between career, recognition, work tasks, pay, benefits, work life balance, business unit
and the results are provided in the table 4.5.1.

Pearson’s coefficient of correlation (obtained through multivariate correlation


analysis) is used to assess the strength, direction and probability of the linear association
between two interval or ratio variables and varies from -1 to +1.It reflects the ratio of the
variance shared by the two variables. The percentage of variance shared by two variables
is the square of the Pearson’s correlation and is called the coefficient of determination .If
the correlation is in the range of .1 to .3 (1% to 9%), then the correlation is said to be
weak; correlation in the range of .4 to.6 (16% to 36%) as moderate and in the range of .7
to .9 (49% to 81%) as strong (Hair et al.1998).

 Reliability Test

Scale reliability is the ratio of true score variance to observed score variance. If
there is less error inherent within the scale, then the scale will yield consistent results
across observations and research settings. In other words, reliability of an instrument is
the degree to which it yields a true score of the variable under consideration. Reliability is
also defined as the extent to which any measuring instruments yields the same results on
repeated trials (Carmines and Zeller, 1990).

 ANOVA

In statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a collection of statistical models,


and their associated procedures, in which the observed variance in a particular variable is
partitioned into components attributable to different sources of variation. In its simplest
form ANOVA provides a statistical test of whether or not the means of several groups are
all equal, and therefore generalizes t-test to more than two groups.

 chi-square

The chi-square distribution is used in the common chi-square tests for goodness of
fit of an observed distribution to a theoretical one, the independence of two criteria of
classification of qualitative data, and in confidence interval estimation for a population
standard deviation of a normal distribution from a sample standard deviation. Many other
statistical tests also use this distribution, like Friedman's analysis of variance by ranks.

Limitation of the study:

• The employees unwilling to spend sufficient time in answering the questionnaire


because of their busy work.

• Fear of Respondents to elicit information in another constraint.

• The sample study at the study is estimated as 300 not the entire employees of the
organization.

• This study is only applicable for Susee group of companies at Madurai locality.
CHAPTER 6

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Analysis and interpretation plays the most important role in research process. It
helps to extract findings from the collected data by applying the statistical techniques in
discovering the additional findings. It converts raw data into meaningful data by bridging
the gap between primary and secondary data. Analysis is done with an attempt to
organize and summarize data in order to enhance the effect of results in such a way that
enables to relate critical points with study’s objectives. The analysis and interpretation is
based on the option chosen by the employees.

6.1 PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

Table 1

Department of the respondents


Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Sales 67 22.3 22.3 22.3
Service 83 27.7 27.7 50.0
HRD 18 6.0 6.0 56.0
IT 46 15.3 15.3 71.3
Spares 28 9.3 9.3 80.7
Accounts 8 2.7 2.7 83.3
Others 50 16.7 16.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION
From table-1 It is clear that 27.7% of the respondents are from service department
followed by 22.3% of the respondents are from sales department and 15.3% of the
respondents are from IT department.

Chart 1

Table 2
Age of the respondent
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid 20 - 30 226 75.3 75.3 75.3
31 - 40 46 15.3 15.3 90.7
41 – 50 22 7.3 7.3 98.0
51 & above 6 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-2 we can conclude that 75.3% of the respondents are in the age group of 20-
30 followed by 15.3% of the respondents belongs to the age group 31-40 and 7.3% of the
respondents belongs to the age group 41-50

Chart 2

Table 3
Gender of the respondent
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Male 165 55.0 55.0 55.0
Female 135 45.0 45.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-3 It is clear that 55% of the respondents are male and the remaining 45% of
the respondents are female.

Chart 3

Table 4
Years of work in Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid 0 - 1 yr 152 50.7 50.7 50.7
2 - 3 yr 91 30.3 30.3 81.0
4 - 5 yr 36 12.0 12.0 93.0
6 yrs & above 21 7.0 7.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-4 we can conclude that 50.7% of the respondents are at work from 0-1 years
followed by 30.3% of the respondents are at work in susee from 2-3 years and 12% of the
respondents are at susee from 4-5 years.

Chart 4

Table 5
Worked anywhere before joining Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Yes 138 46.0 46.0 46.0
No 162 54.0 54.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-5 we confirm that about 46% of the respondents worked in some other
organization before joining Susee followed by 54% of the respondents did not worked
anywhere before joining Susee.

Chart 5

Table 6
Number of years worked for the company
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid 0 - 1 yr 54 18.0 40.0 40.0
2 - 3 yr 60 20.0 44.4 84.4
4 - 5 yr 8 2.7 5.9 90.4
6 yrs & above 13 4.3 9.6 100.0
Total 135 45.0 100.0
Missing System 165 55.0
Total 300 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table –6 we came to know that 44.4% of the respondents worked for 2-3 years in
the previous company followed by 40% of the respondents worked from 0-1year.

Chart 6

Table 7
Sort of job doing in Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Target oriented 88 29.3 29.3 29.3
Service oriented 72 24.0 24.0 53.3
Administration oriented 46 15.3 15.3 68.7
System oriented 64 21.3 21.3 90.0
Maintenance oriented 22 7.3 7.3 97.3
Others 8 2.7 2.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table–7 we can determine that about 29.3% of the respondents job are target
oriented followed by 24% of them are service oriented and 21.3% of the respondent’s job
are system oriented.

Chart 7

Table 8
Perception about the job
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Interesting 134 44.7 44.7 44.7
Challenging 87 29.0 29.0 73.7
Confusing 22 7.3 7.3 81.0
Boring 31 10.3 10.3 91.3
Stressful 26 8.7 8.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-8 we came to know that about 44.7% respondents rated their job as interesting
followed by 29% of the respondents rated their job as challenging and 10.3% rated their
job as boring.

Chart 8

Table 9
Satisfaction about the pay scale
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 15 5.0 5.0 5.0
Disagree 97 32.3 32.3 37.3
Neutral 110 36.7 36.7 74.0
Agree 54 18.0 18.0 92.0
Strongly agree 24 8.0 8.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-9 we can determine that about 36.7% respondents are neutral regarding the
satisfaction about their pay scale followed by 32.3% respondents are not satisfied with
their pay scale and 18% of them are satisfied with their pay scale.

Chart 9

Table 10
Rate of job security in Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 2 .7 .7 .7
Disagree 12 4.0 4.0 4.7
Neutral 105 35.0 35.0 39.7
Agree 132 44.0 44.0 83.7
Strongly agree 49 16.3 16.3 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table-10 we can determine that about 44% respondents are agreeing their job as a
secure one followed by 35% of the respondents said their job security as neutral.

Chart 10

Table 11
Career growth opportunities in Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 4 1.3 1.3 1.3
Disagree 42 14.0 14.0 15.3
Neutral 71 23.7 23.7 39.0
Agree 146 48.7 48.7 87.7
Strongly agree 37 12.3 12.3 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table –11 we can confirm that 48.7% of the respondents agree that they have career
growth opportunities followed by 23.7% said neutral about the career growth
opportunities and 14% disagree that they does not have career growth opportunities.

Chart 11

Table 12
I feel I am a valued part of this organization
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 2 .7 .7 .7
Disagree 13 4.3 4.3 5.0
Neutral 79 26.3 26.3 31.3
Agree 153 51.0 51.0 82.3
Strongly agree 53 17.7 17.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -12 we can confirm that 51% the respondents agree that they feel valued part
of this organization followed by 26.3% feel neutral and 17.7% of the respondents
strongly agree that they feel valued part of this organization.

Chart 12

Table 13
Communication, cooperation among staff members
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 7 2.3 2.3 2.3
Disagree 21 7.0 7.0 9.3
Neutral 87 29.0 29.0 38.3
Agree 114 38.0 38.0 76.3
Strongly agree 71 23.7 23.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -13 we came to know that 38% of the respondents agree that communication,
cooperation among staff is good followed by 29% of the respondents said neutral about
the communication, cooperation among staff members and 23.7% strongly agree.

Chart 13

Table 14
Susee's office has a friendly atmosphere
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 5 1.7 1.7 1.7
Disagree 16 5.3 5.3 7.0
Neutral 54 18.0 18.0 25.0
Agree 145 48.3 48.3 73.3
Strongly agree 80 26.7 26.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -14 It is inferred that 48.3% the respondents agree that there is a friendly
atmosphere at Susee followed by 26.7% of the respondents strongly agree there is a
friendly relationship exist in the organization.

Chart 14

Table 15
Susee's policies are supportive to its staff
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 2 .7 .7 .7
Disagree 34 11.3 11.3 12.0
Neutral 116 38.7 38.7 50.7
Agree 117 39.0 39.0 89.7
Strongly agree 31 10.3 10.3 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -15 we can confirm that 39% of the respondents agree that Susee policies are
supportive to the staff followed by 38.7% said neutral and 11.3% of the respondents
disagree that Susee policies are not supportive to the staff.

Chart 15

Table 16
My workload and deadlines are reasonable
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 4 1.3 1.3 1.3
Disagree 18 6.0 6.0 7.3
Neutral 109 36.3 36.3 43.7
Agree 140 46.7 46.7 90.3
Strongly agree 29 9.7 9.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -16 we can determine that 46.7% the respondents agree that my workload and
deadlines are reasonable followed by 36.3% of the respondents said neutral and 9.7% of
the respondents strongly agree that their workload and deadlines are reasonable..

Chart 16

Table 17
Employee welfare activities are carried out effectively in Susee
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 4 1.3 1.3 1.3
Disagree 27 9.0 9.0 10.3
Neutral 83 27.7 27.7 38.0
Agree 151 50.3 50.3 88.3
Strongly agree 35 11.7 11.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -17 it is inferred that 50.3% of the respondents agree that employee welfare
activities are carried out effectively followed by 27.7% of the respondents rated their
views as neutral and 11.7% of the respondents strongly agree that employee welfare
activities are carried out effectively

Chart 17

Table 18
I have an idea of seeking job
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 48 16.0 16.0 16.0
Disagree 36 12.0 12.0 28.0
Neutral 108 36.0 36.0 64.0
Agree 78 26.0 26.0 90.0
Strongly agree 30 10.0 10.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -18 we can confirm that 36% of the respondents rated neutral for having an
idea for seeking job followed by 26% of the respondents agree they have an idea of
seeking job and 16% of the respondents strongly disagree for having an idea for seeking
job.

Chart 18

Table 19
I like my job
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 11 3.7 3.7 3.7
Disagree 13 4.3 4.3 8.0
Neutral 76 25.3 25.3 33.3
Agree 129 43.0 43.0 76.3
Strongly agree 71 23.7 23.7 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -19 we can inferred that 43% of the respondents agree that they like their job
followed by 25.3% of the respondents rated neutral and 23.7% of the respondents
strongly agree that they like their job
Chart 19

Table 20
Overall satisfaction with our company
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Strongly disagree 4 1.3 1.3 1.3
Disagree 9 3.0 3.0 4.3
Neutral 79 26.3 26.3 30.7
Agree 166 55.3 55.3 86.0
Strongly agree 42 14.0 14.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -20 we can determine that 55.3% of the respondents agree that they are
satisfied with Susee followed by 26.3% rated as neutral and 14% of the respondents
strongly agree that they are satisfied overall with Susee.

Chart 20

Table 21
Will you recommend working for this company to your family friends
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Yes 182 60.7 60.7 60.7
No 118 39.3 39.3 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -21 we can confirm that 60.7% of the respondents will recommend working
for Susee to their family members, friends and the remaining 39.3% of the respondents
will not recommend Susee to anyone.

Chart 21

Table 22
Will you return back to Susee once you dispel
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Yes 108 36.0 36.0 36.0
No 192 64.0 64.0 100.0
Total 300 100.0 100.0

INTERPRETATION

From table -22 we can confirm that 64% of the respondents will not return back to Susee
even if they dispel and the remaining 36% of the respondents will return back to Susee
even they dispel

Chart 22

CROSSTABULATION/CHISQUARE

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE
RESPONDENTS

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
department of the respondents.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and department
of the respondents.

Years of work in Susee * Department of the respondent Cross tabulation


Count
Department of the respondent
Account
Sales Service HRD IT Spares s Others Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 43 27 10 26 14 5 27 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 17 30 6 11 9 3 15 91
4 - 5 yr 3 11 2 9 3 0 8 36
6 yrs & 4 15 0 0 2 0 0 21
above
Total 67 83 18 46 28 8 50 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 41.163a 18 .001
Likelihood Ratio 47.377 18 .000
Linear-by-Linear 1.788 1 .181
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 11 cells (39.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .56.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .001 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
department of the respondents.

Table

YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND THE PERCEPTION ABOUT THE JOB


Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
perception about the job.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and perception
about the job.

Years of work in Susee * Perception about the job Cross tabulation


Count
Perception about the job
Interestin
g Challenging Confusing Boring Stressful Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 93 36 5 7 11 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 25 34 11 12 9 91
4 - 5 yr 12 10 4 8 2 36
6 yrs &4 7 2 4 4 21
above
Total 134 87 22 31 26 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value Df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 45.831a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 46.082 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 22.087 1 .000
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 6 cells (30.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is 1.54.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
perception about the job.

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND THE SATISFACTION ABOUT THE PAY
SCALE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and

Years of work in Susee * Satisfaction about the pay scale Cross tabulation
Count
Satisfaction about the pay scale
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 5 37 57 38 15 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 2 40 35 10 4 91
4 - 5 yr 2 16 14 4 0 36
6 yrs &6 4 4 2 5 21
above
Total 15 97 110 54 24 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value Df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 57.187a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 46.788 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 10.117 1 .001
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 6 cells (30.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is 1.05.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
satisfaction about the pay scale.
Table

YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND CAREER GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES IN


SUSEE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and the career
growth opportunities at Susee.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and the career
growth opportunities at Susee.

Years of work in Susee * Career growth opportunities in Susee Cross tabulation


Count
Career growth opportunities in Susee
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 2 33 41 56 20 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 2 7 24 51 7 91
4 - 5 yr 0 2 4 26 4 36
6 yrs &0 0 2 13 6 21
above
Total 4 42 71 146 37 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value Df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 36.693a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 40.285 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 19.433 1 .000
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 8 cells (40.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .28.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and career
growth opportunities at Susee.
Table

YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND OF THE COMMUNICATION COOPERATION


AMONG STAFF MEMBERS

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
communication, cooperation among staff members.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
communication, cooperation among staff members.

Years of work in Susee * Communication, cooperation among staff members Cross


tabulation
Count
Communication, cooperation among staff members
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 7 16 50 49 30 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 0 3 25 45 18 91
4 - 5 yr 0 2 8 18 8 36
6 yrs &0 0 4 2 15 21
above
Total 7 21 87 114 71 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 47.192a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 46.115 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 21.204 1 .000
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 7 cells (35.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .49.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
communication, cooperation among staff members in Susee.

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND MY WORKLOAD AND DEADLINES IN
SUSEE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and my
workload and deadlines in Susee.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and my
workload and deadlines in Susee.

Years of work in Susee * My workload and deadlines are reasonable Cross tabulation
Count
My workload and deadlines are reasonable
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 2 10 59 68 13 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 2 4 44 37 4 91
4 - 5 yr 0 2 4 20 10 36
6 yrs &0 2 2 15 2 21
above
Total 4 18 109 140 29 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 35.746a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 36.318 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 7.297 1 .007
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 8 cells (40.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .28.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and my
workload and deadlines in Susee.

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND THE EMPLOYEE WELFARE ACTIVITIES IN
SUSEE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and employee
welfare activities in Susee.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and employee
welfare activities in Susee.

Years of work in Susee * Employee welfare activities are carried out effectively in Susee
Cross tabulation
Count
Employee welfare activities are carried out effectively
in Susee
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 - 1 yr 4 17 40 75 16 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 0 6 35 43 7 91
4 - 5 yr 0 4 6 18 8 36
6 yrs &0 0 2 15 4 21
above
Total 4 27 83 151 35 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 23.239a 12 .026
Likelihood Ratio 26.442 12 .009
Linear-by-Linear 8.570 1 .003
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 8 cells (40.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .28.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .026 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and employee
welfare activities in Susee.

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND I LIKE MY JOB

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I like my
job

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I like my
job

Years of work in Susee * I like my job Cross tabulation


Count
I like my job
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 – 1 yr 7 11 21 70 43 152
Susee 2 – 3 yr 0 0 35 34 22 91
4 – 5 yr 4 2 10 16 4 36
6 yrs &0 0 10 9 2 21
above
Total 11 13 76 129 71 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 42.775a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 50.198 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 4.455 1 .035
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 7 cells (35.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is .77.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I like my
job.

Table
YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND I HAVE AN IDEA OF SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT ANYWHERE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I have an
idea of seeking employment.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I have an
idea of seeking employment.

Years of work in Susee * I have an idea of seeking job Cross tabulation


Count
I have an idea of seeking job
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 – 1 yr 16 19 63 34 20 152
Susee 2 – 3 yr 18 7 33 27 6 91
4 – 5 yr 8 6 8 10 4 36
6 yrs &6 4 4 7 0 21
above
Total 48 36 108 78 30 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 20.832a 12 .053
Likelihood Ratio 23.363 12 .025
Linear-by-Linear 5.240 1 .022
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 5 cells (25.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum
expected count is 2.10.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .053 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I have an
idea of seeking employment.
Table

YEARS OF WORK AT SUSEE AND OVERALL SATISFACTION WITH SUSEE

Ho: There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and overall
satisfaction in Susee.

H1: There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and overall
satisfaction in Susee.

Years of work in Susee * Overall satisfaction with our company Cross tabulation
Count
Overall satisfaction with our company
Strongly Strongly
disagree Disagree Neutral Agree agree Total
Years of work in 0 – 1 yr 2 9 48 61 32 152
Susee 2 - 3 yr 0 0 29 60 2 91
4 - 5 yr 2 0 0 30 4 36
6 yrs &0 0 2 15 4 21
above
Total 4 9 79 166 42 300
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value Df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 58.782a 12 .000
Likelihood Ratio 75.721 12 .000
Linear-by-Linear 4.295 1 .038
Association
N of Valid Cases 300
a. 9 cells (45.0%) have expected count less
than 5. The minimum
b. Expected count is .28.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above table it is inferred that the calculated p value .000 is not greater than 0.5.
Hence there is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and overall
satisfaction in Susee.

CORRELATION

Table
AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND THE SATISFACTION ABOUT THE PAY
SCALE

Aim:

To identify whether there is any correlation between Age of the respondents and the
satisfaction about the pay scale.

Correlations
Age of the Satisfaction about
respondant the pay scale
Age of the respondent Pearson Correlation 1 -.098
Sig. (2-tailed) .089
N 300 300
Satisfaction about the pay scale Pearson Correlation -.098 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .089
N 300 300

INTERPRETATION

It is clear from the above table that correlation value is -.098 this means that there is a
negative correlation between Age of the respondents and the satisfaction about the pay
scale.

Table

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND THE CAREER GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES IN


SUSEE
Aim:

To identify whether there is any correlation between Age of the respondents and the
career growth opportunities in Susee.

Correlations
Career growth
Age of the opportunities in
respondant Susee
Age of the respondent Pearson Correlation 1 .127*
Sig. (2-tailed) .028
N 300 300
Career growth opportunities in Pearson Correlation .127* 1
Susee Sig. (2-tailed) .028
N 300 300
*. Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed).

INTERPRETATION

It is clear from the above table that correlation value is .127 this means that there is a
positive correlation between Age of the respondents and the career growth opportunities
in Susee

Table

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND I LIKE MY JOB


Aim:

To identify whether there is any correlation between Age of the respondents and I like
my job.

Correlations
Age of the
respondant I like my job
Age of the respondant Pearson Correlation 1 -.199**
Sig. (2-tailed) .001
N 300 300
I like my job Pearson Correlation -.199** 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .001
N 300 300
**. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

INTERPRETATION

It is clear from the above table that correlation value is -.199 this means that there is a
negative correlation between Age of the respondents and I like my job.

Table

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND THE OVERALL SATISFACTION WITH OUR


COMPANY
Aim:

To identify whether there is any correlation between Age of the respondents and the
overall satisfaction with our company.

Correlations
Overall
Age of the satisfaction with
respondant our company
Age of the respondent Pearson Correlation 1 .074
Sig. (2-tailed) .199
N 300 300
Overall satisfaction with our Pearson Correlation .074 1
company Sig. (2-tailed) .199
N 300 300

INTERPRETATION

It is clear from the above table that correlation value is .074.this means that there is a
positive correlation between Age of the respondents and the overall satisfaction with our
company.

ANOVA
ANOVA
Satisfaction about the pay scale
Sum of Squares Df Mean Square F Sig.
Between Groups 10.865 3 3.622 3.646 .013
Within Groups 294.051 296 .993
Total 304.917 299

INTERPRETATION

From the above table the value of P is 0.013 which is less than the significant value
0.05(0.013<0.05).so there is a significant difference between the satisfaction level about
the pay scale and the Age of the respondents.

POST HOC TEST


Multiple Comparisons
Satisfaction about the pay scale
Scheffe
(J) Age of 95% Confidence Interval
(I) Age of the the Mean
respondent respondent Difference (I-J) Std. Error Sig. Lower Bound Upper Bound
20 – 30 31 – 40 .531* .161 .014 .08 .98
41 – 50 .145 .223 .935 -.48 .77
51 & above .009 .412 1.000 -1.15 1.17
31 – 40 20 – 30 -.531* .161 .014 -.98 -.08
41 – 50 -.385 .258 .528 -1.11 .34
51 & above -.522 .433 .693 -1.74 .69
41 – 50 20 – 30 -.145 .223 .935 -.77 .48
31 – 40 .385 .258 .528 -.34 1.11
51 & above -.136 .459 .993 -1.43 1.15
51 & above 20 – 30 -.009 .412 1.000 -1.17 1.15
31 – 40 .522 .433 .693 -.69 1.74
41 – 50 .136 .459 .993 -1.15 1.43
*. The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level.

INTERPRETATION

Scheffe multiple comparisons test shows that there is a significant difference between a
pair of means: “20 YEARS TO 30 YEARS” and “31YEARS TO 40 YEARS ”, p = 0.014
(≤0.05)
RELIABILITY ANALYSIS

Reliability Statistics
Cronbach's Alpha N of Items
.720 14

INTERPRETATION

In general, alpha value 0.60 is acceptable

The obtained alpha score is 0.720, which indicates that the scale

Has high internal consistency (reliability)


Item-Total Statistics
Corrected Item- Cronbach's
Scale Mean if Scale Variance Total Alpha if Item
Item Deleted if Item Deleted Correlation Deleted
Sort of job doing in Susee 45.01 39.201 .009 .760
Perception about the job 45.53 45.166 -.313 .795
Satisfaction about the pay 44.71 38.134 .178 .723
scale
Rate of job security in 43.91 35.460 .547 .684
Susee
Career growth 44.06 34.475 .557 .679
opportunities in Susee
I feel I am a valued part of 43.82 35.180 .587 .681
this organization
Communication, 43.89 32.857 .677 .662
cooperation among staff
members
Susee's office has a 43.69 34.173 .609 .674
friendly atmosphere
Susee's policies are 44.15 34.057 .664 .670
supportive to its staff
My workload and 44.05 35.298 .572 .682
deadlines are reasonable
Employee welfare 44.00 34.311 .633 .673
activities are carried out
effectively in Susee
I have an idea of seeking 44.60 40.682 -.048 .756
job
I like my job 43.84 35.943 .384 .698
Overall satisfaction with 43.85 35.334 .594 .681
our company
INTERPRETATION

Under the “Cronbach’s Alpha if Item deleted” the reliability of 0.795 is the highest/ the
reliability of 0.384 is the lowest from the table.
CHAPTER 6

FINDINGS AND SUGGESTIONS


Findings based on demographic variable:

 27.7% of the respondents are from service department followed by 22.3% of the
respondents are from sales department and 15.3% of the respondents are from IT
department.

 75.3% of the respondents are in the age group of 20-30 followed by 15.3% of the
respondents belongs to the age group 31-40 and 7.3% of the respondents belongs
to the age group 41-50

 55% of the respondents are male and the remaining 45% of the respondents are
female.
 50.7% of the respondents are at work from 0-1 years followed by 30.3% of the
respondents are at work in susee from 2-3 years and 12% of the respondents are at
susee from 4-5 years

 46% of the respondents worked in some other organization before joining Susee
followed by 54% of the respondents did not worked anywhere before joining
Susee.

 44.4% of the respondents worked for 2-3 years in the previous company followed
by 40% of the respondents worked from 0-1year.

Finding based on frequency analysis:

 29.3% of the respondent’s job is target oriented followed by 24% of them are
service oriented and 21.3% of the respondent’s job are system oriented.

 44.7% respondents rated their job as interesting followed by 29% of the


respondents rated their job as challenging and 10.3% rated their job as boring.

 36.7% respondents are neutral regarding the satisfaction about their pay scale
followed by 32.3% respondents are not satisfied with their pay scale and 18% of
them are satisfied with their pay scale.
 44% respondents are agreeing their job as a secure one followed by 35% of the
respondents said their job security as neutral.

 48.7% of the respondents agree that they have career growth opportunities
followed by 23.7% said neutral about the career growth opportunities and 14%
disagree that they does not have career growth opportunities.

 51% the respondents agree that they feel valued part of this organization followed
by 26.3% feel neutral and 17.7% of the respondents strongly agree that they feel
valued part of this organization.

 38% of the respondents agree that communication, cooperation among staff is


good followed by 29% of the respondents said neutral about the communication,
cooperation among staff members and 23.7% strongly agree.

 48.3% the respondents agree that there is a friendly atmosphere at Susee followed
by 26.7% of the respondents strongly agrees there is a friendly relationship exists
in the organization.

 39% of the respondents agree that Susee policies are supportive to the staff
followed by 38.7% said neutral and 11.3% of the respondents disagree that Susee
policies are not supportive to the staff.

 46.7% the respondents agree that my workload and deadlines are reasonable
followed by 36.3% of the respondents said neutral and 9.7% of the respondents
strongly agree that their workload and deadlines are reasonable..

 50.3% of the respondents agree that employee welfare activities are carried out
effectively followed by 27.7% of the respondents rated their views as neutral and
11.7% of the respondents strongly agree that employee welfare activities are
carried out effectively.

 36% of the respondents rated neutral for having an idea for seeking job followed
by 26% of the respondents agree they have an idea of seeking job and 16% of the
respondents strongly disagree for having an idea for seeking job.

 43% of the respondents agree that they like their job followed by 25.3% of the
respondents rated neutral and 23.7% of the respondents strongly agree that they
like their job
 55.3% of the respondents agree that they are satisfied with Susee followed by
26.3% rated as neutral and 14% of the respondents strongly agree that they are
satisfied overall with Susee.

 60.7% of the respondents will recommend working for Susee to their family
members, friends and the remaining 39.3% of the respondents will not
recommend Susee to anyone.

 64% of the respondents will not return back to Susee even if they dispel and the
remaining 36% of the respondents will return back to Susee even they dispel

Finding based on CHI SQUARE:

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and


department of the respondents.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and


perception about the job.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and


satisfaction about the pay scale.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and career
growth opportunities at Susee.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and


communication, cooperation among staff members in Susee.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and my


workload and deadlines in Susee.
 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and
employee welfare activities in Susee.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I like
my job.

 There is a significant difference between the years of work at Susee and I have an
idea of seeking employment.

 There is no significant difference between the years of work at Susee and overall
satisfaction in Susee.

Finding based on CORRELATION:

 There is a negative correlation between Age of the respondents and the


satisfaction about the pay scale.

 There is a positive correlation between Age of the respondents and the career
growth opportunities in Susee

 There is a negative correlation between Age of the respondents and I like my job.

 There is a positive correlation between Age of the respondents and the overall
satisfaction with our company.

Finding based on ANOVA:

 The value of P is 0.013 which is less than the significant value


0.05(0.013<0.05).so there is a significant difference between the satisfaction level
about the pay scale and the Age of the respondents.

SUGGESTIONS