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MANAGEMENT 298D:
PERSUASION AND INFLUENCE
SPRING 2011

Instructor:


 Professor
Noah
Goldstein

Office:


 Collins
Center,
A‐412

E‐mail:


 noah.goldstein@anderson.ucla.edu

Office
Hours:
 5‐6pm
on
Tuesdays
and
by
appointment,
A‐412


TA:
 
 Stephanie
Vezich

E‐mail:


 isvezich@ucla.edu

Office
Hours:
 By
appointment


COURSE MEETING TIMES AND LOCATIONS


298D
–
Section
4
(FEMBA)
 Tuesdays
7:10‐10:00pm
 Room
A301

298D
–
Section
19
(MBA)
 Tuesdays
1:00‐3:50pm
 Room
A301


ABOUT YOUR INSTRUCTOR


Professor
Goldstein
joined
the
UCLA
Anderson
School
of
Management
after
serving
on
the

faculty
of
The
University
of
Chicago
Booth
School
of
Business.
His
research
and
writing
on

the
topics
of
persuasion,
compliance,
and
conformity
have
been
published
in
many
of
the

premier
business
journals.
Goldstein’s
research
on
persuasion
was
featured
in
the
Harvard

Business
Review
2009
List
of
Breakthrough
Ideas.
He
is
co‐author
of
the
New
York

Times
bestseller
Yes,
now
translated
in
over
25
languages.
Goldstein
has
also
consulted
for

a
number
of
corporate
and
government
organizations,
including
Accenture,
The
U.S.
Forest

Service,
and
the
U.
S.
Census
Bureau.
He
currently
sits
on
the
Scientific
Advisory
Boards
of

two
Fortunate
Global
500
companies,
the
Allianz
Global
Investors
Center
for
Behavioral

Finance
and
Express
Scripts
Inc.’s
Center
for
Cost‐Effective
Consumerism.




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND OBJECTIVES
This
course
is
designed
for
individuals
interested
in
improving
their
ability
to
communicate

with,
persuade,
and
more
generally
influence
others.
As
a
leader,
you
will
spend
the

majority
of
your
time
communicating
with
others—team
members,
subordinates,
clients,

and
other
constituents.
Right
now,
you
probably
don’t
spend
much
time
thinking
about
the

way
you
persuade,
nor
are
you
likely,
in
the
corporate
setting,
to
get
honest
feedback
on

the
persuasive
messages
you
send.
Yet
the
quality
of
your
persuasive
communications
will

have
a
large
impact
on
your
overall
effectiveness
to
get
buy‐in
from
others
on
your
ideas,

initiatives,
and
point
of
view.
This
class
will
help
you
appreciate
the
nature
and
complexity

of
persuasive
communication
and
provide
guidelines
for
both
improving
your
influence

style
and
recognizing
the
unique
styles
of
others.
It
will
also
help
you
better
navigate

thorny
issues
related
to
office
politics
that
you
are
sure
to
encounter
throughout
your

career.


The
class
is
based
on
the
assumption
that
interpersonal
influence
is
a
key
mechanism
by

which
things
get
done
and
by
which
you
will
advance
your
career
within
organizations.

Effective
leaders
don’t
simply
lead
by
fiat—they
often
must
influence
and
persuade
others

to
go
along
with
their
ideas.
In
each
session,
we’ll
consider
a
number
of
well‐studied
tactics

of
interpersonal
communication
and
persuasion.
For
each
tactic,
we’ll
talk
about
why
it

works,
when
it
works
best,
and
what
its
limitations
might
be.
We’ll
discuss
how
you
can
put

these
approaches
to
work
in
order
to
support
your
attempts
at
persuasion
and
how
to

resist
them
as
an
unwilling
target
of
persuasion.





After
taking
this
course,
you
will
be
better
able
to:
(1)
identify
strategies
for
crafting

effective
communication
in
the
form
of
everyday
conversation,
written
work,
and
public

presentations,
(2)
develop
techniques
for
building
strong,
long‐term
alliances
with
your

colleagues,
clients,
or
prospective
customers,
and
(3)
become
more
persuasive
in

advancing
an
agenda,
acquiring
resources,
or
eliciting
compliance
from
others.
These
skills

will
be
invaluable
to
you
throughout
your
career.






COURSE METHODOLOGY
Our
time
will
be
divided
between
lecture
content,
an
assortment
of
experiential
exercises,

group
activities,
and
class
discussion.
Students
will
be
expected
to
highlight
important

insights
from
the
readings
and
connect
these
readings
to
their
past
experiences
and

current
course
content.
Please
note
that
this
is
not
a
case‐heavy
class,
especially
the
first
six

sessions
of
the
course.


SUMMARY OF GRADING
Class
Participation…………………………………………….
15%

Individual
Memo
(Due
April
26)………………………...15%

Final
Team
Presentation/Paper
(Due
May
31)……
35%

Final
Individual
Paper
(Due

June
6
@
5pm)………..35%

Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 100%


GRADE DISTRIBUTION
This
course
will
be
graded
within
each
section
using
the
UCLA
Anderson
School
guidelines

for
electives:


A+,
A,
A‐
 No
more
than
50%
of
the
class

B+
or
below

 At
least
50%
of
the
class


ATTENDANCE
Absences
will
have
a
negative
impact
on
your
participation
grade.
If
you
miss
a
class,
you

are
responsible
for
informing
your
TA
of
your
absence
ahead
of
time
and
for
obtaining

announcements,
information,
handouts,
and
materials
from
your
classmates
or
from
the

course
website.


PARTICIPATION
Your
grade
on
class
participation
will
be
based
not
only
on
the
frequency
of
participation

(neither
too
much
nor
too
little)
but
also
on
the
quality
of
your
contributions
to
the
ongoing

discussion
and
your
success
in
leading
the
discussion
in
productive,
analytical
directions.


Comment
quality
will
be
assessed
using
the
following
criteria:



Relevance:
How
is
the
comment
related
to
the
current
discussion?
Is
it
related
to
ideas

in
the
course
readings
or
prior
discussions?

Logic:


Do
you
explain
the
reasoning
behind
your
comment
using
clear
evidence
and

coherent
arguments?

Integration:
Does
your
comment
move
the
discussion
forward
by
building
on
previous

contributions
with
new
insights?

Individuality:

Does
your
comment
contribute
a
new
perspective
to
the
discussion,
or

does
it
simply
repeat
what
others
have
already
said?

Although
I
strongly
encourage
you
to
participate
in
the
class
discussions,
that
is
not
the

only
way
you
can
earn
class
participation
points.
You
may
also
earn
participation
points
by

bringing
to
my
attention
any
examples
(i.e.
news
stories,
something
you
saw
on
the
web,

etc.)
you
find
during
the
spring
quarter
that
relate
to
the
class
material
in
some
way.
If
you

choose
to
do
this,
please
e‐mail
your
instructor
and
the
TA
with
a
short
explanation
of
how

your
example
is
relevant
to
the
class.
When
possible,
please
include
links,
pictures,
or
other

details,
etc.

COMPUTER USE
You
may
not
use
computers,
cell
phones,
recording
devices,
or
any
other
electronic
devices

during
class.
(If
you
have
a
physical
disability
that
requires
a
laptop,
please
see
the

instructor
for
permission.)
One
exception
to
this
is
that
occasionally
you
will
be
given
a

group
exercise
to
complete
during
class.
A
laptop
will
not
be
necessary
in
such
cases;

however,
if
the
group
prefers
to
type
on
a
laptop
rather
than
write
on
a
pad
of
paper,
laptop

use
will
be
permitted
in
such
instances.



A WORD ON LECTURE NOTES


I
will
post
.pdf
versions
of
the
lecture
slides
on
the
course
website
as
quickly
as
possible

after
the
classroom
session
on
myAnderson
(usually
by
midnight
on
the
day
we
have

class).
I
will
not
distribute
them
before
class
for
two
reasons.
First,
I
try
to
keep
lectures
as

up‐to‐date
as
possible,
which
means
that
I
am
often
revising
material
right
up
to
the

beginning
of
class.
I
want
to
make
sure
you
get
the
slides
I
actually
present
in
class.
Second

(and
more
important),
although
having
my
slides
during
the
lecture
seems
like
a
good
way

for
you
to
learn
the
material,
the
experimental
evidence
is
clear
that
it
actually
impairs

learning
because
students
tend
to
take
fewer
notes
of
their
own
during
class.
Taking
notes

in
class
is
an
effective
way
to
encode
and
remember
course
material
(or
any
material,
for

that
matter),
and
passively
watching
the
lectures
because
you
have
the
notes
is
a
terrible

way
to
encode
and
remember
course
material.

I
want
to
facilitate
learning
in
this
course,

not
impair
learning.




REQUIRED MATERIALS
We
will
be
drawing
on
three
sources
of
required
reading
material
for
assignments
and

discussion
in
this
course:

1.
CoursePack
(available
at
LuValle
bookstore
as
well
as
Rosenfeld
library)

2.
Book:
Jeffrey
Pfeffer’s
2010
book
Power:
Why
Some
People
Have
It—and
Others
Don’t

3.
Handouts
(these
will
be
distributed
in
class)


As
you
look
through
the
schedule
of
readings
and
assignments
(below),
you
will
see
that

there
is
a
list
of
readings
to
be
done
before
each
class.
The
CoursePack
readings
are

indicated
by
the
prefix
“(CP)”.
Book
chapters
are
indicated
by
the
author’s
name,
book
title,

and
the
chapter
number.
In
general,
when
I
assign
readings
from
the
Pfeffer
book,
you

might
find
it
helpful
to
read
those
chapters
prior
to
reading
the
case(s).

INDIVIDUAL MEMO (DUE ON TUESDAY, APRIL 26 AT THE START OF CLASS)
Revisit
a
persuasion
attempt
that
you
made
sometime
over
the
last
year
or
two
in
which

you
failed
to
achieve
the
desired
result.
(No,
failing
to
persuade
someone
to
be
romantically

involved
with
you
is
outside
the
scope
of
this
assignment.
Keep
those
sob
stories
limited
to

your
“The
Facebook”
account
or
whatever
that
Twitter
thing
is).
Considering
all
you’ve

learned
in
the
course
so
far,
what
would
you
have
changed
to
increase
the
odds
of
success?


To
minimize
issues
of
confidentiality
or
privacy,
you
may
change
certain
aspects
like
the

names
of
individuals
or
companies
involved,
but
all
aspects
of
your
experience
not
directly

threatening
confidentiality
or
privacy
must
be
real
and
true.
To
help
jog
your
memory

about
such
instances,
you
might
want
to
go
back
through
your
e‐mail
inbox,
but
of
course

that
need
not
be
your
only
source
of
inspiration
for
the
assignment.


If
you
cannot
find
an
adequate
example
of
where
you
failed
to
achieve
your
persuasion

goals,
you
can
consider
a
situation
you
have
previously
experienced
in
which
you
achieved

your
goals
but
you
now
realize
your
persuasion
attempt
could
have
been
improved
in
some

fundamental
way(s).



Your
memo
should
be
no
more
than
1000
words,
double‐spaced,
1‐inch
margins,
and
12‐
point
font.
The
font
can
be
of
your
choosing
provided
that
it
is
legible
(i.e.
you
cannot
use
a

font
like
Wingdings
2
because
it
will
look
like
this: ).

The
best
memos
will
be
those
that
are
specific,
analytical
(referring
back
to
course

material),
and
creative
in
how
you
use
the
principles,
strategies,
and
tactics
that
you’ve

learned.
Be
sure
to
give
enough
detail
so
that
we
understand
what
the
goal
was,
what
you

did,
what
you
would
do
differently,
and
why.



FINAL TEAM PROJECT (DUE ON TUESDAY, MAY 31 AT THE START OF CLASS)


At
the
end
of
this
course,
it
is
my
hope
that
you
will
become
far
more
effective
at

persuading
and
influencing
others.
Accordingly,
the
final
project
for
this
course
offers

you
the
opportunity
to
utilize
your
emerging
skills
to
develop
a
successful
“influence

campaign”
for
a
real­world
client.
Working
in
six‐person
teams,
your
goal
will
be
as

follows:

1.
Identify
a
client
(an
individual,
group,
or
organization)
seeking
to
exert
influence

over
an
audience
(e.g.,
get
customers
to
purchase
a
new
product;
get
a
new
contact

to
switch
financial
services
providers;
get
subordinates
to
embrace
a
proposal
for

personnel
restructuring;
get
team
members
to
bike
or
carpool
to
work;
get
one’s

boss
to
give
one
a
promotion;
get
legislators
to
support
desirable
regulations;
etc).

(Campaigns
for
a
higher
grade
on
your
final
team
project
do
not
count.)
Note:
Be

sure
your
client
is
not
working
with
any
other
team
–
each
team
must
have
a
unique

client.


(Continued
on
next
page…)
2.
Identify
and
diagnose
the
client’s
needs.
Expect
to
utilize
primary
research

methods
(e.g.,
interviews,
direct
observation),
and
feel
free
to
supplement
with
data

from
other
sources
(e.g.,
newspaper
articles,
organizational
histories,
cases)
where

it
adds
value.

3.
Develop
and
present
your
client
with
a
detailed
plan
to
address
your
client’s

persuasion
and
influence
needs,
and
to
achieve
your
client’s
influence
goals.


I
highly
recommend
securing
a
client
outside
of
the
Anderson
community
–
unfamiliar

clients
and
concerns
will
present
you
with
the
greatest
opportunity
to
test
your
diagnostic

and
strategic
abilities,
and
help
increase
the
scope
of
your
work.
There
is
also
considerable

latitude
in
the
type
of
persuasion
and
influence
issue
you
can
tackle
–
typical
business

concerns
(e.g.,
marketing
a
product,
managing
a
reorganization)
as
well
as
less
obvious

concerns
(e.g.,
getting
fraternity
members
to
“go
green”
by
recycling)
are
appropriate.


At
the
end
of
the
Week
2
class,
I
will
ask
you
to
make
a
decision
regarding
the
composition

of
your
team
for
the
final
project.
I
recommend
that
you
allow
yourself
to
be
randomly

assigned
to
a
final
project
team
–
it
will
help
you
become
acquainted
with
new
peers,

and
benefit
from
unfamiliar,
diverse
combinations
of
backgrounds
and
perspectives.

However,
because
this
project
will
require
a
number
of
meetings
outside
of
class,
and

because
many
of
you
have
practical
constraints
that
make
it
difficult
to
meet
with
a

randomly
selected
group
of
people,
I
will
allow
you
to
form
yourselves
into
groups
of
6
(in

general
no
more,
no
less,
though
there
may
be
an
exception
when
necessary).
If
you
take

my
advice
and
do
not
join
a
group,
you
will
be
randomly
assigned
to
a
group.


Finding
a
client.
To
find
a
client,
a
good
place
to
start
can
be
group
members’
own

(past
or
present)
work
histories.
Many
of
you
have
probably
been
witness
to
failed

influence
attempts
that
could
be
productively
revised,
or
you
may
know
of
people
with

unrealized
aspirations
who
are
in
need
of
a
good
action
plan.
These
kinds
of
experiences

can
help
direct
you
to
fascinating,
real‐world
persuasion
and
influence
situations
that
are

perfect
for
this
project.



Behavioral
guidelines.
There
are
always
potential
complications
when
you
study
real
people

and
real
workplaces.
I
recommend
using
the
project
as
an
opportunity
to
provide
yourself

and
others
with
a
productive
study
of
real
world
issues—not
to
poke
into
a
situation
that

could
create
complications
for
your
job
or
for
other
people's
jobs.
In
these
situations,

UCLA
Anderson
particularly
appreciates
your
use
of
common
sense,
your
adherence

to
our
guidelines
for
student
conduct,
and
your
respect
for
others
and
their

confidences.


Deadlines
for
the
final
team
project.
Once
you
have
formed
your
teams,
there
are
two

important
deadlines
for
the
final
team
project/presentation:

‐
Session
4
(Tuesday,
April
19th).
Your
team
will
need
to
hand
in
a
one‐paragraph

summary
of
the
final
team
project
topic
at
the
start
of
this
class
session.
The

purpose
of
this
summary
is
for
the
instructor
to
evaluate
whether
or
not
the
topic
is

appropriate.

‐
Session
10
(Tuesday,
May
31st).
Your
team
will
need
to
hand
in
a
final
paper
that

is
no
longer
than
16
double‐spaced
pages
(excluding
any
title
or
cover
page).
Your

team
should
use
12‐point
font
with
one‐inch
margins.
Your
team
will
also
be
asked

to
do
a
10‐minute
oral
presentation
on
your
paper.
You
will
receive
more
details
in

class
about
the
oral
presentation.


Independence
from
other
projects.
Please
note
that
the
topic
of
your
team
project
cannot

overlap
with
any
team
member’s
Individual
Memo.
Please
also
note
that
the
topic
or
main

idea
underlying
your
project
must
be
different
than
any
other
project
you
have
worked
on

in
other
classes
here
at
UCLA
Anderson.



Team
Paper:

The
final
paper
should:

‐
Detail
the
chosen
problem
or
issue,
including
natural
barriers
to
success.

‐
Describe
the
selected
procedures
for
attacking
it
and
provide
a
rationale
for
the

choice
of
these
procedures
in
terms
of
the
psychological
concepts
covered
in
the

course.
(This
will
be
the
most
important
component
of
your
paper
and
also
the

lengthiest.)


‐
Detail
a
plan
for
evaluating
the
success
of
the
proposed
plan.
In
other
words,
how

will
you
know
how
effective
it
is?

‐
Communicate
a
mutually
agreed
upon
(within
each
team)
definition
of
what

constitutes
ethical
and
unethical
influence
and
analyze
the
proposed
plan
in
terms

of
ethics.
(Note
that
the
goal
is
to
produce
a
plan
that
abides
by
ethical

considerations.
If
certain
proposed
strategies
fall
in
an
ethical
“gray
area,”
they

should
be
acknowledged
and
discussed.)


Team
Oral
Presentation:

During
the
final
class
session,
each
team
will
make
a
10‐minute
presentation
of
its

influence
campaign.
Your
instructor
will
provide
more
details.



Evaluations:

The
final
paper
will
be
evaluated
on
the
following
criteria:

-Organization: How clearly written and professionally presented is the project?
-Mastery: To what extent did you appropriately, insightfully, and cogently apply class
concepts to the development and analysis of your influence campaign?
-Substance: To what extent does the project show that your influence campaign involved
careful research (e.g., interviews, use of secondary sources) into the client’s needs, goals,
context, history, and future?
-Scope: How ambitious is your project? How difficult is the task you set for yourself?
-Creative Insight: To what extent did you creatively extend, modify, or elaborate on
course concepts in developing and analyzing your influence campaign?

At
the
end
of
the
quarter,
the
group
members
of
each
final
team
project
will
have
the
ability

to
evaluate
one
another’s
contributions.
These
within‐team
evaluations
will
be
taken
into

consideration
when
assigning
individual
grades.

FINAL INDIVIDUAL PAPER (DUE MONDAY, JUNE 6TH AT 5:00PM PST)
There
is
no
final
exam
for
this
course.
Instead,
there
is
a
final
paper
designed
to
help
you

draw
a
blueprint
for
your
own
persuasion
and
influence.
Because
I
want
this
final

individual
paper
to
be
optimally
helpful
to
you,
I
will
allow
you
to
choose
your
assignment.

Below
are
two
possible
assignments:


OPTION
A

Think
about
a
current
issue
in
your
personal
or
professional
life
in
which
it
is
a
challenge
to

win
support
for
your
idea,
initiative,
proposal,
product,
or
point
of
view.
(As
was
the
case

for
the
individual
memo,
romantic
relationships
are
a
no‐no
for
this
paper
as
well,
but

almost
any
other
domain
is
okay.
If
you’re
not
sure,
just
ask
the
instructor.)
Using
course

concepts,
detail
what
your
goal
is
and
how
you
would
go
about
achieving
support
for
it.
As

always,
be
specific.
Also
be
sure
to
make
it
clear
how
your
strategy
and
tactics
are
related

to
the
course
material.
Also
include
what
obstacles
you
must
overcome
to
achieve
success.

Note:
If
you
are
not
currently
employed,
think
ahead
to
the
persuasion
challenges
that
you

are
likely
to
encounter
in
your
future
job.



OPTION
B

This
option
is
designed
to
help
you
strategize
in
the
realm
of
power
and
influence
for
the

next
few
years
of
your
career
(and
beyond).
Think
about
your
current
job
or
a
job
that
you

are
likely
to
take
in
the
next
couple
of
years.
Your
paper
should
address
the
following

questions:


1.
What
are
the
power
dynamics
inherent
in
your
current
job
(or
in
the
job
you

expect
to
take)?

2.
What
are
the
kinds
of
political
dilemmas
for
which
you
need
to
be
vigilant?


3.
What
sources
of
power
and
influence
do
you
need
to
be
effective?


4.
Do
your
current
sources
of
power
and
influence
fit
the
requirements
of
the
job?


5.
What
is
your
plan
for
developing
the
sources
of
power,
influence
skills,
and

partnerships
necessary
to
be
effective?


If
you
are
writing
about
a
job
that
you
do
not
currently
have
and
feel
that
you
need
more

information
to
complete
this
assignment,
feel
free
to
do
your
own
research
about
the
types

of
issues
that
arise
in
that
job.
(You
may
speak
to
others
to
gain
more
insight
into
these

issues,
but
those
others
must
not
be
enrolled
in
this
class.)


Final
papers
should
be
typed,
double‐spaced
(12‐point
font;
1‐inch
margins),
and
be
no

longer
than
8
total
pages
of
text
(excluding
title
or
cover
pages).
Your
grade
will
reflect
the

breadth
and
depth
of
your
analysis
and
the
creative
insights
you
offer.
There
will
be

penalties
for
papers
that
exceed
the
length
limit
and/or
are
late.


You
can
also
choose
to
do
a
hybrid
version
of
these
two
options
or
create
your
own

assignment.
However,
if
you
would
like
to
create
your
own
assignment
please
speak
with

your
instructor
first
for
approval.
Whichever
assignment
you
choose,
please
note
that
this

project
must
be
independent
from
any
other
project
you’ve
done
within
the
class
or
any

other
project
you’ve
done
here
at
UCLA
Anderson.





SCHEDULE
OF
SESSIONS


Tuesday, March 29
SESSION
1

ISSUES
IN
PERSUASIVE
COMMUNICATION


PRINCIPLES
AND
TACTICS
OF
INTERPERSONAL
INFLUENCE
I


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Sussman,
“How
to
Frame
a
Message”

• (CP)
Dalton
and
Dalton,
“Trips
and
Tips
for
Negotiation
Self‐Defense”

• (CP)
Humphreys
et
al.,
“World‐Class
Bull”



Tuesday, April 5
SESSION
2

PRINCIPLES
AND
TACTICS
OF
INTERPERSONAL
INFLUENCE
II


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Vranica,
“Hey,
No
Whopper
on
the
Menu?!”

• (CP)
Conger,
“The
Necessary
Art
of
Persuasion”



Tuesday, April 12
SESSION
3

PRINCIPLES
AND
TACTICS
OF
INTERPERSONAL
INFLUENCE
III


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Caro,
The
Path
to
Power:
The
Years
of
Lyndon
Johnson

o “Chapter
13:
On
His
Way”

o “Chapter
16:
In
Tune”


Preparation
questions
for
the
Caro:


• What
personal
and
structural
resources
does
LBJ
have
when
he
starts
his
job?

What

are
his
liabilities?


• What
role
does
LBJ’s
personality
play?

He
was
known
as
someone
that
“could

almost
read
minds.”

Is
this
true?

What
abilities
does
LBJ
have
that
the
average

manager
does
not
have?

• What
do
we
learn
from
LBJ
about
mastering
a
job?

What
does
he
do
when
he
first

arrives
in
his
job
to
acquire
power
(e.g.,
p.
217‐229)?

What
does
he
do
in
the
middle

phases
(e.g.,
229‐234)?

Why
is
the
mail
so
important
(both
for
internal
and
external

reasons)?

What
does
he
do
when
he
has
mastered
the
job?



Tuesday, April 19
SESSION
4

PRINCIPLES
AND
TACTICS
OF
INTERPERSONAL
INFLUENCE
IV


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Goldstein
et
al.,
“Nudge
Your
Customers
Toward
Better
Choices”

• (CP)
Burger,
“The
Foot‐in‐the‐Door
Compliance
Procedure:
A
Multiple‐Process

Analysis
and
Review”


• (CP)
Roddick,
Body
and
Soul

o “Chapter
7:
The
Power
of
Love”


Preparation
questions
for
the
Roddick
reading:


• What
phrases
in
Anita
Roddick’s
chapter
best
capture
her
philosophy
of
managing

people?


• How
has
the
Body
Shop
created
a
culture
that
leads
to
highly
motivated
workers?

• Roddick
claims
that
the
programs
of
the
Body
Shop
are
not
motivated
by
concern

for
“image.”
Do
you
believe
this?


• If
your
commitment
strategy
were
boiled
down
to
a
short
“how
to”
list,
what
would

it
say?


***ONE­PARAGRAPH
SUMMARY
OF
FINAL
TEAM
PROJECT
TOPIC
DUE
AT
THE

START
OF
SESSION
4***



Tuesday, April 26
SESSION
5

PRESENTING
IDEAS
THAT
STICK
AND
MOTIVATE
I:

PERSUASION
THROUGH
INFORMATION,
SYMBOLS,
AND
NARRATIVE



Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Obuchowski,
“Communicate
to
Inform,
Not
Impress”

• (CP)
Phoel,
“Leading
Words:
How
to
Use
Stories
to
Change
Minds
and
Ignite
Action”


• (CP)
McKee,
“Storytelling
that
Moves
People”

• (CP)
Guber,
“The
Four
Truths
of
the
Storyteller”


• (CP)
Denning,
“Telling
Tales”

• (CP)
Frederick,
“The
Persuasive
Power
of
Opportunity
Costs”

• (CP)
Wreden,
“How
to
Make
Your
Case
in
30
Seconds
or
Less”


***INDIVIDUAL
MEMO
DUE
AT
THE
START
OF
CLASS
SESSION
5.***


Tuesday, May 3
SESSION
6

PRESENTING
IDEAS
THAT
STICK
AND
MOTIVATE
II:

LEADERSHIP
AND
INFLUENCE
THROUGH
LANGUAGE


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• (CP)
Harvard
Business
Cases,
“Dashman
Company”

• (CP)
Garvin
and
Roberto,
“Change
through
Persuasion”

• (CP)
Lemann,
“The
Word
Lab”


• (CP)
Wilson,
“To
Get
Heard,
Get
in
Tune
with
Your
Company’s
Rhetorical
Key”

• (CP)
Wreden,
“Language:
Churchill’s
Key
to
Leadership”

• (CP)
Morgan,
“The
Iron
Lady’s
Sterling
Rhetoric”


Preparation
questions
for
the
Dashman
Company
reading:


• Should
Mr.
Post
be
nervous?


• What
did
Mr.
Post
want
from
these
plant‐level
executives?


• Where
did
he
go
wrong?
What
might
he
have
done
differently?





Tuesday, May 10
SESSION
7

POWER,
POLITICS,
AND
INFLUENCE
IN
ORGANIZATIONS
I:

DIAGNOSING
POWER
RELATIONS



Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• Pfeffer,
Power:
Why
Some
People
Have
It
and
Others
Don’t:
Intro,
Ch
3,
Ch
4


• (CP)
Barnes
et
al.,
“Textile
Corporation
of
America”


• (CP)
Pfeffer,
“Zia
Yusuf
at
SAP:
Having
Impact”
(Note:
This
is
in
the
course
pack,
not

a
chapter
from
Pfeffer’s
book.)




Preparation
questions
for
the
“Textile
Corporation
of
America”
reading:


• What
are
the
factors
that
might
make
John
Mitchell’s
job
more
or
less
political?


• What
capabilities
does
John
Mitchell
bring
to
the
job?






• What
do
other
people
expect
from
John
Mitchell?






• Evaluate
John
Mitchell’s
political
tactics
(especially
the
memo
and
the
resignation

threat).



Preparation
questions
for
the
“Zia
Yusuf”
reading:


• In
a
company
dominated
first
by
technology
and
then
by
marketing
and
sales,
Yusuf

built
a
very
successful
career
without
being
in
either
one
of
these
units.
What

advantages
and
disadvantages
have
his
various
organizational
positions
provided
to

him?



Tuesday, May 17
SESSION
8

POWER,
POLITICS,
AND
INFLUENCE
IN
ORGANIZATIONS
II:

DEVELOPING
A
BASE
FOR
POWER,
PERSUASION,
AND
INFLUENCE


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• Pfeffer,
Power:
Why
Some
People
Have
It
and
Others
Don’t:
Ch
1,
5,
6,
8


• (CP)
Caro,
The
Power
Broker:
Robert
Moses

o “Chapter
10:
The
Best
Bill
Drafter
in
Albany”

o “Chapter
11:
The
Majesty
of
Law”

o “Chapter
12:
Robert
Moses
and
the
Creature
of
the
Machine”

• (CP)
Hersch,
The
Price
of
Power:
Henry
Kissinger

o “Chapter
1:
The
Job
Seeker”

o “Chapter
2:
A
New
NSC
System”

o “Chapter
3:
Consolidating
Authority”


Preparation
questions
for
the
“The
Power
Broker”
readings:


• What
were
Moses's
sources
of
power?

• What
tactics
did
Moses
use
to
develop
these
sources
of
power?

• Why
weren’t
Moses’s
opponents
(e.g.,
wealthy
Long
Island
land
owners,
upstate

Republicans)
more
effective
in
thwarting
him?
What
should
they
have
done

differently?

• Opinions
of
Moses
range
from
unselfish
hero
to
monstrous
dictator.
How
do
you

view
Moses
and
his
rise
to
power?
Could
you
do
what
he
did?
Why
or
why
not?


Preparation
questions
for
the
“The
Price
of
Power”
readings:


• What
sources
of
power
did
Kissinger
rely
on
to
get
the
NSC
job?
After
he
got
the
job?

• What
did
Kissinger
do
to
prevent
others
from
curbing
his
power
and
influence?

• Why
does
Rogers
have
so
much
trouble
at
the
State
Department?
What
could
Rogers

have
done
to
exert
more
control
at
the
State
Department?









Tuesday, May 24
SESSION
9

POWER,
POLITICS,
AND
INFLUENCE
IN
ORGANIZATIONS
III:

MANAGING
ORGANIZATIONAL
CONFLICT
AND
POLITICS


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• Pfeffer,
Power:
Why
Some
People
Have
It
and
Others
Don’t:
Ch
9,
11


• (CP)
Friedman
and
Deinard,
“Black
Caucus
Groups
at
Xerox
Corp”

• (CP)
Auletta,
“Power,
Greed,
and
Glory”
and
“The
Men,
the
Money,
the
Merger”


Preparation
questions
for
the
“Black
Caucus
Groups
at
Xerox
Corp”
reading:


• How
did
Black
employees
at
Xerox
acquire
power?
What
sources
of
power
did
they

come
to
rely
on,
and
what
tactics
did
they
use
to
acquire
those?

• Take
Kearns’
perspective
going
into
the
Toronto
meeting.
Which
goals,
and
which

constituencies,
does
he
hope
to
serve?
How
is
he
likely
to
approach
the
meeting?

• What
is
most
important
for
the
caucus
group
leaders
to
achieve
in
the
Toronto

meeting?
What
strategy
would
you
advise
for
them?


Preparation
questions
for
the
Auletta
readings:


• Early
in
the
case,
Peterson
is
in
power.
How
might
that
power
have
affected
his

behavior
toward
others?
Why
was
he
vulnerable
to
Glucksman’s
takeover?

• What
key
moves
did
Glucksman
use
to
orchestrate
Peterson's
ouster?
Why
did

Glucksman
succeed
in
his
power
play?
What
sources
of
power
did
he
rely
on?

• Evaluate
Glucksman’s
use
of
power
once
he
took
over.
What
were
his
priorities?

What
did
his
actions
do
to
his
power
base?

• What
sources
of
power
were
available
to
Peterson
in
the
power
struggle?
What

could
he
have
done
to
prevent
his
own
ouster
or
minimize
the
damage
to
the
firm?



Tuesday, May 31
SESSION
10

COURSE
WRAP­UP
AND
PRESENTATIONS


Please
read
the
following
before
class:

• Absolutely
nothing.



***THE
FINAL
TEAM
PAPER
IS
DUE
AT
THE
START
OF
CLASS
SESSION
10.***




***THE
FINAL
INDIVIDUAL
PAPER
IS
DUE
AT
5PM
PST
ON
MONDAY,
JUNE
7***



***THERE
IS
NO
FINAL
EXAM***