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Automatic Switched Optical Network

Automatic Switched Optical


Networks: functionality and
architectural components
Roberto Clemente
Giuseppe Ferraris

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001
Introduction

Optical transport network evolution


WDM OTN
yesterday today tomorrow

Pre-OTN: OADM ring Meshed/ring networks


Point-to-point systems and point-to-point Interconnection of
systems OTN domains
Main functionality provided by an OTN
è Transparent transport of different optical clients
è Interconnection of different administrative domains
è Optical channel networking and protection
è Performance monitoring and alarm supervision
è Network management
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Introduction

New requirements for OTN


4 Fast and automatic end-to-end provisioning
4 Fast and efficient re-routing
4 Support of different clients, but optimized for IP
4 Dynamic set up of connections
4 Support of Optical Virtual Private Networks (OVPNs)
4 Support of different levels of quality of service

Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON)


More generally, the same requirements can be
applied to any transport network (SDH too)
Automatically Switched Transport Networks (ASTN)

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

An example of SLA

4 I need to permanently
connect my sites (“always
on” connection)…
4 I need other connections
based on my traffic
demands (per usage
connections…)

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Permanent connections

“Always on” connections

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Client equipment are The transport network


connected to the operator sets up the
transport network Node C “always on” connections
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

Without ASON, when traffic grows…


Warning
Too many Traffic
packets to
node B
grows…

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the customer analyses traffic


A new reports…
connection to
B is needed

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…he contacts the network provider…


Connect ports Am and Bn A customer
request…

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the job order moves on… Connect ports


Am and Bn

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the operator looks for a route…


What
route?

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the operator looks for a route…


What
route?

Node A
Node B

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the route is found

Node A
Node B

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the route is found and the network


is re-configured…

Node A
Node B

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the new connection is operational!

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

With ASON…

Node A
Node B

Signaling between Each network


transport equipment element knows the
for network discovery Node C network topology
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…when traffic grows…


Warning
Too many Traffic
packets to
node B
grows…

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…connection-request through the UNI…


Connection set up
request (A,2,B,4…)

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
User
Network Network
Interface

The
Theclient
clientequipment
equipment
request
requestthe
theestablishment
establishment
of
ofaanew
newconnection…
connection… Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…connection-request is sent…
Connection set up request
(W,i,X,j,Y,k,…)

Node A
Node B

…and
…andsends
sendsaaconnection
connection
setup
setuprequest…
request…
Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…setup request is acknowledged…


Setup acknowledgment
(W,i,X,j,Y,k,…)

Node A
Node B

…each
…eachswitching
switchingmatrix
matrixisis
configured
configuredandandthe
the
connection
connectionisisestablished
established Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Why ASON?

…the new connection is established!

Node A
Optical Transport Node B
Network

Node C
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Generic requirements

Generic requirements for an ASON

4Dynamic and fast provisioning of OCh


connections through the optical network
4Different OCh services with different
quality degrees
4Client-independent solution
4Automate the rules of enforcing SLA

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Alternative approaches

Two alternative approaches for switched OChs


4Client server (overlay) model
The client network (IP, ATM, …) or customer device requests
resources (OCh connections) to the optical network (server), but
has no knowledge about its internal structure
l ITU G.ASON “Automatic Switched Optical Network”
l OIF
l ODSI
l IETF G-MPLS “Generalized Multi Protocol Label Switching”

4Peer-to-peer model
The client is only IP and the control plane of the optical network
is integrated with the IP control plane
l IETF G-MPLS “Generalized Multi Protocol Label Switching”

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
General architecture

ASON architecture (logical view)


OCC Control plane

OCC NNI OCC Management


UNI plane
NMI-A
CCI
EM/NM
Client
equipment (IP PI Optical
router, ATM switch NMI-T
switch, …) Optical Optical
PI
switch switch
Transport plane
ASON is an Optical Transport Network (OTN) capable to
switch automatically Optical Channels
CCI: Connection Control Interface
NMI-A: Network Management Interface for the ASON Control Plane OCC: Optical Connection Controller
NMI-T: Network Management Interface for the Transport Network PI: Physical Interface
NNI: Network to Network Interface UNI: User to Network Interface
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Optical transport services

Supported optical transport services


4 Permanent OCh – setup from the management
system by means of the configuration of all the
involved equipment (possible today)
4 Soft permanent OCh – setup from the management
system using routing capability embedded in the
network; it requires routing and signaling at the NNI
to establish connections
4 Switched OCh – setup by the customer/client layer
using signaling at the UNI
4 Optical Virtual Private Network
4 Lambda Trunking

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Control plane

Control plane
4It carries signaling messages
4It represents the transport infrastructure for
control traffic
4It can be either in-band or out-of-band
4Its topology can be different from the transport
network topology

Internet developed protocols seem to be the most


likely candidates to accomplish the functions
needed to automate the OTN
FASHION still have a short look at other protocols
as well (e.g. PNNI)
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Functionality

Basic functionality

4Network topology discovery (resource


discovery)
4Signaling, routing, address assignment
4Connection set-up/tear-down
4Connection protection/restoration
4Traffic engineering
4Wavelength assignment

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Topology discovery

Network topology discovery

4Control plane topology (signaling or


control channel network) and transport
network topology can be different
4ASON requires both logical and
physical topology information
4The discovery can be done by using
currently available IP protocols, like
OSPF or MPLS, with some extensions

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Topology discovery

Network topology discovery (II)


4Physical topology 4Logical topology
information refers to information refers to
è Node address è End-to-end path
è Port number (or address) information like working
è Port connectivity (to both paths, protection/
end devices and neighbor /restoration paths
nodes) è Optical VPN
è Inside node
è Information related to TE
interconnection scheme
è Number of ports
(attributes TE) like
è Bandwidth of each port
available bandwidth,
è Link ID, fiber ID, trunk ID quality of service, policy
è Trench ID routing information, …
è Grooming channel ID

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Resilience

Switched OCh Resilience

4Protection – resources for an alternative


route are reserved before a failure occurs
4Restoration – resources for an alternative
route are not reserved before a failure
occurs and are found after a failure has
occurred (automatic re-rerouting)

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Connection provisioning

Basic operations
4Set-up OChs
4Modify OChs
4Release OChs
4Example of parameters associated
to the set-up OChs operation
è End points
è Scheduled service
è Scheduled duration
è Resilience
è Pre-emption (priority)

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Connection provisioning

Provisioning options

4Slow vs. fast


4On-demand vs. pre-ordered
4Guaranteed vs. best-effort

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Routing and signaling

Routing and signaling

Internet developed protocols seem to be


the most likely candidates
4Routing protocols based on OSPF (or perhaps
IS-IS)
4Constraint-based routing
4Signaling protocols based on MPLS (LDP, CR-
LDP, RSVP)

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Open issues under study

Several open issues are addressed

4Adaptation of IP developed protocol to


ASON
4Transparency (wavelength conversion,
monitoring, management, …)
4Sub-rate bandwidth provisioning and
traffic aggregation
4Traffic engineering

2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop


Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com
Conclusions

Conclusions

4ASON is client independent and it has its


own control plane
4All the information required by the client
layer are exchanged through the signaling
at the UNI
4The signaling and routing protocols allow
fast and automatic configuration of the
network for provisioning and re-routing
purposes
2nd WDM Hungarian Workshop
Budapest, March 27th 2001 roberto.clemente@tilab.com