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BINOMIALS

Binomials are idiomatic expressions in which two words are joined by a "conjunction (usually AND). The order of the words is usually fixed They are often based on a sound pattern, the words used are near-synonyms. often qrammar words.

Let's get the main things packed; we can do the ODDS AND ENDS later. Every relationship needs a bit of GIVE AND TAKE to be successful. Us raining CATS AND DOGS. Tears are PART AND PARCELof growing up. The boss was RANTING AND RAVING at us. The old cottage has gone to RACK AND RVIN. He is so PRIM AND PROPERat work.

The hotel was a bit ROVGH AND READY.

She

has to WINE AND DINE important clients.

You can PICK AND CHOOSE; it's up to you.

My English is progressing in LEAPS AND BOVNDS.

It's nice to

have same PEACE AND QVIET.

The doctor recommended same REST AND RECREATION. FIRST AND FOREMOST. you must work hard. There are cafes HERE AND THERE. We've had meeting ON AND OFF. I've been running BACK AND FORTH all day. TO AND FRO can be used just like BACK AND FORTH. He is unemployed and DOWN AND OUT. She's better now, and OUT AND ABOUT again.

She ran VP AND DOWN the street. LAW AND ORDER NOW AND THEN HIT AND RVN driver ar accident - CLEAN (NEAT) AND TIDY through THICK AND THIN SICK AND TIRED - HIGH AND DRY - THE HIGH AND MIGHTY- FACTS AND FIGVRES COCK AND BVLL STORY - PINS AND NEEDLES - W AIT AND SEE - INS AND OVTS- PROS AND CONS SAFE AND SOVND - SLOWLY AND SVRELY NICE AND EASY BED AND BREAKFAST NOOK AND CORNER - ROUGH AND READY-

SMALL AND VNIMPORT ANT THING S A SPIRIT OF COMPROMISE RAINING HEAVILY A CONSTITUENT PART OF SHOUTINGIVERY ANGRY RUINED/DECAYED RATHER FORMAL AND FUSSY, EASILY SHOCKEDBY ANYTHING RUDE POOR STANDARD ENTERTAIN HAVE A WIDE CHOICE BIG JVMPS, very quickly and successfully PEACE/CALM RELAXATION FIRST/MOST IMPORTANTLY S..f.t'_"UE&ED.AROUND OCCASIONALLY TO AND FROM SOMEWHERE

WITHOUT HOME AND MONEY GOING OUT IN BOTH DIRECTIONS

an accident in which the guilty driver does not stop to help

feeling annoyance. impotience from too much of something in o helpless situotion. stranded very rich and importont people, the rulers of the country

an incredible story (on) o state of anxious expectotion you will find out soon

the detoils

of a difficult situation, a problem

completely undomoged

(crannies) - little known ploces simple and without comfort (Iiving conditions)

BINOMIALS LINKED BY OTHER WORDS THAN AND:

HIT OR

MISS/HIT

AND MISS-

depending on chance, not planned carefully

He won't

help her; she'll have to SINK OR SWIM.

SURVIVE OR FAIL

SOONER OR LATER, you'lIlearn your lesson.

SOME TIME

She didn't want to be just friends; it had to be ALL OR NOTHING. Well, I'm sorry, that's all I can after you; TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT.

It's about the same distance as from

here to Dublin, GIVE OR TAKE a few miles.

You've got your sweater on BACK TO FRONT. SLOWLY BUT SVRELY, I realized the boat was sinking.

THE WRONG WAY GRADUALLY

BINOMIALS

1- Let's get the main th in gs packed . W e c an d o th e less importan t o n e s later.

1- Every rela tio n sh ip n eeds ;r. It' s h eavily rain ing.

a spirit of compromise.

;r: Tears are a constituent part of growing up . ~ . Th e b oss w a s sh o utin g ve ry an gri1 y. ff. Th e o ld co ttag e was in a ru ined co n dition . 7. H e is ea sily shocked by an ythin g ru de . 8. Th e h ote l was in a p oor co ndition. I- S he had to ente rta in h er fathe r' s g u ests. ;er. Yo u h ave a w id e ch oice . .;t. My Eng lish is p rog ressin g in b ig jumps.

)Il.

It' s nic e to b e so p e ace fuL

~ T h e d octo r re comm en ded some re lax a tion .

)4. T he re are cages sca ttered aro u nd. lkf Mo st imp o rtantly, yo u must work hard .

16. O c casio nally , w e me e t in th is c afe. y7. I'v e b e en runn ing to th e c la ssroom and out of it . 1,.8H. e is u nemp Io y ed and w ith o u t h om e an d mon ey. -w. Sh e 's b e tter now and goin g out. f6. Sh e ran in b o th directio ns of the street. .#}:. I am a Iaw -abid ing p erso n. 22: Th e guilty drive r didn 't sto p to h e lp .

, /

)..0.

I want y our room to b e neat.

  • X I am fed up w ith y our stories.

2Ji. Robinson Cruso e was stranded on an islan d . ~ Politics depends on the rulers o f th e co u ntry. 2 7 . M y fo o t is numb . 28':"1 d on ' t b elieve in his sto ry . 21." Y o u 'lI find o ut soo n w h o' s g u ilty .

.se. 1'11giv e y ou all advantages and disadvan tag e s. 3 1. D o n 't wo rry. Y o ur ca r is u n d am aged . Jd. I search ed fo r it in every corn e r of m y hou se . :B. Let' s discuss th e d e ta ils o f the prob lem . 3 4. This situation d ep ends on chan ce .

25.' Sh e'll

h ave to surv ive or fail on h er ow n .

  • 36. S ome

time sh e'll h ave to fin d o u t th e truth .

r: c rvu ORfAND T AKE 1 -PRIM AND PROPER t . HIt AND MISS 4 . ODDS AND ENDS ~ ROUGH AND R E ADY 1WINE AND DINE (/ DOWN AND OUT s: S OONER OR LATER Y.CA TS AND DOGS

}ff : O UT AND ABOUT ,:K N OOK AND COR N ER l ~ CV' 1 l A J

BINOMIALS 1 - Let's get the mai n t h in gs packed . W e

lJ1'. S INK OR SWIM l.J:PICK AND CHOOSE

1 4 . SAFE AND SOUND

  • 15. HIGHAND DRY

lk T HE HIGH AND MIGHTY )17. LAW AND ORDER ~ CLEAN (NEAT) AND TIDY ;14. NICE AND EASY

2 0. ON AND OFF

;J1. BERE AND TBERE

2.1. BACK AND FORTH t /t\A A ~ - ~

~ ; BACK TO FRONT

  • 24. INS AND OUTS

i
i

F ; H IT AND RUN 2-6. SLOWLY BUT SURELY

')J{ RACK AND RUIN

% .

RANTING AND RAVINC

.2!J. PROS AND CONS

30 . P IN S A N D NE E DL E S :rf: U P AND DOWN n : PART AND PARCE L ) 5 . LE APS AND BOUNDS % S ICKANDTIRED

  • 15. F IRST AND FOREMOST FUO I (~Q v v ' ?

,
,

3G-:' C OCK AND BULL

2fT..

T AKE IT OR L E AVE IT

J8. R E ST AND RECREATION

' )If . Th e re is no b a rg a inin g ab o ut it.

  • 38. E very th in g w ent smoothly .

  • 39. PE A CE AND QUIET

;tO. WAlT AND SEE

~ Yo u've go t y our sw eater th e w ro n g way. 40~Gradu a l1 y, sh e rea liz ed th e b oa t was sin k \Vl..:l,

1 4 2 4 3 j 11 ~ 3 21 r f 12 E>5 13 3J:'
1
4
2
4
3
j
11 ~ 3
21
r f
12 E>5 13 3J:'
22 '2s: 23 lK'
31
rlJl
32 11 33 2 4

4 32

5 '2'&

BINOMIALS 1 - Let's get the mai n t h in gs packed . W e

6 ? :r

7 :L

17 '22 27 3 0

BINOMIALS 1 - Let's get the mai n t h in gs packed . W e

8 S

9

6

10 13

14 21 15 35 16 20 24 34 25 15 2 6 16 34 '3 3
14
21
15 35
16 20
24 34
25 15 2 6 16
34 '3
3 5 12-
36 ~

18 -:r

BINOMIALS 1 - Let's get the mai n t h in gs packed . W e

19 1 o 20 31

BINOMIALS 1 - Let's get the mai n t h in gs packed . W e
2..3
2..3

L(n 30 LS

40 ~C'

28 >,c 29

37 '} ;;f- 38 t ') 39

2

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PREPOSITIONS

Definition: Prepositions are words that show relationshipsin time and space and relationships between ideas. Many prepositions can be used as adverbs but not all of them. Prepositions is always followed by a noun, a pronoun or agerund.

1. Prepositions of Time

  • a) One point of time

Types of Prepositions

on - with days of a week, days of the month (I saw him on Saturday, on 15th ofJune)

at

- with

parts of a day considered as a point (I saw himat noon, at 5 o'clock) a month, with a year, part of a day and season. (I saw him in July, in 1998, in the "

..

I

in - with

morning, in autumn)

Examples:

Paula visited Canada in 1980.

Paula visited Canada

in May.

I

.. .

..

Paula visited Canada on May 18. Paula visited Canada on Wednesday. Paula visited Canada in the morning. Paul came on time. Paul came in time for class.

  • b) Extended time (duration) - since (starting point), by (not later than), from-to, for,

during, within, in

  • c) Sequence of time (events thatfollow one another) - before, after

II. Prepositions of Place - Position and Direction

1. Position

  • a) The point itself - in, inside, on, at

After the verb arrive, at refers to a place smaller-than acity ar town (He arrived at the

airport); in refers to a place larger than a city ar town. (Hearrived in Europe, Croatia).

For a city, in is more usual,

but at may also be used, especially in reference to travelling

(The plane arrived in (or at) Zagreb ari hour late.

Examples:

She lives in Denver ( a city)

She

lives in Colorado ( a state)

She lives on Green Avenue (street withouta number) She lives at 265 Green Avenue (street with a number)

She lives in Room 260 or Apartment 210. He is in college. He is at the university. The house is on the beach.

c:t.t

(II\ .....

-

OI.-\ ....

F(OI.CL

plO\. ee,

FlO<. ce

..

ct-1

c2.-1

OL. fOL''-'\."t-

O\.A.-L-

o-. r-eCL--

0-1

c:t

....

.su~fD<c~

The house is on the ocean.

The house

is at

the shore.

The house is in the mountains.

 

The house

is on the river, bay, lake.

The

house

is in the

.

The house is on the plains.

  • b) Higher or lower than a point - over,

above, under, underneath, beneath, below

  • e) Neighbouring the point - near, next to, alongside, beside, between, opposite(~,,:)

The house is on th e oc e a n. The hou s e is at

2. Direction

to-from

toward(s)- ~\.Vo....~

{ r o M

ine to )-out of

up-down

around

through past ( \V - ; ,, - , > )
through
past ( \V - ; ,, - , > )

as far as (up to)

3. Other

relationships -because, fnrth esake of, in spite of, despite, in case of, along

with, as well as, like, as, according to, with, by (means of), from,

The house is on th e oc e a n. The hou s e is at

V,tv

except, etc.

Pr-ep0$.t't,·ons·

n O UVI S

+o

t ' Y\6

CoW\bt'V\e.-

( }J 11-k

f o l'W\

n.ew

U O ce\ /o

.. .....

J.C\

J-

v{"rbs.

t \ ' + ć' "'--'-s

O\.c{/'e c .-r

(

ve S

c'-) v

..

Jl'th

-

..

v e r loS

( P V\('C l

..

S

d

ve (' 10.5) - h - " \ . q fo(.e u t t c c U- L o vc L e ' t c

b ')

\.VI'tlA

..

co) W l 't k

..

V\ OvV l$

-

+o l oe t VI

+ e c trS

<A c {,'ec t- \'ve s

OF"\() t"'j- G'\.t ( e

...o..'1el~

fO r i

r ro k l vv ( t L e .

ARTICLES

Articles are determiners that modify a noun.

The general rule is that we ase

THE with singular and plural countable and

noncountable nouns, A(AN) is .seet with slagar

oountabk nouns

1.~a ni de

1. Back pointing - ex: Jack ~

a TV <mda radio~ but D€resased tM radio.

2.

Forward pointing - Jack returned the. radio he bought yesterday.

 

3.

Unique use of the d.a. - the stars, the Earth, the words, the North Pole

4.

Institutional use of the d.a. - the radio, the TV, the train

 

5.

Generic use of the d-a. ** - general or typical; for a whole class of objects - ex: 'The

tiger is

a beautiful animal

6.

Superlatives - the most beautiful, the nicest

7.

With ordinals - the fifth row, the

ninth day, Henry (the) VIII

8.

With

adjectives in a time or space sequence - the next, the following. BUT when these

adjectives refer to one week

point in time - no article is used - ex: He will give his lecture next .

9.

With adiectives that rank nouns - the chief, the main, the only

 
  • 10. With gerunds or abstract nouns followed by OF PHRASES - The teaching of children

is difficult.

  • 11. with adjectives used as nouns - the rich, the poor

  • 12. in ofphrases after words expressing quantity - most of the children, all of the meu,

the maj~rity of the voters

The definite

article with Place Names

  • 1. Geographic names

  • a) composed of common nouns - the United Kingdom, the Soviet Unio~

  • b) containing OF PHRASE - the Republic of Croatia

  • c) plural names' ~" the Americas, the NetherHn'rdS;'the Alps,

  • d) all bodies of water except lakes and bays - the Sava, the

Channel

the Great Lak:es

_

Atlantic Ocean, the English

  • e) deserts, forests, peninsulas - the Sahara desert, the Black Forest, the Iberian Peninsula

  • f) points on the globe - the Equator, the South pole

The definite article is NOT used with countries, continents and cities

2. Other names

  • a) universities and colleges with-an OF PHRASE - the University ofPrinceton BUT

Princeton University

  • b) buildings - the Empire State Building

  • c) hotels - the Sheraton hotel BUT Hotel Sheraton

  • d) libraries, museums - the Louvre

  • e) bridges, tunnels, towers - the Golden Gate

The definite article is NOT used with names of streets, parks and boulevards

Other uses of the dermite artide 1 . physical posit i on - the top" tI

Other uses of the dermite artide

1. physical position - the top" tII.e ~

  • 2. historical periods of evems - iIrte :R~,

  • 3. names ofbills - tIM ~

CaBIia

iM Fws.t W/W, lBIUl' ViIW tilite ~

4 . official titles - die Ma y «, 1III.e F~

M1Ws:ter

  • 5. law enforceH'lellbt~

- iIt!e aJ:iIililo/, iIle ~ee

  • 6.
    7. politieal parties - * CoesefViaJtii.ves

institutions, orgam.i7:anioĐs - dI.e UN" tiIle UJWi.o.m.

  • 8. with names of parts of the OOdY - tIte shoulder

  • 9. names ofinstruments after the verb play - play the guitar

10. names ofnewspapers - the New York Times

2. Indefinite Article

  • 1. i.a meaning the numeral one - I waited an hour

  • 2. in a

i.a. meaning a specjmen

c1ass - He ate an apple

  • 3. representing a c1ass -

i.a. meaning a specimen

John is a student

  • 4. such, what - Such

after

a beautiful face. What a nice hat!

  • 5. adverbs or adjectives - not a, many a, quite a, rather a

after certain

  • 6. before noun quantifiers - a few, alittle

  • 7. with proper names meaning - a certain - A Mr. Smith called you.

  • 8. After so or too + adjective + noun - He is too sensible a man to say a thing like that.

3. No article

  • 1. In general statements - Milk is good for you

  • 2. with many place names

  • 3. with names of holidays, BUT The 4. July

  • 4. with names of magazines - Life, Vogue,

  • 5. with most physical disorders - He has pneumonia and heart trouble, BUT He has a

headache, or He has the flue

**Generic versus specific use of the articles

  • a) with concrete uncountable nouns

Butter is not healthy. vs Pass the butter, please.

  • b) with abstract nouns

I love music and dancing. vs. -The dancing was poor, but she enjoyed the music.

  • c) with plural nouns - Computers are very useful. vs. The computer in my room is a IBM.

The

tiger is abeautiful animal

- whole c1ass - generic

The tiger-lsaw yesterday was seen today. - specific A tigeris'abeautiful animal- any tiger - generic Tigers are .beautiful animals - all tigers - generic

Other uses of the dermite artide 1 . physical posit i on - the top" tI
Other uses of the dermite artide 1 . physical posit i on - the top" tI

f

.

,

. ; , .' ? This is the question we need to answer. While it's true
. ; , .'
? This is the question we need to answer.
While it's true to sav that
• I really do think ...
We should acknowledge
from the start that ...
The question we need to answer is ...
Same people believe/claim
that .,.
that
However. others maintain/think
Even though some
that ...
There's some truth
people maintain that
• I nevertheless
believe
in the view that
Nevertheless,
it doesn't alter
' i~ai t 5 li; l'd.m•• t si; 'g t
my view that ...
lt's hard to deny that ...
. cC::: I' " . , I MuH••...
-
To that extent, it's true that ...
. •;;"->
GIVING ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
'c"';i.~~Over the past few decades •...
;;'!)~:ifWe have now reached a point where
_
'\";"1; Newspapers are full of stories
about
.
~l!~}In tsome
~
countries
...•
white in others
.
What is more. , ..
Moreover •...
Furthermore • ...
Simitarly • ...
We should also remember that ...
It is also worth bearing in mind that ...
Hrstly, it's important to state that ...
First, I'd like to present
It seems dear that ...
·It is dear that ...
On the one hand •...
some/the arguments in favour of ...
To sum up, I would sav that ...
In condusion • ...
On balance, ...
While it's true that
I firm ly believe that ...
However. on balance, I believe that ...
It is sometimes
argued
that .
Even though
I would still maintain that ...
One argument in favour of
is ...
It can be argued that
However. the truth of the matter is ...
In myviewfopinion
•...
Despite
I feel that .
I firmly believe that ...
However, ...
On the other hand • ...
Some people take the opposite view, and claim/maintain
that ...
Having said that • ...
And yet, ...
Another argument in favour of (a ban on smoking) is (that) ...
tSSAY (FOR AND AGAI N Sn • In the first paragraph, give the reader some idea

tSSAY (FOR AND AGAINSn

tSSAY (FOR AND AGAI N Sn • In the first paragraph, give the reader some idea

In the first paragraph, give the reader some idea about the current situation and saywhy ,

the

subject is important. Make sureyol1 give

the

outline of thestructure

of your essay to

help the readerfellow your argument.

lncludepoints

in favour otthe topic in the

• While the . ... • 1 wilHfdH:
While the
.
...
1 wilHfdH:

understood

to male thiscleart0fthe

second paragraph, even ifvou disagree with

with phrases

this. Show thatyou disagree like While.it is true to SGV ...

...are

,..

reasons{or

with poiritsfq f

reader . .. In the third paragraphvgive points aga'inst

the topic- rernemberto acknowledge.the opposite.viewand state your opinlđn. ... , _e__ , view before giving your
the topic- rernemberto acknowledge.the
opposite.viewand state your opinlđn.
...
,
_e__
, view before giving your own npiriion on the
- subiect.
.

-In the final paragraph, restate both points of ;".-'"

tSSAY (FOR AND AGAI N Sn • In the first paragraph, give the reader some idea
  • - ~ . -. r z: ---- '-'-- ~

" ' ; - -:" ' >
" ' ; - -:" ' >

. ,-:.-:-:::.::;-:

-etJe~t~~

.'

+('~~t!-h

O~Ac..

looo~S

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,
First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example, such as, in this way, in the case

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,
First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,

And, first (of all), at first, <aUhe beginning o!) in the beginning, then, next, before, after, after that, afterwards, when, while, s~on, immediately, once, suddenly, as so01 as, no sooner + than, hardly + when, finally, eventually,

i

i ;~1 t _ ~ &iJllV~l{l_~tiJ t r ~ ~ _~~ E

at the end of.., lli the end, at last ""a ~I::: lU O!c.c' " r;:,d <;,<cO.~"('
at the end
of..,
lli the end, at last
""a
~I:::
lU O!c.c' " r;:,d
<;,<cO.~"(' I /<>.le;
_~1lt T _Il.~ l~J~~. ~ .n
You
can't come unless you have a ticket.
You can borrowthebike
on
condition that you return it by five o'clock.
In case of fire, dial 999.
You can stay as long as you don't mind sleeping on the sofa.

Providing /provided (that) you don't mind cats, you Can stay with us. Supposing!What ifhe doesn't tum up? . However you do itl no matter how you do it, it will cost alat of money. You'll get to the railway station, whichever bus you take. Whoever wins the election, nothing will really change. That box is so big that it will be in the way wherever you leave it.

Certain conditions

must be met before the Peace Talks begin.

A good standard of English is a prereguisite

for studyingat.a British University.

What are the entry reguirements for doing a diploma at your college?

I would not move to London under any circumstances. ~~~~~~ ~ ~ar~f : ~&~ _ '
I would not move to London under any circumstances.
~~~~~~ ~ ~ar~f : ~&~ _ '
. . .
.
,
.
.
"
. .
.
' ~ ~~
~~~ ~~ _ J 1 \ , p . a t 1 J~ \b. D~~
_v·"
~~~
<.
~
Owing to the icy conditions,
the two lorries collided .

. Theco1lision was due to the icy.conditions.

The collision was

caused by ice on the road.

The causeof-the collision was iceon the road. The President's statement gave rise to/provoked/generated a lot of criticism. The.new lawhaSbrought aboutlled to great changes in education. This problemst~rtis'from the inflation. The courtcase arciuseout of allegations made in a newspaper.

.

",dJ?Gl'

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,

Her reason for not going with us was that she had no money. The reason she didn't go with

  • I wonder what his motiYes were in sending that letter?

I wonder what prompted him to send that letter?

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,

-> n"'d''''''o 1~~Jo

us was that ...

She wrote to the press with the aim of exposing the scandal. I've invited you here with a view toresolving our differences.

,;.
,;.

He refused to answer on the grounds that his lawyer wasn't here. The purpose ofher visit was to inspect the equipment.

He did not work. As a resu Itl as a conseguence/ conseguently, he failed his exams.
He did not work. As a resu Itl as a conseguence/ conseguently, he failed his exams.
The resultlconseguence of all these changes is that no/one is happy.
His remarks resulted in everyone getting angry.
The events had an outcome that no-one could have predicted.
1.f},!r!(w~liWf.~~OO;1I~tjfi~~~~t:"~j;2i;~f·.•;.··;.;-!~~~)~~~~~
~ ~' j; I~@E:~ c~;'j~~r t@jI f.~(1t(I~:g ':~I'~~1,~ ,." :" r ~; jt~~~\~
.
.
\ 0 .r+: I d 'tj 0
Although they were poor, they were independent.

He is a bit stupid. He's very kind, nevertheless.

i~J ; ; j '~ i· \f :(i·'

  • I acknowledge/accept that he has worked, but it is not enough.

  • I admitI was wrong,JruListill think we were right to doubt her.

  • I concede that you are right about the goal, but not the method.

OK, you are sorry. That's all well

and good, but how are you going to pay us back?

You should/t seem so surprised. After all, I did wam you. It's all very well saying you love dogs, but who'll take it for walk ifwe do get one? He is boring and he is rather cold, but, for all that, he is your uncle.

Admittedly, she put a lot of

effort in, but it was all wasted.

First of all, firially, the first point, last but not least, for one thing, for example,
But, however , although, despite , in spite of , on the one hand, whereas, I
But, however , although, despite , in spite of , on the one hand, whereas, I
But, however , although, despite , in spite of , on the one hand, whereas, I

But, however, although, despite, in spite of, on the one hand, whereas,

I expected Mr Widebody to be fat. The reverse was true.

i

I

t

,

We're not almost there at all. Quite the opposite: We've got five miles to go yet.

Everywhere in Europe they use metric meas ures. In contrast, Britain stil! uses non-metric.

It's not actually raining now. On the other hand, it may rain later. (= THAT IS TRUE AND THIS IS TRUE)

John quiet? On the contrary, he is the noisiest person. (=THAT IS NOT TRUE, BUT THIS IS TRUE)

There is a huge discrepancy/divide/ gap/difference

between his ideals and his actions.

But, however , although, despite , in spite of , on the one hand, whereas, I

Also, not only, but also ...

SENTENCE 1

Linking phrase

SENTENCE2

For this job you need a degree.

In addition,

You need some experience.

Video cameras are becoming easier to use.

Furthermore

They are becoming cheaper.

Moreover, š1vu i t<:.

Moreover, š1 v u i t< : . What's more besides < s , Egually +c.bJcl

What's more

besides <s, 1 \.' ~

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It' Il take ages to get there and it'1I cost a lot.

We'll have to change trains.

Children should respect their parents.

They should respect their teachers.

likewise

We'll have all the stress of going to court and

On top of (all) that

We'll have to pay the lawyer's

giving evidence.

bilis.

Further to my letter of

, I am writing to, ..

In addition to his BA in History,

he has a Ph.D.in Sociology.

He's on the school board, as well as beingthe bank manager.

Besides lapart from having a salary, he aiso flas a private iucome.

Alongside her many other hobbies, she restores old cars.

Mary was there, along with a few other people who I didn't know ... ~ M
Mary was there, along with a few other people who I didn't know ...
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All in all, overall, generally, in conclusion, on thewhole, in the main, to sum up ....
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