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RAGAN GETS POLE

David Ragan, in the midst


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first career Sprint Cup
Series victory earlier this
month at Daytona, a
track long considered to
be the crown jewel of
NASCAR. Sports, 1C
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WASHINGTON After
weeks of intense partisanship,
Republican congressional lead-
ers and the White House made a
last-minute stab at compromise
Saturday to avoid a government
default threatened for early next
week.
But there was no undisputed
evidence of progress by days
end, only expressions of anxiety
among lawmakers that a poten-
tially crippling blow to the na-
tions economy was drawing un-
comfortably close. The deadline
for raising the nations debt limit
and averting an unprecedented
U.S. default was just three days
away.
We are nowfully engaged, the
speaker and I, with the one per-
son in America out of 307 million
people who can sign a bill into
law, Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell said at a joint
news conference with House
Speaker John Boehner.
Im confident and optimistic
that were going to get an agree-
ment in the very near future and
resolve this crisis in the best in-
terests of the American people.
But McConnells upbeat as-
sessment triggered an unusually
pointed rebuttal fromSenate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid.
Thats not true, said the Ne-
vada Democrat after returning
from a meeting at the White
DEF I CI T SHOWDOWN Lawmakers express anxiety about nearing deadline for raising nations debt limit
Late stab on debt limit fails
AP PHOTO
President Barack
Obama meets
with Senate
Majority Leader
Harry Reid of
Nev., right, and
House Speaker
John Boehner of
Ohio, left, in the
Cabinet Roomof
the White House,
Saturday, in
Washington, to
discuss the debt.
By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent
See DEAL, Page 14A
INSIDE: Richard L. Connor column,
Page 1E
Analysis: Talks show ugly side of
Washington, Page 14A
WILKES-BARRE The line of
more than100 people waiting for
lunch Friday at the St. Vincent de
Paul Kitchen on Jackson Street
was wrapped around the interior
of the building.
Isnt this incredible? asked
Anne Marie McCawley, the long-
time director of the kitchen. And
yet they are talking about more
cuts.
Its beenamonthsincetheclos-
ingof REACHInc., thedowntown
drop-in center for the homeless,
and combined with a still lagging
economy, the fallout from a sput-
teringeconomyinLuzerneCoun-
ty has worsened.
The line at the kitchen of peo-
ple waiting for a meal has grown
dramatically in the past month,
McCawley said. The kitchen,
open seven days per week for
lunch, hadbeenservingabout350
people daily starting at 11a.m.
On Thursday, 460 people
many new faces, McCawley
said were givenmeals.
Need for help in area keeps increasing
Many new persons are seeking
free meals and other help,
due to lagging economy.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See NEED, Page 8A
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
John R. Cool stands in line Friday at St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen.
The Edwardsville man says rent forced himto seek free meals.
The St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen,
39 E. Jackson St., Wilkes-Barre,
needs donations of canned food,
non-perishable items and money.
To donate, call 570-829-7796, ext.
304; or email amccaw-
ley@csswb.org.
T O D O N AT E
A
t the nonprofit Lands at
Hillside Farms in King-
ston Township, Suzanne
Kapral-Kelly enjoys teaching ar-
ea residents about sustainable
gardeningandfarmingpractices.
But her contentment is con-
founded daily when she gets
back to her home in Kingston,
wheresheisforbiddenbymunic-
ipal ordinance from practicing
what shepreaches.
Kapral-Kelly is a member of a
growing community interested
in urban chicken farming, the
keeping of hens in backyard en-
closures for eggs.
She and others she knows liv-
ing in Kingston, Wilkes-Barre
andSwoyersvillewouldlikeraise
chickens but are prohibitedfrom
keeping the birds by municipal
zoningordinances.
Were not talkingabout facto-
ry farms here; were not talking
about 500 or 600 chickens, Ka-
pral-Kelly said. Were interested
inhavingahandful of chickensso
that wecangoout eachmorning
and collect eggs and be respon-
sible for part of our food
BACKYARD CHICKENS
For many,
its no yoke
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Amy Yerke of Shavertown holds a Silkie chicken she is raising in a backyard coop. Above and below, some other varieties.
Some cry
foul over
municipal
controls
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
Heres what you need to get started raising chickens at home:
Chick brooder: A cardboard box or small cage for keeping chicks in their first 60
days of life, lined with wood shavings or newspaper.
Light bulb with reflector: For keeping chicks warm. Chicks should be kept at 90
to 100 degrees until their feathers grow in.
Water dispenser and feeder: Special food is available for chicks and adult chick-
ens. Adult chickens will also eat vegetables, bread, insects and a treat called chicken
scratch.
Chicken Coop and wire enclosure: The rule of thumb is 2 to 3 square feet per
chicken inside the henhouse and 4 to 5 square feet per chicken in an outside run.
Source: www.backyardchickens.com
GETTI NG STARTED
See CHICKENS, Page 11A
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


Boker, John
Bruch, Alvan
Burke, Richard
Davenport, Henry
Gavin, Dolores
Halter, Mary
Hill, Richard
Lukasavage, John
Norton, Daniel
Obester, Joseph
Schwerdtman,
Marion
Shimkoski, Olga
Usefara, Camille
OBITUARIES
Page 10A
BUILDING
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Issue No. 2011-212
FOSTER TWP. State police are investi-
gating the reported theft of a motorcycle
from a garage at 518 Green St.
A 2004 Honda CRF 230 dirt bike was
taken between July 18 and July 24 from the
garage owned by John Francis Braddock,
50. Anyone with information about the
theft is asked to contact state police in
Hazleton at 570-459-3890.
WILKES-BARRE - City police reported
the following:
Lindsey Siegrist, 25, of West River
Street, was charged with driving under the
influence after a three-vehicle crash Thurs-
day afternoon at the intersection of Kidder
and Scott streets.
Police said that when they arrived on the
scene they saw that Siegrist was intoxicat-
ed and administered a portable alcohol
breath test that produced a positive result.
She was placed under arrest and taken to
police headquarters where a legal breath
test was administered that also produced a
positive result, police said. She was re-
leased to a responsible sober adult for her
safety.
David Kutzer of Wilkes-Barre Township
said a person he did not know who struck
him in the face at the corner of South Main
and Hanover streets at 12:57 p.m. Saturday.
St. Marys Church, 134 S. Washington
St., reported to police that someone en-
tered the church auditorium and removed
flea market items Saturday.
Police cited Robert Monaco, 48, of
Mountain Top, on public drunkenness
charges on Public Square at 9:55 a.m. Sat-
urday.
Patricia Jones of East Northampton
Street said Saturday someone withdrew a
large sum of money from her bank account
without her permission.
Police said H. Merritt Hughes of North
Main Street said someone smashed his
vehicles window at 351 S. Main St. Sat-
urday.
Police cited Muara Kathio, 23, of Yates-
ville, on public drunkenness charges at 323
N. Main St at 6:34 a.m. Saturday.
Police arrested Charles Scherer, 43, of
South Meade Street, on evidence of driving
under the influence at the intersection of
Old River Road and Carey Avenue at 5:22
a.m. Saturday.
Brian Yekel of Andover Street said
someone broke a mirror on his vehicle at
183 Andover St. Friday.
Police arrested Sirmar Johnson, 34, of
Brooklyn, N.Y., on a warrant from the U.S.
Marshals Service at 105 Woodside Drive at
9:13 a.m. Friday.
Police arrested David Alberola, 23, of
Glen Lyon, on public drunkenness charges
at 12:13 a.m. Saturday at the Hardware Bar,
12 S. Main St. He was held in police custo-
dy until sober and released, police said.
Lillian Wittmer of Garrahan Street,
Hanover Township reported Friday that a
purse and shirt were stolen from her car
while it was parked in Kirby Park.
John Monseur of Parrish Street Sat-
urday afternoon reported copper pipe was
taken in a burglary at a residence at 37
Hutson St.
Aimee Haas of 202 Bowman St. on
Saturday afternoon reported a purse was
stolen from her vehicle.
Stephon Kinchen, 22, no known ad-
dress, was charged Saturday morning with
disorderly conduct and making terroristic
threats after Nashanda Kinchen of South
Pennsylvania Avenue reported he was in-
volved in a fight with her and members of
her family at 90 Beaumont St. and allegedly
threatened to kill them.
Matthew Mullery, 52, of Boland Ave-
nue, Hanover Township, was charged with
violating a protection from abuse order
Friday night after he sent an email to Laura
Mullery of Regent Street in violation of the
orders no-contact condition.
HANOVER TWP. Township police
reported the following:
Police arrested David Dravage of Ever-
hart Street on charges he violated a protec-
tion from abuse order Friday. Dravage was
arraigned before District Magistrate Joseph
Carmody, West Pittston, and released on
$5,000 unsecured bail, police said.
John McElwee reported to police that
his vehicle was damaged by a gas canister
that blew from a pickup truck traveling in
front of his vehicle on State Route 29 Fri-
day.
Police said they are investigating an
altercation Friday between two males, one
of whom brandished a handgun, at the
intersection of East Germania Street and
Ridge Street.
Logan Cherkauskas of Ross Street and
Ashley and Joshua Bennet of Loomis Park
reported to police that four men assaulted
them outside the Community Room at the
Marion Terrace Apartment Complex Friday.
Cherkauskas and Joshua Bennet both suf-
fered facial injuries, police said.
HAZLE TWP. Police arrested Donald
Bernard Brozoski, 49, of Drums, on evi-
dence of driving under the influence on
state Route 309 near Airport Road at 12:48
p.m. Saturday.
SUGARLOAF TWP. Police cited Mar-
ianne T. Cooper, 57, of Sugarloaf, on harass-
ment charges after she allegedly slammed a
door on the head of Clayton Kirschner, 29,
of Sugarloaf. Kirschner suffered an injury to
the left side of his head, police said.
POLICE BLOTTER
ALLENTOWNIt has been12 years
since Pennsylvania executed a convicted
killer, but inthat time, deathrowhas still
cost taxpayers more than $27 million.
Every year, the state Department of
Corrections spends an estimated
$10,000 more for each inmate on the
countrys fourth largest death row com-
paredtoother prisoners. Thats despite a
de facto halt on capital punishment in
Pennsylvania for all but prisoners who
voluntarily go to their executions.
Thelast personput todeathagainst his
will was in1962, half a century ago.
The most recent to be executed, in
1999, was Philadelphiatorture-murderer
Gary Heidnik and only because he
bowedto it by waiving his appeals. Since
then, thestatehashousedonaverage227
inmates a year facing death sentences,
for an additional cost of $27.24 million,
or $2.27 million annually. And this when
executions have ceased.
The numbers, providedafter a request
by The Morning Call, offer a peek into
the expense of a systemin which a death
row prisoner is far more likely to die of
oldage or illness thanby lethal injection.
They represent the added security costs
involved with isolating the inmates in
prison. But they are just a fractionof cap-
ital punishmentstotal cost fortaxpayers,
given the staggering legal bills also tied
to putting someone to death.
The accounting comes as unsteady fi-
nances have rocked Pennsylvania and lo-
cal governments, causing layoffs and
cuts to services that have affected every-
thing from safety-net programs for the
poor to public schools and higher educa-
tion. The Department of Corrections
budget, at $1.86 billion, re-
mained flat this year.
The death penalty hasnt
been part of the budget de-
bate, though some lawmak-
ers sayit shouldbelookedat
considering the lack of exe-
cutions. Other states have
reconsidered capital puni-
shment in part over its ex-
pense, including New Jer-
sey, New Mexico and Illi-
nois, which have repealed
the deathpenalty inthe past
four years.
For death-penalty oppo-
nents, the price tag under-
scores how much society
spends in the unreasonable expectation
of exactingtheultimatepunishment. For
supporters, it shows how a runaway ap-
peal process has kept murderers from
their deservedfates, thwartingthewill of
juries and state lawmakers.
Theres either going to be a retreat on
thedeathpenalty, oraneffort toput more
of these people to death, depending on
the political will, said Northampton
County District Attorney John Morga-
nelli, aDemocrat whois avocal backer of
capital punishment. Somethings got to
give.
Morganelli blames delays in imposing
death sentences on the federal appeals
process, whichhe calls a frustratingsys-
tem. There, cases affirmed by the state
courts get scrutinized and often re-
versed. He says it may take turnover on
the federal bench for executions to start
again.
Inmates on death row should have
been gone a long time ago, and it
wouldnt becostingthestateall thismon-
ey, Morganelli said.
Marc Bookman, a former public de-
fender who runs the nonprofit Atlantic
Center for Capital RepresentationinPhi-
ladelphia, which advises capital defense
teams, dubs Pennsylvanias death penal-
ty the biggest waste of money imagina-
ble, draining away funds that could be
better spent on more police officers, im-
proving education or building play-
grounds and keeping libraries open. He
thinksthestateshouldeliminatethecost
completely by repealing the deathpenal-
ty.
We cannot continue to
spend this absurd amount of
money and waste these in-
credible resources just so
that some politician can be
tough on crime, Bookman
said. The death penalty
cant be justified.
Pennsylvanias modern
capital punishment statute
dates to 1978, after earlier
laws were struck downas un-
constitutional in the 1970s.
Under it, the death penalty
can be imposed by a jury in
cases of first-degree murder
with at least one aggravating
circumstance, such as multi-
ple victims, or the killing of a child or a
police officer. The alternative is life in
prison without parole.
About 215 state inmates face death
sentences today.
Death row inmates are held in three
prisons: Greene and Graterford for men,
andMuncyfor women. Theyareisolated
in separate cells, in the most restrictive
conditions the prison system has. For
two hours a day they are let out for exer-
cise but alone in a cage.
The heightened security, to protect
guards and other inmates, is labor inten-
sive and pushes up costs, said state cor-
rections spokeswoman Susan
McNaughton. The inmates require addi-
tional staff whenever they are escorted
out of their cells, or when they are trans-
ported outside of prison for court. The
conditions follow the industry standard
for death rows in the United States, she
added.
The Department of Corrections says it
costs $33,000 a year for the average pris-
oner; with death row, the number reac-
hes $43,000.
The inmates get televisions, radios
and reading materials. They can have
one non-contact visitor for one hour a
week, and one 15-minute phone call. Be-
yond dealings with staff, human interac-
tion is sparse: They communicate with
other inmates by yelling from their cells
or fishing bytyinganotetotheendof a
string and flinging it to neighboring
cells.
By comparison, an inmate serving a
life sentence is housed in the prisons
general population, where restrictions
are raised or lowered based on his or her
behavior. There, prisoners usuallyhavea
cellmateandcanbebunkedwithasmany
as sevenothers indorm-style units. They
spend most of their time outside their
cells, and are required to work, attend
classes or volunteer, McNaughton said.
Death row just requires the strictest
of housing available, McNaughtonsaid.
It goes backtothefact theyarethemost
maximumsecurity level we have.
Given the breadth of the appeal proc-
ess, the average death row prisoner has
beenthere141/2years. Thelongest serv-
ing is Mumia Abu-Jamal, under a capital
sentence for nearly 28 years for the 1981
murder of a Philadelphia policeman. His
legal saga continues, witha federal court
in April ordering a newsentencing hear-
ing after finding the instructions given
his original jury were unclear.
The length and contentiousness of ap-
peals has critics who include the chief
justice of the state Supreme Court, Ro-
nald Castille. In a blistering opinion in
April, Castille assailedtactics by defense
attorneys that he saidaimedtoobstruct
capital punishment inPennsylvaniaat all
costs.
Defense attorneys for capital cases
notethat manyinmatesslatedtodiehave
seen their sentences overturned at ap-
peal. That includessixmeninPennsylva-
nia who were eventually exonerated, ac-
cording to the Death Penalty Informa-
tion Center, a nonprofit national clearin-
ghouse.
Since 1983, another 115 death row in-
mates have been resentenced to life in
prison without parole after appeals. And
12 more wound up with even lesser sen-
tences, statistics kept by the state De-
partment of Corrections show.
In that time, 29 inmates on death row
died 23 from natural causes, three
from suicide, and three by execution af-
ter they voluntarily abandoned legal
challenges to their sentences.
Some Pennsylvania legislators are
questioningwhether thedeathpenaltyis
working as intended. And before he left
office in January this year, Gov. Ed Ren-
dell, a death penalty supporter and a for-
mer Philadelphia district attorney, said
that if executions cannot be streamlined,
the state should consider whether capi-
tal punishment should be repealed.
Rarely used Pa. death penalty costly
Death row has cost taxpayers more
than $27 million since 1999, the last
time an execution was carried out.
By RILEY YATES
The (Allentown) Morning Call
CLARK VAN ORDEN FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
George Banks as he
appeared in April
2010. The Wilkes-
Barre man is jailed
at the states Grat-
erford Correctional
Institution, facing
execution for the
Sept. 25, 1982,
shooting rampage
that killed 13 people
in Wilkes-Barre and
Jenkins Township.
The state Office of
Attorney General
asked the state
Supreme Court in
April 2010 to over-
turn a Luzerne
County judges rul-
ing that declared
mass murderer Ge-
orge Banks incompe-
tent to be executed.
Two area men are currently on death row.
George Banks, 68, who was convicted of
gunning down 13 people in Wilkes-Barre
and Jenkins Township in 1982. His compe-
tency to face execution is still being ar-
gued.
Michael Bardo, 42, was convicted in Janu-
ary 1993 for molesting and killing his
niece. He recently filed a petition to be
put to death.
B A N K S , B A R D O O N L I S T
Theres either
going to be a
retreat on the
death penalty,
or an effort to
put more of
these people to
death .
John Morganelli
Northampton County
DA
CLOTHING SHOP OPENS IN MIDTOWN VILLAGE
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A
ddiction Cloth-
ing co-owners
Adam Nulton and
Shirlee Miller tidy
up some clothing
on display during
the grand opening
of their new shop
in Midtown Village
in downtown
Wilkes-Barre on
Saturday after-
noon. The band
POP ROX perform-
ed live. The store
carries distinctive
styles from a varie-
ty of designers,
such as Ed Hardy,
Throwdown, Ex-
treme Couture,
Sullen, English
Laundry and Niki
Biki.
Lottery summary
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 0-8-7
Monday: 9-1-9
Tuesday: 6-6-5
Wednesday: 2-3-7
Thursday: 2-4-9
Friday: 3-9-3
Saturday: 7-0-5
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 6-2-1-1
Monday: 2-9-7-1
Tuesday: 9-6-5-4
Wednesday: 4-5-6-7
Thursday: 5-8-3-8
Friday: 4-4-5-9
Saturday: 2-7-0-3
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 3-1-4-2-0
Monday: 8-6-2-3-3
Tuesday: 0-7-5-1-1
Wednesday: 7-9-1-7-8
Thursday: 9-8-7-7-1
Friday: 5-2-5-6-7
Saturday: 8-5-8-5-1
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-04-14-24-27
Monday: 04-11-13-23-27
Tuesday: 01-03-07-14-30
Wednesday: 03-06-07-25-30
Thursday: 12-13-15-17-18
Friday: 01-07-11-23-30
Saturday: 04-07-18-19-27
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-7-9
Monday: 9-2-8
Tuesday: 1-8-1
Wednesday: 4-4-9
Thursday: 8-7-5
Friday: 9-4-3
Saturday: 5-4-9 (double draw,
5-9-4)
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 0-0-2-2
Monday: 4-6-0-6
Tuesday: 6-5-0-6
Wednesday: 8-3-5-8
Thursday: 6-6-7-8
Friday: 1-7-9-7
Saturday: 8-9-4-9
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-8-7-6-4
Monday: 9-4-5-8-4
Tuesday: 2-2-9-6-5
Wednesday: 4-3-0-1-3
Thursday: 2-0-9-9-8
Friday: 7-1-7-6-5
Saturday: 8-7-8-3-2
Cash 5
Sunday: 10-12-21-29-34
Monday: 02-10-18-19-34
Tuesday: 05-14-21-27-34
Wednesday: 01-04-07-23-29
Thursday: 04-08-12-21-23
Friday: 05-15-17-24-42
Saturday: 25-29-32-39-41
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 01-10-25-26-41-49
Thursday: 05-09-15-30-31-42
Powerball
Wednesday: 38-40-41-51-59
powerball: 33
powerplay: 02
Saturday: 20-40-41-47-55
powerball: 19
powerplay: 02
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 20-25-35-52-55
Megaball: 10
Megaplier: 03
Friday: 08-10-22-47-48
Megaball: 35
Megaplier: 04
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
NANTICOKE
Mullery lists outreach visits
State Rep. Gerald Mullery, D-New-
port Township, said his staff will hold
constituent outreach visits throughout
August.
"My staff can help with the Property
Tax/Rent Rebate Program, PACE/
PACENET, veterans issues, student
financial aid and any other state-related
matter, said Mullery.
On Thursday, Mul-
lerys staff will be at
the Wright Township
Municipal Building,
321 S. Mountain Blvd.,
from10 a.m. to noon
and at the Fairview
Township Municipal
Building, 65 Shady
Tree Drive, from12:30
p.m. until 3 p.m. All other visits will
take place from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
will be held as follows:
Aug. 11 at the Plymouth Borough
Building, 162 W. Shawnee Ave., Ply-
mouth.
Aug. 18 at the Edwardsville Bor-
ough Building, 470 Main St., Edwards-
ville.
Aug. 25 at the Hanover Township
Municipal Building, 1267 Sans Souci
Parkway, Hanover Township.
PLYMOUTH
Deadline near for farmers
Monday is the deadline to nominate
farmer and rancher candidates to serve
on local county committees of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture Farm Ser-
vice Agency.
County committees are made up of
three to five members elected by local
producers. The committee members
serve a three-year term and are respon-
sible for making decisions on FSA
disaster, conservation, commodity and
price support programs in addition to
other federal farm program issues.
Newly elected committee members
and alternates will take office on Jan. 2.
Nominees must sign form FSA-669A.
The form and information about the
county committee elections are avail-
able online at www.fsa.usda.gov/elec-
tions.
Forms must be postmarked or re-
ceived in the local USDA Service Cen-
ter by the close of business on Monday.
For more information, contact the
Luzerne County FSA office at 570
779-0732 or visit www.fsa.usda.gov.
MOUNTAIN TOP
Legal services for seniors
North Penn Legal Services is accept-
ing applications from seniors 60 and
older who reside in Luzerne County
who would like to have power of at-
torney documents, living wills, and
simple wills prepared.
An outreach is scheduled for Sept. 26
at 10 a.m. at the Senior Center in
Mountain Top, located at 460 South
Main Road.
Interested parties must call NPLS at
1-877-953-4250 by Sept. 14 and com-
plete a short application by phone.
Callers should indicate they wish to
attend the outreach scheduled for Sept.
26 when they complete their intake.
DUNMORE
Bank fighting child hunger
First National Community Bank and
the Commission on Economic Oppor-
tunity are working together on a pro-
gram to fight child hunger in North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
During August, the bank will be
collecting non-perishable food items
and monetary donations at its 21
branches in Lackawanna, Luzerne,
Monroe and Wayne counties for CEOs
Backpack Program.
The program provides emergency
food assistance for children during the
weekends or other times when school
is not in session. The food is placed in
backpacks for students to carry home
and removes the stigma a child might
experience by carrying home a bag of
groceries. The filled backpacks will be
provided through local schools, church-
es and after-school programs, reducing
the delay between parents receiving a
referral to a food pantry, getting to the
pantry and preparing the food at home.
Donations suitable for the program
include individual-size items of: grano-
la/cereal bars; dry milk powder; in-
stant breakfast/oatmeal; fat-free pud-
ding; unsweetened apple sauce; Jello
with fruit; peanut butter and jelly; 100
percent fruit juice boxes; dried fruit;
crackers; canned good; and macaroni
and cheese.
I N B R I E F
Mullery
Four Luzerne County post offices are
on a list of branches to be reviewed for
possible closure or consolidation that
was issued last week by the U.S. Postal
Service, but that doesnt mean their
fates are sealed.
Thats the point Postal Service offi-
cials are trying to make days after they
released a list of nearly 3,700 post offic-
es tobe studiedfor performance andpo-
tential closure.
The branches are mostly in rural ar-
eas but some are in larger cities includ-
ing Philadelphia, New York and Chica-
go. Locally, they include the Rock Glen
and Weston post offices, the only two
situated in Black Creek Township;
Beach Haven, Salem Township and the
one in Cambra, Huntington Township.
Post offices in every state but Dela-
ware are on the list, but Postal Service
officials repeatedly said that inclusion
on the list is not a guarantee that a post
office will close.
And past actions resulting following
the release of previous lists bear that
out.
Raymond Daiutolo Sr., a regional
Postal Service spokesman, noted that
the postal service announced in Janu-
ary it was reviewing 1,400 offices for
closing. So far 280 have been closed and
200 have finished the review process
and will remain open. Of the remainder,
620 are still in the review process and
300 will move to the new review list.
Daiutolo said the latest list was gen-
erated using some very sophisticated
criteria including sales, foot traffic, lo-
cation and proximity to other post offic-
es. The list was sent to district officials
who are now tasked with conducting a
more thorough study on each of the
branches.
POSTAL SERVI CE Four post office branches in Luzerne County on review list
Local offices fate not sealed yet
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See POSTAL, Page 6A
SCRANTON Roman Catholics have
regained the ability to purchase items
from The Guild store without making
a trip to Scranton, thanks to a new on-
line option offered by the 71-year-old
purveyor of religious items. The move
restores a convenience lost over the last
two decades as six branch stores
throughout the 11-county Diocese of
Scranton were shut down to save mon-
ey.
People have asked for this, store
General Manager Trish Morrow said.
Were basically hoping to make it eas-
ier for people to shop if they arent able
to come to Scranton.
The Guild was established in Scran-
ton by Bishop William Hafey in 1940. It
offers Catholic books, church goods and
religious articles for both clergy and lay-
persons. It expanded over the years,
moving to a larger Scranton Wyoming
Avenue location with 7,500 square feet
in 1958, and setting up smaller branch
stores in six locations.
The last of those branches closed a
decade ago, Morrow said.
Hazleton, Carbondale and William-
sport locations were closed around
1992, Morrowsaid, Wilkes-Barre, Tan-
nersville and Allentown were closed in
2001.
The new website, www.shoptheguil-
d.org, offers several thousand items,
Morrow said. A substantial amount, but
a far cry from about 65,000 in the Scran-
ton stores database. The plan is to keep
adding items to the online outlet.
The online option became possible
only in the last two years, after the
Guild got new computers that could
handle the work, Morrow said. Once
they were installed, the website had to
be built and offerings cataloged onto it.
The diocese formally announced the
new site in Thursdays edition of its
newspaper, The Catholic Light, but
Morrow said the site has been up and
running for several weeks.
Its too soon to judge the success,
Morrow noted, but she cited national
statistics that show the percentage of
shopping being done online is growing
by double digits.
Its off to a good start, she added.
Guild offers
items for
online sale
The move allows Roman Catholics to
purchase religious items as six
branch stores have closed.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
WYOMING Rosemary Wyatts Les-
tor upright piano is probably worth a
chunk of change.
Manufactured in 1924 by the Lestor
Piano Co. of Philadelphia, its antique
ivories still sound
great. She couldsell it
back to the manufac-
turer or to a restora-
tion company, but
then it would leave
the area, and she
would never know
what became of the
instrument her
daughters grew up
playing, andwhichfil-
ledher home onMon-
ument Street with
Christmas carols
each December.
After having the pi-
ano moved to her front porch during a
recent carpet installation, Wyatt decid-
ed to part with the instrument, but
rather than ship it off to an uncertain
future, she preferred to sell it face-to-
face to someone who might love it as
much as she did.
Sheput thepianoupfor salefor any
reasonable offer at the Wyoming
Community-wide Yard Sale on Satur-
day.
My girls have graduatedandmoved
on, Wyatt said, brushing a tear from
her eye. If someone can love it as
much as we did; if someone would play
it, Id be happy with that.
Eachsummer, communityyardsales
attract throngs of shoppers seeking
bargains like Wyatts piano, but they al-
so bring residents out to say hi and per-
haps tohave a peekat what their neigh-
bors have been ferreting away in their
attics.
Kudos to Wyoming. This is what lit-
tle towns are all about, Wyatts neigh-
bor Nikki Sitkowski said, holding two
armfuls of childrens toys. Youseepeo-
ple that you havent seen in years. Your
neighbors come out.
It gets people talkingtoeachother,
saidRena Hurrey, of Harding, whosaid
she came to the sale to visit her friend
Sharon Ballard, of Wyoming. It gets
people out of the air conditioning to
Wyoming Community-wide Yard Sale a first for the borough
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Potential buyers peruse merchandise on the corner of Monument Avenue and 8th Street at the Wyoming Communi-
ty-wide Yard Sale.
Deals by the yard
Nikki Sitkowski is happy with the toys she bought at the community-wide
yard sale in Wyoming.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
Kudos to
Wyoming.
This is
what little
towns are
all about.
Nikki Sitkowski
of Wyoming
about
community-wide
yard sale
See YARD, Page 6A
WILKES BARRE Pet owners
braved the heat and sun on Saturday
afternoon for some doggone fun for a
good cause. The event held in the
parking lot of Chackos Bowling Alley
included a low cost rabies clinic that
offered the vaccination for $10 per cat
or dog and a pet beauty contest.
All of the proceeds for the event
benefit the Feral Cat Neutering Pro-
gram, a Luzerne based nonprofit or-
ganization devoted to controlling the
staggering population of stray cats.
The organization works to trap the
strays humanely and take them to the
programs surgical facility where the
cats are tested for feline leukemia
and AIDS and then spayed or neu-
tered. The cats are also treated for
ear mites and fleas and are given ra-
bies vaccinations before being return-
ed to their original location in the
wild.
The bulk of the money raised is
dedicated to purchasing the AIDS
and leukemia testing, the most costly
part of the process.
"We are just trying to decrease the
Low cost rabies clinic is a purr-fect way to help control stray cat population
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Veterinarian
Dr. Doug
Ayers, left,
administers a
rabies shot to
Teddy, a Bi-
chon Shih Tzu
mix, as owner
Steve Suda of
Wilkes-Barre
provides sup-
port at a
rabies clinic
at Chackos
Family Bowl-
ing Center in
Wilkes-Barre
on Saturday
morning.
Vaccinations given to local pets
and some fun events benefit Feral
Cat Neutering Program.
By STEFFEN LIZZA
Times Leader Correspondent
See PET, Page 6A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HARRISBURG Before Ja-
nuary, Democrats often por-
trayed the Senate Republican
majority as extremists bent on
gutting programs crucial to
Pennsylvania or blocking com-
mon-sense proposals. This year,
with the GOP freshly in control
of the governors office and the
House of Representatives, the
same Senate majority and its
same leaders are broadly viewed
as the voice of moderation at a
time conservatives are increas-
ingly flexing their muscles.
It wouldnt surprise me to
hear them say, We didnt move
an inch. Were the pole that the
rest of them are rotating around
and were staying where we were
and staying the course and stick-
ing to principles our caucus be-
lieves in, said David Patti, the
president and CEO of the Penn-
sylvania Business Council, a
business advocacy group.
Its all about your perspective.
Conservative grumbling this
year about the Senate GOP is
well-known if relatively mut-
ed since the budget became law
a month ago and their leaders
are considered by some Demo-
crats and liberal groups to be the
most accessible, if not sympa-
thetic, in Republican-controlled
Harrisburg.
For anyone looking for differ-
ences between the Senate, the
House and the governor, theres
this: Many of the Senates 30
members were first elected well
before the tea party wave last
year helped usher Corbett and 21
House GOP freshmen into of-
fice. In fact, the newest Repub-
lican senators joined the cham-
ber in 2009.
Their districts are larger and
more diverse than those of
House members. And, institu-
tionally, theyve been in the ma-
jority for practically three dec-
ades, putting them at the nego-
tiating table for every
budget and major bill as
Republican and Demo-
cratic governors came
and went.
Rick Bloomingdale,
president of Pennsylva-
nias AFL-CIO, didnt
want to stick a label on
the Senate Republicans,
but he said that theyve
learned to listen to all
sides of a debate after so
many years in leader-
ship.
They arent at the
point where they put
ideology above the
facts, Bloomingdale
said. They understand
that, in order to govern, you
have to respect all opinions.
Theyve also had a few high-
profile splits with Corbett or
House leaders, if only in rheto-
ric. For instance, Senate Presi-
dent Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati,
R-Jefferson, a few days ago chal-
lenged the wisdomof privatizing
the state-controlled liquor store
system, a top priority of Corbett
and House Republican leader
Mike Turzai.
Senate Republicans, including
one of its foremost conserva-
tives, Blair Countys John Eichel-
berger, reject the suggestion that
they are any less conservative
than Corbett or the House.
The chambers Republican
leader, Sen. Dominic Pileggi of
Delaware County, said that con-
clusion flatly doesnt fit the re-
sults of legislative activity over
the last six months.
I think the facts actually ar-
gue in the opposite direction,
Pileggi said.
Several key Republican prior-
ities became law with the sup-
port of the Senate GOP. Those
included a budget that cut
spending and did not raise taxes,
as well as bills to expand a per-
sons right to use deadly force in
self-defense; expand the author-
ity of the Corbett administration
to make changes to programs for
the poor and disabled; and scale
back the liability of some civil
court defendants in negligence
cases, the top priority of busi-
ness advocates.
Still, Senate Republi-
cans pressed for more
money in a budget that
slashed about $1.1 bil-
lion frompublic schools
and universities and
passed without a single
Democrat in support.
And with Republicans
looking to toughen reg-
ulations governing
abortion clinics, the
Senate passed a bill
that was less stringent
than a bill that passed
the House, although
each bill won nearly
half of the Democrats
votes.
Kevin Harley, a spokesman for
Corbett, said Senate Republi-
cans have helped the governor
pursue his top priority: creating
an environment in which busi-
nesses and payrolls can grow.
The governor is interested in
results, Harley said. Hes not
interested in labels.
For now, it remains to be seen
whether more key Corbett prior-
ities such as privatizing li-
quor stores and creating a sys-
tem of taxpayer-paid vouchers to
send children to private schools
can get through the Senate or,
for that matter, the House.
One conservative, Lowman
Henry of the Harrisburg-based
Lincoln Institute of Public Opin-
ion Research, said he has more
confidence in Corbett and House
GOP leaders.
Sen. Daylin Leach, a Mont-
gomery County Democrat who
leads a political action commit-
tee devoted to electing more
Democrats to state Senate, said
many of his GOP colleagues pri-
vately are uncomfortable with
the conservative streak they see
in House leaders and Corbett.
Corbett was fortunate to be a
Republican running in a Repub-
lican year, good for him, but I
think you make a big mistake if
you think, Well, Im a Republi-
can and Ive been elected and
therefore people want me to en-
act the most extreme planks of
the Republican platform, Leach
said.
View of GOP senators is shifting
Many Senate members were
first elected before the tea
party wave last year.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
They un-
derstand
that, in
order to
govern,
you have
to respect
all opin-
ions.
Rick
Bloomingdale
President of
Pennsylvanias
AFL-CIO
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
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1
4
9
4
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OSLO, NORWAY
Suspect eyed other targets
T
he anti-Muslim extremist who
confessed to a bombing and youth
camp massacre that killed 77 people in
Norway has told investigators he also
considered attacking other targets
linked to the government or the prime
ministers Labor Party, police said
Saturday.
During a 10-hour questioning session
on Friday, Anders Behring Breivik
asked interrogators how many people
he had killed in the July 22 attacks, and
showed no emotion when they told
him, police attorney Paal-Fredrik Hjort
Kraby told reporters in Oslo.
The 32-year-old Norwegian has con-
fessed to setting off a car bomb that
killed eight people in downtown Oslo
and then gunning down scores of youth
from the left-leaning Labor Party at
their annual retreat on an island north-
west of the capital. Sixy-nine of them
died.
CAIRO, EGYPT
Venue change for trial
Hosni Mubaraks trial on charges he
ordered the killing of protesters during
Egypts uprising will be held at a police
academy on Cairos outskirts instead of
a convention center in the heart of the
capital, the head of Cairos appeals
court said Saturday.
The change appears to be linked to
concerns over security during the oust-
ed leaders trial, which is scheduled to
begin Wednesday and is sure to draw a
large audience. The 83-year-old ex-
president is to stand trial alongside his
security chief and six other senior
security officials facing the same charg-
es stemming from the crackdown that
killed hundreds but failed to stop the
18-day uprising that forced Mubarak
from power on Feb. 11.
BARLING, ARK.
Rink victims mourned
Four siblings killed in a shooting
rampage at a Texas roller rink were
remembered Saturday as a part of a
tight-knit family, even as the hundreds
gathered in an Arkansas church to
mourn them tried to make sense of the
tragedy.
More than 400 people attended a
service for Trini Do, 29, her sisters,
Lynn Ta, 16, and Michelle Ta, 28, and
her brother, Hien Ta, 21. Trini Dos
estranged husband, Tan Do, 35, shot
her and her siblings during a birthday
party for their 11-year-old son and then
killed himself.
Police in Grand Prairie, Texas, have
said they believe the shooting was
planned and followed years of domestic
violence. Trini Do received a protective
order in December against her hus-
band, but she had it withdrawn earlier
this year against a prosecutors advice
and wanted to give him another
chance, an aunt has said.
BATON ROUGE, LA.
Dad sleeps while son drives
Louisiana state police say an 8-year-
old boy was driving a pickup truck
down an interstate while his drunken
father slept in the passenger seat.
Troopers say the mans 4-year-old
daughter was in the back seat when the
truck was stopped Saturday morning in
Livingston Parish. The childs driving
was so erratic that it alarmed motori-
sts, who called authorities.
The children have been handed over
to Louisiana Child Protective Services.
The father, 28-year-old Billy Joe
Madden of Hattiesburg, Miss., was
booked into the Livingston Parish Jail
on charges including Child Desertion
and Allowing a Minor to Drive. It was
not clear Saturday afternoon if he had
an attorney.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Getting Bull-ish for flips
A stunt rider of Red Bull X-Fighters
performs flips during a show in Col-
ombo, Sri Lanka, Saturday. Red Bull
X-Fighters are invitation tournaments
where the best freestyle motocross
riders in the world come face to face.
GEORGETOWN, Guyana
Flight 523 from New York had
just touched down and passen-
gers were applauding the pi-
lots landing in the South
American country Saturday
when something suddenly
went wrong.
The Boeing 737-800 slid off
the end of a rainy runway,
crashed through a chain-link
fence and broke in half just
short of a deep ravine. Yet all
163 people on board survived.
Officials were starting to
probe the cause of the crash
even as they marveled at the
lack of fatalities.
We must be the luckiest
country and luckiest set of
people in the world to escape
so lightly, said Health Minis-
ter Leslie Ramsammy, who
said more than 30 people were
taken to the hospital. Only
three of those had to be admit-
ted for a broken leg, bumps,
cuts and bruises.
The Caribbean Airlines
plane had left John F. Kennedy
International Airport Friday
evening and made a stop in
Trinidad before landing in
Guyana. The airline said it was
carrying 157 passengers and
six crew members.
Geeta Ramsingh, 41, of Phi-
ladelphia, recalled how ap-
plause at the arrival quickly
turned to screams.
The plane sped up as if at-
tempting to take off again. It is
then that I smelled gas in the
cabin and people started to
shout and holler, she said.
The plane came to rest off
the end of the 7,400-foot run-
way at Cheddi Jagan Interna-
tional Airport, which sits on a
ridge in forested region just
south of the oceanfront capital
of nearly 300,000 people.
CRASH I N GUYANA Caribbean Airlines plane left JFK International Airport Friday evening
Jet runs off runway; 163 survive
By BERT WILKINSON
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
The broken fuselage of a Caribbean Airlines Boeing 737-800
is seen after it crashed Saturday in Timehri, Guyana.
KILLEEN, Texas Ultimate-
ly, it was the keen eye of a Texas
gun shop clerk that helped au-
thorities find an AWOL soldier
whod stashed bomb-making ma-
terial in his nearby motel room
for a plannedattackonFort Hood
soldiers.
The tip that led Killeen police
to Pfc. Naser Abdo on Wednes-
day prevented what could have
been the second terrorist attack
on the Army post, following a
2009 shooting rampage in which
an Army psychiatrist is charged
with killing 13 people. Earlier
this year in Texas, a shipping
company that told the FBI about
a suspicious order for a chemical
explosive foiledanallegedplot to
blowupformer President George
W. Bushs Dallas home.
A vigilant public and in-
formed local law enforcement
make it much more complicated
for people wishingtocarryout at-
tacks to do so, said John Cohen,
principal deputy counterterror-
ism adviser at the Homeland Se-
curity Department.
Federal and local law enforce-
ment agencies have established
programs over the past decade
that encourage the public to re-
port suspicious activity.
Abdo, 21, who went absent
without leave from Fort Camp-
bell, Ky., early this month, was ar-
rested Wednesday at a motel out-
side Fort Hood and charged with
possession of an unregistered de-
structive device. Police say he
was perhaps onlyadayawayfrom
unleashing bombs in a restaurant
frequented by soldiers and at-
tacking the Army post.
Businesses
play role
in stopping
terror
Texas gun shop clerk helped
cops find AWOL soldier who
planned attack on Fort Hood.
By JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTONFive months after
President Barack Obama told him to
leave Libya, Moammar Gadhafi is press-
ing on against NATO-backed rebel
forces, flaunting his remaining power in
the face of Western nations fearful of
combatting himwith greater force. And
four months after Obama offeredSyrias
leader an ultimatum to lead reform or
leave, Bashar Assads crackdown on dis-
sent rages on.
Through intervention or engage-
ment, the U.S. is stuck with inconclu-
sive results in both countries. The un-
clear endgame in each is constraining
the actions of everyone involved in-
cluding the United States.
Coming out with guns blazing failed
to deliver an early knockout punch to
Gadhafi. Engagement has proved simi-
larly ineffectual directed toward Assad.
Libyas war has become a quagmire.
For the U.S., policy options are limit-
ed. It has already played its military
card, leading the early stages of NATOs
intervention by bombing Gadhafis air
defense capabilities.
In Syria, the president and Secretary
of StateHillaryRodhamClintons rheto-
ric has dismissed any lingering hopes
that Assads government might be per-
suaded to start a serious democratic re-
form process and pull back an aggres-
sive nationwide campaign to snuff out
dissent.
Unrest in Libya, Syria offers no easy answers for U.S.
AP FILE PHOTO
Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi ges-
tures to his supporters in Tripoli.
By BRADLEY KLAPPER
Associated Press
MAI-AINI, Ethiopia As the world fo-
cuses on famine in Somalia, Eritrea suf-
fers in silence.
Eritrea, a nation of 5 million people
that borders Sudan, Ethiopia and Djibou-
ti, has also seen failed rains and wide-
spread food shortages. But its autocratic
government, which faces international
sanctions, refuses to acknowledge a
drought has swept its territory. Satellite
images showthat the Red Sea nation has
been hit by drought conditions similar to
those in Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti.
Nearly1,000Eritreans arrivedat a refu-
gee camp in northern Ethiopia in July
alone, officials said.
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for
African Affairs, Johnnie Carson, said last
week that many of the Eritrean refugees
crossingborders intoSudanandEthiopia
suffer frommalnutrition. Heurgedthere-
clusive Eritrean regime, led by longtime
President Isaias Afwerki, to address the
hunger and work with humanitarian or-
ganizations to prevent catastrophe.
Over the last few years, more than
48,000 Eritreans have fled to Ethiopia.
Refugees said their families havent
been able to buy food from the govern-
ment for the last three months and that
food prices have spiraled.
Eritreas famine goes unnoticed
AP PHOTO
Amino Said, 5, sits in a hospital in
Mogadishu on Saturday.
Autocratic government, which faces
sanctions, refuses to acknowledge a
drought has swept its territory.
By LUC VAN KEMENADE
Associated Press
ANOTHER ROYAL WEDDING
AP PHOTO
B
ritains Zara Phillips, the eldest granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth, and her husband, England rugby player
Mike Tindall, leave Canongate Kirk in Edinburgh after their marriage Saturday.
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
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BEAUTY
POISE
GRACE
DIGNITY
HUMOR
CARE
LOYALTY
PATIENCE
RESILIENCE
presents
Any way you say it, shes one of a kind. To nominate your Great Woman of Northeast
Pennsylvania submit the form below or visit timesleader.com/women by August 15th.
Then join us to honor her on September 13th at a fabulous High Tea at Glenmaura!
Nominee _______________________________________________________________
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Address________________________________________________________________
City______________________________________________Phone ________________
Email _________________________________________________________________
Nominated by ______________________________________Phone ________________
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and mail it to The Times Leader, 15 N. Main Street, Wilkes Barre PA 18711 by August 15th or
nominate online at timesleader.com/women.

7
0
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Thats where the ball is, Dai-
utolo said.
He said customers served by
the branches that are on the re-
view list will be asked for input
throughout the entire process.
He said questionnaires will be
left in the branches and public
hearings will take place.
We did this to make sure
these stations and branches are
given the same level of transpar-
ency a standalone office gets,
Daiutolo said.
Even after a site is selected for
closure, theres still a chance for
an appeal to the Postal Regulato-
ry Committee before any closing
would take place, he added.
At the earliest, with all the
timelines were working with,
none of these branches would
close before December, he said.
The list released Tuesday, which
contains the names of 203 Penn-
sylvania locations, is the third
grouping of postal retail facilities
facing possible closure issued
since 2009. From the 2009 list of
about 3,600, 140 eventually
closed, Daiutolo said. Among
them were two locally, Ashley
and Dickson City.
If post offices are slated to
close, the postal service said resi-
dents will still receive mail and
be able to purchase stamps local-
ly. In communities without a
post office, the Postal Service
plans to sell stamps and offer ser-
vices through local retailers such
as grocers, convenience stores or
other popular gathering places.
Residents in Luzerne County
that have P.O. boxes at the four
post offices under review, would
be changed to home delivery of
mail and would likely see their
zip codes replaced by ones from
nearby Columbia County com-
munities such as Bloomsburg,
Stillwater, Benton or Berwick.
Bonnie Adams, a Black Creek
Township supervisor and a box
holder at the Rock Glen Post Of-
fice, said residents need to speak
out and organize petition drives
or campaigns to save their post
office. The four post offices on
the list located in Luzerne Coun-
ty serve only a few hundred peo-
ple; Cambra has 35 P.O. boxes.
The Postal Service, solely sup-
ported by postage revenue, has
seen its funding stream on the
decline as technology has al-
lowed people to communicate
through email, social networking
and text messages. The service is
looking at the restructuring as a
way to stave off a reported record
deficit of up to $9 billion this
year.
POSTAL
Continued from Page 3A
talk to eachother.
The Wyoming Recreation
Board hosted the sale a first for
thecommunitytocoincidewith
theFarmers Market alsoheldSat-
urday in the Borough Park on 8th
Street. Dozens of homes along
7th and 8th streets, Monument
Avenue, Susquehanna Avenue
and others brought out their
wares, transforming the commu-
nity into an easily-navigated
open-air market.
Items for sale varied between
the standard
childrens toys
and clothing,
craft items and
costume jewel-
ry to rarer finds
such as furni-
ture, light fix-
tures and archi-
tectural ac-
cents. The
Friends of the
Wyoming Free
Library also hosted a used book
saletoraisemoneyfor thelibrary.
Jerrilynn Carminati of Wyom-
ing said she is a regular on the
yard sale and flea market circuit,
seeking furniture, antiques and
videogamesfor her stepson, John
JosiahCarminati.
Whats the best thing she ever
foundat a yardsale?
Friends, she said. We make
friends, and we meet our neigh-
borsthat weneversee, andwelive
right aroundthe corner.
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Above, Bettylou Murdoch
sells clothing to Jane
Lemardy at her yard sale
on Monument Avenue. At
left, Rosemary Wyatt sits
alongside a 1924 Lestor
piano for sale at her yard
sale. The Wyoming Recre-
ation Board hosted a
community-wide yard sale
a first for the communi-
ty to coincide with the
Farmers Market also held
Saturday in the Borough
Park on 8th Street.
YARD
Continued from Page 3A
The Friends of
the Wyoming
Free Library
also hosted a
used book
sale to raise
money for the
library.
cat population. All of the peo-
ple volunteering here today
love animals and try to do
good for them," said Carol
Coffee, volunteer with the
Feral Cat Neutering Program.
This is the first such event
for the program that has only
been in existence for a year
and a half.
Coffee summed the pro-
gram up succinctly saying,
"This is compassion."
In addition to the vaccina-
tions, dog owners could get
their canine companions
nails clipped for a $5 dona-
tion. The puppy pedicures
were provided by Grooming
By Eloise, Avoca. The after-
noon culminated in a pet
beach beauty contest.
Categories included hap-
piest, best looking, ugliest
and best mutt.
The winning pets earned
themselves some tasty treats,
and their owners received gift
cards to Pet Supplies Plus.
PET
Continued from Page 3A
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Riley, a mini dachshund owned by Deanna Uniatowski of Wilkes-
Barre, receives a rabies shot by veterinarian Dr. Doug Ayers.
We are just trying to
decrease the cat pop-
ulation. All of the peo-
ple volunteering here
today love animals and
try to do good for
them."
Carol Coffee
Feral Cat Neutering Program
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 7A
C L I C K
2
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6
6
9
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News. Events. Captured Moments.
Reader submitted photos thats as easy as drag and drop or a simple click and upload.
Now you can create your own online photo gallery.
Start sharing your collection today at photos.timesleader.com. m.
WYOMING AREA CROSS
COUNTRY CAR WASH
FERAL CAT NEUTERING
PROJECT AT CHACKOS
WYOMINGS
COMMUNITY-WIDE SALE
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
James Kasisky, Joe Earl and Joe Buczynski
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mary Jones of Laflin, left, and Jane Adamczyk of Nanticoke
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Nancy Bohn and Melissa Hudzinski
Maddi Ambruso and Myiah Custer
Christopher Klimchok of Hanover Township, left, and Dr. Doug Ayers
of Plains Township
Fran and Dorothy Belardinelli
Roseann Ambruso, Maureen Radzwilka and Victor Am-
bruso
Amy Decker of Edwardsville with her dog, Squirt, left, and Lori
Krawetz of Wilkes-Barre with her dog, Dude
Linda Sokolowski and Sal Diaz
Amanda Ostrowski, Ron Gitkos and Stephanie Schultz Ellen Slovinski of Plains Township and Andrew Gallagher of Taylor Ken and Connie Vanderheggen
Sara Radzwilka and Emily Ambruso Ann Everetts of Hunlock Creek, left, and Carole Coffee of Wilkes-
Barre
Jerri, John and Josiah Carminati
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
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1325 RIVER ROAD,
WILKES-BARRE, TUFT TEX PLAZA
235-1264
WILKES-BARRE Monsig-
nor Joseph Kelly said he usually
sees the glass half full, but he
said the local crisis affecting the
homeless and those in need is
getting worse every day.
Theres no sense trying to
sugar coat it, Kelly said. We
are in a crisis and its going to
get worse before it gets better.
Local communities will be ex-
pected to pick
up the respon-
sibility of help-
ing our broth-
ers and sis-
ters.
Kelly, execu-
tive director of
Catholic Social
Services for the Scranton Dio-
cese, said he doesnt see a sim-
ple solution because state and
federal funding is being cut
when more and more people are
in need.
There are going to be more
incidences of homelessness,
food insecurity and less and less
programming for children, Kel-
ly said.
The Scranton Diocese oper-
ates a homeless shelter in Scran-
ton, but in Luzerne County,
Mother Thereses Haven for-
merly VISION moves from
church to church on a weekly
basis. Kelly said it is more ex-
pensive to keep moving the shel-
ter and more difficult to get the
clients to appointments usually
in downtown Wilkes-Barre.
Kelly said the diocese was
looking for a permanent loca-
tion for a shelter in Wilkes-
Barre, but with drastic funding
cuts, the chance of that happen-
ing has diminished.
Im not sure where were go-
ing to go, Kelly said. Theres
insufficient money being provid-
ed for individual men and wom-
en and absolutely minimal mon-
ey for sheltering of families,
Kelly said.
Kelly said not only are more
people coming to places like the
St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen for
meals, there has been a signif-
icant spike in the number of peo-
ple coming to Mother Thereses
Haven for shelter.
Just when REACH, Inc.
closed, we had moved a lot of
our homeless men to transition-
al living, Kelly said. But all of
our beds were immediately fil-
led by new people.
Kelly said the sagging econo-
my is the main reason for the
increased demand for services.
I just spoke to a 31-year-old
man who told me hes been
homeless six times this year,
Kelly said. He said he wants to
work and is physically able to
work, but he cant find a job.
Kelly said Mother Thereses
Haven has 28 men staying there
at night. He said there have
been increased demands for
health care as well.
He said more than 200 people
were at the McKinney Clinic
above the St. Vincent de Paul
Kitchen just the other night.
The demand is extremely
high, Kelly said. Donations are
needed. Our funding has been
cut by 62 percent.
He had said Catholic Social
Services, St. Stephens Episcopal
Church, United Way and the
Commission on Economic Op-
portunity have been discussing a
way to establish a permanent
homeless shelter for men. Kelly
had hoped to have something
operating by the fall, but hes not
as optimistic now.
While Kelly said there is noth-
ing new on finding a permanent
shelter location in downtown
Wilkes-Barre, he said it is a pri-
ority and he believes it will hap-
pen soon.
Monsignor says homeless situation is a crisis
Executive director of Catholic
Social Services feels too many
cuts are being made.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Kelly
Cutbacks in state funding for
programs that help those in
need and the lack of a central
shelter where the homeless can
crash at night has exasperated
an already critical situation.
McCawley said the demand
for meals has increased dramat-
ically over the last month.
We have been serving more
than 400 lunches per day and
our evening meal has gone from
125 servings to more than 300,
McCawley said of the recent in-
crease in visitors. More and
more people are losing their
jobs. They come in and tell us
that they have never had to ask
for help before. Ive never seen
our kitchen so crowded.
John Patterson, 54, a Scranton
resident, is now homeless and
has been coming to the kitchen
for meals for about a month.
Hes looking for work and until
he finds a job, hes been forced
to camp out.
I keep clean though, he said.
I make sure I get a shower ev-
ery day. Ive been working one
day a week at the Farmers Mar-
ket. Ill find something soon, I
hope.
John R. Cool, 56, of Edwards-
ville, was standing with Patter-
son. Cool said his rent is so high
he has little money left for food.
Something has to happen to
help us, Cool said.
As more people come to the
St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen for
meals, the demand for food to
serve has also increased,
McCawley said.
So far were keeping up with
the demand, she said. But we
are hopeful our donations in-
crease because the number of
people we serve is increasing
daily.
Sources facing cuts
McCawley said funding for
the Weinberg Food Bank at the
Commission on Economic Op-
portunity will be cut. She said
that will place an even greater
need for donations.
These are extremely tough
times, McCawley said. People
dont realize that these funding
cuts are coming at a time when
the demand is rising dramatical-
ly.
McCawley said more people
are in need and she urged elect-
ed officials to do something.
Bryan Hogan, 49, is a former
homeless man who now lives in
Kingston. Hogan was a frequent
visitor to REACH, which closed
a month ago because of a fund-
ing shortage. The homeless
drop-in center was in St. Ste-
phens Episcopal Church, about
four blocks from the St. Vincent
de Paul Kitchen.
He said he doesnt see many
of the people who came to RE-
ACH daily for showers, break-
fast, to pick up their mail or to
use the phone to set up appoint-
ments.
Ive bumped into a few guys
and Ive tried to help them by
telling them where to go to get
some help, Hogan said.
Another REACH alum, Jeb
he wont reveal his last time
said hes still living in the woods
somewhere on the West Side.
Im surviving, he said. I
dont see anybody much any-
more.
Jeb, a handyman, said hes
been working regularly. He said
he does his work, grabs a meal
at the kitchen and returns to his
woodsy home.
At my place, listening to the
city traffic is like listening to the
ocean if you set your mind
right, he said.
Clients disappeared
Stefanie Wolownik, former ex-
ecutive director at REACH, has
been stopping by her office to
clean it out. She said she has
seen a few of her former clients,
but most have not been around.
I was thinking the other day,
wow, these people have just
kind of disappeared, Wolownik
said. I guess they went under-
ground. But they are used to
places closing and being kicked
out. They adapt and move on.
Wolownik said she has pre-
pared informational sheets that
list services and agencies that
homeless and people in need
can access for help.
NEED
Continued from Page 1A
People line up before 11 a.m. for lunch at the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen in Wilkes-Barre Friday. Anne
Marie McCawley, kitchen director, said the demand for meals has increased over the last month.
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Anne Marie McCawley, director of the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen,
offers a prayer before the start of lunch at the kitchen Friday.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 9A
N E W S
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If you are 12 years of age or older and have acne, you may be
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Come out of your shell and stop hiding.
Contact the study center listed below for more information!
Stephen M. Schleicher, M.D.
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570-582-7180
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Reimbursement for time and travel
To qualify you should:
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PLYMOUTH Frank Tribendis
has coached boys and girls swim-
ming at Wyoming Valley West for
42 years.
For the last 16 years, Tribendis
has also coached boys and girls
water polo.
The funding for water polo
about $13,000has beeneliminat-
ed by the WVW School Board,
causing everyone from team
members to coaches to parents to
supporters tojumpinthepool and
help raise money to keep the wa-
ter polo programabove water.
The school board has been
supportive and the parents group
WVW Aquatic Parents has al-
ready raised about $4,000 so far,
Tribendis said. If we can get to
$10,000 we can keep the pro-
gram.
Tribendis, who retired from
teaching six years ago, said about
40 students participate in the wa-
ter polo program and in 1999 the
girls team won the state cham-
pionship.
Sally Anne Kaminski of Ed-
wardsville, is a former WVW
swimmer and water polo player
who doesnt want the program to
end.
I can easily say water polo is a
demanding, challenging sport
that builds character, discipline
and confidence in students that
theydesperatelyneedthesedays,
Kaminski said. Water polo is like
playing several sports at one time
without beingabletostandupand
use your legs. It teaches you to
have great endurance, which
helps tomakeyouabetter student
and prepares you for college.
Kaminski said more people
should come out and watch a wa-
ter polo game to see howgrueling
and intense it is.
Youreally have tobe very dedi-
catedtoplaywater polo, shesaid.
Kaminski urged her fellow
Class of 2005 members to donate
totheprogramandtrytoget other
donations to keep the sport alive.
I wouldnt havebeenbothacol-
legiate swimmer and in a nursing
programwithout CoachTribendis
or water polo, she said. The for-
mula is tough sport plus tough
coach equals great college suc-
cess.
Tribendis alsotalkedabout past
athletes hes coached like Corey
and Shana Welch who both went
ontomajor colleges Coreytothe
University of Florida andShana to
the University of Michigan. Shana
has played professional water po-
lo, Tribendis said.
Coach has to keep water polo afloat at Valley West
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Valley West water polo coach Frank Tribendis, upper left, and assistant coach Bill Williams
conduct a team meeting at the conclusion of practice at the high school pool in Plymouth.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Valley
West water polo
goalie Bill Ne-
whart defends a
shot during prac-
tice at the high
school in Ply-
mouth.
Aug. 3 - 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Celeb-
rity Scoop at Ritas Italian Ice,
355 Market St., Kingston. Part of
proceeds will go to team.
Aug. 21: 1 p.m. shotgun start, golf
tournament at Four Seasons in
Exeter. To enter, sponsor or do-
nate, contact Mary Lee Klemish,
288-9265; or email
mlklem57@epix.net.
U P C O M I N G E V E N T S
If your school district has cut an
athletic program or extracurric-
ular activity and you are trying to
raise funds to keep it going, please
contact The Times Leader at
829-7180. We will write a story to
explain the situation and to get
the word out about your effort.
I F YO U WA N T T O H E L P
K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
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Satu rd ay To N oon
(A n ytim e B y A ppoin tm en t)
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available atn o charge
O n e ofthe largest& m ost
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N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309
CASTERLINE Donald, a memorial
service 2 p.m. Aug. 13, from
Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home
Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhan-
nock.
CORCORAN Charles, funeral 9
a.m. Monday from the Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in SS.
Peter & Paul Church, Plains
Township. Friends may call 4 to 7
p.m. today.
CROUSE Kimberly, funeral 8 p.m.
Monday from the James L. Hinck-
ley Jr. Funeral Home, 1024 Market
St., Berwick. Visitation 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday at the funeral home.
HULSIZER Anges, celebration of
her life 8:30 a.m. Monday in
McLaughlins, 142 S. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass at
9:30 a.m. in the Church of St.
Mary of the Immaculate Concep-
tion. Visitation 5 to 8 p.m. today
in McLaughlins.
KOSLOSKI Elaine, funeral 11 a.m.
Monday from the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 451 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call 6 to 9 p.m. today.
LYNCH James, memorial service
9:30 a.m. Monday at Corpus
Christi Church, West Pittston.
MAREK Mary Ann, memorial
service noon Tuesday at Our
Lady of Hope Parish, Park Ave-
nue, Wilkes-Barre.
REESE Patricia, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday from the Hugh B. Hughes
& Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
TURNER George, visitation 3 p.m.
until 5 p.m. today in the Harold C.
Snowdon Home for Funerals, Inc.,
420 Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
FUNERALS
D
aniel L. Norton, 64, of Larks-
ville, lost his life to a short
battle with cancer Friday morn-
ing, July 29, 2011, in the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs Medical
Center, Plains Township.
Born in Kingston, he was a son
of the late James and Emma Ber-
trum Norton and his stepfather
Herbert Regan. He was a gradu-
ate of West Wyoming High, class
of 1966.
He was a U.S. Army Veteran of
the Vietnam War, serving from
1966 through 1968 and contin-
ued his military career in the Ar-
my Reserves until 1972. He re-
ceived numerous medals while
serving in Vietnam as a helicop-
ter gunmen and mechanic.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed by IBM as an electrical
engineer for 35 years. After retir-
ing, Dan owned and operated Pa-
triot Tours and was an independ-
ent agent for Atlantic City. He
was also employed with G. Rit-
sick and Sons Plumbing.
He was a member of the Forty
Fort United Methodist Church,
Harding Fire Department, and
the Edwardsville Volunteer Fire
Department. Dan was also a
member of the Kingston VFW
Post 283 and the Department of
Veterans Affairs American Le-
gion.
Dan was the most loving and
devoted husband, father, stepfa-
ther and grandfather. Anyone
who had the opportunity of
knowing him knew of his kind
heart and of his outgoing person-
ality. He was always there when
you needed him and to give a
helping hand. He loved spending
time with his family, grandchil-
dren and his loving dog, Baxter.
He enjoyed his yard and swim-
ming in his pool, going on his At-
lantic City trips with his friends
and customers, and, most of all,
spending his time with his wife,
Evelyn, for 19 wonderful years.
The family would like to thank
all the nurses, staff and doctors,
especially Dr. Mark W. Scinico
from the VA Medical Center.
Surviving are his wife of 19
years, the former Evelyn Pemble-
ton; children, Daniel J. Norton
and his wife, Mary, Forty Fort;
Tracey Matlowski and her hus-
band, Jerry, Kingston; Keri
Elmes and her fianc, Vincent
Depalma, West Pittston, and Jo-
seph M. Norton and his wife,
Shanna, Fredricksburg, Va.;
grandchildren, Tyler Norton,
J.T. Matlowski, Caitlyn Norton,
Ethan Elmes and Mason Matlow-
ski; brother, William Norton and
his fiance, Barbara Smith, West
Wyoming; sister, Ida Dixon, Dal-
las; as well as nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services will be
held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday
from the Metcalfe and Shaver
Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyom-
ing Ave., Wyoming, with church
services to begin at 11 a.m. in the
Forty Fort United Methodist
Church, with the Rev. Donald
Roberts officiating. Interment
will be in the Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the
funeral home.
Daniel L. Norton
July 29, 2011
J
ohn George Lukasavage, 63, of
Shavertown, a well-respected lo-
cal architect, passed away unex-
pectedly Friday, July 29, 2011, at his
home.
Born in Kingston, John was a son
of the late John and Anna Yarmel
Lukasavage. He was a graduate of
Central Catholic HighSchool, King-
ston, and attended Penn State Uni-
versity, Lehman Campus.
John was a self-employed archi-
tect running his architectural firm,
JL Associates, Bennett Street, Lu-
zerne. He was a Registered Archi-
tect in Pennsylvania, New York and
New Jersey since 1979.
He was also a local entertainer,
well known as Johnny Chrome.
He loved karaoke and was the life of
every party.
An avid train enthusiast, he and
his son, John, belonged to several
live steam clubs in Pennsylvania,
New York and surrounding areas.
John enjoyed building trains with
his sonandspendingtime inhis ga-
rage.
John was a loyal Phillies fan, nev-
er missing a game.
He was not only the best of dads
to his son, John, but his best friend
as well. He loved spending time
with his grandson, Jack, encourag-
ing him in baseball and basketball.
He will be sorely missed by all who
knew him.
Preceding him in death, in addi-
tion to his parents, were his beloved
son, Brian Lukasavage; and sister,
Catherine Urban.
Surviving are son John Lukasav-
age; grandson, Jack; sister, Irene
June; brother, Dan Lukasavage;
many nieces, nephews, cousins and
a huge amount of friends.
Funeral services will be held at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday fromthe Harold
C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown. Pastor
Dave Martin, of the Cross Creek
Community Church, Trucksville,
will officiate. Interment will be
made in St. Anns Cemetery, Leh-
man Township. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the fu-
neral home.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions, if desired, may be made to
Pennsylvania Live Steamers Inc.,
PO Box 26202, Collegeville, PA
19426.
John George Lukasavage
July 29, 2011
RICHARD HILL, of Lehigh
Street, Wilkes-Barre Township,
passed away Saturday, July 30,
2011, at his home.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre.
MARY M. HALTER, 94, a for-
mer longtime resident of New
Grant Street in Wilkes-Barre, died
Saturday, July 30, 2011, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Arrangements are in progress.
Full obituary information will be
published in Mondays edition of
The Times Leader and later today
at www.celebrateherlife.com.
H
enry K. Davenport, 88, of Dor-
rance, ended his pilgrimage in
this life at 5:30 p.m. Friday, July 29,
2011, at the Veterans Administration
Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre.
BorninBerwick, onMarch1, 1923,
a son of the late Gould and Lorean
Kreisher Davenport, he graduated
from Berwick High School and did
his studies in Temple University, Phi-
ladelphia.
Henry proudly served in the U.S.
Army, leaving as a Sergeant during
WorldWar II servingwiththe Second
Armored Division Hell of Wheels
in Germany. After being wounded on
D-Day, he returned to the front to
mark his second year of overseas du-
ty. He was also in the Battle of the
Bulge, receiving the Purple Heart,
Distinguished Unit Badge, European
African Middle Eastern Service Med-
al with5bronze stars. He later served
in the Korean War.
He did mechanical engineering at
AC&F for many years, and he also
worked for Meadowvale Ice Cream
Co. for several years.
Henry was a member of the First
United Methodist Church, Berwick.
He also enjoyed painting pictures,
making keys, gardening and taking
care of his yard.
He was preceded in death by his
son, Henry F. Davenport; sister, Mary
Shope; andbrother, Robert G. Daven-
port.
Henry will be remembered by his
wife of 63 years, the former Joan My-
let; sisters-in-law, Mike and Jose-
phine Bilek, Dorrance, and Marie
Mylet, Dorrance; brother-in-law
Frank Shope, Berwick; as well as
many nieces and nephews.
Henrys arrangements have
been entrusted to the care of
the Heller Funeral Home, Nesco-
peck, where services will be held at
10 a.m. Tuesday, with Father Gerald
Shantillo, assistant pastor of St. Ma-
rys R.C. Church, Dorrance, presid-
ing. He will be laid to rest with mil-
itary honors in St. Marys Cemetery,
Dorrance. Calling hours will be held
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. Monday.
Henry K.
Davenport
July 29, 2011
A
lvan Bruch, 86, passed away
Saturday morning, July 30,
2011, at the Veterans Hospital in
Wilkes-Barre. He was born in Du-
ryea on September 27, 1924, and
grew up in Hazleton, a son of the
late Charles A. Bruch Jr. and Mary
Prusch Bruch Grebe.
After retiring from the U.S. Air
Force as a meteorologist and ob-
taining his Ph.D. in physics from
NYU, Alvan was a college profes-
sor at Wilkes College (nowUniver-
sity) and helped start an environ-
mental science department. He
later retired in 1995 as an environ-
mental scientist with the Tennes-
see Valley Authority.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and his wife, Elizabeth
Williams; his brother, Charles A.
Bruch III; his step-sister, Margue-
rite Grebe; and his lifelong friend,
Tom Bigler.
Alvan is survived by his four
children, CarolynBruchMertz, Sa-
muel Weller, Susan Bruch Moore-
head and Mary Bruch Gottstein;
by his two step-daughters, Chris-
tine Caggiano and Katherine Cag-
giano; and by nine grandsons and
eight great-grandchildren.
Interment will be at the
Mountain View Cemetery at
the familys convenience.
Arrangements are being han-
dled by the Hilary J. Bonin Funeral
Home, 99 W. Green St., West Ha-
zleton.
Alvan Bruch
July 30, 2011
M
arion Schwerdtman, 84, of the
Brookside section of Wilkes-
Barre, died Friday evening, July 29,
2011, at her home surrounded by
her family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of the late Robert and El-
izabeth (Hoffman) Williams.
Marion was a graduate of St. Ni-
cholas High School, Wilkes-Barre,
Class of 1945, and the Wyoming Val-
leyHomeopathic Hospital School of
Nursing, Wilkes-Barre. She was em-
ployed as a Nurse at Brooklyn Jew-
ish Hospital. She was a member of
St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre.
She was anavidN.Y. Mets fanand
enjoyed going out to dinner.
Marion was preceded in death by
her husband, Henry Schwerdtman,
on October 5, 1971; and her brother,
James G. Williams.
Surviving are her children, Susan
Miltimore, Wilkes-Barre; James
Schwerdtman and his wife, Marga-
ret, Dallas; Betty Jeanne Segear and
her husband, Edward, with whom
MarionresidedinWilkes-Barre, and
Kevin Schwerdtman and his wife,
Joan, Exeter; grandchildren, John,
Timre, Erika, Justine, Randi and
Sierra Segear, Jimmy, Amanda,
Kourtny and Abigail Schwerdtman;
sister, BettyJeanneCoolbaugh, Dal-
las; as well as nephews and nieces.
Funeral will be held at 8:45 a.m.
Tuesday from the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Interment
will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton. Friends may call from 5
to 7 p.m. Monday.
Memorial donations may be
made to St. Nicholas Church, 226 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Marion Schwerdtman
July 29, 2011
D
olores Kolanick Gavin, 84, of
Morrisville Borough, died
Friday, July 29, 2011, at the Cap-
ital Health Regional Medical
Center, Trenton, N.J.
Born in Hudson, Mrs. Gavin
was a Morrisville Borough resi-
dent since 1960. She retired in
1956 after 12 years service with
Gorts Children Dress Factory in
Hudson.
Dolores was a member of the
Morrisville Senior Center. She
was a local bingo player and en-
joyed trips to area casinos.
She was a dedicated support-
er of her church and was known
to help anyone who was in
need. Also, she was a bird
watcher and a cat lover.
Dolores was a daughter of the
late John Kolanick Sr. and Mary
Rock Kolanick. She was the wife
of the late James J. Gavin Jr.;
sister of the late Anna Hannon,
Helen Mucha, Eva Kopera, John
Kolanich Jr., Andrew Kolanick
and Anastasia Kolanick.
She is survived by her two
sons and their spouses, David J.
and Lyn Gavin of Washington
Crossing, and James A. and Ter-
ri Gavin of Gahanna, Ohio; her
daughter, Linda J. Hanson of
West Pittston; six grandchil-
dren, Harry Hanson, Dr. Katie
McKillip, Nathan McKillip, Kel-
li McKillip Tomlinson, Saman-
tha Gavin and Rebecca Gavin;
her two sisters, Mary Budzak of
Throop and Mildred Skubanicz
of Ewing Township, N.J.; as well
as several nieces and nephews
and grandnieces and grandneph-
ews.
The funeral will be held at
8:45 a.m. Tuesday from the Wi-
nowicz Funeral Home, 308 Ade-
line at Beatty Streets, Trenton,
N.J. Funeral services will be
conducted at 10 a.m. Tuesday in
St. Vladimirs Orthodox Church,
corner of Grand and Stanton
streets, Trenton, with the Rev.
Paul Shafran, Pastor Emeritus,
officiating, and Deacon Michael
Sochka assisting. Burial will be
in St. Vladimirs Cemetery, Ha-
milton Township, N.J. Calling
hours will be held from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday at the funeral
home, with Parastas Services at
7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations are to be made to ei-
ther an S.P.C.A. of the donors
choice or to St. Vladimirs
Church, 812 Grand St., Trenton,
NJ 08610.
Dolores Kolanick Gavin
July 29, 2011
CAMILLE SUSAN USEFARA,
59, of Plymouth Township, passed
away Friday evening, July 29, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St.,
Plymouth.
R
ichard D. Speedy Burke, 69, of
Plymouth, passed away sur-
rounded by his family and friends
onFriday, July 29, 2011, at the Veter-
ans Administration Medical Center
NursingHome, Plains Township, af-
ter a long battle with cancer.
Born May 11, 1943, in White
Haven, he was a son of the late Ri-
chard Burke and Leona Burke-Ze-
bro.
He attended Hanover Area High
School. Richard was a U.S. Army
veteran serving during the Vietnam
War.
For many years, he was a body-
builder and loved spending time at
the gym. He also competed in body-
building competitions. He greatly
enjoyed taking his classic 1968 Che-
velle SS to car shows around the ar-
ea. He was an avid fisherman and
loved the outdoors. He made many
friends throughout the years and
will be sadly missed by all of them.
He was preceded in death by his
sisters, RoseAnn Michael, Bertha
May Brown and Betty Jane Ebert.
Surviving are his wife of 47 years,
Rosemary Grevera Burke; daughter
Barbara Ann Jones and her hus-
band, Randy L., of Plymouth; grand-
children, Brittany Nicole Koons,
Shelby Lynn Jones, Reilly Lynn
Jones, Katelyn Jones and Randy
Jones, of Plymouth; brothers, Er-
nest Butch Burke and Joseph Ze-
bro; 15 nieces and nephews; as well
as great-nieces and great-nephews,
and many cousins.
Funeral will be held at 10 a.m.
Tuesday from the S.J. Gront-
kowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main
St., Plymouth, followed by Mass of
ChristianBurial inAll Saints Parish,
Plymouth. Interment will immedi-
ately follow at Chapel Lawn Ceme-
tery, Dallas. Friends may call from5
to 8 p.m. Monday.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the VA Medical
Center Recreation Therapy Depart-
ment, Wilkes-Barre, in Richards
memory.
Please visit www.sjgrontkowski-
funeralhome.com for directions or
to submit online condolences to Ri-
chards family.
Richard D. Speedy Burke
July 29, 2011
J
osephR. Obester, 77, of Duryea,
passed away Thursday, July 28,
2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
His loving wife is Deanna (Ko-
rey) Obester. Together, Josephand
Deanna shared 48 years of mar-
riage.
Born on January 8, 1934, in
Wilkes-Barre, Joseph was a son of
the late JosephandMary (Karuso)
Obester.
A U.S. Navy Veteran, Joseph
honorably served his country dur-
ing the Korean War.
Joseph was a member of Holy
Rosary Church, Duryea. and also
held membership with the First
Catholic Slovak Union.
In addition to his wife, Deanna,
Joseph is also survived by his
daughters, Theresa Bronson,
Elaine Yakus and her husband, Al-
bert, and Ann Marie Yurish and
her husband, Patrick; and his six
grandchildren.
Aprivate family funeral will
be held.
Funeral arrangements have
been entrusted to the care of the
Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc.,
Forty Fort.
For additional information, or
to send the family of Mr. Joseph
Obester an online message of con-
dolence, you may visit the funeral
home website at www.wroblewski-
funeralhome.com.
Memorial contributions may be
made in Josephs memory to Holy
Rosary Church, 127 Stephenson
St., Duryea, PA18642.
Joseph R. Obester
July 28, 2011
J
ohn R. Boker, 94, of Kingston,
died Friday, July 29, 2011, in Tif-
fany Court, Kingston.
He was born in Kingston, a son of
the late John and Theresa Mickey
Boker. John attended Kingston
schools andwas adecoratedU.S. Ar-
my veteran of World War II, receiv-
ing the Silver Star and the Purple
Heart. He worked for many years as
a coal miner, and retired fromToby-
hanna Army Depot after 35 years as
a security guard.
John was preceded in death by
his wife, the former Emily Ann
Grondski; and a granddaughter,
Kimberly DAmico.
He is survived by his son, John R.
Boker, Danville; daughter, Deborah
Shaw, Wilkes-Barre; grandchildren,
Erik Boker, Katherine Shaw and
Melvin Shaw III; several great-
grandchildren; half-brother, Francis
Naperski, Pringle; half-sister,
Theresa Naperski-Romanofski, Ho-
nesdale; as well as nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services will be held
at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the
Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey
Ave., Kingston. Interment will be in
the Maple Hill Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call from 9
a.m. until the time of service Tues-
day.
In lieu of flowers, the family asks
that memorial contributions be
made to St. Ignatius Church, 339 N.
Maple Ave., Kingston, PA18704.
John R. Boker
July 29, 2011
Olga Shimkos-
ki, 91, formerly of
Moss Street, Ply-
mouth, passed
away Friday eve-
ning, July 29,
2011, at Manor
Care Hampton
House, Hanover
Township.
Olga was born in Buffalo, N.Y., on
December 19, 1919. She was a daugh-
ter of the late Anthony and Anna
(Slaksius) Pekar.
Olga resided in Plymouth for most
of her life. She was a member of All
Saints Parish, Plymouth.
Olga was preceded in death by her
husband, Frank Shimkoski Sr.; sis-
ters, Mary, Helen, Josephine and An-
na; and brothers, John, Joseph, Andy,
Stanley and Harry.
Surviving are a daughter, Rita
Brannigan and her husband, Tho-
mas; son Frank Shimkoski Jr.; grand-
children, Christine and her husband,
Rick, Thomas and his wife, Holly,
andCheryl andher husband, Charlie;
great-grandchildren, Matthew, Lau-
ren, Justin, Mackenzie and Charlie;
as well as numerous nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services for Olga will be
held at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday from the
AndrewStrish Funeral Home, 11Wil-
son St., Larksville, with a Mass of
ChristianBurial at 9a.m. inAll Saints
Parish, 66 Willow St., Plymouth,
withtheRev. Robert Kelleher officiat-
ing. Interment will be held in St. Ma-
rys Nativity Cemetery, Plymouth.
Family and friends may call from5 to
8 p.m. Monday.
Olga Shimkoski
July 29, 2011
NEWPORT TWP. Ken
Angradi, Newport Township
tax collector, has announced
that the Greater Nanticoke
Area Real Estate school taxes
will be issued Friday. The
discount period at 2 percent
will run through Oct. 4. Prop-
erty owners with escrow ac-
counts should forward their
bills to their financial institu-
tion for payment.
Anyone not receiving a bill
by Aug. 15 should contact
Ken at 736-6319.
MUNICIPAL BRIEF
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 11A
WWW.GENETTI.COM
WWW.OYSTERRESTAURANT.COM
BED, BREAKFAST AND BIKE
source.
If we take care of our birds and
theyre not running down Market
Street or Pierce Street, and theres
no roosters, why cant we provide
food for our families? she said.
Spurredbyarenewedinterest in
organic farming and sustainable
development, curiosity in keeping
backyard chickens is on the rise
across the country.
The movement has taken hold
in large urban centers such as
Brooklyn, N.Y., and has prompted
home farmers in communities
such as Madison, Wis., and Por-
tland, Maine, to successfully over-
turn prohibitions on raising chick-
ens in their communities.
Rose White, a worker at Tractor
Supply Co. in Hanover Township,
said the phenomenon appears to
be catching onlocally. The retailer
sells chicken feed, hen boxes, egg
incubators and other chicken-rais-
ing supplies and in April sells live
chicks.
Alot more people fromthe city
of Nanticoke are coming in to buy
feed, and theyre buying it in small
enough quantities that I assume
theyre doing it themselves, said
White, adding that she keeps
chickens at Lake Silkworth.
Municipal restrictions
Kapral-Kelly said she plans to
seekazoningvariancetoallowher
to keep chickens in Kingston, but
eventually she hopes local munici-
pal leaders will overturnzoningor-
dinances banning the keeping of
hens, whicharent asnoisyorlikely
tobecomeanuisanceas their male
counterparts.
Of the municipalities where Ka-
pral-Kelly said her aspiring chick-
en-farmer friends live, only Forty
Fort does not prohibit keeping
chickens.
Ordinances in Swoyersville and
Wilkes-Barre specifically prohibit
the keeping of chickens, while
Kingstons ordinance states that
farm animals other than custom-
ary pets shall not be kept in resi-
dential districts. Kingston Ad-
ministrator Paul Keating said pro-
hibition of farm animals has been
in the municipalitys zoning ordi-
nance since the late1970s. He said
hebelieves raisingchickens or oth-
er farmanimals inKingstonwould
not enhance andwouldprobably
detract fromthe quality of life of
residents.
Clearly, farm animals or live-
stock and that goes for iguanas
and exotic pets, too clearly they
donot belonginahigh-densityres-
idential community,Keatingsaid.
It doesnt have any meaningful
use in this community. We dont
have any rural zones in this com-
munity that can support raising
farmanimals. SoI wouldbe highly
opposedtoever allowinglivestock
or breeding in this community.
Swoyersville Zoning Officer Joe
Ruscavage said his boroughs ordi-
nance banning chickens went into
effect in1976, andwas likelyenact-
ed because the sound and smell
produced by chickens and farm
animals would create a public nui-
sance.
Unfortunately, things have
changed since the 40s and 50s,
he said.
Amy Yerke of Shavertown has
had a small chicken coop at her
Jackson Road property for two
years. She said the birds are man-
ageable, donot pose problems and
provide a steady stream of tasty
eggs.
The eggs have a richer, better-
looking yoke that have more nutri-
ents and taste much better than
store-bought eggs, she said.
Were quite happy with the chick-
ens.
Healthier living
Yerke said she thinks the addi-
tion of the chicken coop has made
her life and health better.
Improvinga healthier lifestyle is
Kapral-Kellys goals. The director
of marketing and development for
The Lands at Hillside Farms said
keeping chickens at home perfect-
ly coincides with the historic
farms mission of promoting
healthy, conservation-minded and
practical lifestyle choices.
She said municipalities should
be promoting those sorts of choic-
es as well.
Shesaidhens wouldnot createa
nuisance or detract fromquality of
life because they do not make as
much noise as roosters, which
arent required for chickens to pro-
duce edible eggs.
This spring, theKingstonTown-
shipfarmhostedaseminar onrais-
ing backyard chickens attended by
more than 35 people.
The requests just havent stop-
ped coming since then, Kapral-
Kellysaid. Weget thephonecalls,
we get the emails the interest is
definitely snowballing.
Home-farmed eggs are lower in
cholesterol, higher invitamins and
many prefer the taste, she said.
Chickens providepest control in
gardens, andtheirnitrogen-richex-
crement makes excellent fertilizer.
The coops, she said, will not
smell if cleanedregularly, andhens
tendtostayinnestsfromsundown
to sunrise.
Raising chickens also makes a
person partially responsible for
their foodsourceandisagreat way
of teaching kids responsibility, she
added.
Ahome chicken farmcan be set
up for less than $300, Kapral-Kelly
said, a bargain given that organic
free-range eggs cancost more than
$5 a dozen.
Websites such as thecitychick-
en.com and urbanchickens.org of-
fer advice and connect seasoned
and would-be chicken farmers
with one another.
The forumof one site, backyard-
chickens.com, has nearly 100,000
registered members.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Suzanne Kapral-Kelly gets the attention of the chickens at the Lands at Hillside Farms before feeding them. Kapral-Kelly is among a
growing number of area residents who would like to raise chickens at home, but local ordinances forbid them from going so.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Suzanne Kapral-Kelly gets the attention of chickens in the hen-
house at the Lands at Hillside Farms.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Mike Yerke of Shavertown chases a rooster and chickens from a
hedgerow on his property.
CHICKENS
Continued from Page 1A
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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SCRANTON Two Luzerne
County men indicted on charges
they stole guns from a firearms
dealer last December will plead
guilty, accordingtodocuments fil-
ed in federal court Friday.
Jerome Sharr, 20, of Wilkes-
Barre and David Toney, 19, of Ha-
nover Township asked that their
presentence reports be prepared
prior to their pleas. They also re-
quested to be sentenced immedi-
ately following their pleas.
Thetwomenwerescheduledto
go to trial on Sept. 27 in U.S. Dis-
trict Court, Scranton.
Their attorneys said they ad-
vised the men of their right to a
trial by jury and that the charges
had to be proven beyond a reason-
able doubt. The attorneys added
that the two men reviewed the
governments evidence against
themand Sharr and Toney intend
to plead guilty to the charges.
Afederal grandjuryindictedthe
men on June 21 on charges they
stole12 handguns fromAmerican
Sport Shooting in Brodheadsville
onDec. 29. Sharralsowascharged
withbeinga feloninpossessionof
firearms.
Prior to the indictment, state
police filed charges against the
two menfor burglarizing the busi-
ness. Sharrallegedlyrammedave-
hicle into a garage door until it
buckledtoget insidethebusiness,
according to state police. He and
Toney were caught by state police
on Dec. 30 after a pursuit that be-
gan in Dallas.
Statepolicesaidthreeof thesto-
lenhandguns were soldat a motel
in Plains Township and were later
recovered from a residence on
East Beatty Street inWilkes-Barre
where they also found crack and
powder cocaine and ecstasy pills.
In addition to the federal charg-
es, Sharr faces burglary and theft
charges for break-ins in Bear
Creek Township and Mountain
Top.
Since the indictment Sharr and
Toney were ordered to be held in
federal custody pending their
trial.
2 will plead guilty to stealing firearms from dealer
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
ished in the disaster. Her mother
and infant brother were put into
separate lifeboats. Due to a lan-
guage barrier, Thelma Thomas
was not reunited with her infant
son for several weeks after the
disaster and she spent nearly
three months in a New York City
hospital recovering.
My mother was actually re-
united with Mrs. MacKenzie, the
woman who cared for my broth-
er during that time, on the To-
day show featuring a group of
Titanic survivors 60 years after
the fact, Thomas said. It was
amazing because (local radio
personality) David DeCosmo or-
ganized the reunion for my
mother.
As a family, we are very grate-
ful to Mrs. MacKenzie, she said.
Unfortunately, Thomas said,
her bother Assid died of pneu-
monia at the age of 21, never ful-
ly recovering from his ordeal.
The Passion Project, the brain-
child of local authors Lisa Lewis
and John Grant, organizes spe-
cial culinary events centered on
various themes and historical
events.
WILKES-BARRE The metic-
ulously restored Fredrick Steg-
maier Mansion hosted a re-en-
actment of last meal served
aboard the R.M.S. Titanic on
Saturday night as part of The
Passion Projects event series.
Wilkes-Barre resident Mae
Thomas, 86, whose mother,
brother and uncle were aboard
the ship when it sank in the
North Atlantic on the morning of
April 15, 1912, gave a special pre-
sentation.
She has been recounting tales
of the disaster for many years.
Her family operated the Thomas
C. Thomas produce company in
Wilkes-Barre for a number of
years.
Thomas said her uncle Alex-
ander Thomas was escorting her
18-year-old mother, Thelma, who
spoke only Arabic, and infant
brother Assid from their home
country of Lebanon. They board-
ed the Titanic in Cherbourg,
France, to begin the maiden voy-
age to America.
Thomas said her uncle per-
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mae Thomas of Wilkes-Barre, left, whose mother survived the
1912 Titanic disaster, speaks at The Last Dinner on the Titanic.
Familys Titanic ordeal recalled
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 13A
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C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
WASHINGTON Claiming
that the twoparties arent that far
apart, President BarackObama is
urging Democratic and Republi-
can lawmakers to reach a deal
quickly to keep the government
from defaulting on payments to
veterans, Social Security recip-
ients and others.
There is very little time he
said Saturday in his weekly radio
and Internet address.
The Republican-controlled
House on Friday passed a bill
aimed at avoiding a debt default,
voting 218-210 almost entirely
along party lines.
In the Republican radio ad-
dress, Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl said
its important for the country to
avoid debt default, but said Dem-
ocrats need to work more closely
with Republicans.
Republicans have tried to
work with Democrats to avoid
this result andput our country on
a better path, but we need them
to work with us, Kyl said.
Unfortunately, after weeks of
negotiations, it became clear that
Democrats in Washington did
not viewthis crisis as an opportu-
nity to rein in spending, he said.
Instead, they sawit as an oppor-
tunity to impose huge tax in-
creases onAmericanfamilies and
small businesses.
Obama insists that borrowing
authority extend through 2013,
beyond next years presidential
campaign.
The Democratic-controlled
Senate, with help from some Re-
publicans, quickly rejected the
House bill on Friday. Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., had
an alternative measure to cut
spending by $2.4 trillion and
raise the debt limit by an equal
amount, enough to meet Oba-
mas demandthat there not be an-
other vote on government bor-
rowing next year.
The time for putting party
first is over, Obama said. The
time for compromise on behalf of
the American people is now.
AP PHOTO
President Obama has urged the
Congress to move quickly.
President
urges two
parties to
cooperate
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTONThere is no
changing how Washington
works. It doesnt.
Even if a bitterly divided Con-
gress and President Barack Oba-
ma avoid a U.S. debt default by
striking a last-second deal, as all
sides expect, plenty of damage
has been done.
People are disgusted. Confi-
dence in the political system is
tanking. Nothing else is getting
done in Washington. The mar-
kets are spooked. The global rep-
utation of the United States has
slipped.
And the real kicker? This
whole wrenching effort to shrink
the debt may actually increase
the debt.
Any emergency deal may not
be broad enough to prevent the
major credit rating agencies from
downgrading the United States
as a rock-solid investment. That,
in turn, could increase the cost of
borrowing for the government
(hence more interest and debt),
not to mention for everyone else.
The spectacle has brought
Washington to its knees. Obama
went onTVbefore the nationand
called it a circus. One lawmaker
felt compelledto apologize to the
American people.
I can only imagine the anger
and disgust they have, said
Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of
West Virginia, at witnessing a
broken government and a presi-
dent and members of Congress
who cant seem to even agree
sometimes on what day it is, let
alone to solve the nations debt
crisis.
That about sums it up.
Polls show peoples trust in
government is at one of its worst
levels indecades. AnABC/Wash-
ington Post survey this month
foundthat awhopping80percent
of people were angry or dissatis-
fiedwiththe federal government.
About a decade ago, it wasnt half
that high.
Pleading for the parties to
work together for the American
people, Obama said, Thats the
least that they should expect of
us, not the most that they should
expect of us.
Achieving the least is proving
nearly impossible.
This Washington moment be-
ganas something big a biparti-
san effort to put a real dent in the
long-termdebt by takingonpolit-
ical issues that are genuinely
tough for both parties. It has now
devolved into a panicky debate
over whether the nations debt
limit will be raised by Tuesday so
the country can pay its bills.
Voters, remember, want their
leaders tobe focusedonjobs. The
goal of preventing a self-inflicted
economic catastrophe is hardly a
standard of excellence.
When this is all over, politic-
ians will claim credit wherever
they can, and blame their oppo-
nents for the long, embarrassing
spectacle.
And the public will assign
blame, deciding whether those
pushing compromise will be re-
warded as eminently sensible or
punished for caving.
That misses the point.
In the biggest sense, everyone
has lost.
We have now taken a process
that was not getting a lot of atten-
tion and convinced people that
this is not the usual shenanigans.
It is farcical and utterly dysfunc-
tional, said Norman Ornstein, a
political science scholar at the
American Enterprise who has
long examined Washingtons
ways. Whatever they pull out
here in the end, that image isnt
going to change.
Consider some of the many
ways Washington has not been
able to escape itself:
Given the huge issues at
stake, fromthe size of the debt to
the role of government, voters
might have hoped for a big, open
debate of ideas. What they have
had instead is a confusing proc-
ess thats playing out in secret or
in strident statements to the
press.
Congress, as usual, is ex-
hausting all of its partisan op-
tions before truly considering a
potential agreement in the final
hours. Thats viewed as normal,
or even helpful, in Washington. A
weary country, meanwhile, is get-
ting daily updates about what it
would mean to live with the first
default in the countrys history.
Boehner suspended the vot-
ing on his own bill so that he
could find a way to snag the final
votes he needed. The House
switched to naming post offices
as time slipped away. A White
House official said this is why
people hate Washington. Boehn-
ers office said it showed reform
for Washington: At least he didnt
try to ram the bill through in the
dead of night.
Obama is getting bashed for
not putting his own plan on pa-
per. The White House claims to
do that would be to ensure its de-
feat, because Republicans cannot
publicly support whatever Oba-
ma does.
The president said the world
is watching. Allies are actually
cringing. The international com-
munity is seeing a superpower
bicker and flail in its attempt to
reduce its staggering debt.
The embarrassing stalemate
follows a breathless budget clash
between the parties that came
close to shutting down the gov-
ernment. And with the nation
still stuck in a rut on job creation,
there is little reason to be hopeful
for a bipartisan economic agenda
between now and the presiden-
tial and congressional elections
in November 2012.
The voices of moderation in
bothparties have beendisappear-
ing, in part because of election
districts drawn to favor sharply
one party of the other. Ornstein
predicts the next election will
bring only more polarization.
This is not exactly a shining mo-
ment for America, he said.
Obama likes to remind voters
that they had better intentions
than this when they put Demo-
crats in control of the White
House and Senate and Republi-
cans in charge of the House.
The American people may
have voted for divided govern-
ment, but they didnt vote for a
dysfunctional government, the
president says.
Too bad they got both.
For most, debt mess showing D.C.s awful side
This whole wrenching effort
to shrink the debt may
actually increase the debt.
A N A L Y S I S
By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent
House with Obama and House
Democratic leader Nancy Pelo-
si.
The renewed negotiations oc-
curred on one track, while an-
other pointed the Senate to-
warda test vote onlegislationto
raise the debt limit while cut-
ting spending by $2.4 trillion.
The vote was delayed from 1
a.m. today to 1 p.m.
That measure was introduced
by Reid but opposed by Repub-
licans, who vowed to prevent it
from advancing.
Adding further confusion, the
White House declined com-
ment on the days develop-
ments.
That left prospects for a com-
promise murky.
But late Saturday night, Reid
said compromise negotiations
were going on at the White
House.
Halfway
around the
world, on a vis-
it to Camp
Leatherneck
in Afghanis-
tan, the na-
tions top mili-
tary officer
fielded ques-
tions from
troops asking
if they would
be paid in the
event of a de-
fault.
I actually
dont know
the answer to that question,
said Adm. Mike Mullen, chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
although he told them they
would continue to go to work
each day.
Without legislation in place
by next Tuesday, administra-
tion officials say the Treasury
will run out of funds to pay all
the nations bills. They say a
subsequent default could prove
catastrophic for the U.S. econo-
my and send shockwaves
around the world.
The president is seeking leg-
islation to raise the govern-
ments $14.3 trillion debt limit
by about $2.4 trillion, enough to
tide the Treasury over until af-
ter the 2012 elections. Over
many weeks, he has agreed to
Republican demands that defi-
cits be cut without a require-
ment for tax increases in ex-
change for additional U.S. bor-
rowing authority.
But Obama has threatened to
veto any legislation that would
require a second vote in Con-
gress for any additional borrow-
ing authority to take effect, say-
ing that would invite a recur-
rence of the current crisis in the
heat of next years election cam-
paigns.
Saturdays developments
opened with Obama saying,
There is very little time in his
weekly radio and Internet ad-
dress.
A few hours later, House Re-
publican leaders engineered a
vote to defeat a Reid-drafted
proposal to raise the debt limit
on a near-party line vote at mid-
afternoon.
Arguing into the night, Re-
publicans stood ready to block
the same measures advance in
the Senate.
Reid accused Republicans of
filibustering, and it appeared he
was hoping to find enough de-
fectors in the GOP ranks so he
could overcome the blockade.
In contrast to McConnell,
Reid said individual Republi-
cans had shown a willingness to
compromise.
Indeed, some Republicans ex-
pressed concerns about the ef-
fects of gridlock.
Im worried about Congress
defaulting on our country, said
Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga. He
suggested terms of a possible
compromise and urged fellow
lawmakers to find common
ground.
Sen. Robert Casey, D-Scran-
ton, was also among those call-
ing for compromise.
The Americanpeople watch-
ing this over so many days now
understand the basic challenge
we face, said Casey. Its a chal-
lenge of reducing the deficit and
debt and cutting spending, but
alsoof makingsure that we have
a bipartisan agreement to pay
our bills and meet our obliga-
tions. And I think if I had to boil
it down to four words, it is this
in terms of what people in Penn-
sylvania have told me that we
must do: compromise for our
country.
With financial markets closed
for the weekend, lawmakers had
a little breathing room, but not
much. Asian markets begin
opening for the new work week
whenit is late Sunday afternoon
in the capital.
In his remarks at a news con-
ference, McConnell saidObama
needs to indicate what he will
sign, and we are in those discus-
sions.
He said later he had spoken
several times during the day
with Vice President Joe Biden,
who played a prominent role in
earlier attempts to break the
gridlock that has pushed the
country to the verge of an un-
precedented default.
Boehner said that despite the
partisanship of recent weeks, I
think were dealing with reason-
able, responsible people who
want this crisis toendas quickly
as possible and Im confident it
will.
To get to the endgame, Re-
publicans and Democrats had
to go through the formality of
killing each others bills scor-
ing their own political points
before they could turn to mea-
ningful negotiations.
Still, the sudden talk of com-
promise contrasted sharply
with the days earlier develop-
ments as both the House and
Senate convened for unusual
Saturday sessions.
The House voted down legis-
lationdraftedby Democrat Reid
to raise the governments debt
limit by $2.4 trillion and cut
spending by the same amount.
The vote was 246-173, mostly
along party lines and after de-
bate filled with harsh, partisan
remarks.
Republicans said the Reid
spending-cuts plan was filled
with gimmicks and would make
unacceptable reductions in Pen-
tagon accounts. It offers no re-
al solutions to the out-of-con-
trol spending problems, said
Rep. Alan Nunnelee of Missis-
sippi, part of a group of 87 first-
term Republicans who have led
the push for deeper spending
cuts.
Republican Reps. Lou Barlet-
ta of Hazleton and Tom Marino
of Lycoming Township joined
the solid opposition by House
Republicans to the Reid plan.
Sen. Reids plan is flawed be-
cause it relies on phantom sav-
ings from war funding that was
never set to be spent anyway,
Barletta said. I cannot support
this bill because it does not cut
enough federal spending.
Americans want real spending
controls, not accounting gim-
micks, which is what the Reid
bill is.
Not even Democrats seemed
to like the legislation very
much, although many emerged
from a closed-door meeting of
the rank and file saying they
would vote for it.
Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas,
called it the least worst alter-
native to avoid default.
Yet with their votes, many
Democrats signaled their read-
iness for compromise by voting
to cut spending without raising
taxes. Many Republicans insist
taxes must not be raised to cut
intofederal deficits, evenfor the
wealthiest Americans and for
big oil companies.
In remarks on the House
floor, Rep. David Dreier, R-Cal-
if., said the vote itself could be
prelude to a final effort at com-
promise that would involve the
White House and the leaders of
both parties.
Across the Capitol, the Sen-
ate marked the hours before a
scheduled test vote at 1 a.m.
Sunday on the same measure.
There was no doubt about the
outcome there, either, unless
compromise intervened.
Atotal of 43 Republicans sent
Reid a letter saying they would
block the bill from advancing,
enough to prevail.
With both parties preferred
solutions blocked, the only al-
ternatives were compromise
that was so far elusive or a de-
fault that no one claimed to
want.
The days events in the House
were orchestrated as political
payback, and unusual at that,
since Republicans lined up to
kill legislation that hadnt even
cleared the Senate.
Less than 24 hours earlier,
Reidhadengineeredthe demise
of a House-passed bill hours af-
ter it passed, and without so
much as a debate on its merit.
Pelosi said Boehner chose to
go to the dark side when he
changed his own legislation to
satisfy tea party lawmakers and
other critics.
There were catcalls from the
Republican side of the aisle at
that, and Pelosi responded by
repeating that the speaker
chose to go to the dark side.
Republicans ridiculed Reids
legislation.
Not only does it fail to ad-
dress our spending and debt
problem, it wont even prevent a
downgrade of our credit rat-
ing, said Rep. Scott Garrett, R-
N.J. We needactual cuts to gov-
ernment spending to address
our long-term debt crisis, not
phantom cuts and accounting
gimmicks.
Times Leader Washington
correspondent Jonathan Risk-
ind contributed to this report.
DEAL
Continued from Page 1A
AP PHOTOS
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks at a news conference as House Speaker
John Boehner of Ohio listens.
To see YouTube
video of Lou
Barletta speech
Thursday, scan
this QR code
into your
smartphone or
visit www.ti-
mesleader.com
O N L I N E
Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a news conference on debt ceiling
legislation on Capitol Hill on Saturday iin Washington.
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011
W
ell, here I am, watching the
most highly paid construction
crew ever assembled build my
dream home.
It took a while, but finally I got my
plans worked out with a committee of
the worlds leading architects. Now as
fabulously expensive and exotic woods
and other building materials are being
brought in by heavy-lift helicopters Im
busy trying to visualize the final prod-
uct.
Its actually going to be fairly retro,
though. Trendy neighbors probably
wouldnt like it. Instead of sending the
welcome wagon, theyd rally on my
sidewalk with packs of dogs and burn-
ing torches, screaming something like
curse you, monster of 1940s taste.
But Id snicker. Truly, I believe that
designers of the past were on to some-
thing, at least something that makes
sense to me. So heres what my person-
al dream home would have.
A wrap-around porch: I drive all over
to look at nice homes, and I faithfully
read The Times Leaders home stories.
I have yet to see a big, comfy-looking
wrap-around porch on a fancy-shmancy
house. What happened to them, I dont
know, but its a tragedy.
I live on my porch as much as pos-
sible during warm weather, sprawled in
my glider, iced tea nearby, reading a
book or magazine and chatting with
neighbors. When I was a kid, my par-
ents home had a fantastic L-shaped
porch, with a solid railing so that on a
stifling night you could actually sleep
out there.
A sitting room: Ill bet most people
younger than 50 today dont know
what a sitting room is. So listen up: it
was a minor-league version of your
living room, and probably right next to
it, usually accessed through a side
door. Youd welcome guests there when
the occasion (or the guests) did not
warrant disturbing the doilies on the
living room furniture.
It was also the place where the fam-
ily gathered to listen to Jack Benny
or Big Town on the Silvertone con-
sole radio. Other functions included:
kids playroom; place to grab a nap on
the old couch; music listening room
(on the wind-up Victrola); or whatever
other purpose you wanted, including
drying out umbrellas.
A cellar and an attic: When I meet
people whose houses have no cellars or
attics, Im appalled. Where do they put
their model railroads? Where do they
store out-of-season decorations? You
cant beat a cellar for half-used cans of
paint whose original purpose you dont
recall. Show me a garden shed how-
ever enormous that can do those
things.
Im especially fond of attics. A good
attic is a veritable history of your per-
sonal life. It holds the first book you
bought, your grade school graduation
pin, the gift appliance you forgot about
until you bought another one that was
on sale. Id wander about in existential
haze without a dusty third floor.
Say, this place is getting pretty big. I
can tell you one thing my dream home
wouldnt have, though: walk-in closets.
If you have that much clothing, you
probably ought to give more stuff to
charity drives. The home in which I
grew up had two little hallway closets
one for each pair of bedrooms.
It also wouldnt have an entertain-
ment and communications center.
The computer and the TV are not on
speaking terms.
Hey, I must have fallen asleep over
the papers Homes section and start-
ed dreaming again. I think Ill turn to
the story about the federal deficit talks.
Thats so much less frustrating.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
A dream home
with a porch
you can live on
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
And thats it.
Youre very involved with the Wilkes-
Barre Riverfront Parks Committee and
RiverFest, correct? Ive been with
them at least 20 years. I started off
picking up trash and then someone
asked me if Id help out coordinating
some of the events. I was also on the
board and was president for about five
years.
Music? Bob Dylan. I like jazz. I like
classical music. You can look at the CDs
that I have or the old vinyl that I have,
and you can find Big Brother and The
Holding Company and Cream, and you
can find something from Wagner or
Wagnerian opera, or Wes Montgomery, a
jazz guitarist, or Felix Slatkin. Frank
Sinatra, big band music, Herbie Hancock
... I like a wide variety.
Favorite food? Italian. But typically
what I eat on a regular basis, because of
my training, is fuel. Its very simple stuff:
carbohydrates, protein and a lot of fruits
and vegetables. And its simply pre-
pared, because Im not going to go
through a whole lot of effort to make
something that to me is simply fuel.
Always in the fridge? Bags of spin-
ach.
Favorite city to visit? New York. Its
energizing. And its a great place to run.
Favorite place for vacation? The shore.
Anyplace where theres an ocean.
Favorite movies? Paths of Glory, Monty
Python and The Holy Grail and The Usual
Suspects.
Favorite TV shows? My favorite was
Seinfeld. But I usually have television on to
listen to news. Ill have on MSNBC, or CNN
or CNBC.
Favorite quote? No excuses, no regrets.
And The mind, once expanded to the
dimensions of larger ideas, never returns to
its original size. Oliver Wendell Homes.
Tell us something about yourself that
might surprise people. I carried the Olym-
pic Torch in 2001, for the 2002 Winter
Olympics.
Defining moment? When I decided to go
into the Air Force. That was not an easy
thing to do. Talk about going out of your
comfort zone. But it had a huge impact.
Everything else flowed from that.
Youve worked with the Chamber for
three years and, prior to that, had been a
volunteer there for many years. Youve
also worked as a computer operator for
the Civil Service Commission, for IMB, for
the American Red Cross and with Little
Flower Manor. What do you enjoy most
about your current position? The inter-
action. Its the fact that you are a part of
this building process. Youre helping
people with their businesses. You can
feel yourself as being integral in the
possible success of something.
What do you enjoy doing outside of
work? Im a runner. Ive been running
for 33 years. Ill be doing my 17th mara-
thon in October. I enjoy that. I run by
myself. I dont wear a headset. In 33
years of running, Ive never been on a
treadmill. I dont care what the weath-
er is. Twelve months out of the year,
Im going. Im always training.
You spent four years as a medic in
the Air Force in the 60s during war-
time yet you prefaced this conversa-
tion by saying you didnt want to talk
about that. Can you briefly explain why?
I came back. Thats it. You accepted your
responsibility. You did what you had to do.
J
ohn Maday is the membership services coordinator at the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. He is a graduate of
Hanover Area High School and Kings College, where he earned degrees in business administration and political science. Prior
to college, he spent four years in the United States Air Force. In 2001, he was given the Rose Brader Community Service Award,
which is issued by the United Way of Wyoming Valley. He lives in South Wilkes-Barre.
MEET JOHN MADAY
CLARK VAN ORDEN/
THE TIMES LEADER
Alan K. Stout writes about area people for
the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7101.
D
ouble, double, toil andbigtrouble. WilliamShakespearepennedhistragedyMacbeth sometimebetween
1603and1607, andthis workof classic Englishliterature is showingits age.
Althoughtheplayis compulsoryfor most highschool students, onlythosewithaloveof languagecanremem-
ber muchmore thana fewiconic lines once they put downthe script.
Macbeth has been adapted into film, nov-
els, opera, television, andcomicbooks tohelp
preservetheclassictaleof regicide, buttheres
stillsomethingkeepingkidsfromunderstand-
ingShakespeares vision.
To hear Daniel Gallagher explain it, that
something is its lack of robots. Gallagher, a
Forty Fort native and CGI animator, is work-
ing on an out-of-this-world animation project
that hebelievescanreconcileMacbethwith
todays audience.
To help update Shakespeares play for the
technology age, Gallagher is employing the
aid of Kickstarter, an online fundraising plat-
formas innovativeandexperimental as his vi-
sion.
Gallaghers appreciation of Macbeth can
be traced to his sophomore year at Bishop
OReillyHighSchool, whenhereadtheplayas
part of Anne Butlers English class. For those
who may forget, the tragedy tells the story of
the title character, a brave Scottish warrior
Theres not a wasted page. When theres not
action going on, theres certainly intrigue. Af-
ter studyingShakespeare incollege literature
classes andworkingwiththe plays onstage, I
came to realize theres a lot more in the play
thanI initially got out of it inhighschool. But
even then I was asking questions: did the
witches really see the future for Macbeth, or
didthey influence his actions?
Now Gallagher is coupling his talent for
analyzingliteraturewithwhat hecallshisfull-
time hobby, CGI animation, to create a film
that will encourage high school students to
keep asking questions about Shakespeares
work.
Theres nothing remotely boring about
this story! Its a power struggle, a political
thriller, a morality tale, and a bloodbath. Its
got dark magic, and evil deeds. Its got re-
venge, and battle, and twisting prophecies,
whoconspireswithhiswife, LadyMacbeth, to
murder the rightful king of Scotland and as-
sume the throne. Prophesying witches and
political rivals torment Macbeth before he
dies fighting the rightful heir to the throne.
Theplays5actsarerepletewithnuancesthat
makeitpartactionadventure, partpsycholog-
ical study, andpart love story.
Gallagher, who earned a Bachelor of Arts
degreeinliberalartsatVillanovaUniversityaf-
ter graduating from OReilly in 2000, says,
By HOLLY VAN LEUVEN For The Times Leader
To watch Gallaghers trailer or to contribute
to CGI Macbeth on Kickstarter, visit http://
www.kickstarter.com/projects/1132615028/cgi-
macbeth
To view other projects by area artists and
organizations that are being funded go to
http://www.kickstarter.com/discover/cities/
scranton-pa
ONLINE
See MACBETH, Page 9B
Above, left: Robots take on Shakespearean characteristics in Dan Gal-
laghers CGI staging of MacBeth.
COURTESY PHOTOS
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
M
r. and Mrs. Robert Archavage,
Wilkes-Barre, announce the en-
gagement and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Tiffany Ann, to Stephen
Patrick Boyle Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs.
Stephen Boyle Sr., Collegeville.
The bride-to-be is the granddaughter
of Stanley Archavage, Benton; Marion
Hvozda, Nanticoke; and the late Antho-
ny and Helen Volingavage, Wilkes-
Barre.
The prospective groomis the grand-
son of Kathleen Castine, Southampton;
the late George Castine; and the late
Francis and Lillian Boyle.
Tiffany is a 2000 graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and earned a Doc-
tor of Pharmacy degree fromWilkes
University in 2006. She is employed as
a pharmacist for Wegmans, College-
ville.
Stephen is a 2000 graduate of La
Salle College High School and earned a
bachelors degree in finance in 2004 and
a Master of Business Administration
degree in finance in 2010 fromSt. Jo-
sephs University. He is employed as a
senior financial analyst at S.E.I. In-
vestments in Oaks.
The couple will exchange vows at the
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and
Paul, Philadelphia, in October 2011.
Boyle, Archavage
A
licia Marie Bosak, Hunlock
Creek, and Jordan Michael
Moore, Beech Creek, together with
their parents, announce their engage-
ment and approaching marriage.
Alicia is the daughter of John and
Cynthia Bosak, Hunlock Creek. She
is the granddaughter of John and
Theresa Bosak, Swoyersville, and
John Gunton and the late Juanita
Gunton, Noxen.
Alicia is a 2007 graduate of North-
west Area High School. She gradu-
ated in May from Lock Haven Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania with a bache-
lors degree in accounting and a bach-
elors degree in business
administration.
Jordan is the son of Steve and
Melissa Moore, Beech Creek. He is
the grandson of Harold and Joan
Moore and Vaughn and Patricia Dick-
ey, all of Beech Creek.
Jordan is a 2006 graduate of Cen-
tral Mountain High School and is a
2010 graduate of The Pennsylvania
College of Technology with a degree
in forestry. He is employed with
Wolfe Tree Company, headquartered
in Tennessee, and based in Mansfield,
Ohio.
The couple will exchange vows in
August 2011.
Moore, Bosak
D
ebi Cappellini of Old Forge
proudly announces the marriage
of her son, Gifford John Cappellini, to
Danielle Stein. The 5 p.m. ceremony
took place on June 10, 2011, at St.
Peters Church, Palm Beach, Fla.
The happy couple will make their
home in Jupiter, Fla., where Gifford is
an account executive with ATT and
Danielle works as a caseworker with
Easter Seals.
Gifford is the grandson of the late
John and Norma Andrews of Ply-
mouth and Judge and Mrs. Gifford
Cappellini.
Cappellini, Stein
N
icole DeLucia and John Nemic
III, together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Daniel and Elizabeth DeLucia, Hard-
ing. She is the granddaughter of the
late Joseph and Philomena DeLucia
and the late Michael and Regina
Jurovsky, all of Pittston.
The prospective groom is the son
of John and Margaret Nemic, West
Wyoming. He is the grandson of the
late John Nemic and Rose Walker,
West Wyoming, and the late Clarence
and Marguerite Hite, Pittston.
Nicole is a 2002 graduate of Wyom-
ing Area High School. She earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in nursing
from Misericordia University in 2006.
Nicole is employed as a registered
nurse, case manager for Geisinger
Health Plan.
John is a 1999 graduate of Wyom-
ing Area High School. He is a 2006
graduate of Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital School of Radiology. John is
employed as a radiologic technologist
for Wyoming Valley Health Care
Systems.
The couple will exchange vows on
Sept. 10, 2011, at St. John the Evange-
list Church, Pittston.
Nemic, DeLucia
K
ara Ann Chacko and Jeffrey Carl
Hodorowski, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Daniel and Rebecca Chacko of Forty
Fort. She is the granddaughter of
Elizabeth Chacko, Swoyersville, the
late John S. Chacko Sr., Anne Marie
Price, Forty Fort, and the late Ed-
ward R. Price.
The prospective groom is the son
of Carl Hodorowski, Courtdale, and
Cindy Fisher, Edwardsville. He is the
grandson of the late Anthony and
Stella Hodorowski, Lois Johnson,
Courtdale, and Harry Johnson, King-
ston.
The bride-to-be is a 2000 graduate
of Wyoming Valley West High School
and a 2004 graduate of Kings College
where she earned her bachelors
degree in marketing. She is employed
as the marketing/event manager at
her familys business, Chackos Fam-
ily Bowling Center, Wilkes-Barre.
The prospective groom is a 1999
graduate of Wyoming Valley West
High School and a 2003 graduate of
Luzerne County Community College
where he earned his associates de-
gree in business administration. He is
employed as a regional sales manager
at Lemon-X Corporation, New York.
An engagement party was hosted
by the brides parents at the home of
the brides sister and brother-in-law,
Kenley and Eric Keiper, where the
couple celebrated their engagement
with their closest family and friends.
The couple will wed on May 5, 2012,
in an evening beachfront ceremony in
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Chacko, Hodorowski
K
enley Marie Chacko and Eric
Charles Keiper were united in the
sacrament of marriage in a double-
ring ceremony on July 24, 2010, at
Forty Fort United Methodist Church
by the Rev. Donald Roberts.
The bride is the daughter of Daniel
and Rebecca Chacko, Forty Fort. She
is the granddaughter of Elizabeth
Chacko, Swoyersville, the late John S.
Chacko Sr., Anne Marie Price, Forty
Fort, and the late Edward R. Price.
The groom is the son of Keith and
Nancy Keiper, Kingston. He is the
grandson of the late Ethel Mae Keip-
er, the late Ruth Oravic, and the late
James Keiper.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle by her father. She chose her
sister, Kara Chacko, as maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Karla Chacko,
sister of the bride, Kristen Stevenson,
sister of the groom, and Christine
Yanchick, friend of the bride. The
groom chose his close friend, Mat-
thew Stitzer, as best man. Groom-
smen were John Sromovsky, friend of
the groom, Jonathan Stitzer, friend of
the groom, and Matthew Bonawits,
friend of the groom. Ring bearer was
Kayden Stevenson, nephew of the
groom. Readings were given by Kara
Chacko, Karla Chacko, and Kristen
Stevenson. The ceremony included
the lighting of a Unity candle by the
mother of the bride and mother of
the groom. Greeters were Jeff Hodo-
rowski, family of the bride, John
Sosnoski, friend of the bride, Joanne
Stitzer, friend of the groom, and Jill
Wujcik, cousin of the groom. Music
was provided by Wendy Grice, orga-
nist, and a special selection was pro-
vided by the maid of honor and bri-
desmaids on the handbells.
The bride was honored with a
bridal shower hosted by the mother
of the bride, mother of the groom,
maid of honor, and bridesmaids at
the home of the brides aunt, Dawn
Chacko, Larksville. The bride and
groom were treated to a pre-wedding
celebration by the bridal party at
Wisecrackers Comedy Club, Scran-
ton, and Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs Casino, Plains Township. A
rehearsal dinner was given by the
parents of the groom at Pierce Street
Deli, Kingston. The wedding recep-
tion was hosted by the parents of the
bride at Chackos Family Bowling
Center, Wilkes-Barre. Each of the 25
guest tables featured a unique, origi-
nal centerpiece that showcased a
special moment from the courtship of
the bride and groom.
The bride attended school in the
Wyoming Valley West School District
and then was home schooled. She
graduated from Luzerne County
Community College with a degree in
broadcasting and business adminis-
tration. She is employed as a graphic
designer by her familys business,
Chackos Family Bowling Center,
Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is a 2001 graduate of
Bishop OReilly High School and a
2003 graduate of Luzerne County
Community College with an associ-
ate degree in criminal justice. He is
also a 2004 graduate of Lackawanna
Junior College, where he completed
his Act 120. He is employed by the
Municipality of Kingston.
The couple honeymooned in Aruba
and reside in Swoyersville.
Chacko, Keiper
A
insli Kehl andMarkGirmenJr.,
together withtheir parents, are
happytoannouncetheir engagement
andapproachingmarriage.
Thebride-to-beis thedaughter of
JeffreyandKatherineKehl, Hanover
Township. Sheis thegranddaughter of
JohnandViola Walsh, Wilkes-Barre;
Linda Hartman, Hanover Township;
andRobert andRiceKehl, Berwick.
Theprospectivegroomis thesonof
Patricia andMarkGirmenSr., Hanover
Township. Heis thegrandsonof Ger-
trudeGirmenandthelateEdward
Girmen, Wilkes-Barre, andJeanCasey
andthelateThomas Casey, Plymouth.
Thehappycouplewill exchange
vows July2012.
Girmen, Kehl
J
acob Tyler Jaskul-
ka, son of Walter
and Christina Jaskul-
ka, Swoyersville, was
baptized at St. Johns
Church, Larksville,
by Deacon Peter
Smith on May 7, 2011. Jacob was
born Feb. 16, 2011, at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Godparents are Lourdes Sikora and
Butch Evanoski. Jacob is a grandson
of David and Dorothy Sikora, Larks-
ville, and Carl and Antoinette Jaskul-
ka of Swoyersville. He is a great-
grandson of Adam and Eleanore
Sikora, Plymouth.
Jacob has a brother, Zachary, 4. A
brunch for family and friends was
held at Andys Diner in Plains Town-
ship.
Jacob T. Jaskulka
baptized at St. Johns
M
r. and Mrs. Stephen Schweitzer,
Dallas, celebrated their 40th
wedding anniversary on June 26,
2011. They were married on June 26,
1971, at Pine Grove Mennonite
Church, Bowmansville, Lancaster
County, by the Rev. Robert M. Lan-
dis.
Mrs. Schweitzer is the former
Anita Renee Hurst, daughter of the
late Sylvester and Ruth Hurst. Mr.
Schweitzer is the son of Betty
Schweitzer and the late Richard
Schweitzer.
The couple has three children,
Emily Tuft and her husband, Troy,
and son, Zachary, Hartsdale, N.Y.;
Matthew and his wife, Colleen, Lor-
ton, Va.; and Andrew, Dallas.
Steve and Anita celebrated their
anniversary with an Alaskan cruise
vacation in May and also a quiet
candlelight dinner at Ruths Chris
Restaurant on the night of their anni-
versary.
Steve is the Pennsylvania Game
Commissions northeast regional
director and Anita is a registered
nurse with Rural Health Corporation.
The Schweitzers
M
r. and Mrs. Robert Murphy Jr.,
Mountain Top, will celebrate their
25th wedding anniversary on Aug. 2,
2011. They were married in St. John the
Evangelist Church, Pittston, by the late
Monsignor Gerald J. Burns.
Matron of honor was Dera Ann Bar-
tashunas Leandri and best man was
Charles Pucilowski.
Mrs. Murphy is the daughter of
Charles and Rose Marie Sciandra, Port
Griffith. Mr. Murphy is the son of Mrs.
Marilyn Murphy, Pittston and the late
Robert Sr.
The couple has been blessed with
two sons, Robert III, Colorado, and
Ryan at home.
The Murphys
E
leanor Gilsky will celebrate her
100th birthday on Aug. 5. She was
born in Kingston, the youngest of
eight children, to John and Mary
LaRue. She graduated from Coughlin
High School in 1929 and worked as a
Bell Telephone operator until she
married Edward Gilsky, Edwardsville,
on her 21st birthday. The couple cele-
brated 41 years of marriage and raised
four children: Edward, Elaine, Evelyn
and Earl. She has 10 grandchildren and
six great-grandchildren. Eleanor lived
in her Wilkes-Barre home for 40 years
before moving to Edwardsville where
she spent the next 22 years at Temple
Apartments. She has resided the past
five years at Smith Nursing Home in
Mountain Top.
Eleanor is a member of Firwood
United Methodist Church and is a
proud member of its J.O.Y. Sunday
School Class. She loves needlework
and baking and gladly has donated
her time and talents to Firwoods
annual craft bazaars and pasty sales.
She is best known by friends and
family for her delicious cinnamon
buns and home baked bread.
Eleanor has seen many changes
over the last 100 years, especially the
many firsts she has experienced
such as electric lights, automatic
washing machines, and a man on the
moon. She is proudest of the list she
keeps in her Bible: the names of the
18 presidents that have served the
country or that she has helped to
elect into office during her lifetime.
She feels blessed to have lived 100
years. When asked for advice for
living a long life, she says Good
genes, a good laugh, and the good
Lord.
Eleanor Gilsky will
mark her centennial
birthday on Friday
M
r. and Mrs. Glen Jenkins, West
Nanticoke, celebrated their 25th
wedding anniversary on July 26, 2011.
They were married in the Polish
National Catholic Church in Ply-
mouth.
Their attendants were Amy Con-
rad, maid of honor, and John Cava-
naugh, best man.
Mrs. Jenkins is the former Susan
Leiby, daughter of Monica Holup and
the late Andrew Holup.
Mr. Jenkins is the son of Ron Gilbo
and Jean Jenkins.
Glen and Susan are the proud
parents of two children, Jessica Sa-
rah, 24, and Glen Andrew, 14.
The Jenkinses
M
r. and Mrs. Marc Divers, Ply-
mouth Township, celebrated
their 10th wedding anniversary July
28, 2011. They were married July 28,
2001, in New York City on the Celeb-
rity cruise liner, Zenith.
Mrs. Divers is the former Heather
Makos, daughter of Edward and
Sandra Makos, Plymouth Township.
Mr. Divers is the son of Nancy
Divers, Kingston.
The couple has one child together,
Noah, 6. Mr. Divers also has two
children, Shelby, 16, and Alec, 12.
They plan on celebrating their
anniversary with a vacation to Playa
del Carmen, Mexico in September.
The Divers
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3B
O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to decide
how your wedding notice reads, with a
few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in Sun-
days People section, with black-and-
white photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to edit
announcements that exceed that word
count. Announcements must be typed
or submitted via www.timesleader.com.
(Click on the "people" tab, then wed-
dings and followthe instructions from
there.) Submissions must include a daytime
contact phone number and must be re-
ceived within10 months of the wedding
date. We do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announcements of
weddings that took place more than a year
ago. (Wedding photographers often can
supply you with a black-and-white proof in
advance of other albumphotographs.)
All other social announcements must
be typed and include a daytime contact
phone number.
Announcements of births at local hospi-
tals are submitted by hospitals and
published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements with local
connections also are accepted. Photos are
only accepted with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony announcements
but not birth announcements.
Engagement announcements must be
submitted at least one month before the
wedding date to guarantee publication
and must include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement announce-
ments once the wedding has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are publish-
ed free of charge at the 10th wedding
anniversary and subsequent five-year
milestones. Other anniversaries will be
published, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times Leader or
mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to Kathy
Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to
people@timesleader.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
C
harlotte and Ottavio Luchetti of
Pittston, formerly of Plains Town-
ship, celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary July 29, 2011.
They were married July 29, 1961, in
St. Marys Byzantine Catholic
Church, Wilkes-Barre, by the Rev.
Dennis. Their attendants were Emily
Loss, Dora Payson, Patsy Rundle,
Louis Luchetti, Louis Luchetti Jr. and
Jim Latsko.
Mrs. Luchetti is the former Char-
lotte M. Latsko, daughter of the late
Andrew and Susan Latsko. She
worked for several years as a dietary
aide at Maffett Street Elementary
School. She is retired from the Social
Security Administration after work-
ing there on and off for 30 years.
Mr. Luchetti is the son of the late
Ottavio and Teresa Luchetti. He
served in the U.S. Air Force for 3
1
2
years during the Korean War and was
stationed in Frankfurt, Germany. He
retired after 30 years of service as a
striping operator at Blue Coal/Lucky
Strike Coal Companies.
They have three children, Colonel
James M. Luchetti M.D., Norfolk, Va.,
who is serving in the U.S. Army;
Maria M. Mclean and her husband,
Joseph, Pittston; and Mark A. Luchet-
ti and his wife, Gigi, West Chester.
They enjoy spending time with
their two beautiful grandchildren,
Anna Michaela and Erin Marie, West
Chester.
Mr. and Mrs. Luchetti celebrated
their anniversary with a dinner host-
ed by family and friends at a shore
house in Manasquan, N.J.
The Luchettis
Students in the Lake-Lehman High School Holocaust class recently attended the Annual
Teen Symposium on the Holocaust at Marywood University. Students had the opportunity
to meet in small group settings with Holocaust survivors and speak with liberators of con-
centration camps. Students from the Holocaust class with concentration camp liberators
Sgt. Alan Moskin and Dr. Leon Bass, who offered keynote speeches at the symposium, from
left, first row: Krysia Goodwin; Shelby Foster; Connor Daly; Kaitlyn Bronson; Lauren Boyle;
Moskin, Staff Sergeant in the 56th Infantry in General Pattons 3rd Army and liberator of
the Gunskirchen concentration camp; Bass, U.S. Army 183rd Engineer Combat Battalion and
liberator of Buchenwald concentration camp; Nikki Snyder; Josh Yaletsko; Kayla Nice; Kris-
tan Newell; Shila Mcroy; and Michael Novrocki, Holocaust class instructor. Second row: C.J.
Whispell, Kendra Smith, Mike Cross, Avery DeFranco, Matt Lewis, Matt Wolman, Desiree
Frost, Kory Mininger, Dan Williams, Chris Gerlin, Kyle Fine, Scott Judson, George Stuffick
and Justin Cornell. Also attending was Kevin Katchko.
Lake-Lehman students take part in Holocaust symposium
Pittston Area High School
students Sara Kosik, Christoph-
er Musto and Grace ONeill
recently met the requirements
to enter the 2012 National
Merit Scholarship Program.
These students are among the
50,000 highest scoring partici-
pants of more than1.5 million
programentrants. Fromleft:
Art Savakinus, vice-principal;
Musto; ONeill; Kosik; and John
Haas, principal.
Pittston students
achieve merit
scholarship status
Solomon/Plains Memorial Junior High School student council spon-
sored a spring food drive to benefit the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen,
Wilkes-Barre. Working in conjunction with Dominos Pizza, students
collected non-perishable food items that were used to help provide
meals over the Easter/Passover holidays at the kitchen. Some of the
participants, from left, first row, are Brigid Wood, Mary Tona, Nicole
Ciprich, Dominique Miraglia and Kelsey Gabrielle, student council mem-
bers. Second row: Mindy Heffron, student council adviser, and Marie
Correll, assistant activities director.
Solomon students hold food drive for St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen
Wyoming Seminary Upper School students were recently honored for their achievements
in Russian based on their scores in the 201 1 Russian Language Olympiad. The test is an oral
competition in which students speak to a panel of judges on a variety of topics, answer
questions and recite a poem, all in Russian. Participants, from left, first row: Jacob Berger,
Kingston; Katherine Maximov, Lake Ariel; Megan Molitoris, Plains Township; and Charles
Amara, Plains Township. Second row: Konstantin Lyavdansky, Russian teacher; Kevin Kopec,
Kingston; Joshua Greenberg, Wilkes-Barre; Scott Kwiatek, Lake Ariel; Daniel Kopec, King-
ston; Joseph Zack, Hanover Township; Asa Saidman, Kingston; Anastasia Stevens, King-
ston; Bryden Gollhardt, Dallas; Artem Puzikov, Kingston; and Bradley Sedor, Wyoming. Con-
nor Scalleat, Wapwallopen, was also honored.
Sem students earn honors in Russian Language Olympiad
Middle school students at St. Jude School, Mountain Top, participa-
ted in a science fair covering a wide range of topics. The projects were
judged and the following students received awards: Grade 6: Alex Abad
and Rachel Jones, tied for first place; Zachary Biros, second place; and
Gigi Albert, third place. Grade 7: John Gentilesco and Vince Gentilesco,
tied for first place; Jordyn Pavelitz, second place; and Rachel Rinehim-
er, third place. Grade 8: Renee Brown and Abby Wolfgang (team) and
Garbrielle Mohutsky, tied for first place; Conlan McAndrew, second
place; and Jacob Martin and Kenny Rexer (team) and Anne Cosgrove,
tied for third place. Winning students, from left, first row, are Abad,
Jones, Biros, and Alberti. Second row: J. Gentilesco, V. Gentilesco,
Pavelitz and Rinehimer. Third row: Brown, Wolfgang, Mohutsky, McAn-
drew, Martin, Rexer and Cosgrove.
St. Jude School students earn awards at science fair
James M. Coughlin High School recently inducted new members into the French honor
society, Societe Honoraire de Francais. The Coughlin chapter received its charter this year
from the sponsoring organization, the American Association of Teachers of French. Pins
and certificates were presented. Seniors also received cords to be worn on graduation
gowns. The induction ceremony was followed by several French musical selections perform-
ed by the Coughlin String Ensemble. The French Club recently completed its final project of
the year, participation in the annual world languages department dance program that ben-
efited the American Red Cross. Other projects included a Thanksgiving food drive, French
Christmas caroling and a trip to New York City. Ann Grimes is the honor society adviser and
French teacher. Some of the new inductees, from left, first row, are Kevin Cantoran, Jessica
Cleary, Victoria Martin, Noelle Mondulick, Bryanne Dudzik, Brittany Kulesza, Abby Moules
and David Cantoran. Second row: Eric Klemchak, Allison Peck, Heather Pilcavage, Mykala
Pacurariu, Rebecca Elmy, Kallista Myers, Sally Sosa and Raizy Sosa. Jacqueline Marroquin
and Kiah Randolph also were inducted.
Coughlin students join French honor society
Spelling bee winners from the Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary School recently re-
ceived a certificate and $10 for their accomplishments. Winners, from left, first row, are
Megen Banas, Brooklyn Blank, Dylen Bonick, Harley Bopp, Asia Branton, Michayla Brennan,
Sean Campbell and Aidan Dalmas. Second row: Matthew Dunbar, Dylan Dundore, Joylynne
Frie, Madalyn Gomelko, Rachel Goss, Brendan Greene, Michelle Guziak and Olivia Kivler.
Third row: Lynn McNeal, Cassidy Moore, Timothy Moore, Daniel Murphy, Jasmine Peters,
Adriana Pezzella, Kimberly Rodriguez and Travis Schultz. Fourth row: Colin Siegel, Sean
Spencer, Brian Stritzinger, Samara Vanderhoff and John Michael Zavatsky. Also receiving
awards were Samantha Chopick, Cody Gabriel and Noah Krubitzer.
Top spellers honored at Greater Nanticoke Elementary School
Sixth-grade students from Rice Elementary School recently present-
ed the play Krazy Kamp in the schools auditorium. The play was di-
rected by teacher Keelin Geisler. At the performance, from left, are
Daniel Tron, Kyle Richards, Scott Mangan, Ky LaMarca, Thomas Hallack-
er, Paige Allen, Amelia Prezkop, and Sarah Klush. Other members of
the cast and crew were Becca Nevin, Timmy Stewart, Jarrod Merrifield,
Hunter Rinehimer, Lexi Gaetano, Ally Olszyk, Madisyn Lowe-Konen,
Jessica Gittens, Nick Miller, Garrett McAfee, Reagan Venturi, Gabby
McElhattan, Brittany Randall, Hannah Williams, Erin Tollinger, John
McGroarty, Maddi Granoski, Ali Ajaz, Monica Schuler, Matt Lacoste and
Madison Maharty.
Rice Elementary sixth-graders perform Krazy Kamp
A team of 10 juniors from Crestwood High School won first place and
$40,000 in tuition at Wilkes Universitys 201 1 Engineering Olympics.
Ten high schools competed in five engineering events, including sky-
scraper building, electrical circuit, self-propelled vehicle, launcher
design, and the MacGyver competition. Each team member on the
first-place team wins a $1,000/year scholarship to Wilkes University.
Second place in the overall competition went to the team from E.L.
Meyers High School. The team from La Salle College High School
placed third. The Crestwood students were led by teacher Anthony
Morris. Winning team members, from left: Dave Carey, adjunct engi-
neering professor, Wilkes University; Wyatt Mitchell, Shawn McCole,
Patrick Henry, Daniel Androckitis, Eric Zulkoski, Jake Possinger, Garrit
Williams, Devin Zurawski, Michael Aielli and Bernie Socha.
Crestwood students earn scholarships during Wilkes Olympics
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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PAULY FRIEDMAN
FAMILYWALK/RUN
Sunday, August 14th, 2011
Anderson Sports &
Health Center
Misercordia University, Dallas
Registration: 8:30AM
Race time: 9:30AM
Registration fee: $25
Distance: 5k (3.1 miles)
FIRST 200 REGISTRANTS WILLRE-
CEIVEAN OFFICIALEVENT T-SHIRT!
Trophies awarded for rst place
overall female and male runners as
well as rst place overall walker.
Age groups: 15 & under; 16-19; 20-
29; 30-39; 40-49; 50-59; 60 & over
ORGANIZEATEAM!
The team that raises the most money
will take home the traveling trophy!
*eligible teams must consist of 5 or more
Post event Awards Party at the
Banks Student Life Center, Miser-
cordia University - refreshments,
music, and fun!
CALL570-823-5144
TO REGISTER.
PLEASE RSVP BYAUG. 7, 2011
Money raised to benet Help Line,
an information-referrel and rst response
point for crisis calls in Luzerne &
Wyoming Counties.
Operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
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The fourth-grade students at St. Judes School, Mountain Top, participated in the Junior Deputy Sher-
iff Program sponsored by the Luzerne County Sheriffs Department. The students attended one-hour,
weekly sessions for five weeks. Topics included dangerous strangers, drugs, alcohol and tobacco, theft
and gun safety. The children received certificates, bracelets and badges from the Sheriffs Department at
a closing ceremony. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are George Strish, Emily Thomas, Ethan
Hoda, Valerie Soto, Sean Murphy, Summer Zito and Matthew DiGangi. Second row: McKaylia Ward, Do-
minic Capaci, Devyn Boich, Taylor Josefowicz, Tommy Shafer, Ann Hagenbuch and Deputy Erin Joyce.
Third row: Madison Stoltz, Adam Mahler, Theresa Daly, Katie Wills, Bryce Zapusek and Matthew Hayden.
Fourth row: Alyson Rymar, Hunter Frerichs, Mary Eroh, Nicholas Ganter, Nathan Ragantesi and Patrick
Curley.
St. Jude fourth-graders attend Junior Deputy Sheriff Program
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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Solomon-Plains Memorial
Elementary School
Sean Flynn, principal, Solomon-
Plains Memorial Elementary
School, recently announced the
Honor Roll for the final quarter
of the 2011 school year.
High Honors: Victoria A. Bilski,
Olivia A. Cabrera, Eric M. Chris-
tian, Michael A. Cinti, Matthew
Davison, Antonio Frankelli,
James M. Gubbiotti, Stephanie L.
Hauser, Sarah Kelly, Ryan M.
Keyes, Hunter Krzywicki, Tho-
mas Mckenna, Jacqulyn M. Miles,
Brittany K. Nastawa, Tyler L.
Pagnotti, Mykala Slavish, Kyle
Williams, Gillian M. Worosilla,
Jason Zubris, Jeremy Bartkus,
Kiara Cotillo, Morgan J. Daniels,
Matthew Hine, Naseem Johnson,
Victoria Martin, Madison L.
Pugh, Jelysa Rosario, Kyler
Scutt, Dante Allen, Emily G.
Andrews, Megan E. Domiano,
Joseph J. Gayton, Kaitlyn Gurna-
ri, Kevin J. Kozerski, Maura M.
Kresge, Matthew Malenovitch,
Hannah E. Redding, Julia
Schneider, Geoffrey S. Walton Jr,
Michelle J. Bidding, Frank Casta-
no, Cheyanna Derr, Steven
Dressler Jr., Jacob M. Lupas,
Sierra Quinn, Sahara Rachman,
Ronald D. Sepkoski, Rebecca L.
Williams, Teri A. Andrews, Ethan
Catalanello, Angelina J. Davis,
Shannon R. Drevitch, Jonathan
Fleig, Victoria Gogick, Jacob
Heylek, Misha Kazmierski, Sarah
Knappman, Rachel M. Lacomy,
Michelle C. Lanning, Paul M.
Marinko Jr., Mary Jeane Pistack,
Courtney Regan, Tyler Sekelsky,
Mykayla V. Timek, Colleen Tlu-
cek, Madison M. Yech, Caleigh M.
Anderson, Jacob Cole, Thaddeus
Donlavage, Megan Gurnari,
Alexandria Kozich, Raymond
Lauer, David Marcincavage, Kira
Meager, Timothy Mykulyn, Kish-
an H. Patel, Jacob Supinski,
Jacob Brown, Bethany Jopling,
Jarred Kline, Taylor L. Mattei,
Ronald Melodick, Brooke Schiel,
Emily White, Nancy Zheng, Gavin
Baranski, Joshua Brown, Cade
Corcoran, Vanessa L. Danko-
vitch, Zachary Everett, Alexan-
der Mintchev, Montana Raggi,
Darren Tomeo, Matthew Zalaffi,
Carmen Biniek, Matthew Cek-
losky, Justin Heidig, Darryn
Marek, George F. Oko, Casey
Salinas, Michael Simon Jr., Ken-
neth M. Wallace Jr., Karissa
Wondoloski, Joshua Anstett,
Haley Carey, Brandon Ceccoli,
Kayla Danko, Marysa Florio, Erik
Javick, Mark Kozub, Alek Krokos,
Gabrielle Nichols, Kallie ODon-
nell, Hannah Rushkowski, Da-
nielle Schmidt, Lauren Waltz,
Theodore Wozniak, Alexzandria
C. Gittens, Morgan Bilski, Robert
Brenner, Jonathan O. Cabrera,
Mikayla Cook, Julia Ercolani,
James Hannigan, Elizabeth A.
Mendoza, Mikayla Mosley, Ali-
yanna Rosario, Kaylei Sahonick,
Kylie Seyler, Benjamin Yozwiak,
Katie Dickson, Jacob Dudeck,
Matthew Hamel, Emily Kukowski,
Anthony Pizzella, Samantha Sax,
Nathan E. Searfoss, David Shov-
er, Demetrius Yeager, Tyler
Bradford, Ashley Chase, Joseph
V. Davis, Madilyn D. Golanoski,
Lawrence Mazurek, Julia Popple,
Brendan Richards, Amanda
Smith, Tanner Smith, Noah
Stankinas, Olivia Wynn, Sheila M.
Brandenburg, Collin Dlugosh,
Dylan M. Flis, Alan Gribble, Za-
chary Katsock, Christian Shubz-
da, Riely F. Snee, Angelina Belot-
ti, Claudia Corchado, Quinn
Daniels, Kayden M. Davison,
Anthony Egidio, Mary Interewicz,
Minerva Kasayapanand, Erin
Knappman, Dylan Komorek,
Christian Kosik, Morgan A. Price,
Cole Redwood, Nicholas Sebas-
tian, Jordyn Sovan, Megan Syp-
niewski, Damien Zendzion, Kyle
Costello, Michael Emmert, Kelsey
Evans, Morgan Gayton, Michael
Grebeck, Emily Hughes, Eva
King, Alexander Mykulyn, Kieran
H. Rinish, Madison Roberts,
Consuela Rodriguez, Alexander
Rubbico, Kelsey Smith, Emily
Colleran, Abygail E. Davis, Gracie
Dombroski, Gavin Donahue,
Ryan A. Fisher, Jacob R. Gibbon,
Autumn MacAfee, Michaela V.
Minnick, Jennifer Patron, Jordan
Pugh, Chad Regan, Hailey Riv-
era, Matthew Thompson, Katelyn
A. Travis, Gianna P. Valenti,
Charles R. Wallace, Krisjin Bilwin,
Richard Carey, Hailey Colleran,
Lauren Dudeck, Kaitlyn Duffy,
Nicholas Hernandez, Gabrielle
Lakkis, Jamie Pahler, Reina
Prado, Aiden J. Redding, Garrett
Wardle, Kerrianne Wardle, Nanda
Zheng, Quimara Anderson, Ryan
C. Ball, Bradley M. Bidding, Lo-
gan Davison, Maria E. Egidio,
Patrick J. Gacha, Lucas Heylek,
Caitlyn Howell, Mia Nichols,
Rebecca Schiel, David Shmakov,
Kayla Weitz, Olivia Wychock,
David Balchun, Raven Bozek, ,
Isabella Gibbon, Kelsey Hardy,
Makayla A. Jopling, Briannah
Lee, Cody Lello, Abigail Lupas,
Chabee D. Patel, Kaylee Roe-
buck, Emanuel Selever, David
Sikora III, Jordyn M. Simonson,
Abigail Sorokas, Ali Tedik, Ra-
chael M. Sennett, Margaret A.
Andrews, Jude Bourdeau, Madi-
son Davis, Lucas Debiasi, Su-
zanne E. Hannigan, Emily N.
Moyer, Brandon M. Palmentere,
Michael B. Senape Jr, Kaia Stets,
Sarah Supinski, Andrew J. Wal-
lace, Dalano J. Yuknavich, Emily
A. Brown, Sean T. Chalker, Alex-
ander P. Fisher, Brooke Gilman,
Anya M. Gramlich, Elayna S.
Grymko, Ryleigh E. Kopiak,
Jeremiah N. Lasky, Caleb A.
Metcalf, Emily A. Saracino,
Breanna D. Singer, Zi X. Weng,
Henri Avila, Randall W. Bednar,
Jordyn Catina, Haylee R. Deats,
Jason M. Dorbad Ii, Enrique L.
Golda, Michael J. Horan, Faati-
mah Y. Kazimi, Makayla G. Ko-
busky, Damien E. McCarthy,
Lillian A. Meese, Akira A. Simon,
Brianna E. Webhost, Brian D.
Belles Jr, Mya Y. Corcoran, Bran-
don W. Emmons, Tyler T. Engle-
man, Mikayla M. Faatz, Rylee E.
Giomboni, Parker W. Gonzales,
Amaya J. Green, Rhayne A.
Hayward, Mykola Kunderevych,
Kyleigh M. OHara, Jack H. Pryor,
Catherine M. Shuleski, Candladia
R. Washinski, Mason B. Baranski,
Addison T. Bielski, Abigale L.
Colleran, Matthew F. Egidio, Ian
S. Gartley, Ryan E. Gdovin, Isaiah
N. Henries, Elizabeth M. Kosik,
Laci A. Kostelnick, Hayden
Krzywicki, Gwyneth E. Lupas,
HONOR ROLL
See HONOR ROLL, Page 6B
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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Dombroski, Kayleigh M. Fisher,
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M. Vincenti, Ashni Voleti, Robert
G. Watkins, Brandon Westawski,
Kaylee A. Yefko and Orion May-
rson.
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Allen, Emily R. Alvarez, Marqui J.
Anderson, Summer A. Balbuena,
Mallory Balchun, Stacy Balent,
Erynn F. Barancho, Ari Bartolai,
Alexa Berecin, Katlyn Berlew,
Edward Biniek, Christian Black,
Robert L. Bonar, Vincent J.
Bowers, Dylan Bronack, Nasirah
B. Brown, Jacqueline M. Burd,
Sienna S. Burgette, Martin J.
Butry, Gabriella Candelario,
Jason Carey, Logan J. Case,
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Sean R. Cavanaugh, Madison A.
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Osiris Chambers, Matthew J.
Chase, Roxanna D. Christian,
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Aidan Connelly, Emily A. Conway,
Tyler J. Cook, Robert L. Corco-
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Zachary Daniels, Brittney A.
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Tyler C. Decinti, Kayla Defebo,
Marco Deluca, Morgan Derby,
Matthew R. Devens, Thomas H.
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Kimmeng Eab, Jacob R. Eber-
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Fassl, Matthew A. Fazio, Allyse
Filipowich, Danielle N. Filipowich,
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Grumblis, Max A. Gryczka, Alex-
ander Gulitus, Amanda P. Haas,
Ian Haczewski, Savannah Hal-
chak, Corey Harrison, Veronica
Hartman, Madison Hawk, William
J. Healey, Lauren Hendrick,
Iliana S. Hernandez, Miguel
Hernandez, Baylee Hickok, Bra-
dley R. Hughes Jr., Dylan J.
Hurrey, Mikaela Isenberg, Za-
chary Jarnot, Aiden Jones,
Bailee Jones, Charles Jones,
Christopher Jones, Kay Dee
Jones, Jonathon S. Karpien,
Alexis Kazmierski, Nicholas Keil,
Haley Kennedy, Daniel Ken-
zakoski, Lucas J. Kenzakoski,
Megan Kenzakoski, Alexia E.
King, Corrin King, Kyle Kondrat-
ick, David M. Kosik Jr., Dominick
Kowalczyk, Kyle Kowalski, Eric
Krzywicki, Katharine Kukowski,
Wilson Kunkel, Caullen Kupris,
Alexis Lanza, Mack Lauer, Con-
nor Lee, Andrew S. Lenkofsky,
Julissa Lezama, Alycia Lispi,
Allyson Losito, Keghan R. Lukas,
Dakoda Luna, Abigail Lyons,
Leah Maciolek, Frank J. Mackow-
sky, Aleksa Malys, Marissa M.
Malys, Courtney E. Martin, Karlie
L. Marx, Kassie Marx, Kelsie E.
Marx, Nathan H. Mattei, Xan
Mayrson, Makayla Mccord, Mekhi
D. McDonald, Reiley A. McDo-
nald, Marissa McElnea, Keturah
McLeod, Kathleen Miller, Kylie
Miller, Loghan E. Million, Joseph
Mohiuddin, Joseph K. Monahan,
Antonio Miguel T. Mondala,
Zackary J. Mudlock, Angelica
Myers, Mikhayla Nash, Makenzie
Nastawa, Kevin Newberry Iii,
Garret Nichols, Emily J. Novak,
Jenna Novakowski, Chase J.
Nowak, Trinity Ostopick, Chris-
topher M. Owen, Joseph Pahler,
Leah Parker, Alyssa Parry, Alexis
Pawluk, Jesus A. Perdomo,
Austin Perrins, Taylor Phillips-
Banas, Hallie Pierandozzi, Jor-
dan Pierandozzi, Olivia Pizzella,
Rhianna N. Polifko, Zachary J.
Popish, Brianna L. Powell, Jason
M. Price, Sara J. Price, Rachel E.
Puglio, Kara Rasimas, Keishla
Reyes-Prosper, Joshua Rhodes,
Kyleigh Rice, Makayla R. Rock-
hold, Saelah K. Rodrigez, Joanny
Rojas, Gideon O. Rosado, Court-
ney A. Rose, Evan Rozell, Jeremy
M. Rozell, Izaiah R. Ruggere,
Corey T. Rush, Melissa Rush,
Ryan T. Rush, Christian Savage,
Samuel Savage, Zachery Savage,
Christian Schmidt, Damiana J.
Schmidt, Daniel Schmidt, Marga-
ret Schmidt, Quinten Schmidt,
Daniel A. Schuler, Matthew F.
Schuler, Alexis M. Serafin, Evan
L. Serafin, James Shaffer, Abigail
Shiner, Jhyqwez T. Simmons,
Faith M. Simonson, Jeremy M.
Simonson, Samantha Smalls,
Dominick Sorbelli and Bryna
Soriano, Eric Sovan, Brandon J.
Spagnola, Jason Stachokus,
Jerome Steligo, Nathaniel E.
Stevens, Jessica A. Stewart,
Patrick Strouse, Albert Suko-
waski, Ian P. Temarantz, Thomas
G. Thatcher, Josephine Thomas,
Kiandra Thomas, Madalynn B.
Thomas, Morgan Thomas, Ash-
ley Tomeo, Brendan Tomeo,
Kasandra E. Travis, Jaiden Trim-
mer-Duffy, Jacob T. Urbanski,
Maya Velez, Alan Vose, Julie
Wardell, Mitchell Warnick, James
Waxmonsky, Richard Werhun,
Nikolas Werkheiser, Kaylee Wert,
Victoria K. White, Joshua A.
Wiggins, Cody Williams, Danika
Williams, Ronald J. Wincek Iii,
Zachary C. Wojtash,Robert
Woolard, Richard M. Worzel,
Daniel J. Wunner Jr., Joshua
Wychock, Brianna Yachera III,
Joshua Yakimowicz, Mackenzie
J. Zavec and Brian Zimmerman
Jr.
HONOR ROLL
Continued from Page 5B
John Bodosky, Exeter, was recent-
ly honored on his retirement by
the staff and students at John F.
Kennedy
Elementary
School in
Exeter. Bo-
dosky has
served the
Wyoming Area
School District
and John F.
Kennedy
Elementary
School for many years. He will
be remembered most for his
seasonal decorations and his
artwork of cartoon characters
that adorn the halls and cafete-
ria at the school. Bodosky re-
ceived the Lauretta Woodson
Award from the Pennsylvania
Association of School Retirees
in 2008. He was also honored
with the dedication of the
schools playground to him in
2007.
Carly Sokach, Wyoming Seminary
cum laude graduate and daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Sokach, West Pittston, received
the Dr. William
Schuler Pierce
Award in
recognition of
her excellence
in science
during the
schools com-
mencement.
Prior to com-
mencement
she received the Presidents
Educational Excellence Award,
the Jerry A. and Edith K. Isco-
vitz Memorial Good Sports-
manship Award, the PIAA Schol-
ar Athlete Award, the Karen
Klassner Award for achievement
through perseverance, the
Spencer Bible Prize and the
Lindsley Morgan Washburn
Prize in Mathematics.
Daniel Phillips, world-renowned
violinist and founding member
of the Orion String Quartet,
recently offered a master class
in violin per-
formance at
Wyoming
Seminary
Upper School.
Phillips met
with members
of the string
section of the
schools or-
chestra and
worked with them on technique.
Phillips also presented a recital
in the Great Hall during which
he performed music by J.S.
Bach, Dvorak and Brahms.
Joining him in the recital were
Seminary artists-in-residence,
Christiane Appenheimer-Vaida,
cello; John Michael Vaida, viola;
and Wen-Chi Liu, piano.
Frank Castano, a sixth-grade
student at Solomon-Plains
Memorial Elementary School,
received the annual Pearl Wo-
loski Memorial Award during
award ceremonies held at the
school. The award is presented
to a sixth-grade student who
has demonstrated and exempli-
fied a true school spirit by his or
her actions in helping others in
the school community through-
out their elementary education.
Castano also received a $500
savings bond.
NAMES AND FACES
Bodosky
Sokach Phillips
DALLAS: Four Misericor-
dia University students per-
formed more than 1,200
hours of community service
volunteering as high school
tutors and literacy advocates
and helping fellow students
acclimate to college life as
part of the AmeriCorps Com-
munity Fellows project.
The AmeriCorps Communi-
ty Fellows project is designed
to develop students as active
citizens and increase the num-
ber of college students serv-
ing in the areas of college ac-
cess and success, preparing
other students to go to col-
lege and helping them suc-
ceed once they get there. The
Fellows are required to each
complete a minimum of 300
hours of service in one calen-
dar year.
The participating students,
who have varied backgrounds
and majors, are: Cory Chikow-
ski, a nursing major from
West Pittston; Sara Nowalis, a
speech-language pathology
major from Forty Fort; Rachel
Ruane, an early childhood,
elementary and special educa-
tion major from Roaring
Brook Township; and Jessica
Szumski, a psychology major
from Dupont.
Upon successful completion
of their term of service, each
AmeriCorps Community Fel-
low will receive an education
award of $1,132 from the Na-
tional Service Trust which can
be used to repay qualified stu-
dent loans, pay current educa-
tional expenses and/or pay
for future education at a qual-
ified institution of higher
learning. They also receive
support and training from
Pennsylvania Campus Com-
pact throughout the project.
For information on the
AmeriCorps Community Fel-
lows program, contact Kristen
Mitchell Samuels at 570-674-
8041, or ksamuels@misericor-
dia.edu.
Chikowski Szumski Ruane Nowalis
Misericordia students participate in AmeriCorps Community Fellows project
Penn State Wilkes-Barres Student Support Services recently
held its annual year-end celebration at Appletree Terrace, New-
berry Estates, Dallas. Students in the programwere treated to a
night of food, fun and friendship with their fellowstudents, faculty
and staff. Continuing students, transfer students, peer mentors,
work study students and spring graduates were honored. Wayne
Wolfe, director of staffing and volunteer services at the American
Red Cross Wyoming Valley Chapter, spoke to the students about
volunteerismin the community, and Dan Downey, former director
of career services at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, offered insight on
career perspectives of volunteerismin relation to rsum building
and job searches. Student Support Services is a TRIO federal
grant programthat aims to increase college retention, graduation
rates and career options for first-generation college students,
those fromlow-income families, the physically challenged and
students with learning disabilities. The universitys programin-
cludes more than160 students. At the celebration, fromleft, first
row: Priscilla Benesky, Forty Fort; Sudan Chen, Kingston; Kristine
Strong, Dallas; Suxia Chen, Kingston; and Lacy Strong, Nanticoke.
Second row: Brian Bunney, Tunkhannock; Aaron Blockus, Hanover
Township; Bryan Harding, Mountain Top; Robert Naro, Wilkes-
Barre; and AdamTamanini, Trucksville.
PSU W-B Support Services holds year-end celebration
Some members of Larksville HighSchool Class of 1960recently trav-
eledtoNewYork City for a class tripthat they were denied50years ago.
The grouptook a limousine toNewYork; touredthe city; took ina Broad-
way play; andhaddinner at Carmines Restaurant. Classmates inattend-
ance, fromleft, first row, are RoseMarie Kachinko, Rita Carver Feeney,
Marlene Belsky, JohnBelsky, Irene Sodak, Deanna Koper Turcan, Elea-
nor Whitecavage Shandra andAnne Barrett Maher. Secondrow: Ronald
Kachinko, Jack Feeney, Diane CostelloBrassingtonandBill Turcan.
A high school trip, at long last
Three students from Wyoming Area
Secondary Center received national
recognition for their excellent results in
the National Spanish Exam. Megan
Potoski received a gold medal for scor-
ing above 99 percent in the nation.
Ashley Melendez earned a bronze
medal and John Bankus scored an
honorable mention. The students were
honored at a dinner at Kings College.
From left are Bankus and Melendez.
Wyoming Area Secondary Center
excels on National Spanish Exam
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 7B
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your childs
name, age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grandparents
names and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Dont forget to include a daytime
contact phone number.
We cannot return photos submitted
for publication in community news,
including birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious or
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require return because such photos can
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in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your childs photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
Happy Birthday Shopping Spree
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Jacob William Bittorf, son of
Jack and Lisa Bittorf, Hazle
Township, is celebrating his 10th
birthday today, July 31. Jacob is
a grandson of Harry and Ruth
Sauers, Drums, and the late
William and Doris Bittorf.
Jacob W. Bittorf
Taylor Ann Delzeit, daughter of
Stephanie Clisham and Phillip
Delzeit of Edwardsville, is cele-
brating her first birthday today,
July 31. Taylor is a granddaught-
er of Joseph and Paula Clisham,
Larksville, Leslie and Daniel
Clisham, Plymouth, and Phillip
and Sue Delzeit, Luzerne. She is
the great-granddaughter of
Josephine Price, Larksville, and
Bertha Delzeit, Wilkes-Barre.
Taylor A. Delzeit
Christopher Jones, son of Chris-
topher and Debbie Jones, Du-
ryea, is celebrating his 1 1th birth-
day today, July 31. Christopher is
a grandson of George and An-
nette Jones, Duryea, and Robert
and Christine Zakseski, West
Wyoming. He has a brother,
Ryan, 4.
Christopher Jones
Austin Jacob Siegel, son of
Ernest W. and Yvonne Siegel,
Alden, is celebrating his 15th
birthday today, July 31. Austin is
a grandson of Robert and Pat
(Helen) Swiatek, Hunlock Creek,
and the late Ernest R. and Betty
(Louise) Siegel. He is a great-
grandson of the late Joseph and
Florence Swiatek and the late
William and Grace Dalon. Austin
has a brother, Colin, 10.
Austin J. Siegel
Gavin Joseph Gisolfi, son of
Joseph and Mollie Gisolfi, Du-
ryea, is celebrating his first
birthday today, July 31. Gavin is a
grandson of Linda and Robert
Nickerson, Plains Township;
Joseph and Grace Gisolfi, Taylor;
and Michael and Gloria Mooney,
Wilkes-Barre. He is a great-
grandson of Verda Wachilla,
Plains Township, and the late
Albert Wachilla.
Gavin J. Gisolfi
Kyle and Ryan Phillips, twin sons of
Peter and Lisa Phillips, Abington,
are celebrating their 10th birthdays
today, July 31. Kyle and Ryan are
the grandsons of Thomas and
Elizabeth Zdancewicz, Swoyersville,
Ted and Linda Downs, Lancaster,
and Fred Phillips, Leola.
Kyle and Ryan Phillips
Nesbitt Womens & Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital
Rivera, Jasmine L. and Joshua S.
Henrie, Edwardsville, a daughter
July 1 1.
Muhammad, Alia and Ikram, Moun-
tain Top, a son, July 1 1.
Delucca, Courtney and A.J., Exeter,
a daughter, July 1 1.
Williams, Wendy and Brian Laman,
Mountain Top, a daughter, July
12.
Lehman, Heidi and Billy Erdman,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, July 12.
Ceppa, Julie A. and Michael S.
Kravets, Nanticoke, a son, July
13.
Aponte, Amanda and Gerardo
Morales, Kingston, a daughter,
July 13.
Wardecki, Jennifer and Jordan,
Warrior Run, a daughter, July 14.
McDonough-Park, Ann and Jason
Park, Kingston, a daughter, July
14.
Dixon, Keri and Andrew Croughn,
West Pittston, a son, July 15.
Ridley, Trina and Frederick Wil-
lauer, West Pittston, a daughter,
July 15.
Reese, Elizabeth, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, July 15.
Gustitis, Kimberly and Eric, Exeter,
a daughter, July 15.
Havard, Tina and Gerald, Hanover
Township, a son, July 16.
Mozdian Hudak, Kristen and Joe
Hudak, Mountain Top, a daugh-
ter, July 17.
Hower, LeeAnn and Allan Brown,
Alden, a daughter, July 17.
Isaac, Lynn and David Dehaut,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 18.
Mitchell, Jennifer, Nanticoke, a
daughter, July 18.
Salvaterra, Holly and Joshua,
Kingston, a son, July 18.
Gensel, Rebecca and Eugene
Milewski, Wilkes-Barre, a son,
July 18.
Sterba Jr., Christina and John,
Exeter, a son, July 18.
Sterling, Shana and Andrew Rob-
inholt, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter,
July 18.
Sowcik, Lori and Matthew, Dallas, a
son, July 19.
Bearce, Amy and Shawn Smith,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 19.
Serra, Stephany and Derek Klick,
Hanover Township, a son, July
19.
Good, Samantha and Frank, Pitt-
ston, a son, July 19.
Stoodley, Ashlee and Patrick,
Kingston, a son, July 20.
Mishanski, Lauren and Eric, Nanti-
coke, a daughter, July 21.
Nafus, June, Hanover Township, a
son, July 21.
Rovelli, Debra D., Larksville, a son,
July 21.
Leonard, Sherry and Anthony
Morales, Nanticoke, a daughter,
July 22.
Hinkle, KeriAnn and Harold, Moun-
tain Top, a daughter, July 23.
Boston, Alyssa and Robert Boe-
decker, Kingston, a son, July 23.
BIRTHS
Marist College,
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Leah Butterwick, Kingston.
Syracuse University,
Syracuse, N.Y.
Andrea Butchko, Dallas; Emily
Banas, Dallas.
The College at Brockport,
State University of New
York, Brockport, N.Y.
Allyson Long, Old Forge.
University of Hartford,
West Hartford, Conn.
Darren M. Duncan, Blakeslee.
University of
Wisconsin-Whitewater,
Whitewater, Wis.
Emilie M. Hoeft, West Wyoming.
Upper Iowa University,
Fayette, Iowa
Grace Anne Cardino, Conyng-
ham.
Villanova University
Matthew Panzitta, Pittston;
Steven Gulotta, Trucksville;
Ryan Brown, Blakeslee; Anto-
nio Villamor, Kingston; Taylor
Smith, Plains Township; Lau-
ren Moyer, Tamaqua; and
Kelly Mericle, Shavertown.
OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS LISTS
Eighth-grade students
at Wilkes-Barre Academy
recently completed Amer-
ican Red Cross training in
first aid, child and adult
CPR and the use of an
AED. At a training ses-
sion, from left, are Tiffany
Webb and Olivia Gregorio.
W-B Academy
eighth-graders
certified in CPR
Aiden Gyle, son of David Gyle
and Tracy Rogers of Wilkes-
Barre, is celebrating his third
birthday today, July 31. Aiden is
the grandson of Wayne and
Susan Gyle, and Rick and Sis
Rogers, all of Wilkes-Barre. Aiden
has two sisters, Sarah and Alys-
sa Gyle.
Aiden Gyle
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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The students of St. Nicholas-St.
Mary School recently held a
dance-a-thon to benefit Macken-
zie Marx, a student at the school
who was diagnosed with acute
myeloid leukemia. Student Joce-
lyn Rogers coordinated the event
with the help of Principal Mary
Catherine Slattery and Mary
Jean Houseknecht, a teacher
and moderator of the Savio Club.
Marx surprised the faculty and
students with a visit to the
school, where she was presented
with the proceeds from the
dance-a-thon. At the check pre-
sentation, from left, are Rogers,
Houseknecht, Marx and Slattery.
St. Nicholas-St. Mary School
dance-a-thon helps ill student
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 9B
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Wyoming Area High School
Vito Quaglia, principal, Wyoming
Area High School, recently an-
nounced the students who qual-
ified for the honor roll for the
fourth marking period.
Grade 7: High Honors: Robert
Acacio, Mackenzie Bilbow, Jo-
seph Buczynski, Matthew Carl-
son, Bryan Cumbo, Katharyn
Dymond, Blaise Erzar, Alexis
Harris, Laura Heinzlmeir, Kelsey
Kasisky, Hannah Klaproth, Lind-
sey Klinges, Zachary Lagrue,
Ashley Lamoreaux, Cassandra
Lockhart, Maria Marstell, Megan
Mattioli, Victoria Mattioli, Anntoi-
nette Mauriello, Michael Murphy,
Ryan Murphy, Lauren Perry,
Victoria Remley, Austin Rought,
Anthony Shaver, Stephanie
Sokach, Rachel Solano, Jessica
Sorick, Krystina Stanczyk, Mor-
gan Tarnalicki, Anna Thomas,
Daniela Vigueras, Claudia Waltz,
Nicole Wright, Megan Wysocki.
Honors: Emily Ambruso, Ryan
Burton, Ian Chandler, Kareemah
Condry, Erin Donnelly, Grace
Gober, Jeffrey Hogan, Nicole
Hollister, Jordan Kelly, Mikayla
Klimas, Klaryssa Kolbeck, Cory
Lescavage, Kimberlee Mackey,
Emily Menta, Theresa Mitten,
Heather Nametko, Jay Neely,
Kevin Pish, Amber Salvo, Saman-
tha Sepko, Alexandria Sitkowski,
Jennie Skursky, Justin Stein-
berger, Kelly Sypulski, Allyson
Tokar, Mackenzie Toler, Alex-
andra Traglia, Nico Vasquez, Eric
Whyte, Emily Yarmey.
Grade 8: High Honors: Amy Lynn
Alder, Madeleine Ambruso, Julia
Banas, Marcyssa Brown, Kenneth
Burkhardt, Cecelia Chisdock,
Carlane Costello, Juliana DeNar-
di, Joshua Donvito, Destini Espo-
sito, Chaslyn Facciponti, Domin-
ick Forlenza, Abigail Gibbs, Ser-
gey Gnilopyat, Nikolas Gushka,
Olivia Katulka, Nicole Kolessar,
Caitlyn Kraynak, Amber Ku-
harchik, Zoe Laporte, Geneva
Laviska, Anthony Lenkaitis,
Alexa Malloy, Lauren Maloney,
Maria Marcum, John Marianacci,
Melissa Mazzitelli, Evan Musto,
Justin Palovchak, Victoria Pen-
nington, Mia Ashley Perrino,
Rachel Polacheck, Jude Polit-
Moran, Carrie Pozaic, Emma
Ramage, Sara Romanowski,
Julianna Scappaticci, Taylor
Schechter, Stephanie Schultz,
Abigail Schwerdtman, Nikki
Sellitto, Haley Stackhouse, Za-
chary Sypniewski, Brittany Tho-
mas, Francesca Trottini, Peter
Urban II, Olivia White, Samantha
Williams, Emily Wolfgang. Hon-
ors: Marc Chervenitski, Jr., My-
iah Custer, Cordell Gresh, Mat-
thew Harding, Madison Hind-
marsh, Raymond Hopkins, Tan-
ner Johnson, Hannah Johnston,
Zachary Lopatka, Marcus Mar-
chetti, Abby Orth, Nina Owen,
Mark Paluski, Carmen Randazzo,
Joseph Roach, Zachary Scrobo-
la, Lauren Sokirka, Jeremy
Zezza.
Grade 9: High Honors: Drew Bed-
narski, Emily Bellanco, Mallory
Bohan, Tyler Marie Bonita, Brian
Buckman, Cody Colarusso, Ni-
cole Cumbo, Morgan DeAngelo,
Sally Deluca, Jaclyn DeNardi,
Lisa Guido, Audrey Hiedacavage,
Courtney Melvin, Austin Shis-
sion, Katherine Sokirka, Danielle
Spagnuolo, Gabrielle Spagnuolo,
Mari Elizabeth Taggart, Abigail
Thornton, Brittney Winsock,
Brian Wisowaty, Gared Zaboski.
Honors: Britney Benkoski,
Amanda Bialy, Kyle Borton,
Stephanie Brown, Briana Eipper,
Jonathan Gamble, Shelby Gates,
Julia Gober, Jamie Hannis, Kath-
erine Harrison, Matthew Hine,
Michaela Jurchak, Sara Justave,
Ariana Keller, Michael Lumley,
Brittney Michael, Adrienne
Przybyla, Raelana Scaltz, Evan
Campenni Skene, Leo Skoronski,
Keegan Thomas, Christopher
Wall.
Grade 10: High Honors: John
Bankus, Mariah Bellanco, Valerie
Bott, Victoria Brown, Gregory
Cajka, Michael Carey, Andrew
Coco, Nicholas Dominick, Nicho-
las Esposito, Katelyn Higgins,
Casey Kasisky, Kaitlyn Kross,
Brittany Lemardy, Maria Mar-
ianacci, Andrew Morrison, Dylan
Pegg, Abby Raieski, Angela
Raieski, Evan Rider, Stormy Ruiz,
Emily Shemanski, Leslie Shum-
las, Eric Smith, Stephanie Spu-
dis, Devaney Wood. Honors:
Gabrielle Alberigi, Stephen
Barush, Gabrielle Bohan, Megan
Bonomo, Jordan Chiavacci,
Glynnis Cowley, April Davis,
Serra Degnan, Nikki Giordano,
Michael Harding, Nicholas Heck,
Timothy Holden, Primo Hughes,
Lucas Johnson, Rebecca John-
son, Sherry Klaproth, Ashley
Klein, Emily Kneeream, Alexan-
der Krispin, Samantha Kudrako,
Zachary Lanunziata, Cassandra
Lescavage, Jessica Martin,
Megan Milunic, Nicholas OBrien,
Mark OHara, Brianna Romiski,
Jared Saporito, Brittani Shearer,
Rachael Stark, Hannah Troy,
William Weiss, IV, Tyler Wrubel,
Jacob Wysocki.
Grade 1 1: High Honors: Johanna
Abend, Trevor Alder, John Barce-
lon, Amber Bolton, David Bono-
mo, Mark Dymond, Allison Gold-
en, Jessica Hollister, Keri Irace,
Theresa Kelly, Michael Kohut, III,
Emily Lukasavage, Nick Maz-
zone, Megan Potoski, Sara Radz-
wilka, James Scrobola, Jonathan
Scrobola, Samantha Shiner,
Jacqueline Stash, Louis Vullo.
Honors: Alexandra Amico, Ni-
cholas Bartoli, Brandon Cellini,
Sarah Crake, Kimberly Golden,
William Gray, III, Naomi Hand-
zelek, Leah Laneski, Kyle Lanun-
ziata, Kaitlin Maguire, Gianna
Marranca, Adam Romanowski,
James Rose, Jr., Hanna Shelley,
Brittany Smetana, Riley Thomas,
Kristy Voychuk.
Grade 12: High Honors: Andrew
Ambruso, Jillian Balberchak,
Caitlin Bernoskie, Macawley
Brown, Alyssa Cajka, Karisa
Calvitti, Joshua Carey, Jessica
Dauber, David Dorbad, Holly
Ference, Alaina Gercak, Michelle
Gitkos, Linnae Homza, Maria
Kelly, Ronald Klepadlo, Kayla
Kross, Brianna Mikolaichik, Amy
Novak, Jessica Olejnik, Alecia
Panuski, Samantha Scott, Tia
Spagnuolo, Caitlin Vitale, Eric
Werbin, Lauren Wysocki, Alyssa
Zekoski. Honors: Kevin An-
derson, Patrick Bone, Robert
Brzozowski, Ryan Carey, Everal
Eaton, Alex Ellsworth, Michelle
Golden, Matthew Kolbeck, Sarah
Mack, Kaithlyn Oravitz, Sheila
Patoka, Katherine Scalzo, Kourt-
ny Schwerdtman, Julia Solomon,
Rachel Taylor, Kevin Thornton,
Michael Tomaszewski, Stanley
Yanik.
HONOR ROLL
hesays.
Gallagher believes todays stu-
dents feel disengagedfromthe sto-
rybecauseof its staging.
Myproject is anewstaging, not
an adaptation, Gallagher says.
ImputtingrobotsinaCyberScot-
land, but it will adhere faithfully to
the text. The project will only be
completed if Gallagher can raise
the production costs. The sculp-
tures, sets, actors, computer equip-
ment, andmotioncapture andani-
mation programs necessary to cre-
ate a 2-hour robot rendering of the
tragedycarrya pricetagof $8,900.
When it comes to raising the
money, though, Gallagher has
demonstratedaforesightworthyof
Macbeths witches: hehas screwed
his courage to the sticking-place
andsubmittedhisproposal toKick-
starter, the largest threshold
pledge systemfor funding creative
projects intheworld.
Kickstarter, hosted at www.kick-
starter.com,allowspeopletocreatea
short video about the music, film,
art, technology, design, food, or oth-
er project for which they want to
raisemoney. If thevideoisapproved
by Kickstarter staff, the project cre-
ators arethenallowedtochoosethe
amount of money they will seek as
well asthetimeperiodduringwhich
donations will be accepted. Once a
project is listed on the website, do-
nors from all over the world may
pledgeanyamountthatismorethan
$1. If the total amount desired is se-
curedinpledges, the project creator
receives his funds. If the project falls
even1dollarshort of itsgoal, howev-
er, no money changes hands. Kick-
starters all-or-nothing funding in-
suresthatanartistscreativevisionis
not compromised, and that project
creators will be very engaged in the
promotion process. Gallagher has
until11:59p.m. ESTonSunday, Aug.
7toreachhisgoal,andhehasalready
securedsomeinterest intheproject.
J.A. Curcione, a writer from Sa-
lem, Mass., is one of Gallaghers
pledgers. The project is pretty out
there, Curcione admits, but Dan
hasaveryfocusedvision:hewantsto
get young people excited about
Shakespeares text. Havingperform-
edShakespearesworkandasafan, I
sayanythingthat triestograbkidsis
great and worth the pledge. Mac-
beth is action-packed, andthe story
workswithwhat hehasdesigned.
Jennifer Joseph, a visual artist
from Santa Fe, N. M., and fellow
pledger echoes Curciones senti-
ments. Because of the preva-
lence of video games today, she
says, kids have a relationship
with visual language. Dans pro-
ject, conceptually, is great. Im
hoping for full funding of his pro-
ject. The great thing about Kick-
starter is that its a give-as-you-
canprogram; youcanraisealot of
money in small increments,
which is fantastic in todays eco-
nomic environment.
One of Gallghers most ardent
supportersmaybeAnneButler, the
English teacher who introduced
him to Macbeth more than a dec-
ade agoandwhocurrently teaches
andheadstheEnglishDepartment
at Dallas HighSchool.
Gallagher, who Butler remem-
bers as havinganeasy time naviga-
ting Shakespeares language and a
talentforpickinguphisinnuendos,
believes a new staging of The
Bards original text is neededinto-
days classrooms.
Imapurist,Butlersays.Ideally,
wewant all readers toget tothat pu-
rist stage. I have found in my career
thatthecomplexlanguageisthebig-
gest barrier to Shakespeares mess-
age. Theres definitely a value in dif-
ferent adaptations and stagings.
They helpa reader buildtowardthe
message Shakespeare intended. Im
interestedtoseewhatDandoeswith
this. Macbeth is the story of one
mansdesiretobemorethanhessup-
posedtobe. Iwonderhowthattrans-
lateswhenMacbethisamachine.
While Gallagher is not giving
awaytoomanytradesecretsjustyet,
hes confident that the human ele-
mentsof thetragedywill resonatein
his animation. I keep thinking as I
workonthisprojectaboutthemasks
actorsworeinancientGreektheater,
or Nohtheater. If thestoryis univer-
sal, and conveyed properly, its al-
mostbetternottoseeanactorsface.
Becausewecanprojectourselveson-
tothemasks.Inaworldaswiredas
the present day, robotic Macbeth
holds great promise: viewers of
Gallaghers creation should have
no trouble projecting themselves
ontomachines.
MACBETH
Continued from Page 1B
COURTESTY
PHOTO
This screen-
shot shows
the three
witches from
Dan Gallagh-
ers CGI
staging of
Shakes-
peares Mac-
beth.
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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with GOLD CARD
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MINUTE MAIDORANGE JUICE or
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WISH-BONE SALADDRESSING
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with GOLD CARD
6
99
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SI SSI SIZ SIZ SI SIZ SIZ SIZ IZ IZ SIZ SIZ ZZZ SSSI IZ IZ SIZ SIZ SIZ ZZZZZZZ SIZ ZZZZ SSSIZ ZZZ S ZZZZ S ZZZZZZZZZZ IIZZ IIIIIIZZZ SIIIZ ZZZZZ IZZZZ SIIZZZZ IIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
PK PPPK PK PK PPK PK PK PK PK PK PK KG KG KG KG KG KG KG KG GG KG G KG GGGG KG PK PK PK PPK PK K PK KKKKKG KKG GGGGGGGGGG PK PPK KKKKKKGGG KG GG PPK PK KKKKKKG KG KG G KG GG KG KG G PPK PK KKKKKKKG KKG KG KG GG KG G KG GG KG G PPKKG KKKKG GGGGGG PPPPKKKG KG GG KG G KG G PPPPKKKKKKG KG KKG GG KG KG PK PKKKKKG G PPK KKKKG KKKG GGGGGGG PKKKKG KKKKG KG GGGGGGG PKKKKKKG GGGG KKKKKGGGGG KKKKKKKKKKG GGGGG KG G KKKKKKKKKG GGGGGG KKKKKGGGGGGGG KKKKKKKKKKG KG GGG !! .! .! .! .! !!!!! .! ! ..! .! .!! .! !!!! .! .! .! !!!!!!!!! .! .! !!!!!! .! ! .!!!!!! ....!!!! ......!!!! .....!! ...!! ...!!! ...!
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CHARMINBATHTISSUE or
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Ultra Strong, Ultra Soft or Sensitive 12 Big Roll and 6 Mega Roll
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5.98
on 2
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011
timesleader.com
INDIANAPOLIS David Ragan, in
the midst of a career breakthrough, add-
edthe pole for the Brickyard400 at Indi-
anapolis Motor Speedway to his sud-
denly improved resume.
Ragan earned his first career Sprint
Cup Series victory earlier this month at
Daytona, a track long considered to be
the crownjewel of NASCAR. Indianapo-
lis ranks among the most prestigious
tracks in the world, and Ragans pole-
winningrunSaturday was nosmall feat.
He made his run late in the session,
with three-time Brickyard winner Jim-
mie Johnson holding down the top spot
on the leaderboard. Ragan turned a lap
of 182.994 mph in his Roush Fenway
Racing Ford to bump Johnson from the
pole.
It will be cool to lead the pack, Ra-
gan said. Its an honor to be here and to
be the fastest guy at Indy. This is a great
track. Any type of accomplishment you
get here is cool.
Its Ragans second career pole. His
first came in April at Texas.
It was a good lap, I didnt
make a mistake, Ragan said. It
wasnt as aggressive as I wanted
to be. But I knew if I hit my marks,
had a conservative lap, Id at least have
a top-five.
Kasey Kahne made his qualifying run
after Raganandjumpedinfront of John-
son with a lap at 182.927 mph in a Toyo-
ta from Red Bull Racing.
We just have to be there at the end,
Kahne said. It seems thats how this
race is won, being up front at the end.
Youre not just going to pass five, six
cars. When you get to turn one, youve
got to be one of those top couple of
cars more times than not.
AP PHOTO
David
Ragan
N
ortheastern Pennsylvania has turned
out its fair share of athletes that have
garnered national attention.
In football alone, names like Rocket
and Qadry Ismail are recognized by
sports fans around the country.
But the area hasnt exactly been a hotbed of
cycling in the past.
That could change as a pair of young area cy-
clists have a chance to earn some international
recognition.
Booey Hottenstein, of Kingston, and Luke Lu-
kas, of Courtdale, will be heading to West Flan-
ders, Belgium, to race and train for a month.
Weve got some pretty pure talent here, said
Paul Lukas, president of the Upstate Velo Club
and Luke Lukas father.
The pair will be making the trip as part of a
group of riders with the FCS Cycling Team out of
Texas. The team is owned by Tim Reduss Vertex
Cycling, a group founded to address the needs of
elite level, developing bicycle racers and to en-
hance the sport of competitive cycling in the U.S.
They are receiving support from the Upstate
Velo Club along with its sponsors Hi-Tech Floor-
ing, Pride Mobility Products, L.T. Verrastro Inc.
and TeeDude.com and Sicklers Bike shop and
Mark and Sue Farrell (former owners of Sicklers).
Upstate Velo, Sicklers Bike Shop, and Mark
and Sue Farrell have been absolutely instrumental
to the development of cycling in the area, Hotten-
stein said. Luke and I couldnt thank them
enough for their support.
The Velo Club also helped send David Novak, of
CYCL I NG
Two young cyclists from area will travel
to Belgium to race and train for a month
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Booey Hottenstein of Kingston and Luke Lukas of Courtdale will travel to Europe to compete in bicy-
cle races as part of a team owned by a group founded to enhance the sport of cycling in the U.S.
Wheels in motion
By JOE SOPRANO
jsoprano@timesleader.com
See CYCLING, Page 4C
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Chad Ochocinco
promised to tone down his antics now that hes in
New England, where coach Bill Belichick likes his
players to be seen and rarely heard.
That lasted all of five minutes.
Aftercallinghimself achameleonwhocanblend
in and do it the Patriot way, Ochocinco riffed on
riding the wave and soaring with his angel wings.
Then, by way of introduction to the crush of media
surrounding himfor his first availability inNewEn-
gland, he asked for a group hug.
It is going to be a little quiet. You wont get the
same Chadyouare usedto, andI probably wont be
talking to the media much, probably not at all, real-
ly. I just want toplayball andridethewave, hesaid
after practice on Saturday.
I will alwaysbeme. It hasbeenapart of mygame
toalways beme, but thereis acertainwaythePatri-
ots do it. Its easy for me. Ive always been a
N F L
AP PHOTO
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady,
right, fools around with new teammate Chad
Ochocinco during training camp practice in
Foxborough, Mass., Saturday.
Ochocinco fails
to tone it down
On first try since joining Pats, the
off-the-wall receiver is his old self.
By JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer
See OCHOCINCO, Page 6C
S
uddenly, everyones flocking to
the Philadelphia Eagles.
And this flurry of activity has
put Philadelphia at the front of the
pack.
The Eagles are the team to beat
now, after bringing some of the big-
gest names in the business to town.
Theyve added game-changers Do-
minique Rodgers-Cromartie, Nnamdi
Asomugha, Jason Babin and Vince
Young to a team that already boasts
Michael Vick, DeSean Jackson and
LeSean McCoy.
Its like a dream team, said Young,
the teams new backup quarterback.
If this is a dream, Eagles fans dont
want to be awakened.
Theyre wide-eyed over a 48-hour
spending spree that should make the
Eagles Super Bowl favorites in the
NFC.
Whos better?
The Eagles now have the best cor-
nerback tandem in the league. They
could have the best two front-line
quarterbacks of any team. And now
theyll get more push from their pass
rush.
All because theyre in a rush to win
it all.
The Eagles are all-in, Eagles presi-
dent Joe Banner said.
Dont bet against them this time.
The Eagles figured Kevin Kolbs
time was up, so they traded their
once-promising quarterback of the
future to Arizona. In exchange, they
got a lockdown cornerback who has
picked off 13 passes during his three
NFL seasons and returned four of
them for touchdowns.
That Thursday deal was only the
start of a team transformation for the
Eagles.
Its dramatic, Banner said.
For Philadelphias opponents, the
change could be traumatic.
The Eagles signed Asomugha, who
was so dynamic in Oakland that quar-
terbacks only had a 50-50 shot of
completing a pass when they threw
his way. And last year, they threw the
ball his way just 19 times the entire
season.
Meanwhile, Jason Babin was having
a breakout season as a pass-rushing
defensive end for Tennessee. If he can
come anywhere close to accumulating
12 sacks this year after signing with
the Eagles, Philadelphia can count on
a furious pass rush with Babin on one
side and Trent Cole on the other.
On the other side of the ball, they
signed Young to take Kolbs place and
back up Vick.
Thats four big names added to the
Eagles game plan.
It sent shock waves through the
NFL, said Babin, who was a training
camp cut by the Eagles a couple years
ago. Its impressive.
Its a statement, heard loud and far.
The Eagles are putting their chips
on the table, gambling a Super Bowl
run is in their immediate future.
They wanted to come to a team
that gave them a chance to get to a
Super Bowl, Reid said of his new
recruits. I appreciate that. Thats
what we strive for every year.
Striving doesnt always mean thriv-
ing.
The Eagles are still smarting from
four NFC Championship game defeats
during Reids 12-year tenure.
Theres a big focus on relieving the
pain of being so close so many times
and not getting there, Banner said.
The Eagles got better in one fell
swoop during the early days of train-
ing camp.
They practiced at Lehigh University
in front of fans for the first time Sat-
urday, and spent the morning listen-
ing to chants of Super Bowl. Those
cries always come from the stands at
camp.
This time, they sounded more real.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Eagles send
shock waves
through NFL
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
A U T O R A C I N G
Driver continues hot streak after
getting first Sprint Cup victory
earlier this month at Daytona.
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
Ragan wins Brickyard pole
See BRICKYARD, Page 8C
BRICKYARD 400
1 p.m. today, ESPN
ROCHESTER, N.Y. If the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees hope to win the International
League North for a sixth con-
secutive year, they cant turn in
many more appearances like
Saturday night.
The Yankees struck first
against last-place Rochester but
gave up six unanswered runs
and lost 6-2 before a sellout
crowd of 11,436 at Frontier
Field.
The Yankees are in third
place in the IL North, four
games behindLehighValley and
two behind second-place Paw-
tucket.
The Yankees scored an un-
earned run in the first inning off
Kevin Slowey, but could do
nothing over the next seven in-
nings against the control spe-
cialist, who is on the trade block as the major-
league deadline hits today.
He was really on tonight, second baseman
I L B A S E B A L L
Yanks fall 4 games
off pace in North
By JIMMANDELARO
For The Times Leader
See SWB, Page 4C
6
RED WINGS
2
YANKEES
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S C O R E B O A R D
CAMPS/CLINICS
Rock Solid Girls Elite Basketball
Camp will be held at the Rock Rec
Center 340 Carverton Road. The
Camp runs August 8-18, Monday
Thursday. Girls entering 3rd-5th
grade will be from 4 p.m. 5:30
p.m. and 67th-8th grade will be
from 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. The camp
will focus on making players more
fundamentally sound with position
specific drills for each player.
Please contact the Rock Rec for
more information at 570-696-2769
or email TheRockRecCen-
ter@bmha.org.
CONDITIONINGS
The Wyoming Valley West High
School Boys Soccer Team will
continue voluntary conditioning
sessions every Monday though
Thursday from 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. at
the Forty Fort Rec Field (Cabbage
Patch). All players who will be
entering grades 9 though 1this fall
are encouraged to attend. Please
contact Coach Charlie Whited at
570-407-3133 with any questions.
MEETINGS
Hanover Lady Hawks Basketball
Booster Club will meet at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday 4 at Screwbalz
bar/restaurant on the Sans Souci
Highway. All parents/guardians of
any girls that maybe playing
basketball in the 2011/2012 season
should attend. For more informa-
tion, contact Mike Kaminski at
570-829-5140.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
and Wyoming/West Wyoming
Little League will hold an in-
formational meeting on August 9
at 6:30 p.m. at the Kingston Recre-
ation Center. Both leagues will be
sponsoring a Fall Baseball League
for Coach Pitch and Minor League
levels ages 5-8 and a Softball
League for Minor, Major, and
Junior League levels ages 7-14. For
more information, call Bill at 570-
417-2094.
Luzerne County Federation of
Sportsmen will meet at 7:30 p.m.
Monday at the American Legion,
Post 609, corner of Lee Park Ave
and St. Marys Rd. Club delegates
are urged to attend and interested
sportsmen are cordially invited.
Nanticoke Little League will hold its
monthly meeting 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday at West Side. Everyone
is welcome.
PHYSICALS
Lake-Lehman will hold will conduct
athletic physicals for junior high
boys playing a fall sport at 9 a.m.
Tuesday and for junior high girls at
9 a.m. Thursday. Thursday will be
the final day for physicals. Those
students who missed the senior
high physicals are welcome to
attend either of the days listed
above. There will not be a make up
exam day this year. All athletic
physicals must be completed
before Aug. 15. This includes those
athletes who will have their exams
done by a private physician. Ath-
letes will not be permitted to
practice on Aug. 15 until a physical
is received by the district. Physical
forms may be obtained at the main
office during regular school hours.
A parent/guardian must fill out and
sign all forms prior to the exam.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Coughlin Jr. High Field Hockey sign
ups will be on Thursday, August 4
at Plains Solomon Field house
from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Any ques-
tions please call 570-650-9217.
Duryea Little League is holding Fall
Ball Registrations for Coach Pitch,
Minor, and Major age groups.
Please call Ron at (570) 655-0203
for more information.
Exeter Lions Little League will hold
registration for Fall Baseball and
Softball. Registrations will be held
at the field on August 1 and August
3 from 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Fall Ball is
open to players from Coach Pitch
to Junior League. The registration
fee is $25 per player.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
is accepting applications for Ball
Baseball teams for ages 12-14.
Teams must be affiliated with a
Little League. Travel teams are not
permitted. Games will be played at
OHara Swoyersville beginning
August 27. Email KFFLL@ya-
hoo.com for more information.
Moosic Raiders Junior Football will
be accepting registrations from 6
p.m. 8 p.m. August 1 thought
August 4 at the football field
located off Spring Street. You do
not have to reside in Moosic to
participate. Boys and girls ages 5
to 14 are eligible. A wallet size
photo of each child is required,
along with an original birth certif-
icate and a photocopy. For more
information visit www.moos-
icraiders.com.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
EMMYS
Outstanding Drama Series
Mad Men 1/2
Boardwalk Empire 5/2
The Good Wife 4/1
Game of Thrones 12/1
Friday Night Lights 15/1
Dexter 30/1
Outstanding Comedy Series
Modern Family 1/5
The Office 6/1
30 Rock 8/1
Glee 10/1
The Big Bang Theory 15/1
Parks and Recreation 30/1
Outstanding Lead Actor/Drama
John Hamm (Mad Men) 1/2
Steve Buscemi (Board-
walk Empire)
2/1
Timothy Olyphant
(Justified)
10/1
Michael C. Hall (Dexter) 12/1
Kyle Chandler (Friday
Night Lights)
15/1
Hugh Laurie (House) 5/1
Outstanding Lead Actress/Drama
Julianna Margulies (The
Good Wife)
even
Elisabeth Moss (Mad
Men)
3/2
Mireille Enos (The
Killing)
10/1
Kathy Bates (Harrys
Law)
10/1
Connie Britton (Friday
Night Lights)
15/1
Mariska Hargitay (Law &
Order: SVU)
25/1
Outstanding Lead Actor/Comedy
Steve Carell (The
Office)
1/3
Jim Parsons (The Big
Bang Theory)
3/1
Alec Baldwin (30 Rock) 5/1
Johnny Galecki (The Big
Bang Theory)
20/1
Louis C.K. (Louie) 25/1
Matt LeBlanc (Epi-
sodes)
30/1
Outstanding Lead Actress/Comedy
Laura Linney (The Big
C)
even
Amy Poehler (Parks and
Recreation)
3/2
Tina Fey (30 Rock) 6/1
Edie Falco (Nurse
Jackie)
10/1
Martha Plimpton
(Raising Hope)
20/1
Melissa McCarthy (Mike
& Molly)
30/1
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
TIGERS -$132 Angels
INDIANS -$145 Royals
YANKEES -$195 Orioles
Rangers -$125 BLUE JAYS
WHITE SOX -$115 Red Sox
AS -$142 Twins
Rays -$125 MARINERS
National League
REDS -$158 Giants
PHILLIES -$200 Pirates
BRAVES -$170 Marlins
NATIONALS -$125 Mets
BREWERS -$185 Astros
PADRES -$115 Rockies
DODGERS -$110 Dbacks
CARDS -$145 Cubs
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
September 8
PACKERS 5 Saints
September 11
RAVENS 2.5 Steelers
BUCS 3 Lions
BEARS PK Falcons
CHIEFS 6.5 Bills
TEXANS PK Colts
Eagles 4 RAMS
BROWNS 3 Bengals
JAGUARS 2.5 Titans
Giants 3 REDSKINS
CARDS 3.5 Panthers
49ERS 5.5 Seahawks
CHARGERS 9 Vikings
JETS 4 Cowboys
September 12
Patriots 4 DOLPHINS
BRONCOS 1 Raiders
AME RI C A S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC welterweight title fight on September 17 in Las
Vegas, Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$700 vs. Victor Ortiz at +$500; in the
WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pac-
quiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Hungarian Grand Prix, at
Budapest, Hungary
1 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Brickyard 400, at
Indianapolis
11 p.m.
ESPN2NHRA, Fram-AutoliteNationals, at Sono-
ma, Calif. (same-day tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
5 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Los Angeles
7 p.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
2:30 a.m.
ESPN2 XGames, at Los Angeles (delayed tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Irish Open, final
round, at Kerry, Ireland
9 a.m.
ESPNWomens British Open, final round, at An-
gus, Scotland
1 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, final
round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, final
round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
NBC USGA, U.S. Senior Open Championship,
final round, at Toledo, Ohio
7 p.m.
TGCNationwide Tour, Utah Championship, final
round, at Sandy, Utah (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
ABC NTRA, Haskell Invitational, at Oceanport,
N.J.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
YES Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees
1:30 p.m.
ROOT Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
2 p.m.
TBS Boston at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at Silverstone,
England (same-day tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Bank of the West Classic,
championship match, at Palo Alto, Calif.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Farmers Classic, championship
match, at Los Angeles
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLESPlaced RHP Brad Ber-
gesen on the paternity leave list. Recalled RHP
Chris Tillman from Norfolk (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALSAcquired INF Yamaico
Navarro and RHP Kendal Volz fromBoston for INF
Mike Aviles.
SEATTLE MARINERSTraded RHP Doug Fister
and RHP David Pauley to Detroit for OF Casper
Wells, INF Francisco Martinez and LHP Charlie
Furbush.
National League
MILWAUKEEBREWERSAcquired INF-OF Jerry
Hairston Jr. fromWashington for OF Erik Komatsu.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALSAgreed to terms with CB
Richard Marshall on a one-year contract. Signed
CB Tae Evans. Released CB Damon Merkerson.
BALTIMORERAVENSSigned CBChris Carr to a
four-year contract.
CHICAGO BEARSAgreed to terms with CB Co-
rey Grahamon a one-year contract. Waived GHer-
man Johnson.
CINCINNATI BENGALSSigned QB Andy Dal-
ton, LB Dontay Moch, QB Bruce Gradkowski, HB
Brian Leonard and S Gibril Wilson.
CLEVELAND BROWNSSigned K Phil Dawson,
RB Brandon Jackson, DB Usama Young, TE Evan
Moore, LB Marcus Benard, DL Brian Schaefering,
G Billy Yates, DE Jabaal Sheard, WR Greg Little,
TEJordan Cameron, RBOwen Marecic, DBBuster
Skrine, OT Jason Pinkston, DB Eric Hagg, LB Der-
rick Addai, GDominic Alford, DLKyleAnderson, DT
Andre Caroll, WR L.J. Castile, CB James Dockery,
DE Jabari Fletcher, OL Calton Ford, WR Evan
Frosch, CB Carl Gettis, DB Darian Hagan, LB Ben-
jamin Jacobs, WR Chris Matthews, WR Juan Nu-
nez, OL Jarrod Shaw, RB Armond Smith, LB Brian
Smith, LB Sidney Tarver, QB Troy Weatherhead, K
Jeff Wolfert and LB Alex Wujciak.
DALLAS COWBOYSSigned OL Doug Free, OL
Kyle Kosier, S Alan Ball, WR Jesse Holley and CB
Bryan McCann.
MIAMI DOLPHINSRe-signedDLTony McDaniel.
Signed LB Jason Trusnik, QB Matt Moore, RB Da-
niel Thomas and WR Clyde Gates.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTSSigned RB Mark In-
gram and LB Martez Wilson.
NEW YORK JETSSigned WR Santonio Holmes
to five-year contract. Signed S Eric Smith, K Nick
Folk, OL Wayne Hunter, OL Robert Turner and WR
Jeremy Kerley. Agreed to terms with DE Muham-
mad Wilkerson on a four-year contract.
ST. LOUIS RAMSAgreed to terms with WR Mike
Sims-Walker on a one-year contract.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERSRe-signed K Con-
nor Barth, QB Rudy Carpenter, WR Micheal Spur-
lock, OT James Lee, OT Demar Dotson, DE Mi-
chael Bennett, SCorey Lynch, andCBElbert Mack.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
SEATTLE SOUNDERS FCSigned MF Amadou
Sanyang.
I N T E R N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
At A Glance
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 62 45 .579
Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 60 47 .561 2
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(Yankees) ................................ 57 48 .543 4
Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 47 58 .448 14
Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 44 63 .411 18
Rochester (Twins).................. 41 65 .387 20
1
2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays)......................... 59 47 .557
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 59 47 .557
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 52 56 .481 8
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 39 67 .368 20
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians)................ 65 42 .607
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 56 52 .519 9
1
2
Louisville (Reds) .................... 56 52 .519 9
1
2
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 50 58 .463 15
1
2
Friday's Games
Toledo 5, Norfolk 2
Syracuse 3, Columbus 0
Pawtucket 4, Lehigh Valley 3
Louisville 8, Rochester 3
Gwinnett 5, Durham 0
Indianapolis 3, Charlotte 2
Buffalo 8, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 5
Saturday's Games
Louisville at Pawtucket, 6:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Lehigh Valley, 6:35 p.m.
Syracuse at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Louisville at Pawtucket, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Gwinnett, 2:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 5:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Columbus, 5:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Lehigh Valley, 5:35 p.m.
Syracuse at Toledo, 6 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Rochester, 6:35 p.m.
E A S T E R N
L E A G U E
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Hampshire (Blue Jays)... 57 48 .543
Trenton (Yankees)................... 56 50 .528 1
1
2
Reading (Phillies) .................... 55 50 .524 2
New Britain (Twins) ................. 55 51 .519 2
1
2
Portland (Red Sox).................. 44 61 .419 13
Binghamton (Mets).................. 43 64 .402 15
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) ........... 60 47 .561
Richmond (Giants) ................. 59 47 .557
1
2
Bowie (Orioles)....................... 57 48 .543 2
Akron (Indians) ....................... 55 52 .514 5
Erie (Tigers) ............................ 49 57 .462 10
1
2
Altoona (Pirates)..................... 45 60 .429 14
Friday's Games
New Britain 4, Bowie 3, 1st game
Binghamton 8, Harrisburg 7
Portland 6, Altoona 2, 6 innings
Richmond 3, Trenton 2
New Britain 3, Bowie 1, 2nd game
Erie 1, Akron 0
Reading at New Hampshire, ppd., rain
Saturday's Games
Altoona at Portland, 6 p.m.
Reading at New Hampshire, 6:05 p.m., 1st game
Binghamton at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
Erie at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
Bowie at New Britain, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Trenton, 7:05 p.m.
Reading at New Hampshire, 8:35 p.m., 2nd game
Sunday's Games
Altoona at Portland, 1 p.m.
Richmond at Trenton, 1:05 p.m.
Erie at Akron, 1:05 p.m.
Bowie at New Britain, 1:35 p.m.
Reading at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m.
Binghamton at Harrisburg, 2 p.m.
N A S C A R
Sprint Cup-Brickyard 400
Lineup
After Saturday qualifying;race Sunday
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis, Ind.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 182.994.
2. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 182.927.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 182.801.
4. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 182.671.
5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 182.556.
6. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 182.445.
7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 182.367.
8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 182.242.
9. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 182.216.
10. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 182.05.
11. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 182.024.
12. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 181.969.
13. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 181.895.
14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.892.
15. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 181.87.
16. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 181.848.
17. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 181.715.
18. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 181.682.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 181.635.
20. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 181.422.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 181.389.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 181.335.
23. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 181.32.
24. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 181.251.
25. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 181.134.
26. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 180.981.
27. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 180.926.
28. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 180.912.
29. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.854.
30. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 180.618.
31. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 180.61.
32. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 180.133.
33. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 179.924.
34. (37) Scott Speed, Ford, 179.548.
35. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 179.451.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 179.297.
37. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 179.276.
38. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 178.99.
39. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 178.926.
40. (50) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 177.992.
41. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 177.866.
42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (23) Terry Labonte, Ford, Past Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 177.939.
45. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 177.413.
46. (46) Erik Darnell, Ford, 177.396.
47. (55) J.J. Yeley, Ford, 176.439.
48. (77) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 175.046.
NASCAR Camping World
Truck-AAA Insurance 200
Results
Friday
At Lucas Oil Raceway at Indianapolis
Indianapolis, Ind.
Lap length: .686 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (16) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 200 laps, 104.9 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (7) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 128.4, 44.
3. (12) David Starr, Toyota, 200, 105.2, 41.
4. (17) Miguel Paludo, Toyota, 200, 84.5, 40.
5. (5) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 104.2, 39.
6. (8) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 200, 116, 38.
7. (3) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 94.6, 37.
8. (9) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 199, 101.1, 36.
9. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 199, 110.4, 36.
10. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 199, 84.8, 34.
11. (6) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 199, 98.2, 34.
12. (18) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 199, 89.2, 33.
13. (19) Steve Arpin, Chevrolet, 199, 71.7, 31.
14. (11) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 198, 80.4, 30.
15. (22) Clay Rogers, Chevrolet, 198, 72.9, 29.
16. (10) Brendan Gaughan, Toyota, 198, 66.8, 28.
17. (13) Johanna Long, Toyota, 198, 55.7, 27.
18. (29) Max Papis, Toyota, 198, 55, 26.
19. (27) Ricky Carmichael, Chevrolet, 197, 74.7, 25.
20. (24) Justin Lofton, Toyota, 197, 61.5, 24.
21. (21) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 197, 55.7,
23.
22. (25) Josh Richards, Toyota, 197, 61.6, 22.
23. (4) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 196, 100.8, 22.
24. (2) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 196, 68.8, 0.
25. (28) Jake Crum, Chevrolet, 196, 49.9, 19.
26. (14) Jason White, Chevrolet, 194, 35, 18.
27. (32) Todd Peck, Chevrolet, 194, 40, 0.
28. (26) Jack Smith, Ford, 193, 47.4, 16.
29. (20) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 193, 37.2, 15.
30. (34) Ricky Moxley, Toyota, 193, 34.5, 14.
31. (33) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 189, 33.5, 13.
32. (36) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, 183, 29.3, 0.
33. (30) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, 181, 37.1, 11.
34. (35) Brad Queen, Chevrolet, engine, 133, 28.6,
10.
35. (23) ShaneSieg, Chevrolet, vibration, 127, 47.8,
9.
36. (31) Mike Garvey, Chevrolet, rear gear, 7, 26.8,
8.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 83.306 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 38 minutes, 49 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.645 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 28 laps.
Lead Changes: 7 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-36;J.Sauter
37-80;T.Bodine 81;P.Kligerman 82-94;J.Buescher
95;P.Kligerman96-98;J.Buescher 99-194;T.Peters
195-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
J.Buescher, 2 times for 97 laps;J.Sauter, 1 time for
44 laps;A.Dillon, 1 time for 36 laps;P.Kligerman, 2
times for 16 laps;T.Peters, 1 time for 6 laps;T.Bo-
dine, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top10 in Points: 1. J.Sauter, 453;2. A.Dillon, 449;3.
J.Buescher, 433;4. T.Peters, 431;5. C.Whitt, 424;6.
M.Crafton, 415;7. P.Kligerman, 407;8. J.Coulter,
403;9. R.Hornaday Jr., 401;10. T.Bodine, 383.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running
Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under
Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Fin-
ish.
P G A
Greenbrier Classic Scores
Saturday
At The Old White Course
White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,274; Par 70
Third Round
Anthony Kim......................................69-69-62200
Scott Stallings ...................................70-65-66201
Gary Woodland .................................65-70-67202
Webb Simpson..................................65-68-69202
Jimmy Walker....................................69-72-62203
Bill Haas.............................................71-67-65203
Chris Couch.......................................68-68-67203
Nick OHern .......................................70-68-66204
Cameron Tringale.............................70-67-67204
John Merrick......................................69-67-68204
Chris DiMarco ...................................66-75-64205
John Senden .....................................70-70-65205
Johnson Wagner...............................72-67-66205
D.A. Points.........................................71-67-67205
Scott Verplank...................................72-66-67205
Brian Davis.........................................71-64-70205
Brendon de Jonge ............................66-67-72205
Bob Estes...........................................69-72-65206
Kyle Stanley.......................................66-75-65206
Andres Romero.................................71-69-66206
Spencer Levin ...................................70-68-68206
Tag Ridings .......................................71-66-69206
Will Strickler.......................................67-70-69206
Ricky Barnes......................................72-65-69206
Chez Reavie......................................67-69-70206
Charles Howell III..............................68-68-70206
Michael Letzig ...................................69-66-71206
Ryuji Imada........................................69-70-68207
Briny Baird..........................................69-69-69207
David Hearn.......................................66-72-69207
Michael Connell ................................72-66-69207
Derek Lamely ....................................65-70-72207
Trevor Immelman..............................64-70-73207
Josh Teater ........................................71-70-67208
Steven Bowditch...............................65-75-68208
Chris Stroud.......................................69-71-68208
Brett Wetterich ..................................73-67-68208
Duffy Waldorf.....................................69-70-69208
Keegan Bradley.................................72-67-69208
Andre Stolz ........................................69-69-70208
Jim Herman........................................67-71-70208
Kenny Perry.......................................68-70-70208
Chris Baryla .......................................67-69-72208
Aron Price..........................................69-67-72208
Adam Hadwin....................................70-71-68209
Matt Bettencourt ................................73-67-69209
Carl Pettersson .................................70-70-69209
Steve Allan.........................................71-68-70209
Blake Adams .....................................69-70-70209
Fabian Gomez...................................71-68-70209
Billy Mayfair........................................65-73-71209
Chris Kirk ...........................................72-69-69210
Sergio Garcia ....................................72-69-69210
Garrett Willis......................................72-69-69210
Jeff Quinney ......................................71-70-69210
Tom Gillis...........................................71-69-70210
Ben Curtis ..........................................68-72-70210
Steve Flesch......................................71-68-71210
Troy Matteson....................................69-70-71210
J.P. Hayes..........................................68-70-72210
Brandt Jobe .......................................68-69-73210
James Driscoll ...................................69-68-73210
Jeff Overton.......................................74-67-70211
Matt Weibring.....................................70-70-71211
Heath Slocum....................................68-72-71211
Tommy Gainey..................................70-70-71211
Cameron Beckman...........................71-68-72211
Shaun Micheel...................................72-69-71212
Kent Jones.........................................69-69-74212
Billy Horschel.....................................71-70-72213
Joseph Bramlett ................................72-69-72213
Erik Compton.....................................73-67-73213
Tom Pernice, Jr.................................68-70-75213
Camilo Villegas .................................71-66-77214
Bio Kim...............................................71-70-74215
U . S . S E N I O R
O P E N
Scores
Saturday
At Inverness Club
Toledo, Ohio
Purse: $2.75 million
Yardage: 7,143; Par 71
Third Round
a-denotes amateur
Olin Browne.......................................64-69-65198
Mark OMeara ...................................66-68-66200
Jeff Sluman........................................68-71-65204
Peter Senior.......................................69-67-68204
Joey Sindelar.....................................69-66-69204
Mark Calcavecchia...........................68-67-69204
Hale Irwin...........................................69-71-66206
Jeff Roth.............................................72-66-68206
Michael Allen.....................................66-69-71206
Hal Sutton..........................................74-67-66207
Bernhard Langer ...............................70-69-68207
Nick Price...........................................70-69-68207
Jay Haas ............................................70-69-68207
Steve Jones.......................................67-71-69207
Corey Pavin.......................................68-69-70207
Loren Roberts ...................................71-69-68208
John Huston ......................................69-69-70208
Damon Green....................................67-71-70208
Trevor Dodds.....................................68-69-71208
Willie Wood........................................70-70-69209
Steve Pate..........................................68-71-70209
Kiyoshi Murota ..................................68-69-72209
Steve Lowery.....................................73-70-67210
Phil Blackmar ....................................73-69-68210
Jim Thorpe.........................................68-74-68210
Dan Forsman.....................................70-71-69210
Scott Simpson...................................70-70-70210
Tom Kite.............................................72-67-71210
Brad Bryant ........................................74-69-68211
Mikael Hogberg.................................73-70-68211
Larry Mize..........................................71-70-70211
Nobumitsu Yuhara............................72-68-71211
Larry Nelson......................................69-69-73211
Mark Wiebe .......................................67-71-73211
Tom Lehman .....................................73-69-70212
Russ Cochran....................................70-69-73212
a-Tim Jackson...................................72-72-69213
Lonnie Nielsen ..................................70-74-69213
Jim Rutledge .....................................73-71-69213
Tom Jenkins ......................................72-71-70213
Gary Hallberg....................................70-73-70213
D.A. Weibring ....................................74-68-71213
Fred Funk...........................................71-71-71213
Chien-Soon Lu..................................70-72-71213
Jeff Hart..............................................73-71-70214
Ted Schulz.........................................69-74-71214
Jim Carter ..........................................74-69-71214
Mark McNulty ....................................72-69-73214
Mike Nicolette....................................73-69-73215
David Eger .........................................71-70-74215
Bob Gilder ..........................................72-72-72216
Bill Britton...........................................70-74-72216
Tommy Armour III .............................68-75-73216
Kirk Hanefeld.....................................71-70-75216
Bob Tway ...........................................73-71-73217
Mark Brooks ......................................70-72-76218
Chris Endres......................................72-72-75219
Vic Wilk...............................................71-72-76219
Chris Williams....................................70-72-77219
Keith Fergus ......................................74-69-77220
R I C O H
W O M E N S
B R I T I S H O P E N
Par Scores
Saturday
At Carnoustie Golf Links
Carnoustie, Scotland
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 6,490;Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Caroline Masson.........................68-65-68201-15
Yani Tseng...................................71-66-66203-13
Catriona Matthew.........................70-69-68207 -9
Inbee Park....................................70-64-73207 -9
Na Yeon Choi ..............................69-67-72208 -8
Brittany Lang................................70-70-69209 -7
Sophie Gustafson .......................68-71-70209 -7
Se Ri Pak .....................................72-64-73209 -7
Anna Nordqvist............................70-71-69210 -6
Sun Young Yoo...........................71-70-69210 -6
Paula Creamer.............................69-70-71210 -6
Mika Miyazato..............................69-69-72210 -6
Dewi Claire Schreefel.................70-66-74210 -6
Sophie Giquel-Bettan .................71-68-72211 -5
Amy Yang .....................................68-70-73211 -5
Shanshan Feng ...........................70-75-67212 -4
Sun-Ju Ahn..................................71-71-70212 -4
Vicky Hurst...................................70-71-71212 -4
Song-Hee Kim.............................69-72-71212 -4
Angela Stanford...........................68-72-72212 -4
Momoko Ueda.............................69-71-72212 -4
Rachel Jennings .........................71-73-69213 -3
Stacy Lewis..................................74-68-71213 -3
Cindy LaCrosse...........................72-69-72213 -3
Jiyai Shin......................................75-66-72213 -3
Karrie Webb.................................70-71-72213 -3
Pat Hurst.......................................70-69-74213 -3
Candie Kung................................72-73-69214 -2
Amanda Blumenherst .................73-71-70214 -2
I.K. Kim.........................................71-72-71214 -2
Hee Kyung Seo...........................72-71-71214 -2
Karen Stupples............................74-68-72214 -2
Michelle Wie ................................74-68-72214 -2
Maria Hjorth .................................72-69-73214 -2
Linda Wessberg..........................73-66-75214 -2
Caroline Hedwall .........................69-69-76214 -2
Brittany Lincicome.......................67-71-76214 -2
Meena Lee...................................65-69-80214 -2
Julieta Granada...........................71-74-70215 -1
Chella Choi ..................................74-70-71215 -1
Suzann Pettersen .......................76-66-73215 -1
Sandra Gal ...................................71-70-74215 -1
Cristie Kerr ...................................72-69-74215 -1
Tiffany Joh....................................71-69-75215 -1
Jimin Kang ...................................74-70-72216 E
Kristy McPherson........................71-71-74216 E
Beth Allen.....................................71-70-75216 E
Eun-Hee Ji ...................................70-71-75216 E
a-Danielle Kang...........................72-69-75216 E
Morgan Pressel ...........................70-71-75216 E
Hee Young Park..........................70-70-76216 E
Holly Aitchison.............................71-74-72217 +1
Jaclyn Sweeney ..........................74-71-72217 +1
Azahara Munoz............................73-71-73217 +1
Janice Moodie .............................75-67-75217 +1
Christel Boeljon...........................76-69-73218 +2
Lorie Kane....................................69-76-73218 +2
Haeji Kang....................................75-70-73218 +2
Virginie Lagoutte-Clement.........75-70-73218 +2
Melissa Reid................................75-70-73218 +2
Hee-Won Han..............................73-71-74218 +2
Hiromi Mogi..................................72-72-74218 +2
Kylie Walker.................................72-72-74218 +2
Katie Futcher................................71-74-74219 +3
Amy Hung.....................................69-72-78219 +3
Miki Saiki ......................................72-72-76220 +4
a-Sophia Popov...........................70-75-77222 +6
Georgina Simpson......................71-73-79223 +7
F R I D A Y S
L A T E B O X E S
Twins 9, Athletics 5
Minnesota Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Revere cf 5 1 2 1 JWeeks 2b 5 0 1 0
Plouffe 2b 6 3 2 2 Crisp cf 3 2 1 0
Mauer 1b 4 2 2 0 Matsui dh 4 1 3 0
Cuddyr rf 5 1 1 3 Wlngh lf 3 2 2 5
Kubel dh 4 0 1 2 CJcksn 1b 3 0 0 0
DYong lf 3 1 1 0 DeJess rf 4 0 0 0
LHughs 3b 3 0 0 0 SSizmr 3b 3 0 0 0
Tolbert ss 5 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0
Butera c 4 1 1 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0
Totals 39 912 8 Totals 33 5 8 5
Minnesota.......................... 201 011 040 9
Oakland.............................. 200 000 030 5
EG.Gonzalez (1), S.Sizemore (8). DPMinne-
sota 2, Oakland 2. LOBMinnesota11, Oakland 5.
2BKubel (16), Butera (9), Matsui (19). HRCud-
dyer (16), Willingham2 (15). SBRevere (17), Tol-
bert (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Liriano W,7-8........... 7 6 2 2 2 4
Mijares...................... 1 2 3 3 1 1
Al.Burnett .................
1
3 0 0 0 1 1
Perkins .....................
2
3 0 0 0 0 2
Oakland
G.Gonzalez L,9-8 ... 5
1
3 9 5 4 3 5
De Los Santos......... 1
2
3 0 0 0 1 2
Wuertz......................
2
3 3 4 4 3 1
Fuentes ....................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Magnuson................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBPby Wuertz (L.Hughes).
UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover;First, Chris Con-
roy;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Tony Randazzo.
T3:07. A25,656 (35,067).
Rays 8, Mariners 0
Tampa Bay Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jnnngs lf 4 1 0 1 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0
Damon dh 3 1 1 2 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0
Longori 3b 4 0 0 1 Ackley 2b 3 0 1 0
Zobrist 2b 5 1 2 2 Olivo c 4 0 0 0
BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 Carp lf 3 0 0 0
Ktchm 1b 5 2 3 1 Smoak dh 4 0 0 0
Shppch c 5 0 1 1 AKndy 1b 4 0 1 0
Joyce rf 3 1 0 0 FGtrrz cf 3 0 0 0
SRdrgz ss 3 1 2 0 Figgins 3b 2 0 1 0
Totals 36 810 8 Totals 30 0 3 0
Tampa Bay......................... 080 000 000 8
Seattle ................................ 000 000 000 0
DPSeattle 1. LOBTampa Bay 8, Seattle 7.
2BKotchman (21), S.Rodriguez (16). HRZo-
brist (14).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Niemann W,5-4....... 6
2
3 3 0 0 3 11
Howell.......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
B.Gomes.................. 2 0 0 0 0 0
Seattle
Bedard L,4-7............ 1
1
3 3 5 5 4 2
Laffey........................ 1
2
3 4 3 3 2 2
J.Wright .................... 3 1 0 0 0 2
Ray............................ 2 2 0 0 1 2
Lueke........................ 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBPby Niemann (Ryan). WPNiemann. Balk
Laffey.
UmpiresHome, Angel Campos;First, Doug Ed-
dings;Second, DanaDeMuth;Third, KerwinDanley.
T2:59. A26,570 (47,878).
Rockies 3, Padres 2
Colorado San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
EYong lf 4 0 1 0 Maybin cf 5 1 3 0
Splrghs lf 0 0 0 0 OHudsn 2b 4 1 2 1
Fowler cf 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 2 0 1 1
Helton 1b 4 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 1 0
Tlwtzk ss 4 1 2 0 Guzmn 1b 4 0 0 0
S.Smith rf 4 1 1 0 Denorfi rf 4 0 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 AlGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0
IStewrt 3b 4 1 1 1 LMrtnz c 4 0 0 0
Iannett c 3 0 1 1 Stauffr p 2 0 0 0
Hamml p 3 0 1 0 Blanks ph 0 0 0 0
Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 Spence p 0 0 0 0
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Forsyth ph 1 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 8 2 Totals 34 2 7 2
Colorado ............................ 030 000 000 3
San Diego.......................... 002 000 000 2
DPSan Diego1. LOBColorado 4, San Diego 9.
2BHelton (21), Hammel (1), Maybin 2 (14). SB
I.Stewart (3), Iannetta(4), O.Hudson(14). CSIan-
netta (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Hammel W,6-10...... 6
1
3 5 2 2 3 5
Lindstrom H,12........
1
3 1 0 0 0 1
Mat.Reynolds........... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Belisle H,9................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Betancourt H,19.. 1 0 0 0 0 2
Street S,28-30......... 1 1 0 0 0 2
San Diego
Stauffer L,6-8........... 7 8 3 3 1 3
Spence..................... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Qualls .......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 2
Mat.Reynolds pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WPHammel. BalkStauffer.
UmpiresHome, Mike Winters;First, Mike Everitt-
;Second, Chris Guccione;Third, Mike Muchlinski.
T3:02. A27,612 (42,691).
Dodgers 9, Diamondbacks 5
Arizona Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Blmqst ss 5 1 1 1 Furcal ss 4 0 1 1
KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Miles 3b 5 2 2 0
ACastll p 0 0 0 0 Ethier rf 4 1 3 1
Monter ph 0 0 0 0 Kemp cf 5 1 2 5
J.Upton rf 5 2 1 1 JRiver lf 4 0 2 0
CYoung cf 3 1 0 0 MacDgl p 0 0 0 0
Nady 1b 4 0 1 1 Oeltjen ph 1 0 0 0
RRorts 3b-2b 3 1 2 2 Guerra p 0 0 0 0
Cowgill lf 3 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 0
HBlanc c 3 0 0 0 DNavrr c 2 1 0 0
Cllmntr p 0 0 0 0 Velez 2b 2 1 0 0
Patersn p 0 0 0 0 Hwksw p 0 0 0 0
Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0
Duke p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph-lf 1 1 0 0
GParra ph 1 0 0 0 Lilly p 1 0 0 0
Demel p 0 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 1 1 1 1
Ransm 3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 33 5 6 5 Totals 34 912 8
Arizona............................... 010 111 100 5
Los Angeles....................... 003 201 30x 9
EJ.Upton (9), Lilly (1). DPArizona1. LOBAri-
zona 7, Los Angeles 8. 2BFurcal (4), Ethier (25),
J.Rivera 2 (5). HRBloomquist (3), J.Upton (21),
R.Roberts (14), Kemp (25). SCollmenter, Lilly.
SFJ.Carroll.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
Collmenter L,6-6..... 3
2
3 7 5 5 2 1
Paterson...................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Duke ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Demel ....................... 1
1
3 4 2 1 0 0
A.Castillo.................. 1
2
3 1 2 0 1 1
Los Angeles
Lilly W,7-10.............. 5 3 3 2 2 1
Hawksworth H,6......
1
3 1 1 1 2 1
Guerrier H,12 .......... 1
2
3 1 1 1 0 2
MacDougal .............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Guerra...................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBPby Collmenter (Furcal, Ethier). WP
Hawksworth, Guerra.
UmpiresHome, Chad Fairchild;First, Joe West-
;Second, Sam Holbrook;Third, Paul Schrieber.
T3:33. A35,169 (56,000).
S W I M M I N G
FINA World Championships
Results
Saturday
At Shanghai
Swimming
Men
50 Freestyle
Final
1, Cesar Cielo Filho, Brazil, 21.52. 2, Luca Dotto,
Italy, 21.90. 3 Alain Bernard, France, 21.92. 4, Nath-
an Adrian, United States, 21.93. 5, Bruno Fratus,
Brazil, 21.96. 6, Krisztian Takacs, Hungary, 21.99.
7, George Bovell, Trinidad and Tobago, 22.04. 8,
Gideon Louw, South Africa, 22.11.
50 Backstroke
Preliminaries
Qualified for semifinals
1, Gerhard Zandberg, South Africa, 24.72. 2, Ca-
mille Lacourt, France, 25.03. 3, Helge Meeuw, Ger-
many, 25.04. 4, Flori Lang, Switzerland, 25.12. 5,
Faber Wildeboer, Spain, 25.14. 6, Junya Koga, Ja-
pan, 25.17. 7, Guy Barnea, Israel, 25.18. 8 (tie), Ni-
cholas Thoman, United States, David Plummer,
UnitedStates, 25.22. 10(tie), LiamTancock, Britain,
and Aristeidis Grigoriadis, Greece, 25.26. 12, Mirco
di Tora, Italy, 25.28. 13, HaydenStoeckel, Australia,
25.29. 14 (tie), Ashley Delaney, United States, and
Bastiaan Lijesen, Netherlands, 25.33.
Semifinals
Top eight to final
1, LiamTancock, Britain, 24.62. 2, Camille Lacourt,
France, 24.85. 3, Gerhard Zandberg, South Africa,
24.91. 4, Faber Wildeboer, Spain, 24.99. 5 (tie), Ni-
cholas Thoman, United States, and David Plum-
mer, United States, 25.03. 7, Flori Lang, Switzer-
land, 25.07. 8, Guy Barnea, Israel, 25.09. 9, Junya
Koga, Japan, 25.14. 10 (tie), Hayden Stoeckel, Aus-
tralia, and Helge Meeuw, Germany, 25.20. 12, Mir-
co di Tora, Italy, 25.40. 13, Ashley Delaney, United
States, 25.43. 14, Aristeidis Grigoriadis, Greece,
25.46. 15, Bastiaan Lijesen, Netherlands, 25.51. 16,
Charles Francis, Canada, 25.56.
100 Butterfly
Final
1, Michael Phelps, United States, 50.71. 2, Conrad
Czerniak, Poland, 51.15. 3, Tyler McGill, United
States, 51.26. 4, Jason Dunford, Kenya, 51.59. 5,
Takuro Fujii, Japan, 51.75. 6, Evgeny Korotyshkin,
Russia, 51.86. 7, Joeri Verlinden, Netherlands,
52.21. 8, Geoff Huegill, Australia, 52.36.
1,500 Freestyle
Preliminaries
Qualified for final
1, Sun Yang, China, 14:48.13. 2, Gergo Kis, Hun-
gary, 14:52.72. 3, Peter Vanderkaay, United States,
14:54.99. 4, Chad La Tourette, United States,
14:54.99. 5, Ryan Cochrane, Canada, 14:55.86. 6,
Pal Joensen, Faeroe Islands, 14:56.66. 7, Yohsuke
Miyamato, Japan, 14:57.12. 8, Samuel Pizzetti, Ita-
ly, 14:58.30.
Women
50 Freestyle
Preliminaries
Qualified for semifinals
1 (tie), Theresa Alshammar, Sweden, and Jessica
Hardy, United States, 24.82. 3, Aliaksandra Herasi-
menia, Belarus, 24.85. 4, Dorothea Brandt, Germa-
ny, 24.86. 5, Marleen Veldhuis, Netherlands, 25.01.
6, Ranomi Kromowidjojo, Netherlands, 25.03. 7
(tie)., Chantal VanLandeghem, Canada, Francesca
Halshall, Britain, 25.05. 9 (tie), Amanda Weir, Unit-
ed States, and Yolane Kukla, Australia, 25.11. 11,
Theodora Drakou, Greece, 25.13. 12, Olivia Hali-
cek, Australia, 25.18. 13, Jeanette Ottesen, Den-
mark, 25.23. 14, Victoria Poon, Canada, 25.24. 15,
Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace, Bahamas, 25.28. 16,
Yayoi Matsumoto, Japan, 25.34.
Semifinals
Top eight to final
1, Ranomi Kromowidjojo, Netherlands, 24.56. 2,
Jeanette Ottesen, Denmark, 24.61. 3, Theresa Al-
shammar, Sweden, 24.63. 4, Aliaksandra Herasi-
menia, Belarus, 24.69. 5, Francesca Halshall, Bri-
tain, 24.80. 6, Marleen Veldhuis, Netherlands,
24.88. 7, JessicaHardy, UnitedStates, 25.00. 8, Ar-
iannaVanderpool-Wallace, Bahamas, 25.05. 9, Do-
rothea Brandt, Germany, 25.06. 10, Yolane Kukla,
Australia, 25.11. 11, Amanda Weir, United States,
25.14. 12, Olivia Halicek, Australia, 25.20. 13, The-
odora Drakou, Greece, 25.22. 14, Chantal Van Lan-
deghem, Canada, 25.23. 15, Victoria Poon, Cana-
da, 25.26. 16, Triin Aljand, Estonia, 25.57.
50 Butterfly
Final
1, Inge Dekker, Netherlands, 25.71. 2, Therese Al-
shammar, Sweden, 25.76. 3, Melanie Henique,
France, 25.86. 4 (tie), Lu Ying, China, and Sarah
Sjoestroem, Sweden, 25.87. 6, Yuka Kato, Japan,
26.02. 7, Dana Vollmer, United States, 26.06. 8,
Marieke Guehrer, Australia, 26.21.
50 Breaststroke
Preliminaries
Qualified for semifinals
1, JessicaHardy, UnitedStates, 30.20. 2, YuliyaEfi-
mova, Russia, 30.72. 3, Rebecca Soni, United
States, 30.72. 4, Jenni Johansson, Sweden, 30.89.
5, Leisel Jones, Australia, 30.93. 6, Leiston Pickett,
Australia, 31.07. 7, Rebecca Ejdervik, Sweden,
31.19. 8, Kate Haywood, Britain, 31.30. 9, Liu
Xiaoyu, China, 31.32. 10 (tie), Moniek Nijhaus,
Netherlands, and Zhao Jin, China, 31.40. 12, Petra
Chocova, Czech Republic, 31.41. 13, Sycerika
McMahon, Ireland, 31.49. 14, Rikke Pedersen,
Denmark, 31.65. 16, Suzaan van Biljon, South Afri-
ca, 31.96. 16, Jane Trepp, Estonia, 32.00.
Semifinals
Top eight to final
1, Jessica Hardy, United States, 30.40. 2, Rebecca
Soni, United States, 30.74. 3, Yuliya Efimova, Rus-
sia, 30.81. 4, Leiston Pickett, Australia, 30.96. 5,
Leisel Jones, Australia, 31.14. 6, Jenni Johansson,
Sweden, 31.16. 7, Moniek Nijhaus, Netherlands,
31.40. 8, Rebecca Ejdervik, Sweden, 31.41. 9, Kate
Haywood, Britain, 31.43. 10, Zhao Jin, China, 31.46.
11, Liu Xiaoyu, China, 31.50. 12, Petra Chocova,
Czech Republic, 31.75. 13, Sycerika McMahon, Ire-
land, 31.83. 14, Suzaan van Biljon, South Africa,
31.97. 15, Rikke Pedersen, Denmark, 32.07. 16,
Jane Trepp, Estonia, 32.33.
200 Backstroke
Final
1, Missy Franklin, United States, 2:05.10. 2, Belinda
Hocking, Australia, 2:06.06. 3, Sharon van Rou-
wendaal, Netherlands, 2:07.78. 4, Daryna Zevina,
Ukraine, 2:07.82. 5, Elizabeth Beisel, United
States, 2:08.16. 6, Meagan Nay, Australia, 2:08.69.
7, Elizabeth Simmons, Britain, 2:08.76. 8, Alex-
ianne Castel, France, 2:09.07.
800 Freestyle
Final
1, RebeccaAdlington, Britain, 8:17.51. 2, LotteFriis,
Denmark, 8:18.20. 3, Kate Ziegler, United States,
8:23.36. 4, Chloe Sutton, United States, 8:24.05. 5,
Boglarka Kapas, Hungary, 8:24.79. 6, Katie Gold-
man, Australia, 8:29.20. 7, Wendy Trott, South Afri-
ca, 8:30.45. 8, Lauren Boyle, New Zealand,
8:32.72.
4x100 Medley Relay
Preliminaries
Top eight to final
1, United States (Elizabeth Pelton, Rebecca Soni,
Christine Magnuson, Amanda Weir), 3:56.95. 2,
Russia (Anastasia Zueva, Yuliya Efimova, Irina Be-
spalova, Veronika Popova), 3:59.08. 3, China (Gan
Chang, Sun Ye, Liao Liuyang, Li Zhesi), 3:59.44. 4,
Australia, 3:59.62. 5, Britain, 3:59.65. 6, Japan,
4:00.08. 7, Canada, 4:00.72. 8, Germany, 4:00.90.
9, Denmark, 4:01.60. 10, Sweden, 4:02.71. 11,
Netherlands, 4:03.20. 12, Spain, 4:03.98. 13,
France, 4:04.05. 14, Italy, 4:04.74. 15, South Africa,
4:04.97. 16, Finland, 4:08. 47. 17. Brazil, 4:14.52.
South Korea, did not start.
Final
1, United States (Natalie Coughlin, Rebecca Soni,
Dana Vollmer, Missy Franklin), 3:52.36. 2, China
(Zhao Jing, Ji Liping, Lu Ying, Tang Yi), 3:55.61. 3,
Australia (Belinda Hocking, Leisel Jones, Alicia
Coutts, Merindah Dingjan), 3:57.13. 4, Russia,
3:57.38. 5, Japan, 3:57.84. 6, Britain, 4:01.09. Can-
ada and Germany, disqualified.
Water Polo
Men
Gold Medal
Italy 8, Serbia 7, OT
Bronze Medal
Croatia 12, Hungary 11
Fifth Place
Spain 11, United States 10
Seventh Place
Montenegro 8, Germany 5
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3C
YANKEES S UNDAY
Today
at Rochester
6:35 p.m.
Monday
Lehigh Valley
5:35 p.m.
Tuesday
Lehigh Valley
7:05 p.m.
Thursday
Louisville
7:05 p.m.
Sunday
Louisville
1:05 p.m.
Saturday
Louisville
7:05 p.m.
Friday
Louisville
7:05 p.m.
U P C O M I N G S C H E D U L E
1. Jesus Montero, catcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: Montero is hitting
.283 with 10 home runs and
47 RBI for the Yankees.
2. Gary Sanchez, catcher,
Single-A Charleston: For the
RiverDogs, he has 10 home
runs to go along with a .243
batting average and 39 RBI
in 71 games and 263 at-bats.
3. Manny Banuelos, start-
ing pitcher, Double-A Tren-
ton: The left-hander holds a
record of 4-5 with a 3.59
ERA, while fanning 94 in 95
1
3 innings.
4. Dellin Betances, start-
ing pitcher, Double-A Tren-
ton: A right-hander for the
Thunder, hes 4-5 with 98
strikeouts and a 3.43 ERA in
89
1
3 innings.
5. Austin Romine, catcher,
Double-A Trenton: The 21-
year-old backstop is htting
.284. He has five home runs
and 42 RBI.
6. Slade Heathcott, out-
fielder, Single-A Tampa: He
was promoted to Tampa and
hit the DL after playing just
one game, but still moved
up from No. 8 in last weeks
rankings. His minors totals
consist of a .279 average
with five home runs.
7. Adam Warren, pitcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: Hes been the most
consistent, healthy pitcher
for the Yankees this season,
making 20 starts and going
6-3 with a 3.15 ERA and one
complete game. Batters are
hitting just .247 against the
righty.
8. David Phelps, pitcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: For SWB, he has
made 14 starts, going 4-6
with a 3.38 ERA and fanning
74 in 85
1
3 innings. 9. An-
drew Brackman, reliever,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: His ERA is still high,
but falling. Its currently at
7.22 to go with a 2-6 record.
He has allowed 60 walks and
72 hits in 72
1
3 innings. He
has also given up 10 home
runs.
10. Cito Culver, shortstop,
Short Season Staten Island:
The switch-hitting first
round draft pick from 2010
(32nd overall) wont turn 19
until the end of this month
and is hitting .296 with 27
RBI and two stolen bases for
the Yankees.
YA N K E E S I N M I N O R S
Montero produces
9 RBI this week
Editors Note: The Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees have taken a page
from their parent club by winning
championships.
SWB has racked up four consecutive
International League North Division
titles and more could be on the way
because the minor league system is
stacked with top prospects that are
close to contributing at the Triple-A
or Major League level. Heres a look
at the organizations top 10 prospects
according to MLB.com, where they
are now and how they are faring:
The Times Leader staff
July 31, 2005
At Yankee Stadium, the Moli-
na brothers, Bengie and Jose,
both homer off Randy Johnson.
The Angel teammates join Hank
and Tommie Aaron, Matty and
Jesus Alou, Aaron and Bret
Boone, Billy and Tony Coniglia-
ro, Al and Tony Cuccinello, Rick
and Wes Farrell, Vladimir and
Wilton Guerrero, Graig and Jim
Nettles, Cal and Billy Ripken
and Paul and Lloyd Waner as
siblings who have gone deep in
the same game.
On This Date
1. Brody Colvin, starting
pitcher, Single-A Clearwater:
He has a 2-5 record in 15
starts with a 3.96 ERA and
59 strikeouts in 84 innings.
2. Sebastian Valle, catcher,
Single-A Clearwater: The
20-year-old is batting .325
with four home runs, 34 RBI
and an on-base percentage of
.348 in 265 at-bats for the
Threshers.
3. Jesse Biddle, starting
pitcher, Low-A Lakewood:
The left-handed first-round
has a 5-6 record with a 3.18
ERA and 106 strikeouts in
107
2
3 innings. Hitters are
batting just .221 against him.
4. Trevor May, starting
pitcher, Single-A Clearwater:
A strikeout machine, hes
fanned 151 in 112 innings,
going 7-6 with a 3.54 ERA.
Hes had three double-digit
strikeout games for the
Threshers, with his season-
high being 14.
5. Aaron Altherr, outfiel-
der, Short Season Single-A
Williamsport: For the Cross-
cutters, hes batting .270 in
37 games after being demot-
ed from Lakewood. Overall in
the minors this year, hes just
hitting .239 with three home-
rs.
6. Cesar Hernandez, sec-
ond base, Single-A Clear-
water: The switch-hitting
21-year-old has played in 87
games for the Threshers this
year, posting a .263 average
with three home runs, 30 RBI
and 16 stolen bases.
7. Justin De Fratus, reliev-
er, Triple-A Lehigh Valley: A
righty, hes made 16 appear-
ances for the IronPigs this
season, going 2-1 with a 4.70
ERA after being promoted
from Reading. His minor
league totals this season are
6-1 with a 3.14 ERA, 70
strikeouts and 10 saves in 57
1
3 innings.
8. Jiwan James, outfielder,
Single-A Clearwater: The
22-year-old is batting .280
with three homers, 22 RBI
and 20 stolen bases in 393
at-bats.
* Outfielder/infielder Jo-
nathan Singleton and start-
ing pitcher Jarred Cosart,
previously the Philadelphia
Phillies two top prospects,
were traded to the Houston
Astros organization Friday
night as part of the deal in
which the Phillies acquired
major league outfielder Hun-
ter Pence. Both Singleton
and Cosart had been playing
for Single-A Clearwater.
P H I L L I E S P R O S P E C T S
Pitcher Colvin
assumes top spot
Editors Note: Heres a look at the
Phillies top prospects, according to
MLB.com, how they are faring and
where they are currently playing:
The Times Leader staff
Russ Canzler: The Hazleton
Area grad, who is an outfielder
for Durham, the Triple-A affil-
iate of the Tampa Bay Rays, has
been playing exceptionally well.
His fine season has continued
with a .296 batting average in 97
games. He has 13 home runs, 29
doubles and 62 RBI. He was also
named MVP of the Triple A
All-Star Game earlier this sea-
son.
Cory Spangenberg: An Abing-
ton Heights grad and the 10th
overall draft pick by the Padres
last month got off to a stellar
start for the Short-Season Eu-
gene (Ore.) Emeralds and was
promoted to Class-A Fort Wayne
(Ind.) in the Midwest League.
After hitting .384 for the Em-
eralds, he has struggled early on
for the Tin Caps. Hes batting
.167 (9-for-54) with 5 RBI and
two stolen bases in eight games.
Overall in the minors, hes bat-
ting .300 (42-for-140) with a
home run, 25 RBI and 12 stolen
bases in 39 games.
L O C A L S I N T H E P R O S
Canzler continues
fine year for Bulls
By The Times Leader staff
MOOSIC When the Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees
broke spring training and head-
ed north to Moosic, they didnt
plan on Doug Bernier being
their starting shortstop. He
wasnt in the starting lineup
when the team opened its
season in Lehigh Valley. How-
ever, now he is in the starting
lineup and is playing a big role
as the teams everyday short-
stop.
Its a nice surprise. I have
been in the game a long time
and I know even if youre not
starting at the beginning of the
year, opportunities always
come up at some point, Ber-
nier said. Its been nice to
have the opportunity to play
every day, its been a lot of
fun.
Some players have gotten
down on themselves if they
didnt play as often as they
would have liked. However,
Bernier continued to work
hard as if he were playing ev-
ery day rather than let it effect
his play on the field. The prep-
aration paid off and due to
injuries and call-ups the Yankee
infielder has been a regular at
shortstop.
Its tough, because everyone
wants to play, Bernier said.
But going into the year I un-
derstood the situation and
knew the level of talent of the
guys we had on the team.
So, you just try and prepare
every day as if you would be
playing and when you do get
the opportunity, you dont
want to be surprised by it.
The 2011 season marks Ber-
niers second stint with the
Yankees organization. Bernier
feels this season has gone
much better than 2009 did.
In 79 games with Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre in 2009, he batted
.181 with no home runs and
just 20 RBI. He has really turn-
ed it around in his second stint
with the Yankee organization.
As of July 28, he is hitting .279
and had 23 RBI, which is al-
ready three more than his RBI
total of 2009. He considers the
2009 season his worst in pro-
fessional baseball.
It was draining, because
that was my worst year, Ber-
nier said. It was frustrating to
have that kind of year knowing
you are a free agent the next
year and hoping you can find a
job somewhere.
However, years later he has a
job with the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees and he is happy
to be back in the organization.
I had a good time when I
was over here and the fact that
they showed interest and want-
ed me back after I didnt have a
very good year for them in
2009 gave me some confidence
and excitement, Bernier said.
I love playing for this orga-
nization, because they preach
winning and team together-
ness.
Bernier has taken full ad-
vantage of his second opportu-
nity with the Yankee orga-
nization. He combined hard
work in the offseason and hard
work during the season to get
his game to where it is today.
I started to feel myself get-
ting better about a month and
a half into the season, Bernier
said. I was starting to trust
myself more. I think the whole
trust factor and taking what I
have been working on into the
game and seeing that it can
work.
Many players have said the
game of baseball is just as
much a mental game as it is a
physical game. Bernier is no
exception. After working with
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre hitting
coach Butch Wynegar, he has
taken a different mental ap-
proach at the plate.
He (Wynegar) talked a lot
about the mental side of hit-
ting, Bernier said. He would
ask me, what am I really trying
to do with this at bat. One of
his favorite lines he always tells
me is, a bad approach is always
better than no approach.
Although Bernier is appear-
ing regularly in the Yankee
lineup, he still feels there are
things he needs to work on.
I really want to become a
more consistent hitter, Ber-
nier said. Baseball for me has
always been like a chess match
and if you stop working and
trying to get better, then I
think you need to find some-
thing else to do.
Bench player at start of year now SWBs starting shortstop
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees infielder Doug Bernier dives after a ball during a game against the Columbus Clippers at PNC
Field. Bernier has worked hard and become the Yankees starting shortstop.
Hard work pays off for Bernier
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
SWB Yankees infielder Doug Bernier messes up his line while
taping a promo for a local television station on media day at
PNC Field in Moosic.
By JOSH HORTON
For The Times Leader
I really want to become a more consistent hitter. Baseball for me
has always been like a chess match and if you stop working and try-
ing to get better, then I think you need to find something else to do.
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
Click: Kingston/Forty Fort softball
Kyleigh Cicacci, 3, and Peggy Askew and Ryan Sullivan, 7 Bill and Doris Simone
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Leo Szmurlo and Megan Murphy
Tunkhannock, to Canada re-
cently to compete in the Tour
de lAbitibi, an extremely presti-
gious junior race.
Hottenstein, 18, and Lukas,
16, leave for Belgium tonight.
I really dont know what to
expect, said Lukas, 16. Its a
chance to get a lot better real
quick.
According to his father and
Hottenstein, Lukas can expect
a country that loves its cycling.
The sport is so popular that
there are races every day, said
Paul Lukas, adding that the
races are all within 30 or 40
miles of where the two cyclists
will be staying.
It would be like if they had a
race in Pittston here one day,
then Nanticoke the next day
then Scranton the next.
Hottenstein and Lukas will
race three days a week and use
the other three races as training
or recovery days. All the while
living with other young cyclists
in what can best be described
as a bike hostel.
The international experi-
ence that these riders will gain
is immeasurable, from thinking
tactically, adopting new train-
ing and recovery techniques,
and racing under all conditions
and road surfaces, Paul Lukas
said. They will then bring this
knowledge back to young rid-
ers in our area to help them
perform better.
Lukas, the son of Paul and
Jane Lukas, will race against
junior competition. Hottenstein
will race against elite amateurs
and some professional riders
who are under 23.
Its a step up in competi-
tion, said Hottenstein, the son
of Nora and Bill Hottenstein, of
Kingston. They are super
fast.
Hottenstein, who made the
trip last year, added that its not
so much that the quality of
cyclists in Europe is better, but
the fact that there are so many
more top-notch riders than in
the United States.
It Lukas first taste of in-
ternational competition. He
started riding a bike when he
was 8 or 9, like most kids.
But he has been riding com-
petitively only since last year,
competing in between 20 and
25 races.
There is nothing like it,
Lukas said of racing. Pushing
yourself to the limit and then
blowing up Theres just
something about it.
Lukas has yet to land on the
top spot on the podium, but he
said he does have multiple
second-place finishes.
For him, the trip to Europe is
all about getting some experi-
ence and becoming a better
rider.
Its a chance to get a lot
better real quick, he said.
That doesnt mean the Valley
West junior hasnt been work-
ing hard to get ready for the
competition.
He has been training like a
convict, his father said.
Hottenstein has a bit more
experience racing, riding com-
petitively since he has been 9
or 10.
Last year, he also competed
in the Tour de lAbitibi in Cana-
da.
For Hottenstein the experi-
ence will be a big plus, too, but
he is also looking for some
good finishes.
Its a big step up, he said. I
like to finish in the front top
10s, top 20s.
He added that if everything
goes just right for him, perhaps
he could even find himself in
the top spot on a podium.
Its a slim possibility, Hot-
tenstein said of winning a race
overseas. But its still a possi-
bility.
Hottenstein will begin col-
lege in the fall at Northeastern,
majoring in International Busi-
ness with a minor in Spanish.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Booey Hottenstein, of Kingston, and Luke Lukas, of Courtdale, leave for Belgium tonight.
CYCLING
Continued from Page 1C
The international experience that these riders
will gain is immeasurable, from thinking tactically,
adopting new training and recovery techniques,
and racing under all conditions and road surfac-
es.
Paul Lukas
President of the Upstate Velo Club and Lukes father
NANTICOKE Danielle
Cook scored on an error after
tripling in the seventh to lift
Kingston/Forty Fort over
Neshanimy 5-4 Saturday eve-
ning in a 10-11 softball state
championship losers bracket
game.
Melodi Raskiewicz struck
out 13 batters in seven innings
for the victory, allowing just
two hits and two earned runs.
Morgan Klosko was 2-for-3
with a double and an RBI,
while Cook had a run, an RBI
and a stolen base.
Kingston/Forty Fort scored
two in the bottom of the sixth
to tie the game. Tacarra Roper
had two stolen bases and a run
in the sixth.
Kingston/Forty Forts next
game is yet to be determined.
S O F T B A L L
Kingston/Forty Fort wins
state losers bracket game
The Times Leader staff
LOS ANGELES Mardy
Fish fought from behind in the
third set to advance to his
second straight final, beating
teenager Ryan Harrison 6-0,
4-6, 7-6 (3) at the Farmers
Classic on Saturday.
Fish and Harrison were
playing a rematch of their
semifinal last week in Atlanta,
where Fish won his first title
of the season.
The top-seeded Fish defeat-
ed Harrison in straight sets in
Atlanta and picked up where
he left off Saturday, breezing
through the opening set in 20
minutes. A frustrated Harrison
won only six points.
Thats probably the clean-
est set of tennis Ive played in
a long time, Fish said.
Harrison responded in the
second set and pushed Fish to
the brink in the third. Fish
regrouped and went up 5-0 in
the tiebreaker and won the
match with an ace.
Its never going to be like
that for two sets, Fish said. I
was playing at an extremely
high level. You expect him to
bounce back and play better.
And he did.
Fish has won six career
titles, but has never reached
the final at this tournament.
He will play the winner of the
second semifinal between Alex
Bogomolov Jr. of the U.S. and
Ernests Gulbis of Latvia.
The 19-year-old Harrison
was trying for his first career
final. He is the first American
teen to make consecutive
semifinals appearances since
Andy Roddick in 2002.
Harrisons current run has
pushed him to a career-best
94th in the world. With the
loss, he fell to 0-7 when facing
top-10 players.
I dont feel like I cant beat
(Fish), Harrison said. It was
a coin-flip there at the end,
and he won.
Harrison showed his emo-
tions in the third set, smash-
ing his racket to the court and
bending it in half after Fish
broke his serve.
Harrison received a warning
from the chair umpire and
tossed the mangled racket to a
group of kids sitting courtside.
Cilic to play Dolgopolov in
Croatia Open final
UMAG, Croatia Marin
Cilic defeated Fabio Fognini of
Italy 6-2, 6-2 Saturday to ad-
vance to the Croatia Open
final against Aleksandr Dolgo-
polov of Ukraine.
The fourth-seeded Cilic
dropped serve only once in
the match, at the start of the
second set, before becoming
the first Croat to reach the
Umag final since Goran Prpic
defeated compatriot Goran
Ivanisevic in 1990.
In the other semifinal Sat-
urday, the second-seeded Dol-
gopolov beat Juan Carlos Fer-
rero of Spain 6-4, 6-4.
It was not as easy as it
looks, Cilic said. I had to
play really hard to win. My
serve went up and down,
especially in the second set.
But I am really happy how I
played.
T E N N I S R O U N D U P
Fish tops Harrison,
makes another final
The Associated Press
Kevin Russo said. We couldnt
do much of anything against
him.
Slowey scattered five hits,
walked none and struck out eight
(five looking) in a 104-pitch ef-
fort. Mike Lamb hit a solo homer
off Kyle Waldrop in the top of the
ninth.
The fans turned out to watch
the Red Wings, the Famous
Chicken, postgame fireworks
and to some degree, the Yankees.
Western New York is Yankee ter-
ritory, and interest in New Yorks
top farm club is high.
The Yankees entered the night
35-24 on the road, including an
impressive 19-9 against IL North
foes. Rochester, which has the
second-worst record in the IL, is
just 25-32 at home.
We cant worry about that
(losing to a last-place club), Rus-
so said. A loss is a loss.
The Yankees struck right off
the bat and in this case, the
glove. Russo flied to center on
the secondpitchof the game, and
the ball glanced off the heel of
Rene Tosoni.
Russo reached second, moved
to third on Greg Golsons sacri-
fice bunt and scored on Jesus
Monteros bloop single to right.
Yankees starter Adam Warren
gave it back with interest. Jeff
BaileyandAaronBates singledin
runs inthe bottomof the first and
Rene Riveras solo homer off the
railing in left field made it 3-1.
Mike Hollimons 30-foot nub-
ber down the third-base line
scored Toby Gardenhire from
third with Rochesters fourth run
inthe fourthinning. Hollimonhit
a pitchfromWarrenoff the endof
his bat, and both Warren and
third baseman Brandon Laird let
the ball roll, hoping it would go
foul.
It didnt, andthe Wings capital-
ized. They scored another run in
the fifthona wildpitchfromWar-
ren.
Warren (6-4) allowed five runs
on eight hits in his five-inning
stint. He suffered his first loss
since June 30.
The Wings padded their lead
with a run in the seventh, scoring
on a sacrifice fly by Rivera.
Mike Lamb homered off Kyle
Waldrop in the top of the ninth.
Russo said the Yankees are in-
terested in the off-field doings as
todays trade deadline hits, but
they cant do much about it.
All we cando is take it one day
at a time, he said.
The two-game series con-
cludes tonight witha 6:35 start at
Frontier. D.J. Mitchell (8-7, 3.11
ERA) will pitch for the Yankees
against Rochester rookie Liam
Hendriks (1-0, 3.55) ina matchup
of right-handers.
SWB
Continued from Page 1C
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) Manofmanymissions
and Broad Bahn won their elim-
inations and set the field of 10 for
next weekends $1.5millionHam-
bletonian at the Meadowlands
Racetrack.
Manofmanymissions covered
the mile for 3-year-olds in1:52 4-5
on Saturday night in posting the
fastest winning time and advanc-
ing to the final of trottings most
prestigious race. AndyMiller was
in the bike as the son of Yankee
Glide wore down longshot Mag-
numKosmos en route to a length
victory. Pastor Stephen, Opening
Night and Whiskey Tax also ad-
vanced out of the heat.
Manofmanymissions,
Broad Bahn win elims
PETE G.WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Danielle Cook of Kingston Forty Fort All Stars (right) steals
second base standing up in the first inning as Neshaminys
Victoria Smith tries to control the ball during the 10-11 year old
little league softball state playoff game in Nanticoke on Sat-
urday.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5C
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
PHILADELPHIA Ryan
Howard had four hits, includ-
ing a homer and two doubles,
and three RBIs to lead the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-4
victory over the Pittsburgh
Pirates on Saturday night.
Hunter Pence had an RBI
single in his debut for the Phil-
lies after he was acquired from
the Houston Astros Friday
night for three minor leaguers.
Cliff Lee (10-7) struck out 11
to reach double digits for the
16th time in his 10-year career,
including seven this season. He
allowed four runs on eight hits
and walked two in 7 2-3 in-
nings.
Ryan Madson pitched a
scoreless ninth, striking out
the side, for his 17th save in 18
chances.
James McDonald (7-5) gave
up five runs on 10 hits while
striking out five and walking
two.
Maya gets first career win,
Nats shut out Mets 3-0
Nationals 3, Mets 0
WASHINGTON Jayson
Werth hit a three-run home
run, and Yunesky Maya, filling
in for traded starter Jason
Marquis, earned his first career
win for the Washington Nation-
als in a 3-0 victory over the
New York Mets on Saturday
night.
Maya (1-1) allowed five hits
in 5 1-3 scoreless innings after
being recalled from Triple-A
Syracuse when Marquis was
traded to the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks shortly before the
game. Maya, who made his
major league debut with Wash-
ington last season, was making
his fourth start of the season
and 10th of his career. He en-
tered the game with an 0-4
career record.
The Nationals snapped a
six-game losing streak, their
longest of the season.
The Mets were shutout for
the fifth time this season and
ended a five-game winning
streak.
Cardinals 13, Cubs 5
ST. LOUIS Albert Pujols
and David Freese each home-
red and Ryan Theriot added
four hits and three RBI to help
the St. Louis Cardinals over-
come a five-run deficit in a 13-5
victory over the Chicago Cubs.
It was the 432nd homer of
Pujols career and came one
day after he reached 2,000 hits.
The home run places him
alone in 40th place on the
career list. He just missed
getting a second one when the
ball sailed just outside the
left-field foul pole in the sev-
enth inning.
Braves 5, Marlins 1
ATLANTA Tim Hudson
allowed one run in seven in-
nings, Dan Uggla hit a three-
run homer and the Atlanta
Braves beat the Florida Mar-
lins.
Ugglas 20th homer, a three-
run shot in the second inning,
extended his career-best hitting
streak to 21 games.
The Marlins have dropped
two straight following a five-
game winning streak.
Hudson (10-7) allowed six
hits, one run and no walks with
five strikeouts.
Brewers 6, Astros 2
MILWAUKEE Yovani
Gallardo tossed seven effective
innings and Prince Fielder hit a
475-foot home run to lead the
surging Milwaukee Brewers to
a 6-2 victory over the Houston
Astros on Saturday night.
Corey Hart hit a leadoff
homer in the first for NL Cen-
tral-leading Milwaukee, which
earned its fifth consecutive win
and stayed 11-2 games ahead
of St. Louis. Hart finished with
four hits, and Fielder and Jo-
nathan Lucroy had three
apiece.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Howard goes deep
as Phils top Bucs
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Robinson
Cano, Nick Swisher and
the New York Yankees
broke loose for 12 runs in
the first inning Saturday
night, setting a franchise
record en route to a 17-3
rout of the Baltimore
Orioles that completed a
painfully embarrassing
sweep of their split double-
header.
Cano went 5 for 5 with
five RBIs, a career high for
hits, and Swisher smacked
his second two-run homer
of the day in the nightcap.
Curtis Granderson added
four hits for the Yankees,
who roughed up both
young pitching prospects
called up from the minors
to start for Baltimore.
New York opened a 15-0
lead after two innings,
making it an easy night for
Ivan Nova (9-4) in his re-
turn from Triple-A Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre.
Mariners 3, Rays 2
SEATTLE Rookie Mi-
chael Pineda gave up just
one hit and struck out a
career-high 10, Dustin Ack-
ley homered, doubled and
scored twice, and the Seat-
tle Mariners won for just
the second time in 20
games, 3-2 over the Tampa
Bay Rays on Saturday.
Angels 5, Tigers 1
DETROIT Dan Haren
pitched a six-hitter for his
second complete game
against the Detroit Tigers
in 25 days, leading the Los
Angeles Angels to a victo-
ry.
Haren (11-6) walked one
and struck out one. In two
starts against Detroit, he is
2-0 with a 0.50 ERA.
Rangers 3, Blue Jays 0
TORONTO Derek
Holland pitched a four-
hitter to win his fourth
straight decision, Mitch
Moreland and Mike Napoli
homered and the Texas
Rangers beat the Toronto
Blue Jays.
Red Sox 10,
White Sox 2
CHICAGO Jon Lester
pitched eight strong in-
nings and the Boston Red
Sox got homers from
Adrian Gonzalez and Kevin
Youkilis and three RBIs
from Marco Scutaro in
victory over the Chicago
White Sox.
Indians 5, Royals 2
CLEVELAND Matt
LaPortas three-run homer
with two outs in the ninth
inning gave Cleveland its
12th home win its last at
bat.
LaPorta connected off
Royals closer Joakim Soria
(5-4) on a 1-1 pitch. It was
Sorias sixth blown save in
25 changes.
Tony Sipp (6-2) pitched
the top of the ninth.
Soria hit Asdrubal Cabre-
ra in the right foot with a
pitch and Travis Hafner
bounced into a forceout
and was replaced by pinch
runner Orlando Cabrera at
first base. Carlos Santana
then doubled down the
third-base line to put run-
ners on second and third.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Record-setting night
for Yanks in sweep
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
AP PHOTO
The New York Yankees Eric Chavez hits an RBI single off of Balti-
more Orioles Troy Patton in the fifth inning of the first baseball
game of a doubleheader on Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New
York. The Yankees won 8-3.
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston .......................................... 65 40 .619 7-3 W-1 33-19 32-21
New York...................................... 63 42 .600 2 6-4 W-2 36-22 27-20
Tampa Bay ................................... 55 51 .519 10
1
2 8
1
2 4-6 L-1 24-25 31-26
Toronto......................................... 54 53 .505 12 10 6-4 L-1 27-26 27-27
Baltimore ...................................... 42 62 .404 22
1
2 20
1
2 3-7 L-2 25-28 16-34
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit............................................. 56 51 .523 5-5 L-1 30-24 26-27
Cleveland....................................... 53 51 .510 1
1
2 9
1
2 3-7 W-1 29-23 24-28
Chicago.......................................... 52 53 .495 3 11 6-4 L-1 24-27 28-26
Minnesota...................................... 50 56 .472 5
1
2 13
1
2 5-5 W-1 26-25 24-31
Kansas City ................................... 45 62 .421 11 19 6-4 L-1 28-29 17-33
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas ............................................. 61 47 .565 5-5 W-1 35-21 26-25
Los Angeles .................................. 59 49 .546 2 5
1
2 7-3 W-1 28-23 31-26
Oakland.......................................... 47 59 .443 13 16
1
2 5-5 L-2 29-24 18-35
Seattle ............................................ 45 61 .425 15 18
1
2 2-8 W-1 26-28 19-33
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................. 67 39 .632 7-3 W-2 40-18 27-21
Atlanta........................................... 63 45 .583 5 6-4 W-2 34-21 29-24
New York...................................... 55 52 .514 12
1
2 7
1
2 6-4 L-1 22-26 33-26
Florida........................................... 52 55 .486 15
1
2 10
1
2 5-5 L-2 23-30 29-25
Washington.................................. 50 56 .472 17 12 2-8 W-1 29-22 21-34
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee .................................... 59 49 .546 7-3 W-5 38-14 21-35
St. Louis ....................................... 57 50 .533 1
1
2 5
1
2 7-3 W-2 29-23 28-27
Pittsburgh..................................... 54 51 .514 3
1
2 7
1
2 3-7 L-2 26-25 28-26
Cincinnati...................................... 52 55 .486 6
1
2 10
1
2 5-5 W-2 29-27 23-28
Chicago ........................................ 42 65 .393 16
1
2 20
1
2 3-7 L-5 25-31 17-34
Houston........................................ 35 72 .327 23
1
2 27
1
2 3-7 L-2 17-36 18-36
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
San Francisco.............................. 61 46 .570 5-5 L-2 32-18 29-28
Arizona ......................................... 57 49 .538 3
1
2 5 5-5 L-2 29-23 28-26
Colorado....................................... 50 56 .472 10
1
2 12 5-5 W-2 26-26 24-30
Los Angeles................................. 48 57 .457 12 13
1
2 6-4 W-1 28-29 20-28
San Diego..................................... 46 61 .430 15 16
1
2 4-6 L-1 21-33 25-28
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Kansas City 12, Cleveland 0
Detroit 12, L.A. Angels 2
Toronto 3, Texas 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Boston 1
Minnesota 9, Oakland 5
Tampa Bay 8, Seattle 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 3, 1st game
Texas 3, Toronto 0
L.A. Angels 5, Detroit 1
Seattle 3, Tampa Bay 2
N.Y. Yankees 17, Baltimore 3, 2nd game
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 2
Boston 10, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota at Oakland, (n)
Sunday's Games
Baltimore (Arrieta 10-7) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia
9-7), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-9) at Cleveland (Carmona
5-10), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 14-4) at Detroit (Verlander
14-5), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 10-4) at Toronto (Morrow 7-5),
1:07 p.m.
Boston(A.Miller 4-1) at ChicagoWhiteSox (Buehrle
8-5), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 6-7) at Oakland (McCarthy
3-5), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 9-7) at Seattle (Vargas 6-9),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y. Mets 8, Washington 5
Philadelphia 10, Pittsburgh 3
Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 3, 13 innings
Atlanta 5, Florida 0
Milwaukee 4, Houston 0
St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Colorado 3, San Diego 2
L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 5
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 13, Chicago Cubs 5
Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 5, Florida 1
Milwaukee 6, Houston 2
Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 2
Colorado at San Diego, (n)
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Sunday's Games
San Francisco (Zito 3-3) at Cincinnati (Cueto 6-4),
1:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 7-7) at Atlanta (Hanson11-5), 1:35
p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 10-8) at Washington (Zimmer-
mann 6-9), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 8-5) at Philadelphia (Worley
7-1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-11) at Milwaukee (Narveson 7-6),
2:10 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 4-3) at San Diego (LeBlanc 0-2),
4:05 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 7-8) at L.A. Dodgers (R.De La
Rosa 4-4), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 7-8) at St. Louis (West-
brook 9-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
A L B O X E S
Rangers 3, Blue Jays 0
Texas Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 0
Quntnll ss 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 1 0 0 0
MiYong 1b 4 0 0 0 Rasms cf 4 0 0 0
JHmltn lf 0 0 0 0 Bautist 3b 4 0 2 0
Napoli c 4 2 2 1 Lind dh 4 0 0 0
Morlnd rf-1b 3 1 1 2 Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0
Torreal dh 4 0 1 0 EThms rf 3 0 0 0
DvMrp lf-rf 3 0 2 0 RDavis lf 2 0 0 0
C.Davis 3b 4 0 1 0
JMcDnl
2b-ss 3 0 1 0
EnChvz cf 4 0 1 0 Arencii c 3 0 1 0
Totals 34 3 9 3 Totals 30 0 4 0
Texas.................................. 020 000 010 3
Toronto............................... 000 000 000 0
ED.Holland (2). DPTexas 1, Toronto 1. LOB
Texas 7, Toronto 4. 2BC.Davis (3). HRNapoli
(15), Moreland (13). CSDav.Murphy (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
D.Holland W,10-4 ... 9 4 0 0 1 5
Toronto
Mills L,0-1 ................ 7 6 2 2 2 5
Litsch........................ 1 1 1 1 0 3
T.Miller .....................
2
3 2 0 0 0 1
Camp........................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
HBPby Mills (Moreland).
UmpiresHome, Brian Runge;First, Marvin Hud-
son;Second, Tim McClelland;Third, Ted Barrett.
T2:29. A22,560 (49,260).
Angels 5, Tigers 1
Los Angeles Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
MIzturs 3b 4 0 1 1 Dirks cf 4 1 1 0
TrHntr rf 5 0 1 1 Boesch lf 4 0 0 0
Abreu dh 4 0 2 0 Ordonz rf 4 0 2 1
V.Wells lf 5 0 1 0 MiCarr 1b 4 0 2 0
HKndrc 2b 4 1 0 0 VMrtnz dh 4 0 0 0
Aybar ss 5 2 3 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 0 0
Trumo 1b 3 1 1 1 Guillen 2b 3 0 0 0
Bourjos cf 0 1 0 1 Avila c 3 0 0 0
Mathis c 3 0 0 1 Kelly 3b 2 0 1 0
Totals 33 5 9 5 Totals 31 1 6 1
Los Angeles....................... 000 012 020 5
Detroit................................. 000 100 000 1
EAvila (5). DPLos Angeles 2. LOBLos An-
geles 10, Detroit 4. 2BM.Izturis (25), Aybar (22),
Trumbo (20), Dirks (6). 3BAbreu (1). SBAbreu
(15), V.Wells (6), Aybar 2 (23), Bourjos 2 (14). S
Bourjos. SFMathis.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Haren W,11-6.......... 9 6 1 1 1 1
Detroit
Ja.Turner L,0-1 ....... 5
1
3 3 2 2 3 6
Coke ......................... 2
1
3 5 3 3 1 1
Schlereth.................. 1
1
3 1 0 0 0 1
HBPby Coke (Bourjos, M.Izturis), by Ja.Turner
(Bourjos). WPSchlereth.
UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson;First, Hunter
Wendelstedt;Second, Brian Knight;Third, Jerry
Layne.
T2:54. A40,753 (41,255).
Mariners 3, Rays 2
Tampa Bay Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jnnngs lf 3 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 1 1 0
Damon dh 3 1 0 0 Ryan ss 4 0 0 0
Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 2 Ackley dh 3 2 2 2
Ktchm 1b 4 0 0 0 Carp lf 3 0 1 1
Longori 3b 2 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0
Joyce rf 2 0 0 0 FGtrrz cf 3 0 0 0
BUpton cf 3 0 0 0 J.Bard c 3 0 1 0
Chirins c 3 0 0 0 Figgins 3b 3 0 1 0
SRdrgz ss 2 1 0 0 JaWlsn 2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 26 2 1 2 Totals 28 3 6 3
Tampa Bay......................... 000 101 000 2
Seattle ................................ 200 001 00x 3
EJ.Bard (2). DPTampa Bay 2. LOBTampa
Bay 3, Seattle 2. 2BAckley (9). HRAckley (5).
SBDamon (9), Figgins (11). CSZobrist (4). S
Jennings.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Cobb L,3-1............... 6
1
3 6 3 3 1 9
Howell.......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Seattle
Pineda W,9-7 .......... 6
1
3 1 2 1 4 10
Gray H,1................... 1
2
3 0 0 0 0 2
League S,24-28 ...... 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBPby Pineda (S.Rodriguez).
UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings;First, Dana De-
Muth;Second, Kerwin Danley;Third, Angel Cam-
pos.
T2:24. A24,985 (47,878).
Yankees 8, Orioles 3
First Game
Baltimore New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Hardy ss 5 0 0 1 Gardnr cf 5 0 1 2
Markks rf 4 0 1 0 ENunez ss 5 0 0 0
AdJons cf 3 0 2 0 Teixeir dh 4 1 0 0
Guerrr dh 5 0 1 0 Cano 2b 3 1 0 0
D.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0 Swisher rf 4 2 3 2
J.Bell 3b 0 0 0 0 ErChvz 3b 4 2 2 1
MrRynl 3b-1b 4 2 2 1 Posada 1b 4 0 1 1
Pie lf 4 0 1 0 Dickrsn lf 4 1 2 1
Tatum c 4 1 0 1 Cervelli c 3 1 2 1
BDavis 2b 3 0 1 0
Andino ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 37 3 9 3 Totals 36 811 8
Baltimore............................ 000 200 010 3
New York ........................... 002 330 00x 8
EB.Davis (2), E.Nunez (14). LOBBaltimore 10,
New York 6. 2BMarkakis (16), Ad.Jones (19),
B.Davis (2), Swisher (20), Cervelli (3). HR
Mar.Reynolds (23), Swisher (13). SBMarkakis
(9), Ad.Jones (9), Dickerson (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Tillman L,2-4............ 4
1
3 8 7 5 1 6
Patton ....................... 2
2
3 3 1 1 0 2
M.Gonzalez ............. 1 0 0 0 1 0
New York
Colon W,8-6 ............ 5 5 2 2 2 6
Wade........................ 3 2 1 1 0 2
Logan........................ 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBPby Colon (Ad.Jones).
UmpiresHome, Tim Welke;First, Mike Esta-
brook;Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Mike DiMuro.
T3:02. A46,469 (50,291).
Indians 5, Royals 2
Kansas City Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 3 1 1 0 Brantly lf 3 0 1 1
MeCarr cf 4 0 3 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0
Butler dh 4 0 1 0 ACarer ss 3 0 1 0
Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 Hafner dh 4 0 0 0
Francr rf 4 1 1 0 OCarer pr 0 1 0 0
Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0 CSantn c 4 1 2 0
Treanr c 2 0 0 0 Fukdm rf 3 0 0 1
B.Pena c 2 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 1 2 0 0
Getz 2b 4 0 2 1 LaPort 1b 4 1 2 3
AEscor ss 4 0 0 0 Carrer cf 3 0 1 0
Totals 34 210 2 Totals 29 5 7 5
Kansas City ....................... 100 000 001 2
Cleveland........................... 000 000 014 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
DPKansas City 2, Cleveland 1. LOBKansas
City 7, Cleveland4. 2BMe.Cabrera(27), Getz (6),
C.Santana 2 (19), LaPorta (14). HRLaPorta (10).
SBFrancoeur (18), A.Cabrera (13). CSMe.Ca-
brera (5), Brantley (4). SMoustakas. SFFuku-
dome.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
F.Paulino.................. 6 4 0 0 2 4
Collins H,5 ............... 1 0 1 0 1 0
Crow BS,4-4............ 1 1 0 0 0 0
Soria L,5-4 BS,6-25
2
3 2 4 4 1 0
Cleveland
Masterson................ 8 9 2 2 1 5
Sipp W,6-2............... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Masterson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
F.Paulino pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Collins pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBPby Soria (A.Cabrera). PBB.Pena.
UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz;First, Wally Bell;Se-
cond, John Hirschbeck;Third, Scott Barry.
T2:56. A31,436 (43,441).
Red Sox 10, White Sox 2
Boston Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsury cf 6 1 1 0 Pierre lf 4 0 0 0
Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 1 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0
AdGnzl 1b 4 1 3 2 Konerk 1b 3 1 1 1
Sutton 1b 0 0 0 0 De Aza ph 1 0 0 0
Youkils 3b 5 1 2 2 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0
Aviles 3b 0 0 0 0 Quentin rf 3 0 0 0
D.Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 Lillirdg ph 1 0 1 0
Crwfrd lf 5 2 2 0 Przyns c 4 0 1 0
DMcDn lf 0 0 0 0 Rios cf 3 0 0 0
Sltlmch c 4 2 2 2 Bckhm 2b 3 1 1 1
Reddck rf 4 2 1 0 Morel 3b 3 0 0 0
Scutaro ss 3 0 2 3
Totals 40101510 Totals 31 2 5 2
Boston.............................. 000 040 015 10
Chicago............................ 000 000 110 2
EPierzynski (3). DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 9,
Chicago 4. 2BSaltalamacchia 2 (14), Lillibridge
(4), Pierzynski (17). HRAd.Gonzalez (18), Youki-
lis (15), Konerko (25), Beckham (8). SBEllsbury
(30), C.Crawford (12), Scutaro (3). SFPedroia,
Scutaro.
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Lester W,11-4.......... 8 4 2 2 1 8
Wheeler.................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
Chicago
Humber L,8-7.......... 4
2
3 6 4 4 2 4
Ohman...................... 1
2
3 2 0 0 1 1
Frasor .......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Bruney...................... 1
2
3 7 6 6 1 0
Thornton...................
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Gary Darling;First, Bruce Dreck-
man;Second, Alan Porter;Third, Rob Drake.
T3:00. A33,919 (40,615).
Cardinals 13, Cubs 5
Chicago St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
SCastro ss 4 1 0 0 Theriot 2b 5 1 4 3
Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 Jay cf 5 1 1 0
ArRmr 3b 3 1 0 0 Pujols 1b 4 2 2 1
C.Pena 1b 3 1 0 0 Dotel p 0 0 0 0
Byrd cf 4 0 1 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0
Soto c 4 1 1 2 Hollidy lf 3 2 1 1
ASorin lf 4 1 1 3 CPttrsn lf 0 0 0 0
Colvin rf 3 0 0 0
Freese
3b-1b 4 2 1 3
RLopez p 2 0 0 0 G.Laird c 0 0 0 0
Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0 Schmkr rf 4 1 2 1
JRussll p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c-1b 4 1 1 1
JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0
Descals
ss-3b 3 1 0 0
Grabow p 0 0 0 0 Lohse p 2 0 0 0
Marshll p 0 0 0 0 T.Cruz ph 0 1 0 1
Lynn p 0 0 0 0
Greene
ph-ss 1 1 0 0
Totals 31 5 3 5 Totals 35131211
Chicago............................ 500 000 000 5
St. Louis........................... 200 082 10x 13
EAr.Ramirez (7), A.Soriano (7), Freese (7), Des-
calso (6). DPChicago 1. LOBChicago 2, St.
Louis 5. 2BByrd(16), Soto(18), Theriot 2(21), Jay
(13), Holliday (25). HRA.Soriano (16), Pujols (24),
Freese (7). CSTheriot (5). SBarney.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
R.Lopez L,2-3.......... 4
1
3 8 6 6 3 2
Samardzija...............
1
3 2 4 3 3 0
J.Russell .................. 1
1
3 1 2 2 1 2
Grabow..................... 1 1 1 0 0 0
Marshall ................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Lohse W,9-7............ 5 2 5 0 2 3
Lynn.......................... 2 0 0 0 0 2
Dotel ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Salas......................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa;First, Jim Wolf;Sec-
ond, Derryl Cousins;Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T2:43. A43,784 (43,975).
N L B O X E S
Nationals 3, Mets 0
New York Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
JosRys ss 4 0 0 0 Ankiel cf 4 1 1 0
JuTrnr 2b 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 1 0
DnMrp 1b 4 0 1 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 1 0
DWrght 3b 3 0 2 0 Morse 1b 3 1 2 0
Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 1 2 3
Bay lf 4 0 2 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0
Duda rf 4 0 0 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0
Thole c 2 0 2 0 Bixler lf 0 0 0 0
Dickey p 1 0 1 0 WRams c 3 0 3 0
Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 Maya p 1 0 0 0
DCrrsc p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0
Acosta p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Harris ph 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 0 8 0 Totals 27 310 3
New York ........................... 000 000 000 0
Washington ....................... 300 000 00x 3
DPNew York 3, Washington 2. LOBNew York
9, Washington5. 2BMorse(24). HRWerth(12).
CSDesmond (6). SDickey, Desmond, Maya,
Clippard.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Dickey L,5-9 ............ 6 6 3 3 2 1
D.Carrasco .............. 1
1
3 4 0 0 0 1
Acosta ......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
Maya W,1-1 ............. 5
1
3 5 0 0 0 0
Detwiler H,1............. 1
1
3 1 0 0 0 0
Clippard H,26 .......... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Storen S,26-29........ 1 2 0 0 1 2
HBPby Detwiler (Thole), by Maya (Thole). WP
Dickey.
UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals;First, CB Bucknor-
;Second, Dan Iassogna;Third, Dale Scott.
T2:30. A35,414 (41,506).
Braves 5, Marlins 1
Florida Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bonifac 3b 4 1 2 0 Constnz cf 4 0 0 0
Infante 2b 4 0 2 1 Prado 3b 4 1 2 1
GSnchz 1b 3 0 1 0 Fremn 1b 4 1 2 0
HRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 3
Morrsn lf 4 0 0 0 Hinske lf 3 1 2 1
Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 D.Ross c 4 0 0 0
Camrn cf 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 2 0 0 0
J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 AlGnzlz ss 4 1 2 0
AnSnch p 1 0 0 0 THudsn p 1 0 0 0
Wise ph 1 0 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0
Sanchs p 0 0 0 0 Conrad ph 1 0 0 0
Helms ph 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Choate p 0 0 0 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 7 1 Totals 31 5 9 5
Florida ................................ 000 001 000 1
Atlanta ................................ 004 000 01x 5
DPAtlanta 2. LOBFlorida 6, Atlanta 7.
2BBonifacio (17), Cameron (2), Hinske (8). HR
Uggla (20), Hinske (10). SBFreeman (4). S
T.Hudson 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Florida
Ani.Sanchez L,6-4 .. 5 8 4 4 1 5
Sanches ................... 2 0 0 0 1 2
Choate......................
1
3 1 1 1 1 0
Cishek ......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 2
Atlanta
T.Hudson W,10-7 ... 7 6 1 1 0 5
Venters H,22 ........... 1 1 0 0 2 2
Kimbrel ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
WPCishek 2, Venters.
UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth;First, Lance
Barksdale;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Adrian
Johnson.
T2:37. A40,656 (49,586).
Brewers 6, Astros 2
Houston Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 C.Hart rf 5 1 4 1
AngSnc ss 4 0 2 1 Morgan cf 5 0 1 1
Bourgs rf 4 0 0 0 Braun lf 4 1 0 0
Ca.Lee lf 4 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 4 2 3 1
CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 FLopez 2b 4 0 0 0
MDwns 2b 3 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 3 0 0 1
Wallac 1b 4 0 0 0 YBtncr ss 4 1 1 0
Quinter c 3 1 1 0 Lucroy c 4 0 3 2
Happ p 1 0 0 0 Gallard p 3 1 1 0
Altuve ph 1 1 1 0 Estrad p 0 0 0 0
AnRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0
JMrtnz ph 1 0 1 1 Loe p 0 0 0 0
WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 6 2 Totals 37 613 6
Houston.............................. 000 001 010 2
Milwaukee.......................... 101 030 10x 6
EAng.Sanchez (7), M.Downs (5), Y.Betancourt
(13). LOBHouston 5, Milwaukee 8.
2BJ.Martinez (1), Lucroy (10), Gallardo (3). HR
C.Hart (14), Fielder (24). SFMcGehee.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Happ L,4-13............. 5 10 5 2 0 6
An.Rodriguez .......... 2 1 1 1 0 3
W.Lopez................... 1 2 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,12-7...... 7 4 1 0 0 7
Estrada..................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Loe............................ 1 0 0 0 1 0
UmpiresHome, Jeff Kellogg;First, Eric Cooper-
;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Tim Timmons.
T2:51. A44,306 (41,900).
Phillies 7, Pirates 4
Pittsburgh Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ciriaco ss 4 1 2 0 Rollins ss 5 2 2 1
GJones ph 1 0 0 0 Victorn cf 5 2 2 0
Diaz lf 3 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0
AMcCt cf 3 1 0 0 Howard 1b 4 1 4 3
Walker 2b 4 0 3 1 Pence rf 5 0 1 1
Pearce rf 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0
BrWod 1b 4 1 2 1 Polanc 3b 5 1 2 0
Alvarez 3b 3 1 1 2 Ruiz c 5 0 2 1
McKnr c 4 0 0 0 Cl.Lee p 4 1 2 0
JMcDnl p 2 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
DMcCt p 0 0 0 0 Madson p 0 0 0 0
Overay ph 1 0 0 0
Resop p 0 0 0 0
Veras p 0 0 0 0
Paul ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 8 4 Totals 41 716 6
Pittsburgh .......................... 000 200 020 4
Philadelphia....................... 012 200 11x 7
EWalker (6), Pearce (4). DPPhiladelphia 1.
LOBPittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 13. 2BHoward
2 (23), Ruiz (16). 3BVictorino (12). HRAlvarez
(3), Rollins (13), Howard (21). SBVictorino (14).
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald L,7-5 . 5 10 5 5 2 5
D.McCutchen .......... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Resop....................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
Veras ........................ 1 3 1 1 1 0
Philadelphia
Cl.Lee W,10-7......... 7
2
3 8 4 4 2 11
Bastardo H,8............
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Madson S,18-19 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 3
HBPby Cl.Lee (Alvarez).
T2:59. A45,737 (43,651).
Diamondbacks obtain Mar-
quis: The Arizona Diamond-
backs have acquired right-hand-
er Jason Marquis from the
Washington Nationals, giving
them another veteran arm for
the their rotation.
Red Sox acquire Aviles from
Royals: The Boston Red Sox
have acquired infielder Mike
Aviles from the Kansas City
Royals for infielder Yamaico
Navarro and minor league pitch-
er Kendal Volz.
Aviles was batting .222 with
five home runs and 31 RBIs in
53 games with the Royals. Hes
expected to fill a utility infiel-
ders role with the Red Sox.
Brewers get Hairston: The
Milwaukee Brewers acquired
utilityman Jerry Hairston Jr.
from the Washington Nationals
for a prospect to shore up their
depth after injuries to two regu-
lars
Seattle sends Fister, Pauley to
Detroit: The Seattle Mariners
have sent right-handed starter
Doug Fister and reliever David
Pauley to the Detroit Tigers for
outfielder Casper Wells, in-
fielder Francisco Martinez and
left-handed pitcher Charlie
Furbush.
T R A D E R O U N D U P
Yankees 17, Orioles 3
Second Game
Baltimore New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 Jeter ss 6 1 2 2
Pie cf 1 0 0 0 Grndrs cf 6 3 4 0
Markks rf 3 1 1 0 Teixeir 1b 5 3 3 2
Tatum 1b 1 0 0 0 Cano 2b 5 2 5 5
AdJons cf 3 0 1 0
Cervelli
pr-3b-c 1 0 0 0
BDavis ss 1 1 1 0
Swisher
dh-rf 6 2 3 3
Guerrr dh 4 1 4 2 AnJons rf-lf 5 2 2 2
MrRynl 1b-3b 3 0 1 1 Martin c-3b 5 1 2 1
Wieters c 4 0 1 0
ENunez
3b-2b 5 2 2 1
Reimld lf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 1 1 1
J.Bell 3b-rf 4 0 0 0 Ayala p 0 0 0 0
Andino 2b 4 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 3 9 3 Totals 48172417
Baltimore............. 0 01 001 010 3
New York............ (12)31 001 00x 17
EHardy (3), Reimold (3). DPBaltimore 1, New
York 1. LOBBaltimore 6, New York 11.
2BMarkakis (17), Guerrero (14), Granderson
(15), Teixeira (17), Cano 2 (27), An.Jones (3), Mar-
tin (10). 3BE.Nunez (2). HRGuerrero (9),
Swisher (14), An.Jones (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Britton L,6-8.............
1
3 7 9 6 1 1
Berken...................... 2
2
3 8 7 7 2 2
Jakubauskas............ 3 5 1 1 0 2
Hendrickson ............ 1 2 0 0 1 0
M.Gonzalez ............. 0 1 0 0 0 0
Patton ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 2
New York
Nova W,9-4.............. 7 6 2 2 1 6
Ayala......................... 1 3 1 1 0 0
R.Soriano................. 1 0 0 0 0 2
M.Gonzalez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
PBWieters.
UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher;First, Jim Rey-
nolds;Second, MikeDiMuro;Third, MikeEstabrook.
T3:24. A43,190 (50,291).
Reds 7, Giants 2
San Francisco Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AnTrrs cf 5 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 1 1 0
Kppngr 2b 5 0 2 0 Renteri ss 5 2 1 0
Beltran rf 5 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0
PSndvl 3b 5 1 3 1 Votto 1b 4 1 1 0
Schrhlt lf 5 0 1 0 BPhllps 2b 2 1 1 1
Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 Cairo 3b 2 1 1 1
BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 1 1 2
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Heisey lf 4 0 1 2
Rownd ph 1 0 1 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0
RRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Leake p 2 0 0 0
CStwrt c 3 1 1 0 Bray p 0 0 0 0
Bmgrn p 1 0 0 0 Frazier ph 1 0 0 0
A.Huff ph 1 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0 Janish ss 0 0 0 0
Fontent ss 2 0 1 0
Totals 40 211 1 Totals 31 7 7 6
San Francisco.................... 010 010 000 2
Cincinnati ........................... 500 200 00x 7
EAn.Torres (3), Schierholtz (2), P.Sandoval (4),
Renteria 2 (11). LOBSan Francisco12, Cincinnati
8. 2BSchierholtz (20), Belt (3), Rowand (21),
Renteria (8). HRP.Sandoval (11). SLeake.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,6-10 .. 4 7 7 5 3 4
S.Casilla................... 1
2
3 0 0 0 3 2
Affeldt ....................... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
R.Ramirez................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
Leake W,9-6............ 6
1
3 8 2 1 0 7
Bray H,13.................
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Ondrusek ................. 1 1 0 0 1 1
Masset...................... 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBPby Bumgarner (Cairo). WPS.Casilla, On-
drusek. BalkBumgarner.
UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza;First, Marty Fos-
ter;Second, Bill Welke;Third, Jeff Nelson.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N F L
TL
TL
Kountry Wood Cabinets, Inc.
WASHINGTON Its on to
the next step for the NFL and its
players, who are getting closer to
a full-fledged collective bargain-
ing agreement.
The NFL and NFLPA staffs
have been working for the past
few days on the final details of
the new CBA, league spokes-
man Greg Aiello wrote in an
email to The Associated Press on
Saturday.
A person familiar with the ne-
gotiations confirmed to the AP
that the NFL Players Association
already re-established itself as a
union. The person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because no
announcement had been made
by the NFLPA.
Re-establishing the union was
a key step needed to finish a CBA
after the main parts of the deal to
end the NFLs 4
1
2-month lockout
were agreed to by owners on July
21 and by players on Monday.
Only a union can negotiate items
such as drug testing, player con-
duct policy and disability and
pension programs.
For the lockout to remain lift-
ed and the season to proceed,
those issues must be resolved
and a full CBA completed by
Thursday, a deadline both sides
are confident will be met.
In March, when federally me-
diated talks in Washington be-
tween owners and players broke
down and the old CBA expired,
the NFLPA said it was dissolving
itself as a union and instead be-
coming a trade association. That
move allowed the players to sue
the league under antitrust law,
and10 did, including TomBrady,
Peyton Manning and Drew
Brees. That case was settled as
part of the deal the sides have
agreed to.
But by decertifying, the
NFLPA gave up its right to bar-
gain on behalf of all players un-
der labor law. Thats why the
union needed to formagain in or-
der to complete a CBA.
Once the CBA is fully squared
away, veteran free agents who
have signed new contracts in the
past few days will be allowed to
practice with their teams. Those
players are currently allowed to
attend team meetings, work out
individually and watch but
not participate in practice.
Its frustrating, Buffalo Bills
receiver/quarterback Brad
Smith said after watching the
teams first walk-through of train-
ing camp in suburban Rochester
on Saturday. Its good. I can sit
here and watch the guys go
through the plays and learn the
system. It hurts a little bit. But
its a positive opportunity.
The former New York Jets
multipurpose offensive star
signed a four-year contract with
the Bills on Friday.
In addition to the Bills, at least
the following teams had voted in
favor of re-certification as of Sat-
urday afternoon: Patriots,
Chiefs, Broncos, Bengals, Cow-
boys, Jaguars, Browns, Saints
and Steelers, 49ers, Falcons, Gi-
ants, Titans, Buccaneers and
Bears.
Giants player rep Kareem
McKenzie said of his teams
unanimous vote: The guys real-
ly wanted to go ahead. Once they
had an idea of what the deal en-
compassed and all we gained, the
guys really wanted to get back to
work.
Said Broncos safety Brian
Dawkins, a member of the
NFLPAs executive committee:
It was an easy sell.
While noting that the final
CBA is not yet done, Dawkins
was confident the final issues
will be settled.
De and those guys will contin-
ue to hash those things out, he
said, referring to NFLPA execu-
tive director DeMaurice Smith.
We have nothing but 100 per-
cent trust in De. He knows what
we want. He knows what, obvi-
ously, we need.
Source says players have recertified NFLPA
Re-establishing union was key
step into completing CBA
between owners and players.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Pro Football Writer
chameleon, so I amgoing to blend
in and do it the Patriot way, which
is win. We had our talk, and with-
out him(Belichick) evenhavingto
saying anything there is no
need for some of the stuff I did be-
fore. Theres no need for it.
The Patriots were among the
biggest newsmakers in the league
coming out of the lockout, agree-
ing to trades for Ochocinco and
Redskins defensivelinemanAlbert
Haynesworth shortly after the
NFL reopened for business.
Whats most unusual: Neither
player is whats thought of as the
usual type for Belichick, who pre-
fers the quiet and businesslike to
the guys who make headlines off
the field.
I think every player on this
team, every person on this team,
has their own individual personal-
ity, Belichicksaid. None of us are
the same, sothats probably a good
thing.
Ochocinco, who was originally
ChadJohnson, has caught 751pas-
ses for 10,783 yards and 66 touch-
downs in his 10-year career. But he
is perhaps better known for his
touchdown celebrations, for
changing his legal name to the
Spanishwords for 8and5tomatch
his uniform number, and for his
prolific tweeting almost 30,000
messages to more than 2.4 million
Twitter followers.
Belichick is not among them.
Thats not something I follow,
as you know, he said, smiling.
So far, the biggest complication
in Ochocincos arrival in New En-
gland had been tight end Aaron
Hernandez owning No. 85. Ocho-
cinco said he didnt have to pay
himanything for the No. 85. (Her-
nandez switched to No. 81.)
This was Mr. Hernandezs way
of greeting me here. He gave me
thenumberandI didnt havetopay
anything, I just shookhis handand
I said, Thank you, Ochocinco
said. I drive a Toyota Prius, so I
was going to let him use my Prius
on the weekends, and thats about
the best I can do right now. I have
some leftover McDonalds cou-
pons since I dont eat there any-
more.
A two-time Pro Bowl selection
in Tennessee, Haynesworths tal-
ent was completely overshadowed
in Washington by his legal prob-
lems andhis feudwithcoachMike
Shanahan that ended with Thurs-
days trade to the Patriots for a
2013 fifth-round draft pick.
All the trades weve been in-
volved in through the years the
Ted Washingtons and the Corey
Dillons andthe Randy Mosses and
all each one is different. Belich-
ick said In the end, you just try
to do whats best for your football
team.
Haynesworth, who repeatedly
failed his conditioning test in
Washington, did not practice on
Saturday morning.
There are things we still need
todowithAlbert for himtobeable
to get on the practice field and
when those things are done, hell
be out there, the coach said.
OCHOCINCO
Continued from Page 1C
SPARTANBURG, S.C. Cam
Newtonquietly walkedaroundas
cameras swarmed Carolinas new
kicker Olindo Mare. Newton
peeked out from behind a lens
and asked his Panthers team-
mate, How hot was it today?
Newton sure didnt act like a
No. 1 pick shortchanged by the
rookie wage scale.
The Heisman Trophy winner
spoke Saturday for the first time
since signing a four-year, $22 mil-
lion contract with the Panthers.
His deal was set by the newly bar-
gained rookie scale that was part
of the agreement between NFL
owners and players.
Newton took a major financial
hit as the drafts top selection,
getting$56millionor soless than
Sam Bradfords $78 million, six-
year deal he got as St. Louis No. 1
pick.
It really doesnt matter, New-
ton said. Either way you look at
it, Ive still got more money than
Ive ever had.
And Newton knows that he re-
aches his potential onthefootball
field, hell make up any financial
disparity later.
In this league, they set stan-
dards, Newton said. If you play
the way theyre predicting you to
play, youre going to be all right
either way it goes.
Newton was eager to take the
field for his first practice at Wof-
ford College later Saturday and
said holding out was never an op-
tion, even before the NFL lock-
out. Hespent thetimeawaytrain-
ing, working out with star Pan-
thers receiver Steve Smith in
some private sessions that
proved to Newton the Panthers
have plentyof offense despite last
years dismal 2-14 showing.
Newtonhopes he canbe part of
that. He received the offensive
coordinator Rob Chudzinskis
playbook in April in the short
time a judge lifted the NFL lock-
out. Newtons worked to learn
what he can, but knows he cant
really progress until he gets back
on the field. Hell wear No. 1 at
Panthers camp with quarterback
rival Jimmy Clausen wearing No.
2, the jersey number Newton
wore at Auburn during the 14-0
national championship season.
Newton said he and Clausen
talked about acquiring No. 2, but
in the end thought it was best to
start out fresh.
Rightfully so, since it was his
number, Newton said.
He and Clausen have a healthy,
friendly relationship so far and
bothunderstandthat the quarter-
back competition will make each
one better for the Panthers.
I dont want to give off a sit-
uation where we hate each oth-
ers guts and were just out there
running over each other, New-
ton said. Jimmy is helping me
andI hopeImhelpingJimmy. We
want to bring out the best in each
other.
Therell be plenty of people
hoping Newton can bring the
best out in Carolinas offense,
which set a franchise low in
points scored last year. The 6-
foot-5 Newton knows hell have
some help with that starting with
Smith.
The Panthers sometimes
prickly receiver had nothing but
glowing reviews for Newton in
their workouts, whichapparently
went a long way toward Smith
wanting to remainwiththe team.
Bothof Carolinas headliners in
the backfield, DeAngelo Wil-
liams and Jonathan Stewart, re-
turn and the Panthers picked up
Chicagotight endGregOlsenina
trade to bolster the receiving
corps.
I dont know about you guys,
but I dont know that Ive ever
seenanyone like him, Olsensaid
of his new quarterback. Watch-
ing him on TV is a whole lot dif-
ferent than seeing him in person.
He just has that something about
him, that confidence.
Newtons hopes he can carry
that through camp and into the
regular season. He said hes pre-
pared to work as hard as possible
to show hes ready for the NFL.
Its exciting just to be around
the football atmosphere again,
he said.
Newton is
thrilled to
finally be
in camp
Quarterback has no hard
feelings about getting $56M
less than last years top pick.
By PETE IACOBELLI
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Carolina Panthers rookie quarterback Cam Newton, right, smiles as he looks through a camera as
members of the media interview teammate Olindo Mare in Spartanburg, S.C., Saturday.
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Two-time Pro Bowl defen-
sive end Osi Umenyiora has
ended his holdout after a
day and reported to the New
York Giants.
Umenyiora reported to
training camp Saturday af-
ternoon after missing the
opening day of training
camp at the teams head-
quarters.
The 29-year-old failed to
report Friday.
He said during the sum-
mer that he was unhappy
with the team because gen-
eral manager Jerry Reese
failed to live up to a promise
to renegotiate his contact af-
ter last season.
Ill be there today, Ume-
nyiora said in a email to The
Associated Press around
3:20 p.m. Saturday.
Neither Umenyiora nor
Reese was available for com-
ment after the player report-
ed around 4 p.m.
Coach Tom Coughlin said
he spoke briefly with Ume-
nyiora and that the defen-
sive end didnt have his
physical because of his late
arrival in the afternoon.
Umenyiora started all 16
games last season and led
the league with 10 forced
fumbles.
His 11
1
2 sacks tied Justin
Tuck for the team lead.
Tuck hinted earlier in the
day that Umenyiora might
return soon.
I think he realizes this is
a business and hes doing
whats best for him. You
cant blame him for that,
Tuck said.
A lot of people have dif-
ferent opinions on how to
handle the situation. You
might not see eye-to-eye
with how he handled it. He
has to do whats best for
him. Thats all I tell him to
do. My biggest concern is
that he doesnt do some-
thing thats going to hurt
Osi.
Umenyiora ripped Reese
in an affidavit filed by play-
ers as part of an antitrust
suit against the league dur-
ing the recent lockout.
Tuck felt the comments
would not be a problem.
A couple years ago Mi-
chael Strahan was in a simi-
lar situation, Tuck said.
He mightve had a little bit
more (leverage) being a fu-
ture Hall of Famer. Youve
got to understand, we just
got out of a tremendous
business deal with just being
able to come out here and
play this game again. It is a
business.
I think a lot of people get
caught up in the loyalty to
the game and things of that
nature like the Giants in this
situation. Were definitely
loyal to the team. But, in
Osis situation, he feels as
though he needs to do this.
Giants Umenyiora ends
holdout after just 1 day
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
I think he realizes this
is a business and hes
doing whats best for
him. You cant blame
him for that.
Justin Tuck
On Giants teammate Osi Umenyiora
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 7C
S P O R T S
AT PLAY
The Times Leader will accept
photos, standings and stories from
readers about youth and adult
recreation activities. Were also
encouraging anyone in a league
darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. to sub-
mit standings and results to us.
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well to ensure publication.
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ject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off
at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y AAU team in Battle of Baltimore
The AAU FIRMAC Elite U16 team recently competed in the
Battle of Baltimore Blue Chip Basketball Tournament held
at Towson University in Towson, Md. Pictured are team
members left to right: Coach Isiah Walker, Lauren Szerenc-
sits, Celeste Robinson, Kaitlyn Smicherko, Sarah Shaffer,
Lisa Kitner, Dallas Ely, Taylor Reilly, Megan Kress, and
Coach Darnell Ford.
GWA Senior Teeners reach states
GWA senior teeners advanced to the state championship by defeating District 17 champs
North Pocono 11-1 at Battaglia Field in Scranton. Starting pitcher Adam Romanowski again
was in top form, pitching a complete-game 5-hitter. Catcher Trent Grove was solid behind
the plate, stopping the North Pocono running game in its tracks. Jake Granteed, Trent
Grove, Mattie Klimas, Jorden Zezza, and Freddie Cefalo all had hits for GWA ,but the big
hits came from Bart Chupka, who blasted two tape-measure shots that secured the GWA
victory. GWA outscored its opponents 55-2 in the five games of the tournament.
Vipers take state title
The Wyoming Valley Vipers won the ASA Pennsylvania
State Championship, going undefeated In tournament play.
Team members are Gwen Glatz, Aubrey Mytych, Hope
Jones, Morgan Bienkowski, Tiana Wren, Emily Elick, Nikki
Cragle, Faith Jones, Courtney Cragle, Kaitlin Connolly, Kae-
ley Zatorski and Jaden Belles.
Chaos wins state crown
The Luzerne County Chaos 10U team won the Babe Ruth
State Championship, going undefeated In tournament play.
Chaos advanced to Mid Atlantic Regional play. Team mem-
bers are Morgan Bienkowski, Courtney Cragle, Brinley So-
beck, Hope Jones, Emily Elick, Sarah Whitesell, Faith Jones,
Alyssa Lewis, Tiana Wren, Nikki Cragle, Kaeley Zatorski,
Jaden Belles and coaches Ed Bienkowski, Annie Elick, Doug
Jones and Dan Zatorski.
Alliance thanks sponsors
The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance (GHHA) would like
to thank the following hole-in-one sponsors for their sup-
port in GHHAs 13th Annual Corporate Invitational Golf
Tournament. Proceeds will benefit and support GHHAs
development of a Level-Three Trauma Center at Hazleton
General Hospital. Shown, from left to right: Dave McCarthy,
Susquehanna Bank; Jack Vozar, tournament co-chair,
GHHA; Jim Kennedy, Berger Family Dealerships; and Tony
Cusatis, KNBT Bank. Absent from the photo, Patrick Mur-
phy, Murphys Jewelry Stores.
Knight receives Langin Award
Crestwood High School recently held its Senior Awards
Ceremony with the Crestwood Football Booster Club pre-
senting its annual Langin Scholarship Award to David
Knight. The award is given to a senior who exhibits lead-
ership, perseverance, dedication, and academic commit-
ment. The Scholarship Award is funded by the Crestwood
Football Booster Club in memory of Jeff Langin, a Comet
football player and graduate of the Crestwood class of
2000, tragically taken in 2005. Knight will continue his
education at Luzerne County Community College. Shown
from left to right, Keri Hinkle, Jeffs sister; Gail Prutzman,
Jeffs mother; Tony Genoble, Crestwood Football Booster
Club President; Langin Award recipient David Knight; and
Evan Knight, Davids brother.
West Pittston 2nd in District 31
The West Pittston 10-year-old team finished as runner-up
in the District 31 tournament. Pictured are team members.
First row: from left: Curtis Hannon, Greg McDade, Greg
Godlewski, 2nd row: Anthony Scalzo, Zack Nossavage, Col-
by Thomas, Brycen Fox, Andrew Janosky; 3rd row: Jake
Hogan, Marc Minichello, Gabe Slusser, Kyre Zielinski; Back
row: manager Marc Minichello, coach Curt Hannon, coach
Tim Dougherty. Missing: coach Jim Manginello
Flames capture Sunbury crown
The Wyoming Valley Flames 14U squad beat the 16U Dan-
ville Bandits 5-2 to capture the ASA Sunbury Girls Fastpitch
Invitational 16U Championship.The final featured a 4-hit
pitching gem by Nanticoke Areas Baylee Steininger. The
offense was powered by the Hanover Area trio of Brittany
Mcnair, Shelly Mcnair and Caitlyn Bogart, along with Dallas
Maddie Perez. Front row, from left, Caitlyn Bogart, coach
Pat Langen, Brittany Mcnair. Kneeling, from left, Rachel
Langen, Rachel Roccograndi, Maddie Perez, Amber Gro-
howski, Kayla Cunningham. Standing, from left, Colleen
Borum, Haylee Bobos, coach Hank Mcnair, Baylee Stein-
inger, Katy Gushka, Shelly McNair, coach John Perez.
Magic third at Beach Blast
Mountain Top Magic girls recently finished in third place at
the U-13 A Division at the Beach Blast 5 on 5 Sand Soccer
Tournament held in Wildwood, N.J. They ended with a re-
cord of 2-1, playing some very talented teams from the tri-
state area. Pictured are first row: Breann Fetterman and
Julie Murphy. Second row: Kaitlin Snipas, Emily Hons, Au-
tumn Kaminski and Mady Heller. Third row: Tatiana Kogoy,
Alyssa Cuono, Shyla Seesoltz and Maria Ellis. Coaches are
Kim Kaminski, Brian Hons and Tony Ellis.
Stripes & Strikes third at states
Stripes & Strikes placed 3rd at ASA10U Fast-Pitch Softball
State Championshps. Pictured are team members: First
row, from left: Marissa Trivelpiece and Olivia Wolk. Second
row: Tiana Treon, Julia Mrochko, Maddy Mrochko and Tay-
lor Kaschak. Third row: Coach Ted Treon, Taylor Adamchick,
Brooke Stout, Paige Bonin, Emma Stoker and manager
Vince Trivelpiece. Absent from photo: Erika Book, Tara
Hohn, Allison Hohn and sponsor Keith Segedy.
DeLuca to wrestle in Alabama
Brian DeLuca of Dallas High School recently signed his
official letter of intent to wrestle for Marion Military In-
stitute (MMI), Alabama. Shown here during the letter-sign-
ing are, from left, first row, Denise DeLuca (mother), Brian
DeLuca, Phillip DeLuca (father). Standing Mike Richards,
head wrestling coach, Dallas School District; Brian Brad-
shaw, assistant principal, Dallas High School; and Nancy
Roberts, athletic director, Dallas School District.
C M Y K
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
RIO DE JANEIRO World
champion Spain was drawn on
Saturday with 1998 winner
France, Georgia, Belarus and Fin-
land in a qualifying group for the
2014 tournament the first
World Cup in Brazil in 64 years.
The United States, featuring
new coach Juergen Klinsmann,
was drawn with Jamaica in a
qualifying group from North and
Central America and the Carib-
bean.
England was placed with 2012
European Championship co-
hosts Ukraine and Poland in
Group H. Montenegro, Moldova
and San Marino also are in the
group.
It will be interesting, there
wont be easy matches, England
coach Fabio Ca-
pello said. En-
gland will have to
be very careful,
especially against
Montenegro, Po-
land and Uk-
raine.
Italy will meet
Denmark and the
Czech Republic in
Group B, while
Germany faces
Sweden, Austria
and Ireland in
Group C.
Sweden and
Irelandare very strongteams and
that makes the group interest-
ing, Germany general manager
Oliver Bierhoff said.
The draw will determine the
path of 166 teams in their bid to
qualify for the tournament in
three years. It was the first major
World Cup event in Brazil since
the South American nation was
awarded the competition in
2007. As host, Brazil is the only
nation that doesnt have to qual-
ify.
We are happy to be back in
Brazil, FIFA President Sepp
Blatter said.
Fifty-three European nations
were divided into nine groups,
with the winners automatically
qualifying and the eight best
group runners-up advancing to a
playoff. European qualifying
matches begin Sept. 7 and end
Oct. 15, 2013.
Spain is in a difficult Group I,
the only one with five teams in-
stead of six.
The Netherlands, last years
runner-up in South Africa, was
drawn in Group D with Turkey,
Hungary and Romania, while
Portugal will have to face Russia
and Israel in Group F.
Group A has Croatia, Serbia,
Belgium and Scotland. Greece
will play Slovakia in Group G,
while Norway was drawn in
Group E with Slovenia and Swit-
zerland.
The U.S. and Jamaica will face
two teams in Group A. that will
come from preliminary qualify-
ing matches featuring Haiti, Gua-
temala, the U.S. Virgin Islands
and five other nations.
Mexico is in Group Bwith Cos-
ta Rica, while Cuba and Hondu-
ras are in Group C. All three
group winners and runners-up
will advance to a final qualifying
round, beginning February 2013.
In Asia, Japan will face Uzbe-
kistan, Syria and North Korea in
Group C, while Australia will
play Saudi Arabia, Oman and
Thailand in Group D.
Iran, Bahrain and Qatar were
drawn in the same Group E,
along with Indonesia, while Chi-
na is inGroupAwithIraq, Jordan
and Singapore.
The African teams were divid-
ed into 10 groups for qualifiers
beginning in November. South
Africa, last years World Cup
host, was drawn in Group A
along with Botswana. Ghana, the
best African team last year, is in
GroupDwithZambia andSudan.
South America was not includ-
ed in the draw because the conti-
nents nine teams will be placed
in a single group. They will play
each other twice, home and
away, with the top four finishers
securing a World Cup spot. The
fifth-place team will advance to
an intercontinental playoff
against a team from Asia. The
other playoff will pit teams from
CONCACAF and Oceania.
The quali-
fiers began
June 15 and
will end
Nov. 19,
2013, after
824 match-
es. Twenty-
eight teams
were elimi-
nated in pre-
liminary
rounds be-
fore Satur-
days draw.
The
World Cup
will be played fromJune 12 to Ju-
ly 13, and the complete schedule
will be announced in October.
Today, Brazil is admired for
more than just football, music
and its popular festivities, Brazi-
lian President Dilma Rousseff
said at the draw. I invite you to
come visit us. You will find a
country very well prepared for
the World Cup.
About 1,000 protesters demon-
strated near the draw, opposing
the removal of families from ar-
eas where the World Cup and the
2016 Rio Olympics will be held,
Brazilian media reported. Some
were also protesting the nearly
$20 million of public funds said
to have been spent for Saturdays
event.
Riot troopers and mounted po-
lice were negotiating to end the
demonstration, which remained
peaceful by the time the drawbe-
gan. Some protesters held ban-
ners criticizing Brazilian soccer
federation president Ricardo
Teixeira and FIFA.
The total of 203 teams vying
for a WorldCupspot surpasses by
three the number that participa-
ted four years ago. The only asso-
ciations not to have signed up to
compete this time are Bhutan,
Brunei Darussalam, Guam and
Mauritania.
Seven nations have qualified
for each of the last six World
Cups Argentina, Brazil, Ger-
many, Italy, South Korea, Spain
and the U.S. Germany has been
the most successful team in
World Cup qualifiers so far, with
only two losses in 74 matches.
Ronaldo, Neymar, Zico and Za-
gallo were among the current
and past Brazilian players partici-
pating in the draw. More than 35
coaches and representatives
from 104 national teams were in
attendance. Rousseff, Pele and
Michel Platini were also at Mari-
na da Gloria harbor in Rio.
Strong wind damaged part of
the auditorium holding the draw
just before the start, but workers
fixed the problemin time and the
event was not disrupted.
W O R L D C U P S O C C E R
AP PHOTO
FIFA President Sepp Blatter holds up the key to the city of Rio de
Janeiro during a ceremony connected to Saturdays Brazil 2014
World Cup qualifying draw The draw laid out each nations path to
securing a spot in the tournament in three years time.
Qualifying draw held
for 2014 tournament
By TALES AZZONI
Associated Press
Today, Brazil is admired
for more than just foot-
ball, music and its pop-
ular festivities. I invite
you to come visit us.
You will find a country
very well prepared for
the World Cup.
Dilma Rousseff
Brazilian president
INDIANAPOLIS Tony
Stewart seemed to be on a date
with destiny in both of his wins
at Indianapolis Motor Speed-
way, where there was an over-
whelming sense in 2005 and
2007 that nothing could get in
his way in the race to Victory
Lane.
Even though he seemed to be
a lock both of those years, Stew-
art never allowed himself to
think the race was his for the
taking. Hed suffered too many
heartaches at the Brickyard to
assume anything was a given.
I know how much this track
can change. You can have a
great race car in practice and
then when you start the race,
the conditions seem to change
a little bit, Stewart said. Its
just a battle of trying to keep
the car balanced all day. Even
during the race, you can have a
fast car at the beginning and
lose the handle at the end. You
have to make sure you have a
car thats adjustable all day.
Stewart doesnt appear to be
a lock to win today, but he
should at least be a contender.
His Stewart-Haas Racing team
turned a corner two weeks ago
at New Hampshire, where Ryan
Newman led his boss to a 1-2
finish in both qualifying and the
race.
The roll continued into this
week, when Stewart won his
first ever World of Outlaws
race.
So his mood was sky high
when he arrived at the Brick-
yard. Thats a bit of a change for
Stewart, who has admittedly
gotten himself too stressed out
about racing at the track he so
adores.
He had a shot to win the 1996
Indianapolis 500 as a rookie
until a broken part ended his
race on lap 82. He was leading
in 1998 when his engine failed
right after hed moved to the
front.
Then came NASCAR, where
Stewart was a threat to win in
2001 until he bounced off the
wall racing with Dale Jarrett for
the lead. He admitted after-
ward, I was just trying too
hard. The next year he led four
times for 43 laps but faded at
the end, and 2003 saw a slow
final pit stop and a late caution
ruin another chance.
The 2005 victory came when
Stewart had finally found some
peace both with himself he
had moved home to Indiana
earlier that year in a search for
some serenity and the track.
That breakthrough win ended
the love-hate relationship Stew-
art always had with Indy.
I think I got by the hate part
once we won the second one,
he said. You love the place
because of the history of it,
because its home. The hate
part was we worked so hard,
led so many laps, couldnt win.
Once we won the race, think it
took that side of the equation
away, made it that much better.
We got to enjoy it that much
more afterward.
GORDONS GUILT: With a
record $119 million in winnings
in his NASCAR career, Jeff
Gordon is quite accustomed to
the finer things in life.
A fact-finding mission to
Congo last week has left the
four-time NASCAR champion
feeling a bit guilty about the
luxuries he enjoys.
It was an experience that
will change me forever, Gor-
don said of last weeks trip with
the Clinton Global Initiative.
I feel guilty about buying a
bottle of water for two bucks.
You look at your refrigerator
and you go like, Oh my gosh,
theres so much waste here.
You just start looking at every
aspect of your life and the
things you take for granted.
Gordon made the 28-hour
flight to Africa following the
July 17 race at New Hampshire.
He spent almost three days in
Congo, where he saw children
walking barefoot along busy
roads and women carrying
sacks of coal on their backs.
The father of two young chil-
dren said he didnt expect to
see such struggles.
DALE AND DANICA: Dale
Earnhardt Jr. would love the
opportunity to give Danica
Patrick a full-time job in NAS-
CAR.
Patrick could leave IndyCar
at the end of this season to
focus only on NASCAR. Shes
so far driven 19 Nationwide
Series races for Earnhardts JR
Motorsports team.
I would like for her to run
full-time and Im sure she is
considering that, and I think
she would enjoy it, Earnhardt
said.
But he said hes unsure of
what Patrick will do, even
though he believes shes happy
at JRM. Patrick has developed
a decent rapport with crew
chief Tony Eury Jr., and flirted
with victory earlier this month
at Daytona, where she led 13
laps before the last-lap chaos
dropped her to a 10th-place
finish.
I feel confident that shes
content where she is and happy
with what were doing. I think
things are looking positive for
us to put something together,
he said. I think shes doing
great. Shes way ahead of the
curve. Weve had the opportuni-
ty to put several drivers in that
car and her performance is
right on par with all those driv-
ers.
We started out struggling
and she had a steep, steep
climb to go and shes really
come a long way. Im excited
about what the potential is with
her going forward.
Patrick has six more sched-
uled NASCAR starts this sea-
son.
DRIVER SAFETY: Kyle
Busch plans to work with the
B.R.A.K.E.S young driver safety
program in the wake of his
recent speeding ticket.
Busch was ticketed for driv-
ing 128 mph in a 45 mph zone
in a loaned Lexus in May. Now
hell partner with the program
Be Responsible And Keep
Everyone Safe -- that was found-
ed in 2008 after drag racer
Doug Herbert lost two sons in a
car accident.
Busch will do public service
announcements and have mon-
etary donations through the
Kyle Busch Foundation.
Those guys have a great
program and do a lot of great
work for kids that may not
know exactly what driving a car
entails, Busch said. Its cer-
tainly a lot more than just being
able to make it from point A to
point B sometimes. Ill be work-
ing toward about 300 of those
new kids getting through the
program and taking some initia-
tive there to help them through
it and give them some advice
and give them my story.
Busch is due in court Aug. 23
on charges of speeding and
reckless driving.
A U T O R A C I N G
Stewart optimistic about Brickyard
AP PHOTO
Tony Stewart, right, talks with fellow driver Kasey Kahne during
practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 Saturday.
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
Johnson, the five-time defend-
ingseries champion, fell tothird.
His lap of 182.801 mph in his
Hendrick Motorsports Chevro-
let had led the qualifying session
until the late runs by Ragan and
Kahne.
He wasnt upset though, and
knows his past success at Indy
will come into play today.
This track is clearly unique
and we dont race on anything
else like it, Johnson said.
When you get it right, you have
an advantage.
Penske Racing teammates
Kurt BuschandBradKeselowski
qualified fourth and fifth in their
Dodges for todays race, and the
drivers have already heard from
team owner Roger Penske on
what theyll need to do to win.
He made a phone call last
night and reminded us that we
needed to try two tires in prac-
tice, Keselowski said.Hes got
this whole game plan and how
the strategy is going to play out.
He definitely studies this race.
He loves coming here.
AJ Allmendinger, Juan Pablo
Montoya, Jeff Gordon, Matt Ken-
seth and series points leader
Carl Edwards rounded out the
top 10.
DavidStremme, Travis Kvapil,
Erik Darnell, JJ Yeley and Scott
Wimmer were the five drivers
who failed to qualify for the race.
Denny Hamlin qualified 14th,
but hell have to drop to the back
of the field at the start of the race
as a penalty for changing his en-
gine.
The move was necessary be-
cause the engine inhis Joe Gibbs
Racing Toyota blew up late in
Fridays final practice.
Its at least the11th engine fail-
ure by a JGRcar this season, and
comes as speculation mounts
that the team will close its en-
gine shop and lease engines next
season frommanufacturer Toyo-
ta.
BRICKYARD
Continued from Page 1C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 9C
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0
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3
TOLEDO, Ohio Unflap-
pable Olin Browne fought off
the heat to shoot a 65 and forge
a two-shot lead over Mark
OMeara through Saturdays
third round of the U.S. Senior
Open.
Browne, never a winner in his
three years of competition since
turning 50, set the tournament
record for lowest score through
54 holes. After a record-tying 64
followed by a 69, hes at 15-
under 198.
OMeara, winner of the 1998
Masters and British Open, had a
66 in a head-to-head duel. Play-
ing in the same pairing, he
pulled even with Browne with a
birdie at the ninth hole but
Browne had five birdies on the
difficult back nine.
Heading into the final round,
its apparently a two-man race.
Six shots off the pace at 9-under
204 are Jeff Sluman (65), Peter
Senior (68), Joey Sindelar (69)
and Mark Calcavecchia (69).
Browne is trying to join Si-
mon Hobday, who won at Pine-
hurst No. 2 in 1994, as the only
wire-to-wire winners in the
tournaments 32 years.
His 54-hole total was one
better than Hobdays 199.
Browne began the day with a
one-shot edge on OMeara. They
matched each other swing for
swing, putt for putt, throughout
a day of scorching heat and high
humidity at Inverness Club.
Both birdied the fourth hole,
with OMeara falling two back
with a bogey on the next hole.
Birdies on holes 8 and 9 helped
OMeara catch Browne heading
to the back nine at the old Do-
nald Ross layout, which plays to
a par of 37 on the front but
doesnt have a par-5 hole and
plays to a 34 on the last nine.
Browne hit a wedge to 18
inches for birdie on the 10th
hole and took off. He built a
three-stroke lead with two more
birdies through 13.
OMeara birdied the 17th and
18th to pull within a shot, but
each time Browne with three
wins on his PGA Tour resume,
the last the 2005 Deutsche Bank
dropped in a birdie putt im-
mediately on top of OMearas.
Inverness again remained
defenseless despite sun and high
temperatures. The course was
hit with almost 4 inches of rain
in the last week, with a huge
thunderstorm on Friday morn-
ing delaying play and forcing 21
players to return to the course
on Saturday morning to com-
plete the second round.
Barely staying in range of
Browne and OMeara are Hale
Irwin, who shot his age (66),
along with New Mexico club pro
Jeff Roth (68) and Michael Allen
(71), all at 7-under 206.
Tied for 10th and nine shots
back came a whos who of senior
golf, including defending cham-
pion Bernhard Langer (68), Hal
Sutton (66), Nick Price (68), Jay
Haas (68), Steve Jones (69) and
Corey Pavin (70).
Kim leads by 1 at Greenbrier
WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS,
W.Va. Golf is fun again for
Anthony Kim. The Greenbrier
Classic is helping solidify that.
Kim shot an 8-under-par 62
Saturday for a one-stroke edge
over PGA Tour rookie Scott
Stallings after the third round
on the Old White TPC course.
Kims low round of the year
left him at 10 under with a
chance to advance to next
weeks Bridgestone Invitational
with a win. He hasnt missed
Firestone since his rookie year
in 2007.
A third place-or-better finish
would put him in position to
earn a spot in the PGA Cham-
pionship in two weeks in Atlanta
heading into the FedEx Cup
playoffs.
I havent had this much fun
playing golf in a long time, Kim
said.
Stallings shot 66 to move into
second place at 9 under. Gary
Woodland (67) and second
round co-leader Webb Simpson
(69) were two strokes back.
Kims last victory came a year
ago at the Shell Houston Open
before he underwent thumb
surgery and took three months
off. Hes had an up-and-down
year, with eight missed cuts and
two top 10s in 21 events.
Kim tied for fifth at the Brit-
ish Open earlier this month after
making it as an alternate. But
last week he was disqualified
from the Canadian Open after
signing for a score other than an
11-over 81 in the second round.
Kim credited a talk he had
after the disqualification with
his mother, whom he termed a
great golf psychologist.
It was just about having fun,
relaxing and enjoying the posi-
tion Im in because Im very
fortunate to be playing golf for a
living, he said. Sometimes you
forget about that. I was pretty
upset about my 81 and she no-
ticed somebody in the gallery
who was less fortunate. We
talked about that and I came out
here ready to play some golf and
have a good time.
Thats a stark contrast to the
first six months of the year, in
which Kim said he didnt want
to be on the golf course because
he wasnt sure where his shots
would end up.
People may think Im exag-
gerating, but thats how tough
this game got for me, Kim said.
Going back to the basics is
really what helped my game.
Because without that, I would
still be struggling.
Kim made eight birdies, tying
his total from the first two
rounds combined. All of his
birdies Saturday came from
inside 10 feet. His 113-yard
wedge to within a foot of the pin
at the par-4 14th gave him the
outright lead.
I was just hitting smart golf
shots, he said. I was starting
to think my way around the
course instead of just get up to a
tee and the fairways are 40 yards
wide and the rough is not that
penal and just try to hit it as
hard as I can. Thats not how
you play golf.
Stallings had missed the cut
in seven of 13 previous events
since a third-place finish in the
Transitions Championship.
Starting the day two strokes
out of the lead, Stallings made
four birdies. He missed a 34-
footer for eagle at the par-5 17th
that would have tied him with
Kim, then missed a 13-footer at
No. 18.
Stallings has gone 42 straight
holes without a bogey and will
be in his first final pairing.
Its my rookie year, Stallings
said. Im three-fourths of the
way through. Im sitting here
just kind of pinching myself
every single day to have the
opportunity to play out here.
The Old White TPC under-
went a makeover after Stuart
Appleby shot 59 in last years
final round to beat Jeff Overton
by a stroke at 22 under. The talk
all week had been about how the
courses lengthened tees and
reseeded, firm greens would
make low scores impossible.
Jimmy Walker, who advanced
to weekend play on the cut line,
and Kim changed all that.
Walker posted a career-best
round 62 and also matched
Kims birdie total.
Youve got nothing to lose
when youre at the back of the
pack, Walker said. I told my
wife last night, lets go out and
attack, see what happens. It
worked.
Those low scores were aided
by the courses setup. Some tees
were moved up and many pin
placements were favorable com-
pared to Friday, when Phil Mick-
elson called the course brutally
difficult.
The fields scoring average of
69.3 strokes was two better than
Friday.
The greens felt a lot softer
today, Walker said. You could
see they were receptive right off
the bat.
Walker was three strokes out
of the lead along with Bill Haas
(65) and Chris Couch (67).
Second-round co-leader Bren-
don de Jonge made two bogeys
and a double-bogey on his first
seven holes, shot 72 and fell into
a group of seven golfers five
shots back.
First-round leader Trevor
Immelman, seeking his first win
since the 2008 Masters, went 23
holes without a bogey before a
double bogey on the par-4 13th.
He made four bogeys and a
birdie after that, shot 73 and
trailed by seven strokes.
Masson leads
Womens British Open
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland
Caroline Masson of Germany
shot a 4-under 68 to double her
lead to two strokes after the
third round at the Womens
British Open on Saturday.
The 22-year-old Masson made
three birdies in the front nine
and three on the back to hold off
a late charge from Yani Tseng.
The top-ranked Taiwenese play-
er closed within a shot at one
stage after picking up five
strokes in as many holes, in-
cluding an eagle.
I was quite nervous at the
start, said Masson, who has
totaled 15-under 201. I hit a
poor tee shot at the first and
then three-putted from 40 feet,
but I settled down with a birdie
at the next when I hit my 5-iron
to 7 feet and holed it.
I hit some really good shot
out there today and really en-
joyed it. The wind was a bit
stronger and there were some
tough pin positions.
Masson birdied No. 5 with a
lay-up to 10 feet and the long
No. 6 with an approach to 30
feet and two putts. At No. 11,
she holed from 7 feet, then got
up and down from a greenside
bunker at the long 14th for an-
other birdie.
Her last was at No. 17 but she
dropped a shot at the next after
hitting into another greenside
bunker.
Browne still up by 2 shots at U.S. Senior Open
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Olin Browne watches his drive on the eighth hole during the third round of the U.S. Senior Open at
the Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio, Saturday.
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Dr. Tom O'D.
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amazing. Italian
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566 Sales/Retail/
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THE HAR-
DEST TIME
FOR Julian Paksi
comes duringthe
day, when hes
working. Mow-
ing lawns gives
you too much
time to think, too much time to
worry about a future thats sudden-
ly very uncertain.
Its at night when hes lifting
weights and running that his head
begins to clear. Then theres a goal,
and some newtotals to jot down in
the journal that helps him prepare
forthelast football seasonof hislife.
Hegets comfort fromtheroutine
because hes been doing it most of
his life. Talent wasnt going to get
him anywhere, so he became the
classic overachiever.
Football has always been my
life, Paksi said. I dont knowwhat
my life would be like without it.
His plan had always been to an-
chor the defensive line this season
for tiny Albion College in one final
year of glory on the field. But life
isnt just about football anymore.
Paksi foundout just after thefirst
of the year that he has a cancer so
rare it took doctors weeks to figure
out what was wrong with him.
Withnoknowncure, theonlytreat-
ment is to get a newliver.
If there is any good news its that
the cancer is slow growing and so
far hasnt spread beyond the liver.
Paksi was scheduledto have anoth-
er MRI on Saturday just to make
sure.
His name should be on a liver
transplant waiting list by now, but
its not. Paksi will take his chances
for afewmoremonths, determined
not tolet cancer robhimof aseason
that means so much.
To Paksi its simple. Hes a foot-
ball player.
Im getting so excited for the
season, he said. I dont want tobe
down, I want to be up high.
Paksi didnt have to look far for
inspirationwhenhe was diagnosed
with Epithelioid hemangioendoth-
elioma, a cancer diagnosed in only
a few hundred people each year in
the United States. The day he
found out he went to a Relay for
Life cancer meeting on campus,
where he met a woman who was a
liver cancer survivor.
Not long after he learned about
Mark Herzlich, the Boston College
linebacker who missed a season to
bone cancer and is now trying to
maketheNewYorkGiants as aroo-
kiefreeagent. Hes got anarticleon
Herzlichs battle pasted in his jour-
nal, and he reads it during times
that hes down.
I wroteabout Herzlichafewdays
ago, whichishowPaksi andI ended
up connecting on the phone. His
girlfriend, Samantha Cornish,
wrote to let me know how impor-
tant Herzlichs fight was to Paksi.
Their storiesaresimilar, their de-
termination much the same. Both
lovethegamesomuchthat theyre-
fuse to let cancer take it away.
But whileHerzlichwas astar at a
big school, a prospect so good that
hewas onceconsideredalocktobe
pickedinthe first roundof the NFL
draft, Paksi plays Division III foot-
ball for a school of just 1,650 in
south-central Michigan.
The21-year-oldpayshisownway
just like the other players at Albion.
Hes undersized at 5-foot-11, 240
pounds andheunderstandsthereis
no career on the field once his se-
nior season is over.
He has only one year left to play.
The newliver will have to wait.
It brings me downsometimes. I
start thinkingthat Imhealthy, Ima
healthy kidandwhat didI dotode-
serve this, Paksi said. But this
summer Ive been focusing and try-
ing not to think about it. Imtrying
to live my life like it was before I
knewabout it.
Paksi hasnt told many people
about his condition. His fraternity
brothers know, and so do a few
teammates.
And, of course, his coach.
Springwasthetimehegot most
worried because he wasnt sure if
hewouldhavethetransplant before
the season, Albion coach Craig
Rundle said. Hes handled it a lot
better than I would have. Hes ac-
cepted what it is and has a positive
attitude.
Rundle said Paksi is the kind of
player whoalways hadtoworkhar-
der than the next player to win a
spot onthefield. Heblossomedlast
year at Albion, making eight tack-
les one week in a win over Olivet,
and is the only returning starter on
the defensive line.
Hes a throwback player, Run-
dle said. Hes a real humble guy,
never worries about himself, just
about the team. Hes probably
thought more about the team
through all this than he has about
himself.
Indeed, the team was on Paksis
mindwhenwetalkedonthephone.
With practice less than two weeks
away, the excitement was building
to see if a summer spent mowing
lawns and lifting weights would
pay off in one big final season.
TheBritons, whohavebeenplay-
ingfootball since1888, finishedsec-
ond the last two seasons in the Mi-
chigan Intercollegiate Athletic As-
sociation conference. This year,
Paksi figures they have a chance to
upset conference powerhouse
Trine University and win the title.
Paksi knows all the dates. The
opener is Sept. 3 at Butler, and the
last game is home Nov. 12 at Spran-
kle-Sprandel Stadiumon the north
bank of the Kalamazoo River
against Trine.
One last date is Nov. 21. Thats
when he has an appointment for
some final tests before his name
goes on the transplant list.
Football will beover then. Ahead
will be months of waiting for a new
liver, months of worrying about
what might go wrong.
Its my life, not just my football
life, andthats what makes it sucha
bummer, Paksi said. I mean, Im
only 21 and I havent even gradu-
ated college.
The only comfort for Paksi is
hell havehis final season. Hell play
football one last time.
Hes not about to let cancer take
that away.
Man to play final season of football,
THEN worry about cancerous liver
OPINION
T I M D A H L B E R G
SHANGHAI Michael Phelps easily won the
100-meter butterfly, then ceded the spotlight to
Missy Franklin, swimmings newest breakout
star who made a splash on her final night at the
world championships.
Without Milorad Cavic pushing him, Phelps
scowled upon seeing his time of 50.71 seconds
Saturday night. Too slow for his liking, it was
still good enough to earn him a second individu-
al gold medal and his sixth overall with one day
remaining in the meet.
Franklin won two more golds to leave the
worlds with five medals overall three gold, a
silver and a bronze. As he watched her, Phelps
recalled his first world meet in 2001 as a 15-year-
old who set a world record.
I kind of remember myself being like that, full
of energy all the time, he said. Shes just happy,
just enjoying everything, shes never tired, shes
always swimming fast. Shes really been able to
come on the scene strong. Ive said this all along,
shes a stud.
With a nickname to match Missile Missy,
bestowed by her father four years ago.
The 16-year-old phenom has energized the en-
tire U.S. team and coaching staff with her bubbly
personality, wide smile revealing a mouth full of
braces, and impressive maturity.
Shes genuinely happy and excited to race,
more so than any swimmer on this team, U.S.
womens co-captain Natalie Coughlin said. Its
unbelievably refreshing to have her energy on the
team.
Franklin led all the way to win the 200 back-
stroke, then anchored the U.S. women to victory
in the 400 medley relay. She accomplished so
much at these worlds that her coach Todd
Schmitz had to shave off his goatee as payback.
Ive never been this happy in my entire life. It
has been such an incredible meet, Franklin said.
I couldnt ask for anything better.
Listening to her, Coughlin laughed and said,
See what I mean? So excited to be here.
Franklin set two American records, winning
the 200 back in 2 minutes, 5.10 seconds third
fastest ever and the medley relay in 3:52.36,
along with Coughlin, Rebecca Soni and Dana
Vollmer.
The teenager from Centennial, Colo., an-
chored the Americans victory in the 4x200 frees-
tyle relay on Thursday, when she swam faster
than Italys Federica Pellegrini did in winning the
individual 200 free.
Franklin finished nearly a second in front of
200 back silver medalist Belinda Hocking of Aus-
tralia, while Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Neth-
erlands took bronze, another 2.68 seconds be-
hind.
Franklin was asked if she was the female
Phelps, a comparison that made Schmitz chafe,
but one she handled with aplomb.
Its hard to compare yourself to someone who
is just that unbelievable at what he does, Fran-
klin said. So right now Im just going to stick to
swimming my races and just being me and hav-
ing fun with it.
Phelps won the 100 fly in 50.71 seconds after
rallying from third at the turn. Konrad Czerniak
of Poland took the silver at 51.15 while another
American, Tyler McGill, earned bronze in 51.26.
Its definitely more comfortable having this
than having a hundredth win, Phelps said, re-
ferring to his victory by a hundredth of a second
over Cavic at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.
Cavic, who is still regaining his form following
back surgery, didnt advance out of the prelimin-
aries.
Phelps has three golds, two silvers and a
bronze with one more event to go the 4x100
medley relay today.
S W I M W O R L D C H A M P I O N S H I P S
AP PHOTO
American Melissa Franklin, top, is congratulat-
ed by teammates, from left, Rebecca Soni, Dana
Vollmer and Natalie Coughlin, after they won
the gold in the womens 4x100 medley relay
U.S. teenager
wins 2 more
gold medals
Franklin takes 200 back, anchors winning
400 medley team. Phelps wins 100 fly gold.
By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer
BUDAPEST, Hungary Asafa Powell won the
100-meter race in 9.86 seconds at the Hungarian
Grand Prix on Saturday, the fastest run in the coun-
try.
The Jamaican was the only competitor to run
under 10 seconds in windy conditions and 68-de-
gree temperature at Ferenc Puskas Stadium, fin-
ishing ahead of Ngonidzashe Makusha of Zimbabwe
and Andrew Hinds of Barbados.
I could have gone a lot faster today but I was
working on some stuff, said Powell, whose person-
al best is 9.72.
It was cold and I was a bit cautious. It was still a
good time.
Powell will compete at the Aviva Grand Prix Dia-
mond League meet in London next weekend. Its
his last race before the world championships, which
start Aug. 27 in Daegu, South Korea.
This is my year and Ill try my best. Well see if
its enough for a gold medal (at the worlds), said
Powell, who won bronze in the 100 at the worlds in
2007 and 2009.
Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica won the
womens 200 in 22.26 seconds, with Sanya Ri-
chards-Ross of the United States second in 22.63.
Blessing Okagbare of Nigeria was third.
Joel Craddock led an American sweep of the top
three spots in the 110 hurdles, winning in 13.48.
Kevin Craddock was second, followed by Jeff Por-
ter.
Kevin Borlee of Belgium took the 400 in 45.91,
followed by Hungarys Marcell Deak Nagy and Eri-
son Hurtault of France.
Double-amputee Oscar Pistorius of South Africa,
who runs on carbon-fiber blades and qualified for
the able-bodied worlds for the first time earlier this
month, was last in the 400 after finishing in 47.47.
This is a really beautiful city and the crowd was
really supportive. Im just sorry I couldnt give
them a quicker time, Pistorius said.
I hope to return one day and give them a better
race.
The tournament was the inaugural edition of the
Istvan Gyulai Memorial, commemorating the late
Secretary General of the IAAF who died in 2006. He
was a sprinter in his youth, winning 28 national
championships in Hungary.
T R A C K & F I E L D
With eye on worlds,
Powell wins the 100
Sprinter has one more meet to work on some things
before world championships at the end of August.
Americans sweep top three spots in 110 hurdles.
By ABLO GORONDI
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 11C
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PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
L
ast fall I found the beginnings of
a beaver dam on a small stream
that emptied out of a vast wet-
lands.
Back then, the beavers had just
moved into the area and began to con-
struct a small mud-packed dam across
the stream. Water was beginning to
pool into the grassy swamp and I knew
the landscape was about to change if
the beavers remained.
Last week my father and I returned
to the site to see what the beavers had
created.
What we found was a different world.
The dam had now grown into an
impressive structure more than five
feet high in spots that stretched across
the stream and well into the woods on
each side. The wetlands behind the
dam sit in a bowl flanked by two gradu-
al hillsides, and the beavers had suc-
cessfully dammed the open end.
Getting into the wetlands, however,
wasnt an easy task. To do it, we used a
beat-up 10-foot jon boat and a pair of
oars. Thick grass and blueberry bushes
partially submerged in knee-deep wa-
ter encompassed the swamp. If we
wanted to see the pond that the bea-
vers created, we had to get through the
jungle-like vegetation first.
Beaver trails wound through the
vegetation, so we followed one with
the boat for 100 yards before the water-
choked vegetation gave way to an open
pond more than five feet deep about an
acre in size. Gliding out onto the new-
ly-created beaver pond in the middle of
the woods conjured up images of a
pristine wilderness yet to be discov-
ered.
Small chubs, brook trout and newts
darted away as we glided quietly out
onto the ponds surface. The calls of
bullfrogs and green frogs emanated
from the weeds and dozens of brightly
colored dragonflies buzzed overhead as
we explored every inch of the pond.
Muskrat sign was evident on floating
logs and feathers from ducks could be
seen on a large boulder that they used
to get out of the water and preen them-
selves.
These were all just some of the ex-
amples of the types of wildlife that had
already been attracted to the new bea-
ver pond.
After taking a break from the morn-
ing expedition, I returned to the pond
later to search for something else.
A beaver hut.
Upstream, above the two small
dams, there was a hut that the beavers
constructed over the winter but was
now abandoned.
I knew the beavers had to have a
newer hut somewhere, but I couldnt
find it despite exploring every corner
of the swamp.
Except one.
As I glided the boat back to the main
dam, I spied a watery trail that dis-
appeared into the tall grass away from
the pond.
The trail was too narrow for the little
jon boat, so I climbed out, pulled up
my hip boots and followed the path.
The water was two to three feet deep
in the trail, but the grass and brush
choked it down to a small corridor. I
knew the trail had to lead to some-
thing, so I hunkered down and fought
through the junglelike vegetation.
After trudging another 50 yards, the
trail curved into a flooded grove of
small maple trees. I pulled back the
limbs of blueberry bushes and stepped
inside the flooded grove to find an
enormous hut standing tall and seclud-
ed among shade of the maples.
Freshly cut sticks and damp mud
fortified this hut, which rose at least
four feet above the waters surface. It
was clear that the beavers werent
satisified with their other living quar-
ters at the other end of the swamp and
opted to build somewhere a bit more
secluded.
I stood in the flooded grove for a few
minutes, admiring the hut and appre-
ciating the new world that the beavers
had created. Its one that will continue
to change and Ill continue to explore.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
Exploring how
beavers altered
a landscape
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com
Goose, dove seasons set
Early Canada goose and dove hun-
ters will be able to take to the fields of
Penns Woods on Sept. 1 as part of
Pennsylvanias 2011-12 migratory bird
seasons.
Dove hunters will have the opportu-
nity to participate in a triple-split sea-
son, which will see some shifts due to
the way the calendar falls this year.
During the first season (Sept. 1-Oct. 1),
hunting will start at noon and close at
sunset daily. The second and third
splits will be Oct. 29-Nov. 26, and Dec.
26-Jan 4, with hunting hours a half-hour
before sunrise until sunset. In all three
seasons, the daily bag limit will be 15,
and the possession limit will be 30.
The early statewide season for resi-
dent Canada geese will open Sept. 1,
and continue through Sept. 24. The
early season retains a daily bag limit of
eight Canada geese and possession
limit of 16.
As noted, young Pennsylvania hun-
ters will be provided with an extra day
of waterfowl hunting. Saturday, Sept.
17 and Saturday Sept. 24 are Youth
Waterfowl Days, which previously were
limited to one day. They are open to
those 12 to 15 years old who hold a
junior hunting license. To participate, a
youngster must be accompanied by an
adult, who may assist the youth in
calling, duck identification and other
aspects of the hunt. During this special
two-day-long hunt, youth can harvest
ducks, mergansers, coots and moor-
hens.
Youth Waterfowl Days bag limits for
ducks, mergansers and coots will be
consistent with the limit for the regular
season, which will be announced in
mid-August, after the annual Waterfowl
Symposium on Aug. 5.
Pennsylvanias woodcock season also
has been expanded an extra two weeks.
This year, woodcock season will open
Oct. 15, and continue through Nov. 26.
The daily limit remains three, and the
possession limit is six.
Migratory game bird hunters, in-
cluding those afield for doves and
woodcock, are required to obtain and
carry a Pennsylvania migratory game
bird license ($3.70 for residents, $6.70
for nonresidents), as well as a general
hunting, combination or lifetime li-
cense. All waterfowl hunters age 16 and
older also must possess a federal migra-
tory game bird and conservation
(duck) stamp.
The Pennsylvania 2011-12 Guide to
Migratory Bird Hunting brochure will
be posted on the Game Commissions
website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) in mid-
August, and the mass-produced bro-
chure should be available at U.S. Post
Offices in the state by the end of Au-
gust.
Hunters are encouraged to report
leg-banded migratory game bird recov-
eries online at www.reportband.gov, or
use the toll-free number (1-800-327-
BAND). Hunters will be requested to
provide information on where, when
and what species were taken, in addi-
tion to the band number. This informa-
tion is crucial to the successful manage-
ment of migratory game birds.
Trout Unlimited reports on drilling
Trout Unlimited (TU) supports
many of the recommendations from the
Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale Advisory
Commission for improving the com-
monwealths oversight and manage-
ment of natural gas development.
While a step in the right direction, TU
calls for additional protections neces-
sary to limit impacts of Marcellus Shale
development on fish, wildlife and water
resources.
The commission released its final
report recently to Gov. Tom Corbett.
The commissions recommendation
to increase the distance from the edge
of the well pad to a stream or water
body is an improvement over existing
regulations, said Ken Undercoffer,
president of the Pennsylvania Council
OUTDOORS NEWS
See NEWS, Page 13C
Jerry Bavitz stood near the boat
launch at Frances SlocumLake earlier
this month and watched as dozens of
kids sawed, drilled and hammered a
myriad of wooden structures.
The kids all members of the Back
Mountain Harvest Assemblys Youth
Wilderness Experience,
were helping build five
porcupine fish habitats
and nine turtle basking
platforms to be depos-
ited in the lake.
For the kids, the fact
that they were building
something to help wild-
life was reason enough
to generate enthusiasm.
For Bavitz, who is a
World War II veteran
and lifelong outdoors-
man, his enthusiasm
came fromseeing the
kids enjoy their time
outdoors while doing
something to benefit
wildlife.
Theyre doing a great
job, Bavitz said. Pro-
jects like this set them
down the right path.
For the last 11years,
Bavitz and other mem-
bers of the Nanticoke Conservation Club
along with officials fromthe Pennsylva-
nia Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC)
came out to the park for one evening
each summer to build the habitat struc-
tures for the lake. While the porcupine
structures a pyramid-shaped arrange-
ment of two-inch boards used as a shel-
ter by smaller fish, have been built and
deposited into the lake each year by the
club, last week they added something
newto the list.
The club decided to build several
turtle basking platforms this summer
based on the results of a lake assessment
by the PFBC. Mike Swartz, assistant
habitat manager for the agencys Lake
Section, said Frances SlocumLake is
loaded with shallow, marshy areas that
make it a prime place for turtles. The
only ingredient missing are trees or
floating logs, and the
basking platforms are
designed to remedy
that.
The platforms
allowthe turtles to
get up out of the
water and bask in the
sun and absorb the
heat, Swartz said. A
lake this size can
support 20 more
platforms and weve
seen as many as16
turtles at a time using
one.
The platforms are
placed in three to five
feet of water and
within100 feet of the
shore. While the kids
of the Youth Wilder-
ness Experience
never built a platform
before, they were well
aware of howimpor-
tant they are for turtles.
It helps the turtles so they can get out
in the sun and raise their body temper-
ature, and that helps themdigest their
food, said12-year-old Connor Jenkins as
he took a break fromoperating a cord-
less drill. Its hard work, but it makes me
feel good knowing Imhelping wildlife.
Ten-year-old Jena Simmons spent her
time helping to build porcupine fish
habitats. Like Jenkins, she was well-
versed on why the structures are vital to
fish.
They give protection to the small fish
so they dont have to worry about getting
eaten by the bigger fish in the lake,
Simmons said. They can be protected
and growlarger.
Joe Rutchauskas, who organized the
habitat project for the conservation club,
said both the turtle and fish structures
are built out of hemlock and should last
about 20 years. He said the club is talk-
ing about adding more rock habitats as
well.
We enjoy doing these projects each
year and its something the club looks
forward to, Rutchauskas said. You
really get a sense of satisfaction fromit
knowing that youre helping wildlife.
Gary Farber, one of the founders of the
Youth Wilderness Experience, said the
habitat project was a good way to get the
kids outdoors and away fromvideo
games.
Still, there was another benefit that
Farber didnt anticipate.
You see the guys fromthe club out
here who have been doing these things
all their lives, and then the kids who are
just getting involved working right with
them, Farber said. Theyre connected
with the club members and the Fish and
Boat Commission doing something
hands on for wildlife. Its an experience
that will stay with themfor a long time.
Porcupine fish habitats, turtle basking platforms built
ALEXANDRIA ANTONACCI/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ben Paige drives Jackson Wydra, Mya Farber and Hunter Woods across Frances Slocum Lake to deposit a turtle basking plat-
form.
Kids pitch in
to aid wildlife
Mya Farber, 5, teamed up with Andy Novak to build turtle basking platforms at
Frances Slocum State Park.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Bryce Steele, 12, and Penn-
sylvania Fish and Boat Com-
mission official Michael Swartz
build a turtle basking platform
for Frances Slocum Lake.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 13C
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of TU. However, the recom-
mendation allows the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion (DEP) to waive the distance
of these setbacks, which means
the requirement could easily be
rendered toothless. Undercoffer
continued, The distance be-
tween any major disturbance
and a stream is critical to pro-
tecting habitat for trout.
The report also recommends
that energy companies set well
pads at an even greater distance
from High Quality or Exception-
al Value streams throughout the
state The report does not specify
exactly how far that distance
should be in order to protect
these ecologically valuable
streams.
Pennsylvania has more than
15,000 miles of streams managed
for trout fishingmany of which
overlap with High Quality or
Exceptional Value streamsand
trout populations are at risk as
drilling permits continue to be
issued in close proximity to
streams, said Katy Dunlap, TUs
Eastern Water Project Director.
Its critical that the legislature
pick up where the commission
left off and pass legislation re-
quiring setbacks that adequately
protect these valuable ecological
and economic resources.
TU applauds the commissions
recommendation to restore the
role played by Pennsylvanias
county conservation districts in
inspecting erosion and sediment
control plans at Marcellus Shale
well pad sites. County conserva-
tion districts have soil and water
management expertise and are
based in the region where drill-
ing occurs. The conservation
districts know the territory and
the local environment and are
thus well positioned to inspect a
sites erosion control practices.
The report also recommends
that the DEP be given the expli-
cit authority to require a water
management plan, which allows
the agency to issue a permit for
a water withdrawal to a gas
company. TU supports consis-
tent statewide regulation of
water withdrawals for the gas
industry and other large water
users across the state.
The commissions recom-
mendation to limit gas lease
agreements on state forest lands
to those that result in no or
minimal surface disturbance
does not go far enough toward
protecting these areas, said
Dunlap. With one-third of Penn-
sylvanias forests already leased,
a full cumulative impact study
should be conducted by the
Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources (DCNR)
before considering leasing addi-
tional state forest landsthe
places where Pennsylvanians
fish and hunt.
The commissions recom-
mendations represent the points
of agreement among agencies,
industry and conservation orga-
nizations. It is imperative that
Pennsylvania decision-makers do
not let pass this rare opportunity
to strengthen the states over-
sight of gas development. TU
calls on the Pennsylvania Gener-
al Assembly to move swiftly to
adopt legislation this fall that
gives the DEP and other state
agencies the appropriate author-
ity and resources to adequately
regulate the impacts of Marcel-
lus Shale development on rivers,
streams, forests, fish and wild-
life.
NEWS
Continued from Page 12C
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
W E A T H E R
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 87/68
Average 83/62
Record High 94 in 1933
Record Low 47 in 1997
Yesterday 13
Month to date 311
Year to date 519
Last year to date 588
Normal year to date 369
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date 3.79
Normal month to date 3.64
Year to date 30.40
Normal year to date 21.81
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 0.40 -0.02 22.0
Towanda 0.48 0.06 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 2.97 0.05 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 83-89. Lows: 62-64. Mostly sunny
skies and pleasant today.
The Poconos
Highs: 83-89. Lows: 69-71. Sunshine and
pleasant temperatures can be expected
today.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 82-89. Lows: 61-70. Skies will be
partly cloudy with warm temperatures
today.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 90-91. Lows: 69-71. Sunshine and
warm temperatures today.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 85-91. Lows: 68-75. Sunny skies
and warm today.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 61/53/.00 62/51/r 61/51/r
Atlanta 95/75/.06 92/75/t 91/75/t
Baltimore 95/76/.00 92/71/s 94/72/pc
Boston 89/73/.00 83/69/s 90/70/pc
Buffalo 85/66/.00 85/70/pc 83/64/s
Charlotte 99/73/.00 88/71/t 90/72/pc
Chicago 90/67/.00 91/74/pc 89/75/pc
Cleveland 87/70/.00 84/76/pc 84/71/pc
Dallas 99/79/.00 103/81/s 107/82/s
Denver 95/65/.00 97/67/pc 94/66/pc
Detroit 89/69/.00 90/74/pc 89/72/pc
Honolulu 84/74/.03 88/73/s 89/74/s
Houston 94/77/.16 100/78/s 101/80/s
Indianapolis 89/73/.05 91/71/s 92/73/s
Las Vegas 100/88/.00 97/84/pc 103/84/pc
Los Angeles 70/64/.00 77/66/pc 80/66/pc
Miami 92/81/.00 92/82/t 91/80/t
Milwaukee 89/70/.00 86/71/t 83/73/pc
Minneapolis 89/73/.00 89/71/pc 91/73/pc
Myrtle Beach 91/75/.00 90/79/t 87/78/t
Nashville 86/75/.92 93/73/pc 95/73/s
New Orleans 92/76/.00 95/79/pc 94/79/t
Norfolk 89/82/.00 91/72/t 92/74/pc
Oklahoma City 102/78/.00 105/81/pc 106/82/s
Omaha 100/73/.00 93/76/pc 96/78/s
Orlando 94/74/.00 95/76/t 94/77/t
Phoenix 109/87/.00 107/87/pc 105/87/t
Pittsburgh 89/69/.00 87/66/s 88/66/pc
Portland, Ore. 77/58/.00 77/56/pc 83/58/pc
St. Louis 85/76/.13 95/76/pc 97/78/s
Salt Lake City 90/71/.00 87/71/t 87/67/t
San Antonio 96/77/.02 100/77/s 102/79/s
San Diego 72/68/.00 75/66/pc 76/66/s
San Francisco 72/57/.00 70/55/pc 70/55/pc
Seattle 74/56/.00 71/55/sh 76/55/s
Tampa 92/80/.00 94/79/t 93/79/t
Tucson 98/81/.00 99/79/t 97/78/t
Washington, DC 97/81/.00 93/73/pc 95/75/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 61/55/.00 64/52/c 72/55/s
Baghdad 124/91/.00 122/94/s 121/90/s
Beijing 88/70/.00 91/74/s 89/71/s
Berlin 64/57/.00 64/57/sh 70/55/c
Buenos Aires 48/32/.00 56/39/c 57/42/pc
Dublin 68/50/.00 68/57/sh 69/54/sh
Frankfurt 63/57/.00 70/52/pc 77/55/pc
Hong Kong 91/81/.00 89/82/t 90/81/t
Jerusalem 96/73/.00 89/69/s 87/68/s
London 72/54/.00 75/61/pc 73/54/sh
Mexico City 72/59/.00 72/56/t 74/55/t
Montreal 82/64/.00 84/70/pc 82/66/sh
Moscow 84/61/.00 81/57/t 77/50/pc
Paris 72/54/.00 72/51/s 77/57/s
Rio de Janeiro 90/72/.00 84/67/s 85/68/sh
Riyadh 109/81/.00 115/91/s 116/88/s
Rome 81/63/.00 81/63/c 82/66/s
San Juan 88/77/.19 86/78/t 87/79/t
Tokyo 84/75/.00 80/73/t 81/72/t
Warsaw 63/54/.00 68/63/sh 73/61/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
91/72
Reading
90/66
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
87/63
86/64
Harrisburg
90/70
Atlantic City
87/70
New York City
88/70
Syracuse
88/66
Pottsville
87/65
Albany
86/65
Binghamton
Towanda
84/62
88/60
State College
88/62
Poughkeepsie
86/60
103/81
91/74
97/67
93/73
89/71
77/66
66/55
96/78
99/64
71/55
88/70
90/74
92/75
92/82
100/78
88/73
58/50
62/51
93/73
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:58a 8:22p
Tomorrow 5:59a 8:20p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 7:00a 8:40p
Tomorrow 8:13a 9:11p
First Full Last New
Aug. 6 Aug. 13 Aug. 21 Aug. 28
Looking back
later this
autumn, chances
are this may be
declared the
nicest weekend
of the summer
weather-wise.
Skies will remain
mostly sunny
today with high
pressure allow-
ing a westerly
owof warm, if
not hot air to the
region. What has
been left out of
the equation is
the humidity,
which will
remain comfort-
ably low through
tonight. A few
storms may pop
up later tomor-
row afternoon
and evening as a
weak cold front
presses toward
the region, but
many areas will
remain dry.
Temperatures
will hold on to
the upper 80s
right into the
new week with
only spotty
chances for
showers both
Monday and
Wednesday.
Enjoy what's left
of this wonderful
summer week-
end!
-Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: High pressure will provide sunshine and pleasant conditions from the Ohio
Valley into much of the Northeast today. Behind the high, a frontal boundary will trigger a few show-
ers and thunderstorms over the western Great Lakes. Meanwhile, a moist and unstable air mass will
remain in place, fueling thunderstorms over the Southeast.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Mostly sunny
MONDAY
An isolated
T-storm
89
65
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
88
62
THURSDAY
Mostly
sunny
85
65
FRIDAY
Mostly
sunny
85
61
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
87
63
TUESDAY
Mostly
sunny
87
65
87

62

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011
timesleader.com
STUDENTSPREPAR-
INGto go to college
this fall might be preoc-
cupiedwithchoosing a
computer or shopping
for sheets that fit a
dormitory bed.
Oftenless attention
goes into selecting college student loans.
The decisiongets shuntedaside or made
inaninstant because tuitionis due, loans
have confusing names andthe financial
aidoffice at your college may provide
little guidance. Many students assume all
loans are similar a mistake that can
inflict thousands of dollars inunneces-
sary debt.
Evenif your financial aidoffice isnt
particularly helpful, youcanidentify the
best loans yourself.
Start witha telephone call to your
college financial aidoffice director, and
take the initiative by asking whether you
might still qualify for any grants or schol-
arships that youhave not yet requested. If
youcome froma modest-income family,
ask about Pell Grants, whichcanprovide
up to $5,500 inmoney that does not have
to be repaid. Thenask if youcantap any
state grants inyour home state or the
state where youare attending school.
Also try calling your state governments
department of education.
After tapping as muchfree money as
possible, your next step is to choose
student loans. Youwant to turnfirst to
loans fromthe federal government rather
thanprivate loans that come froma bank
or nongovernment lender. Again, you
shouldbe directedto federal loanapplica-
tions by your college financial aidoffice.
Youcanget additional informationat
students.gov.
The paperwork fromyour financial aid
office will probably give youa choice
betweensubsidizedor unsubsidized
Staffordloans. If youqualify, take the
subsidizedStaffordloans, whichcarry a
$19,000 limit for four years of undergrad-
uate studies. Subsidizedmeans the gov-
ernment reduces your costs by absorbing
interest during in-school deferment and
provides a very lowinterest rate, of 3.4
percent, for loans originatedduring the
2011-12 academic year.
Thats a lot better thanthe 6.8 percent
onthe regular Staffordloan. Also, be-
cause interest onanunsubsidizedloan
accumulates while youare inschool, your
balance wouldbe about 16 percent higher
comparedwitha subsidizedloan, said
Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of FinAid.
Keep inmindthat for 2012-13, the sub-
sidized-loanrate increases to matchthe
rate for anunsubsidizedloan.
Typically, if your familys income is no
higher than$50,000 youwill be ina good
positionto qualify for a subsidizedloan.
More than$100,000 makes it unlikely but
not impossible. Factors like having retired
parents or multiple siblings incollege will
affect eligibility. Cost of the college also
canmake a difference, Kantrowitz said.
If youcant get a subsidizedloan,
choose the regular Staffordloan. Also, ask
your college financial aidoffice if youcan
get a Perkins loan. These are federal loans
witha 5 percent interest rate, andthey go
to students who have lower incomes than
most students at a particular college. So if
youcome froma middle-income family,
but attenda college that attracts affluent
students, youmight qualify for a Perkins
loanat that college, eventhoughyou
wouldnt at a community college with
many low-income students.
If youare like many students, you
might findthat the federal loans youare
offeredare not adequate to cover all your
costs. Inthat case, your parents canbor-
rowadditional money using what are
calledPLUSloans. The interest rate is set
at 7.9 percent.
Another alternative: private loans. But
beware. Althoughfederal loans all have
fixedrates, that will never increase dur-
ing the10 years youpay themoff, thats
not the case withmany private student
loans. They might have a starter interest
rate that looks attractive, but witha varia-
ble rate that canincrease continually over
10 years. So the rate might climb well
past the 7.9 percent onparent PLUS
loans.
PERSONAL FINANCE
G A I L M A R K S J A R V I S
Take charge
in search for
student loans
Gail MarksJarvis is a personal finance
columnist for the Chicago Tribune and author
of Saving for Retirement Without Living Like
a Pauper or Winning the Lottery. Readers
may send her email at gmarksjarvistribune-
.com.
SACRAMENTO, Calif. If youre
not feeling a lenders love, youll soon
knowexactlywhyyougot jilted.
Asoflastweek,ifalenderdeniesyou
a credit card, a car loan or other loan
product based on your credit score,
youre entitled to a free copy of that
score. Youll also get a list of the rea-
sons whyyougot rejected. Dittoif you
get a less-than-favorable interest rate
ona newloan.
Somecreditexpertscallthenewdis-
closure rules a historic change in how
consumers aretreatedbylenders.
Its all part of the Dodd-Frank Wall
Street Reform and Consumer Protec-
tionAct, whichCongress enactedlast
year togiveconsumers moreclarityin
their financial life. Thelegislationalso
created a new Consumer Financial
ProtectionBureau.
The bureaus mission is to ensure
that consumers know exactly what
theyre gettingwithmortgages, credit
cards, loans and other financial prod-
ucts. Or as the fledglingbureaus web-
site (consumerfinance.gov) notes: Its
to ensure that prices are clear up
front, that risks are visible, and that
nothingis buriedinfineprint.
And part of that clarity is knowing
whyyougot dingedbya lender.
Inthepast, if youwererejectedfor a
credit card, you might not get any ex-
planation. Under the newrules, youll
now get in the mail the exact
scoreusedbythelender whenreview-
ing your credit application. The letter
will alsoincludethereasons whyyour
score was considered risky: too many
late payments, balances too high, too
manycredit cardapplications, etc.
Forconsumers, thisisthefirsttime
theyll see their real score used by the
lender. Itll give consumers an exact
pictureof wheretheystandinthelend-
ers eyes. ... And theyll get this in the
mail without even asking, said John
Ulzheimer, president of consumer
educationfor SmartCredit.com. Its a
historic change.
Just as a refresher, the mostly com-
monlyusedcredit score, knownasthe
FICO, isathree-digitnumberbetween
Declined
loans to
come with
explanation
By CLAUDIA BUCK
McClatchy Newspapers
See LOANS, Page 2D
NASCAR DRIVERS,
teams and fans will
inundate the region
this week in advance
of next Sundays
Good Sam RV Insur-
ance 500 race at
Pocono Raceway.
There are plenty of free driver, owner
and car appearances in the area in-
cluding two at Mohegan Sun at Poco-
no Downs.
Kasey Kahne, who drives the No. 4
Red Bull Toyota, will be at the Plains
Township casino on Thursday from 6
to 7 p.m. on the sky bridge. Richard
Childress, a legendary team owner
who Dale Earnhardt drove for, will be
there Friday night, from 7:30 to 8:30.
Both Childress and Kahne will be
signing autographs and posing for
pictures and there is no cost.
TGI Fridays is still one of my favor-
ite places to grab a meal I love any-
thing on the Jack Daniels menu -- and
Ive gotten into a habit thats a hard
one to break. It goes like this:
Print this coupon, https://se-
cure.petsmart.com/petperks/_webas-
sets/TGIFridays.pdf, which will get
you $5 off your food purchase of $15 or
more. Your receipt comes with an
online survey code and if you take the
survey youll get a code for a free appe-
tizer up to $8 or $8 off any appetizer
on a future visit. Go back to the restau-
rant with the code on your receipt
within 30 days and enjoy. Two trips,
$13 in savings, and another receipt
with another chance for more savings
in the future. With deals like these,
every day could be a (TGI) Friday.
If you like saving money on gas and
enjoy pineapple or other fruits, head
to Price Chopper. Get $10 worth of
select Dole products, including canned
pineapple and four-pack fruit cups, and
use your AdvantEdge card to earn 10
cents off per gallon at participating
Sunoco stations. You can earn only
one of the Dole-related gas discounts
per transaction, but you can make
multiple purchases this week and
accumulate the savings.
There are plenty of coupons avail-
able in todays Times Leader -- more
than $620 worth in fact and theyre
mostly in the glossy inserts, but check
out the front page of the Redners
Warehouse Markets circular. Theres a
$5 off a $35 purchase coupon thats a
must use. While youre there, use the
$1 off a pack of Duracell batteries
coupon on a four-pack of AA or AAA
batteries that are on sale for $2.99.
Here are some great ways to use
other coupons in todays paper at area
retailers:
Take the $1 off a Skinny Cow
multipack coupon to Rite Aid, where
theyre on sale for $2.99.
CVS has the Skinny Cow single
crisp or clusters candy bar for 99
cents. Use the buy-one, get-one free
coupon and get two for 99 cents. If you
use your Extra Care card youll get the
full purchase price refunded by way of
a receipt coupon for a future store
purchase.
Head to CVS with your Extra Care
card or Rite Aid with your Wellness +
card and the $4 off a Gillette Pro Fu-
sion ProGlide razor coupon in hand.
Not only will you pay $5.99 for it, but
youll get a $5 off your next store visit
coupon on your receipt.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
NASCAR fans can start their engines for this weeks 500 race
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local steals or deals, send
them to: aseder@timesleader.com.
The cost of prescription
medicines used by millions of
people every day is about to
plummet.
The next 14 months will
bring generic versions of seven
of the worlds 20 best-selling
drugs, including the top two:
cholesterol fighter Lipitor and
blood thinner Plavix.
The magnitude of this wave
of expiring drugs patents is un-
precedented. Between now
and 2016, blockbusters with
about $255 billion in global an-
nual sales will go off patent,
notes EvaluatePharma Ltd., a
London research firm. Generic
competition will decimate
sales of the brand-name drugs
and slash the cost to patients
and companies that provide
health benefits.
Top drugs getting generic
competition by September
2012 are taken by millions ev-
ery day: Lipitor alone is taken
by about 4.3 million Americans
and Plavix by 1.4 million. Ge-
neric versions of big-selling
drugs for blood pressure, asth-
ma, diabetes, depression, high
triglycerides, HIV and bipolar
disorder also are coming by
then.
The flood of generics will
continue for the next decade or
so, as about 120 brand-name
prescription drugs lose market
exclusivity, according to pre-
scription benefits manager
Medco Health Solutions Inc.
My estimation is at least 15
percent of the population is
currently using one of the
drugs whose patents will ex-
pire in 2011 or 2012, says Joel
Owerbach, chief pharmacy offi-
cer for Excellus Blue Cross
Blue Shield, which serves most
of upstate New York.
Those patients, along with
businesses and taxpayers who
help pay for prescription drugs
through corporate and govern-
ment prescriptionplans, collec-
tively will save a fortune. Thats
Drug prices expected to plummet
AP PHOTO
Bottles of prescription drugs
as labeled Lipitor, TriCor,
Plavix, Singulair, Lexapro
and Avapro are displayed at
Medco Health Solutions Inc.,
in Willingboro, N.J.
Wave of expiring patents
said to be cause of price drop
By LINDA A. JOHNSON
AP Business Writer
See PRICES, Page 3D
A
changingeconomyhasledavenerablelocal businesstore-enteramarket it abandoneddecades
ago.
A. Rifkin Co.s sewing machines have been producing goods since the 19th century, first in the
Heights sectionof Wilkes-Barre andsince1968ina Hanover Townshipfacilityalongthe Sans Souci
Parkway.
Over thedecades, thecompanythat wasfoundedin1892byAbrahamRifkin, hasadaptedwiththe
times, securingnewworkthat wouldkeepit inbusiness.
The company made its mark in the
pre-Depression era with the patented
Rifkin-Alls but then got out of the
clothing business and focused on bank
bags, and later security bags. A. Rifkin
became the number one producer of
bankbagsinthecountryandsignedcon-
tracts with governments in 45 states to
supplythemwithfabricbagswithcham-
ber/seal securityclosurestoprotect pro-
visional ballots to meet the Help Amer-
ica Vote Acts requirements.
But as the recessionhit andit became
costlier for clothing sewn in China to be
imported into this country in small
batches, A. Rifkin began rethinking its
businessmodel, saidPaul D. Lantz, pres-
ident and chief executive officer of the
company.
Investments in new specialized sew-
ing machines and hiring skilled people
ontheapparel sideof thebusinessarebe-
ginningtopay off.
Werestartingtobuildit, Lantzsaid.
Part of that growth comes from Mary
Brewster, a 56-year-old entrepreneur
fromRedding, Conn.
Thedancer, artistandteacherdecided
tobecome a clothingdesigner andstart-
ed a home-based business selling dance
and yoga clothes made from a unique,
eco-friendly yarn called Repreve thats
made from recycled products including
plastic water bottles.
When she was looking for companies
that could sew her products, she found
A. Rifkinandcontactedthe company.
While researching manufacturers in
the United States, I found there arent a
whole lot anymore who did this, Brew-
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Mary Brewster and Joe Bachkosky, center, plant manager of A. Rifkin in Hanover Township., look over the shoulder
of sewing machine operator Brooke Dribelbis as she works on the clothing line of Mary Brewster.
A company SEW fine
Mary Brewster who has a clothing
company in Connecticut shows some
of the finished products that are
made by A Rifkin Company. See RIFKIN, Page 3D
By ANDREWM. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
New Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus
Call Today for a Consultation
Complimentary Whirlpool Session
with all routine nailcare
Dr. Nicole M. Branning
New for 2011
CryoPen
Advanced
Treatment
for
Plantar Warts.
CALL TODAY!
Dr. David A. Scalzo
Foot & Ankle Surgery
Diabetic Foot Care/Shoes
Heel Pain
Bunion Repair
Hammer Toe Correction
Arthritic Foot Care
Plantar Warts
Ingrown Nails
Corns & Calluses
Reconstructive Procedures
Ankle Arthroscopy
Sports Related Injury
Onsite Ultrasound used for diagnosing multiple
foot problems including:
Plantar Fasciitis Neuromas Tendonitis
Inammatory Arthritis
570-457-4560
Endoscopic Heel Surgery
David A. Scalzo, D.P.M., P.C.
Certied by the American
Board of Podiatric Surgery
We Make
Housecalls!
Day, Evening and Weekend Appointments Available
FLEET DECAL AND GRAPHICS
Lisa DeAngelo, Wyoming, recently
joined the Plymouth printing and
graphics com-
pany as a
business oper-
ations special-
ist. She mon-
itors and ana-
lyzes business
operations and
external mar-
ket indicators
and coor-
dinates the companys business
strategy. DeAngelo has 17 years
of experience in the commercial
printing industry.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
JUSTICE
Daniel W. Munley, Clarks Summit,
was recently
named nation-
al chairman of
the Trucking
Litigation
Group. He has
been an exec-
utive commit-
tee member
since 2001.
PENNSTAR BANK
Ann Vadella, Carbondale, recently
joined the bank as a business
development
officer. She
contributes to
branch sales,
customer ser-
vice and oper-
ations in the
Lackawanna
region. Vadella
has 31 years of
retail banking experience and
holds an associates degree from
Keystone Junior College.
THE GREATER SCRANTON
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
The chamber recently announced a
staff change and the hiring of
three new employees.
Marie Ferraro, Scranton, is assum-
ing the role of
accounting
specialist. The
14-year cham-
ber employee is
responsible for
assisting the
vice president
of finance with
general ac-
counting func-
tions.
Amanda E. Mar-
chegiani, Arch-
bald, joined the
organization as
the communi-
cations special-
ist. She coor-
dinates all
marketing communications for
the chamber and its affiliates.
Marchegiani has been an intern
with the chamber since March
and holds a bachelors degree in
mass communications in the
option of public relations from
Southeast Missouri State Uni-
versity.
Elizabeth Shechner, Clarks Sum-
mit, joined the group as a busi-
ness development specialist. She
serves as an
outreach coor-
dinator for
MetroAction,
assisting with
small business
lending, train-
ing and tech-
nical assist-
ance. Shechner
holds a bache-
lors degree in corporate com-
munications from Marywood
University, Scranton.
Contessa Singleton, Scranton,
joined the organization as the
membership services assistant.
She supports
the member-
ship depart-
ment and
assists with
chamber
events. Single-
ton holds an
associates
degree in
business and management from
McCann School of Business.
CORPORATE LADDER
DeAngelo
Munley
Vadella
Marchegiani
Shechner
Singleton
Ferraro
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUN-
CHEON: Aug. 9, noon-1 p.m.,
Genettis, 77 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre. $14.50 for Women
in Business Council Members,
$16.50 for non-council members.
Val Berzanski, of Tuckers Travel,
will discuss Rose Tuckers book,
The Junkmans Daughter. Reser-
vations required; call 823-2101,
ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-
barre.org.
CAN DO ENERGY SOLUTIONS
SEMINAR: Aug. 10, 1 1 a.m.-1p.m.,
Penn State Hazleton, Graham
Building G-1 15, 76 University Dr.,
Hazleton. Topics include efficient
lighting, solar power and access-
ing green energy tax credits.
$30 per person, includes lunch.
Reserve online at www.hazle-
tonchamber.org, call 570-455-
1509 or email jferry@hazle-
tonchamber.org.
NETWORKING MIXER: Aug. 11, 5-7
p.m., Phoenix Rehab, 685 Carey
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Free for
Chamber members. For reserva-
tions, call 823-2101, ext. 1 13 or
email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.
HR PROFESSIONALS ROLE IN
CREATING REVENUE: Aug. 12,
9 a.m.-10 a.m., Greater Hazleton
Chamber office, 20 W. Broad St.
Free. Reserve online at www.ha-
zletonchamber.org, call 570-455-
1509 or email jferry@hazle-
tonchamber.org.
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
HUMAN RESOURCES FORUM:
Aug. 12, 8:30 a.m., Chamber
Conference Room, 2 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre. Topic is
Effective Methods for Intergen-
erational Training with speaker
Catherine Kline. Reservations
required; call 823-2101, ext. 133 or
email Karen@wilkes-barre.org.
GOLF OUTING & ON COURSE
TRADESHOW: Aug. 18, Mountain
Valley Golf Course, Barnesville.
Registration 8:30-10:30 a.m.,
shotgun start at 1 1 a.m. 18 holes
of golf, cart, breakfast, cocktails
and hors d oeuvres, buffet
dinner. $500 per foursome.
Reservations required. For more
information call Leann at 570-
455-1509 or email lfallabel@ha-
zletonchamber.org.
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
GOLF TOURNAMENT: Aug. 26,
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, Moun-
tain Top. Registration at 10 a.m.;
shotgun start at 1 1 a.m. $125 per
person, $440 per foursome.
Reservations required; call 823-
2101, ext. 1 13 or email jean-
kile@wilkes-barre.org.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Submit announcements of business
meetings, seminars and other events
to Business Agenda by email to
tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail
to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-
5537. Photos in jpg format may be
attached to email.
SallySmithbecameCEOof Buf-
faloWildWingsInc. aftertheother
guy didnt showup.
It was 1996
and Smith was
the top finance
officer for the
chicken wings
chain, whichwas
still relatively
small, withabout
70restaurants.
The founders, friends Jim Dis-
brow and Scott Lowery, had
opened the first Buffalo Wild
Wings 14 years earlier, after mov-
ing to Columbus, Ohio, from Buf-
falo, N.Y. Unable to find Buffalo-
style chicken wings in their new
town, theyd opened Buffalo Wild
Wings &Weck, cooking sauces in
their apartment kitchen and play-
ing MTV in the restaurant to at-
tract OhioState college students.
But the pair knew they needed
help taking the business froma la-
borof lovetoaprofessionallyman-
aged corporation, especially be-
cause Disbrow, by then CEO, was
about to leave to run the U.S. Fig-
ure Skating Association. They
chose the operations vice presi-
dent of another restaurant as their
newchief exec. But hedidnt show
uponhis scheduledfirst day.
The board members huddled,
then told Smith a few days later
that they wanted her to be CEO.
She doesnt really remember
agreeingtotakethejob; it was just
assumedthat she would.
She got the books in order,
shookupthesupplychainandadd-
ed marketing, human resources
and finance departments. She set
out todiversifythecustomer base,
and she dropped Weck fromthe
end of the name (a weck is a cara-
way roll popular in Buffalo). In
2003, she took the company pub-
lic.
The chain has since grown to
about 750 restaurants, including
oneinOntariothatopenedinMay,
marking Buffalo Wild Wings first
international expansion. Now,
Smith is eyeing London. Unlike
many competitors, the Minneapo-
lis-based chain has weathered the
recession well. Its revenue rose14
percent last year, when U.S. reve-
nue fell at Applebees, Chilis and
Ruby Tuesday, according to Tech-
nomic, a restaurant industry re-
searchfirm.
Smith, 53, talkedtoThe Associ-
ated Press about when to get the
biggest chicken wings, what she
looks for in job applicants and
whats worrying the restaurant in-
dustry.
Q. What was Buffalo Wild
Wings like when you first got
there?
A. Wehadacommissaryandev-
erything came through it. They
were buyingchickenwings, bring-
ing them to the commissary and
sendingthembackout tothe fran-
chisees. We had about 14 trucks,
and it was not efficient. If we were
going to open a restaurant in Tex-
as, you ended up having a truck
that had to go from Columbus to
Texas.
Q. How did you reshape the
brand?
A. The restaurants were really
college bars. And theres nothing
wrong with college bars, but you
probably werent going to raise
money. We started delivering the
foodtothe(tables). Wedidhigher
ceilings, windows, we expanded
themenu. Weupdatedthelogo
it was a Buffalo nickel on a plain
creambackground.
Q. Doyoueverhearpeoplecom-
plaintheir wingsaregettingsmall-
er?
A. Inthesummer, wings tendto
be smaller because chickens dont
eat as much. In the winter, theyre
eating more. You also have
Thanksgiving and Christmas,
timeswhentheplantsaretypically
closed. So chickens the next week
have muchbigger wings.
Q. Yourechairwomanof theNa-
tional Restaurant Association.
What are restaurants worried
about right now?
A. Whats going to happen with
thehealthcarebill (whichrequires
most businesses to offer health in-
surance to any employee who
works an average of at least 30
hours a week). The industry em-
ploys alot of part-timepeoplewho
want tobepart-time. Somepeople
work 20 hours one week, 30 hours
thenext. Wejust needsomedefini-
tion around what the rules are go-
ingtobe.
Sally Smiths (chicken) wings are soaring
By CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP Business Writer
Smith
300 and 850. It determines how
muchor howlittleyoull pay
forallkindsofborrowing,fromstu-
dent loans to credit cards to home
mortgages.
The higher your score, the bet-
ter your chances of getting ap-
proved for a loan and the lower
yourinterest rate, whichcanmean
hugesavings inthelongrun.
Note: Credit scores are not the
same as credit reports, which are
the histories of all your bill pay-
ments, loan balances and delin-
quencies. Credit reports are com-
piled by the three reporting bu-
reaus (Experian, Equifax and
TransUnion).
The new rules do not cover
mortgage loans, which already re-
quire disclosure of credit scores.
They also dont apply to applica-
tions for insurance, since those
dont generally rely on credit
scores.
Those with good credit wont
get acredit scoreletter inthemail,
but the new rules validate that
youre getting the best possible
ratefromalender, Ulzheimersaid.
For thosewhodoget rejectedor
receive a less-than-ideal APR, the
lenders explanatory letter em-
powers consumers to actually go
out andimprove their score. They
knowwhyit isnt higher, hesaid.
Andonelastnoteonthenewdis-
closure law: It underscores the
importance of opening that mail
fromalender,Ulzheimersaid. At
the very least, the consumer will
now have a road map to better
credit.
LOANS
Continued fromPage 1D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
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LOS ANGELES Wind tur-
bines are getting really big
some with blades as long as a
football fieldandmorepower-
ful, often generating 50 times
more electricity than the first
generation of wind power ma-
chines built in the 1980s.
But scientists are also study-
ing how to harness the wind in
different ways that could help al-
lay concerns that todays tur-
bines are unattractive, noisy and
sometimes even dangerous.
Already in the works: Tur-
bines that float and turbines that
fly. Turbines without blades and
turbines with blades fat enough
to fit a double-decker bus inside.
They wont just be on hillsides
either. Somewill beintheocean,
while others will be on rooftops
and light poles. A few will even
be in the sky.
One design was inspired by
the humble bumblebee.
Sabri Sansoy, an MIT gradu-
ate and former rocket engineer,
has built a 19-foot-tall prototype
whoseblades, rather thanspinin
a circle, move in a figure-eight
motion like the insects wings.
Sansoy hopes the design will
generate more electricity than
turbines of similar size.
Ive been called everything
from brilliant to a nincompoop
over this, said Sansoy, whose
Marina del Rey, Calif., company
Green Wavelength is looking to
commercialize the technology.
But theres a lot of people in-
terestedinthis kindof thing, tak-
ing energy out of the wind, he
said.
Thats because theres a lot of
moneybeingpouredintofinding
ways to ease off coal-based elec-
tricity. Last year, the Depart-
ment of Energy set aside a re-
cord $79 million for its wind pro-
gram budget nearly $20 mil-
lion more than its previous top
allotment in 1980.
General Electric Co., which
makes half of the turbines in the
U.S., has investedmorethan$1.5
billion developing renewable en-
ergy technology since entering
the wind business in 2002. Goo-
gle Inc., the Internet search gi-
ant, and its philanthropic arm
have plunged millions of dollars
into new wind concepts.
At the moment, most turbines
are designed to look like stream-
linedwindmills: Blades connect-
ed to a rotor, usually mounted
high on a tower to capture stron-
ger gusts, spin like propellers in
the wind. The rotor helps turn a
shaft connected to a generator,
which produces electricity.
But companies are coming up
with innovative variations.
An Alameda, Calif., company,
Wind turbines growing taller and more powerful
By TIFFANY HSU
Los Angeles Times
See TURBINES, Page 4D
because generic drugs typically
cost 20 percent to 80 percent less
than the brand names.
Doctors hope the lower prices
will significantly reduce the num-
ber of people jeopardizing their
health because they cant afford
medicines they need.
Evenpeople withprivate insur-
ance or Medicare arent filling all
their prescriptions, studies show,
particularlyfor cancer drugs with
copays of hundreds of dollars or
more.
The new generics will slice co-
payments of those with insur-
ance. For the uninsured, who
have been paying full price, the
savings will be much bigger.
Daly Powers, 25, an uninsured
student who works two part-time
jobs at low wages, says he often
cant afford the $220 a month for
his depression and attention def-
icit disorder pills. He couldnt
buy either drug in June and says
hes struggling with his Spanish
class and his emotions. He looks
forward to his antidepressant,
Lexapro, goinggeneric earlynext
year.
Itd make all the difference in
the world, says Powers, of
Bryan, Texas.
Generic medicines are chem-
ically equivalent to the original
brand-name drugs and work just
as well for nearly all patients.
When a drug loses patent pro-
tection, often only one generic
version is on sale for the first six
months, so the price falls a little
bit initially. Then, several other
generic makers typically jump in,
driving prices down dramatical-
ly.
Last year, the average generic
prescription cost $72, versus
$198 for the average brand-name
drug, according to consulting
firm Wolters Kluwer Pharma So-
lutions. Those figures average all
prescriptions, fromshort-termto
90-day ones.
Average copayments last year
were $6 for generics, compared
with $24 for brand-name drugs
given preferred status by an in-
surer and $35 for nonpreferred
brands, according to IMS Health.
Among the drugs that recently
went off patent, Protonix, for se-
vere heartburn, now costs just
$16 a month for the generic, ver-
sus about $170 for the brand
name. And of the top sellers that
soon will have competition, Lip-
itor retails for about $150 a
month, Plavix costs almost $200
a month and blood pressure drug
Diovancosts about $125amonth.
For those with drug coverage,
their out-of-pocket costs for each
of those drugs could drop below
$10 a month.
Many discount retailers and
grocery chains sell the most pop-
ular generics for $5 a month or
less to draw in shoppers.
Theimpact of thecomingwave
of generics will be widespread
and swift.
Insurers usesystems that make
sure patients are switchedtoa ge-
neric the first day its available.
Many health plans require newly
diagnosed patients to start on ge-
neric medicines. And unless the
doctor writes brand only on a
prescription, if theres a generic
available, thats almost always
what the pharmacist dispenses.
A blockbuster drug that goes
off patent will lose 90 percent of
its revenue within 24 months.
Ive seen it happen in12 months,
says Ben Weintraub, a research
director at Wolters Kluwer Phar-
ma Solutions.
Drug companies have received
U.S. approval for 20 drugs this
year and expect approval for oth-
er important ones the next few
years. Eventually, those will help
fill the revenue hole.
For now, brand-name drug-
makers are scrambling to adjust
for the billions in revenue that
will soon be lost. Typically, they
raise prices 20 percent or more in
the final years before generics hit
to maximize revenue. Some also
contract with generic drugmak-
ers for authorized generics,
which give the brand-name com-
pany a portion of the generic
sales.
PRICES
Continued fromPage 1D
ster said. And with an easy drive
from New England to Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania, she said the lo-
cationwas anaddedbonus.
What she heard and saw from
the companys employees seemed
like a perfect fit, said Brewster,
whosecompanyAmericanFlorais
in its first year of operations, with
itsproductssoldthroughawebsite
andat trunksales.
I was very impressed with the
production facility and the way
theydothings, shesaidabout her
first visit to the facility last year.
This was a slice of America.
Thats how I felt and thats what I
was lookingfor.
She said she wanted to support
the planet by using recycled prod-
ucts, support the dance communi-
ty by creating comfortable and
fashionable items and she wanted
to support her country by having
her goods made domestically.
To date shes ordered close to
1,000 garments, including leo-
tards, tank tops and yoga pants.
Thats in addition to100 tote bags
made from used poly-vinyl bill-
boards donated to her by Adams
Outdoor Advertising.
Lantz saidhes amazedwiththe
ideas people have come up with
and hes glad the company is able
tohelpout.
Its fascinatingtoseewhat peo-
ple are tryingtodo, Lantz said.
Theres so many people that
have been downsized or lost jobs
that theyre looking to control
their ownlives, Lantz said.
Brewster didnt lose her job but
the thought of tryingtohelpdanc-
ers, while helping the environ-
ment andmakingsomemoneyfor
herself seemed like a worthy en-
deavor.
Ilovetheconceptof businessin
abasement,saidBrewster, whose
daughter Rebeccaandtwointerns
assist her.
Lantz, 57, of Kingston, said A.
Rifkin loves it, too. He said that
whilebankandvotingbagsarestill
their biggest lines, about 70 per-
cent of all items produced by the
company, contract sewingnowac-
counts for about 10 percent of its
business. And the apparel portion
of that is still relatively tiny.
But it creates anopportunityfor
growth, which bank bags havent
provided.
There are only so many banks,
Lantz said, but optimistically add-
ing, we are still far away frombe-
ing cashless and paperless. But
with more people like Brewster,
the reliance on bags could dwin-
dle.
We have to adapt, said Lantz,
becausewedont want tobecome
just a distributor.
He said the purchase of new
equipment to handle the apparel
business is worth the investment
long-term but we havent made
money onthat side yet.
Brewster hopes to change that,
because if she places more orders
with Rifkin, it means her business
is takingoff.
RIFKIN
Continued fromPage 1D
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
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C
OUNTY
L
UZERNE
In a slow economy, small busi-
ness owners know what to do:
adapt.
We have to constantly keep
adjusting, says Janice Cutler,
president of North Raleigh Flo-
rist in North Carolina. She has
changed her marketing strategy
since the start of the recession in
late 2007. That has kept people
buying even though flowers
arent always a high priority.
At Graphic Imagery, a printing
company in South San Francisco,
owner Rachel Imison and her
husband are working harder for
eachsale. Andtheyve investedin
new equipment that gets the
work done better.
Heres a look at howfour small
business owners have adapted to
an economy that keeps limping
along:
Cutler says her floral busi-
ness has done well despite the re-
cession because people still need
flowers for holidays, special occa-
sions and big events like wed-
dings. But the economy has defi-
nitely affected us in that we
would be doing better, if some
customers werent cutting back
on regular purchases, she says.
For example, consumers and
companies that used to order
flowers regularly as decorations.
Her answer to the recession
was to market her flowers differ-
ently. We do more than just sell
flowers. Its a sentiment, she
says. The strategy has beenwork-
ing. Cutler says, weve honestly
had double-digit growth every
month.
At Graphic Imagery, we are
working longer hours, customers
are demanding more for less, the
average value of each sale is low-
er, Imison says. But she under-
stands that her customers are un-
der as much pressure as her com-
pany is.
To meet customers greater de-
mands, Graphic Imagery invest-
ed$500,000 inequipment that al-
lows it to print more efficiently
and cheaply. Its able to make
booklets and brochures faster
sometimes in as little as a day.
The company is also trying to
keep its costs down. Its putting
off hiring because, while busi-
ness has been good, were not
confident yet, Imison says. Her
family is putting off its vacation
this year, something it also did
during the recession. Were still
anxious, Imison says.
Alan Gaynor & Co., a New
York-based architectural firm,
was primarily doing interior de-
sign work for companies before
the recession. That meant rede-
signing lobbies, offices and other
spaces. That type of business be-
gan to slow at the start of 2008.
But the firmstarted getting more
projects to renovate building in-
frastructure.
We realized that was a good
market for us, says Michele Bod-
dewyn, the firms president. She
says that after thecollapseof Leh-
man Brothers in September
2008, the market for corporate in-
terior design was very dead.
The interior design market has
recovered somewhat, but pro-
jects are smaller. Boddewyn says
of clients, if they have a wish list
of 10 things, maybe theyre hit-
ting seven of those 10.
Brian Butlers dry cleaning
business in Columbus, Ohio, ca-
ters to affluent customers. He
says Dublin Cleaners held on to
them by giving them superior
service. Like Graphic Imagery,
his company invested in new
equipment and technology that
improved the quality of its work
and also made it easier to satisfy
customers needs.
Dublin had its best sales in
2007. Business fell in 2008
through 2010, but Butler says
sales were downonly2percent to
4 percent each year. That was be-
low the industry average of 10
percent. He says the company is
back up near its 2007 level.
SMALL TALK
Businesses find ways to
adapt in slow economy
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
Q: The woman whose desk is
next to mine spends hours on
Facebook and even refers to her-
self as an online stalker. She is
pals with our network adminis-
trator, who supposedly likes to
read every email that comes into
the company.
I recently figured out that
these two have been reading my
personal email whenever I ac-
cess my account at work. Even
more alarming, they apparently
tried to log in to my online bank-
ing. Because they exceeded the
allowed number of password at-
tempts, I was locked out of the
account when I got home.
To prevent this prying, I have
stopped checking my personal
email at work. This frustrates my
co-worker, who now tries to
make me log on by saying that
she sent me a picture or joke.
When I reply that Ill read it at
home, she gets really annoyed.
What else can I do about this?
A: If the cyber-snoopers are
this eager to invade your privacy,
then they are undoubtedly doing
the same to other unsuspecting
employees. Therefore, in addi-
tion to protecting yourself, you
might also take steps to protect
your colleagues.
Giventhe serious nature of the
offense, talking to someone in
management or human re-
sources would seemto be the ap-
propriate next step. If you know
of others who have been victi-
mized, they can also attend and
help present the case.
For example: We thought you
shouldknowthat some people in
the company have been reading
their co-workers personal email
online and have even tried to get
into their bank accounts. Were
asking you to investigate the sit-
uationandput a stoptothis inap-
propriate behavior.
You can then provide whatev-
er proof you have of these intru-
sions. If management fails to
take immediate action, informal-
lyspreadthewordthat accessing
personal accounts at work can
make them vulnerable to view-
ing by others.
Q: After two days at my new
job, I have not yet signed a pay-
roll form or been told about my
work hours. This is a small fam-
ily business that has been quite
successful, but seems very disor-
ganized. I have made two ap-
pointments with the owners to
discuss my schedule, but they
forgot both times. Is this a bad
sign?
A: While this confusion may
be disturbing, it is not unusual.
Many successful small compa-
nies expand so quickly that their
processes and procedures cant
keep up with the growth. To
compound this problem, the
founders are often entrepreneu-
rial types who are not the most
organized people in the world.
Whether this is a bad omen or
an excellent opportunity de-
pends largely on the nature of
your position. If you have an ad-
ministrative job, you may have
actually been hired to help bring
order out of this chaos. In that
case, your organizational skills
will soon make you indispens-
able. On the other hand, if your
work leaves you at the mercy of
these muddled managers, you
may soon need a crash course in
stress reduction.
OFFICE COACH
Email snooping crosses the line, invades personal life
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics. Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
Makani Power Inc., is develop-
ing a kite-like contraption that
generates electricity as it whips
in circles in the wind. Another
firm, Magenn Power Inc., has
built a giant spinning blimp with
generators affixed to each end. It
somewhat resembles a giant in-
flatable hamster wheel.
Some machines could double
as art installations. Poway, Calif.-
basedHelixWindCorp.s turbine
looks like a spiral staircase wrap-
ped in a white sheet. Another
model, from WindTronics,
evokes a large bicycle wheel
or Saurons eye from The Lord
of the Rings.
Although many current instal-
lations are limited to sites with
just the right mix of topography
and wind speed, designers are
starting to create turbines that
can adapt to a wide range of ter-
rains.
One Italian proposal involves
wind turbines being built be-
tweenthe pillars of a bridge. Last
month, turbine manufacturer
Vestas said it adapted military
stealth technology that can keep
turbines from interfering with
airport and army radar systems,
potentiallyopeningupnewsites.
The popularity of rooftop so-
lar panels has sparked a surge of
smaller wind turbines that can
sit atopbuildings. Municipalities
aroundthe country are gradually
updating zoning rules to allow
for the more compact models.
Technology like the not-quite-6-
foot-tall Eddy from Urban Green
Energy Inc. has popped up at
trade shows in China and the
Consumer Electronics Show in
Las Vegas.
Turbines could also end up in
the oceans as developers try to
tap powerful sea breezes. Re-
searchers say those machines
couldgenerate many times more
power than land-based ones.
In March, Vestas announced a
7-megawatt offshore turbine that
will be more than 600 feet tall
from the blade tip to the bottom
of the tower. The blades will
sweep in a circle larger than the
London Eye Ferris wheel.
The monstrous machines, to
be made mostly with recyclable
materials, will be mass produced
by 2015, Vestas said.
One turbine inGermany spans
nearly 700 feet from the bottom
of the tower tothe blade tip. Oth-
er developers saythat land-based
turbines with 300-foot blades
may be ready within a decade.
But some said scaling up isnt
always the way to go.
The wind industrys central
tenet now is that bigger is bet-
ter, said John O. Dabiri, an aero-
nautics professor who runs Cal-
techs Center for Bioinspired En-
gineering. It certainly goes
against conventional wisdom,
but were taking the opposite
perspective.
But some of the newfangled
models may not go far, said Nan-
cy Rader, executive director of
the California Wind Energy As-
sociation. The technology with
the most longevity probably will
be variations of current turbines,
she said.
In 20 years, I think its going
tobemoreof thesame, shesaid.
TURBINES
Continued from Page 3D
MCT PHOTO
Bob Hayes, left, president of Prevailing Wind Power, and CalTech
professor John O.Dabiri discuss the location to place an ane-
mometer, a device to measure wind speed, at the CalTech field
test of vertical-axis turbines in the Antelope Valley, Calif.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
Stan Choe, Kristen Girard AP
TOO ROSY
Remember when the U.S. government said in 2001
that the country could have a total budget surplus of
$5.6 trillion over the next 10 years? It was off by about
$11.8 trillion. One reason for the miss was that the
governments forecasts for future growth were too op-
timistic, says research from Harvard University. And
investors should be skeptical not only about U.S.
numbers but other countries as well. After looking at
official forecasts for growth and budget balances by
33 countries, Professor Jeffrey Frankel found that
they were often too rosy. They also tended to be even
more biased during economic booms. One exception
was Chile, which tended to be too pessimistic.
SHOW ME THE SALES
One of the best surprises this
earnings season is how
strong revenue growth has
been. Total revenue is up 9.9
percent from a year earlier for
the S&P 500 companies that
reported their second-quarter
results through Thursday. If
they keep up the pace, it
would be the best revenue
growth in a year. It could also
mean that companies are
moving into the second phase
of earnings growth, say
Deutsche Bank strategists: If
companies can depend on
stronger revenue to raise their
profits, theyll focus less on
cutting jobs and other costs.
NOT EVERYONES STRUGGLING
Governments around the world are get-
ting financially weaker, which means
credit-rating agencies are busy cutting
their ratings. Greece is already in junk
status, and agencies warn that the U.S.
may lose its top rating. Then theres
Uruguay. Standard & Poors upped the
South American countrys rating to BB+
last week. That means its just one level
away from graduating to investment
grade from junk status. S&P cited
Uruguays prudent and consistent eco-
nomic policies. Compare that with how
S&P described the U.S. debate on cut-
ting the deficit: entangled.
Total revenue growth,
S&P 500 companies
Source: FactSet
*Data through July 28
Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2*
0
4
8
12 percent
10 09 11
9.9*
2011
2001
20 20 20 20 20 0 20 20 0 20 0 20 00 20 22220 00 20 20 0 20 0 20 222222222220 2200 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 220 220 20 0 20 20 22220 20 220 20 222220 20 20 20 0 20 220 0 20 220 220 220 220 20 220 2220 000 22 11 11 1111 111111 11 11 111 1111 11 11 11 11 111 11 111 11111 11 1 11 11 111111111 111 111 11 111 11 111 11 11 11 1 111 1 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 111 11 1 11 1 11 1 11 1111 11 1 11 11 11111111111
+$5.6t
-$6.2t
2011
In January 2001,
the Congressional Budget Office projected
that the country could have a cumulative
surplus of $5.6 trillion from
2002 through 2011.
It ended up being a deficit of
$6.2 trillion.
Source: Congressional Budget Office
The U.S. governments fiscal trou-
bles mean bond investors should
focus more on corporate and mu-
nicipal bonds, says George Strick-
land, managing director at Thorn-
burgh Investment Management,
which has about $84 billion in as-
sets under management. He is also
co-portfolio manager of Thornburgs
Strategic Income Fund.
What will
happen if
the U.S. los-
es its top
AAA credit
rating?
In the short
run, I would
expect there
would not be
a huge effect
because in-
vestors have
virtually no-
where else to
go. If youre a
(mutual fund with a mandate to in-
vest in) U.S. government bonds,
you literally have nowhere else to
go. If youre a high-quality buyer,
you can shift some of your incre-
mental purchases to high-grade
corporates, but its a much smaller
market. Mortgages, the high-quali-
ty ones, are agency backed, which
are implicitly government backed.
Many (mutual funds) cant take
cross-currency risk and go to
(German) bunds, so really youve
got nowhere else to go
Longer term, I think that the
U.S. government and U.S. gov-
ernment bond market (has bene-
fited) greatly from being a store of
value, something thats rock solid
when nothing else is. I think were
damaging that image in a long-
term way. Weve already done it,
but a downgrade would do more
damage to our image as a store
of wealth. I think well see a con-
tinued incremental shift on the
part of both central governments
and private buyers of debt toward
other markets.
Should U.S. investors be look-
ing at foreign bonds instead?
If youre a U.S. based investor, you
should have most of your money in
U.S. bonds. For a variety of rea-
sons, U.S. corporates and U.S.
municipals are where you should
have the bulk of your assets ver-
sus U.S. Treasurys. First of all, you
get (more yield than you do with)
Treasurys, and you dont lose
sleep over the political dynamics.
Really, youre not losing any
sleep over municipals?
Im not losing any sleep. Some
people potentially are, but U.S.
municipalities have demonstrated
a lot more fiscal responsibility than
the U.S. government. Their bud-
gets are smaller than they were a
couple years ago, and their tax
revenues are growing pretty nicely.
But municipalities are at risk of
getting less federal aid.
Its definitely a concern, but mu-
nicipalities have had to tighten
their belt straps for several years
now, and I think that theyll by and
large continue to do that. There
may be some exceptions to that
rule, but by and large, I think well
see them through this crisis in
pretty good shape.
And you like corporates
because of how much cash
they have?
Corporate cash flows are very
good, and corporate balance
sheets and the absolute level of
debt both look quite good. You
have to be a little concerned about
what happens to the economy go-
ing forward. If we actually do get
fiscal tightening of lets call it $3
trillion over 10 years, thatll shave
probably 1.5 to 2 percent off of
(economic) growth, which would
make you a little concerned about
the high-yield market place.
What kind of corporate bonds
do you like?
With high-grade bonds, the
(prices) just dont offer enough to
justify it. So were more in the high
speculative grade and low invest-
ment grade. Thats probably the
sweet spot. Its kind of interesting,
because theres a lot of demand
for the juiciest bond deals, for the
highest yielding, highest risk stuff,
and theres a lot of demand for the
highest quality stuff, but investors
dont seem to be buying at the
train stops in between.
Where to
find income
Strickland
InsiderQ&A
Francesca Levy Kristen Girard AP SOURCES: FactSet Morningstar Data through July 28 *annualized
Rydex S&P 500 Pure Growth RPG 8.8% 35.3% 12.2% 8.6% $335.7m 0.35% 0
Bridgeway Small-Cap Momentum BRSMX 4.2 23.0 3.0 0.90 $2,000
AQR Momentum AMOMX 4.4 21.8 265.0 0.49 $5m
COMPANY TICKER 1-YR YTD 3-YR* 5-YR*
NET
ASSETS
EXPENSE
RATIO
MIN.
INITIAL
INVESTMENT
Funds that use a momentum strategy are relatively new. But some show big returns.
Jump on the bandwagon
Many investors look at a stock
like Priceline.com and get uneasy.
Its up 560 percent since the start of
the bull market on March 10, 2009.
After that kind of advance, theres
no way a stock can go much higher,
they say. But some fund managers
expect stocks that have shot higher
to keep on going. They use a strate-
gy known as momentum investing.
To understand how the strategy
works, think of a runaway train. The
longer it stays on the track, the
more speed it builds up. It keeps
getting faster until it hits a sharp
turn. So momentum fund managers
buy even when a stock is high
and then try to sell before it derails.
Its a strategy that tends to work
long-term, but it can also be vola-
tile. Some things to remember
about momentum investing:
DONT TRY IT AT HOME
Although it sounds simple, picking
stocks based on momentum isnt
recommended for individual inves-
tors. It means following the stocks
closely to avoid getting burned if they
fall sharply. If you want to profit from
momentum, buy a mutual fund that
uses the strategy, says John Mont-
gomery, CEO of Bridgeway Funds.
IT CAN GET EXPENSIVE
Amomentum strategy depends on
regularly switching out stocks in a
fund. Turnover the rate at which a
portfolio replaces its stocks with new
ones can be up to 150 percent for
momentum funds. Some stock funds
with different strategies have turn-
over rates as low as 22 percent. In-
vestors pay a fee every time a stock
in their fund is bought or sold. So re-
turns from a momentum fund must
be high enough to offset those costs.
ITS A SIDE DISH, NOT A
MAIN COURSE
Momentum isnt a replacement for
other strategies. Funds that use
momentum tend to work when val-
ue funds ones made up of
stocks that are cheaply priced
dont. The strategies complement
each other, Montgomery says.
How a momentum fund has
fared against a value fund.
0%
AQR Momentum
+38.3%
Russell
1000
Value
+30.8%
2009 2010 2011
RETURNS
Air Products APD 71.75 7 98.01 88.73 -3.17 -3.4 t t -2.4+25.20 2 8.8 16 2.6
Amer Water Works AWK 20.97 8 30.70 28.00 -1.48 -5.0 t t 10.7+35.08 216.4a 17 3.3
Amerigas Part LP APU 41.53 2 51.50 42.72 -1.82 -4.1 t t -12.5 +3.91 4 12.7 27 6.9
Aqua America Inc WTR 18.90 5 23.79 21.15 -1.09 -4.9 t t -5.9 +11.65 3 1.8 22 2.9
Arch Dan Mid ADM 26.50 4 38.02 30.38 -1.74 -5.4 t t 1.0+13.30 3 -5.6 9 2.1
AutoZone Inc AZO 203.05 9302.00 285.45 -10.40 -3.5 t s 4.7+34.92 2 26.6 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 9.40 1 15.31 9.71 -0.42 -4.1 t t -27.230.56 5-21.3 ... 0.4
Bk of NY Mellon BK 23.78 2 32.50 25.11 -0.52 -2.0 t t -16.9 +1.91 4 -3.3 12 2.1
Bon Ton Store BONT 6.08 4 17.49 10.15 -0.28 -2.7 s t -19.8 +7.22 3-15.4 78 2.0
CIGNA Corp CI 30.06 9 52.95 49.77 -2.85 -5.4 t s 35.8+61.93 1 10.4 9 0.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 26.84 8 39.50 36.35 -1.00 -2.7 t s 4.5+19.95 2 3.0 15 1.4
CocaCola KO 54.43 9 69.82 68.01 -1.72 -2.5 t s 3.4+26.71 2 11.3 13 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 16.76 7 27.16 24.02 -0.83 -3.3 t t 9.8+25.50 2 1.9 18 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.76 5 28.95 25.16 0.24 1.0 s s -9.4 +5.54 3 6.9 13 3.8
Community Hlth Sys CYH 22.33 2 42.50 25.84 -1.16 -4.3 t t -30.920.32 4 -6.6 10 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.97 4 13.63 7.94 -0.76 -8.7 t t -31.4 5.25 4-15.7 7 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 7.71 6 21.02 15.01 -2.09 -12.2 t t -3.8+65.31 1 -1.7 11 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 7.39 1 9.84 7.49 -0.36 -4.6 t t -23.0 +7.85 3 -0.9 54 10.0
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 7 18.71 16.50 -1.01 -5.8 t s 8.6 +9.49 3 7.6a 24 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.59 1 13.74 8.17 -0.35 -4.1 t t -36.024.82 5-17.0 11 3.9
Heinz HNZ 44.35 8 55.00 52.64 -1.35 -2.5 t s 6.4+22.46 2 7.7 17 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 45.31 8 59.45 56.44 -2.49 -4.2 t t 19.7+22.91 2 2.6 21 2.4
Kraft Foods KFT 28.76 8 36.02 34.38 -1.05 -3.0 t s 9.1+21.67 2 4.3 20 3.4
Lowes Cos LOW 19.35 3 27.45 21.58 -1.04 -4.6 t t -14.0 +6.32 3 -3.8 15 2.6
M&T Bank MTB 72.03 7 95.00 86.24 -2.84 -3.2 t t -0.9 +1.95 4 -3.9 12 3.2
McDonalds Corp MCD 68.59 9 89.57 86.48 -2.08 -2.3 s s 12.7+27.43 2 22.1 17 2.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 19.27 5 24.98 22.04 -0.84 -3.7 t t -8.7 -+3.44 4 1.9 13 3.6
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 3.64 8 10.28 8.76 -0.49 -5.3 s s 46.2+62.22 1 16.4 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 49.43 4 65.19 54.29 -2.30 -4.1 t t -10.6 7.07 4 -2.6 8 2.6
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 9 28.73 27.90 -0.11 -0.4 t s 6.0 +7.37 3 0.3 12 5.0
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 11.98 8 17.72 16.05 -0.15 -0.9 t s 21.3+31.45 2 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 10.03 7 17.34 14.60 -1.48 -9.2 t t 0.5+23.68 2 -11.0 ... 4.1
PepsiCo PEP 62.05 3 71.89 64.04 -1.72 -2.6 t t -2.0 +1.67 4 2.7 16 3.2
Philip Morris Intl PM 50.54 0 72.74 71.17 -0.94 -1.3 s s 21.6+44.46 114.8a 16 3.6
Procter & Gamble PG 59.17 3 67.72 61.49 -2.76 -4.3 t t -4.4 +3.83 4 4.4 16 3.4
Prudential Fncl PRU 48.56 6 67.52 58.68 -2.25 -3.7 t t -0.1 +4.43 4 -4.3 9 2.0
SLM Corp SLM 10.83 8 17.11 15.59 -1.12 -6.7 t t 23.8+30.75 2-20.0 11 2.6
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 32.41 9 60.00 55.52 -1.17 -2.1 t t 26.7 ... 0.0 ... 8.3
Southn Union Co SUG 22.02 0 44.65 43.00 -1.25 -2.8 s s 78.6+93.18 1 11.0 21 1.4
TJX Cos TJX 39.56 0 56.78 55.30 -0.89 -1.6 s s 24.6+34.73 2 18.8 17 1.4
UGI Corp UGI 26.32 6 33.53 30.30 -1.66 -5.2 t t -4.1+16.14 3 6.7 13 3.4
Verizon Comm VZ 28.03 7 38.95 35.29 -1.45 -3.9 t t -1.4+28.15 2 7.7 15 5.5
WalMart Strs WMT 50.00 4 57.90 52.71 -1.81 -3.3 t t -2.3 +5.58 3 5.4 12 2.8
Weis Mkts WMK 32.99 8 42.20 40.19 -0.93 -2.3 t t -0.3+15.34 3 3.2 16 2.9
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
The steadiest ships in the S&P 500
Stock
Screener
The budget standoff over raising the U.S. borrow-
ing limit has many investors wondering whether its
safe to own stocks. The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age fell more than 500 points last week. If lawmak-
ers cant reach a deal by Tuesday, the U.S. could
default on its debt. If that happens, some analysts
predict stocks could fall as much as they did at the
height of the financial crisis. The Standard & Poors
500 index fell 32 percent in just over a month after
Lehman Brothers announced its bankruptcy.
Many investors are wondering which stocks
have the best chance of holding steady in a
worst-case scenario.
A few stocks in the S&P 500 rose last week
even though the index fell 3.5 percent. We
screened those for a measure of reliability: a
strong dividend yield. Companies with a solid divi-
dend have a steady cash flow that can cushion
them against calamity.
When we screened for S&P 500 stocks that rose
over the past week and have a dividend yield above
2 percent, we were left with only 12 companies.
Many are in industries considered safe, like energy
and technology. Above, the corporations that stayed
the course while the rest of the market lurched.
Data through July 28
DIVIDEND
YIELD
MARKET
VALUE YTD P/E COMPANY TICKER
ACE Ltd. ACE 2.1% 2.1% 8.9% 7.4 $22.7b
Assurant AIZ 2.0 2.3 -6.1 14.3 3.5
Constellation Energy Group CEG 2.4 1.2 30.2 7.9
Exelon EXC 4.7 2.1 9.7 11.5 29.6
FirstEnergy FE 4.9 1.2 24.3 17.5 18.8
Microsoft MSFT 2.3 0.7 0.5 11.8 232.2
Norfolk Southern NSC 2.2 0.4 23.1 19.1 26.6
Philip Morris International PM 3.5 0.3 25.8 18.4 128.7
PPL PPL 4.9 1.6 10.8 13.1 16.4
Public Service Enterprise Group PEG 4.1 0.9 6.2 10.7 16.7
RETURNS
WEEK-TO-DATE
iPath ShtExt Rus2000 RTSA 33.19 8.85 36.4 33.0 ...
CS VS 2x Vix ShTm TVIX 21.16 4.41 26.3 29.9 ...
iPath ShtExt Rus1000 ROSA 33.11 6.60 24.9 22.1 ...
iPath ShtExt S&P500 SFSA 34.26 6.64 24.0 20.5 ...
Barc ShortC LevS&P BXDC 38.42 6.10 18.9 16.7 ...
C-Trk CitiVolIdx CVOL 28.26 4.42 18.5 17.5 ...
Direxion SCapBear 3x TZA 37.64 5.29 16.4 13.7 18.2
ProShs UltPro ShtR2K SRTY 18.51 2.59 16.3 13.6 -60.5
Pro UltPro ShtMid400 SMDD 21.93 3.02 16.0 15.8 -57.8
Direx SOX Bear 3X SOXS 73.22 10.00 15.8 21.7 160.8
Direxion EngyBear 3x ERY 13.83 1.75 14.5 -2.1 -73.9
Direxion MCapBear3x MWN 37.83 4.71 14.2 15.2 119.6
Dir Dly Gold Bear2x DUST 40.83 4.86 13.5 -12.5 ...
Pro UltPro ShtDow30 SDOW 33.09 3.89 13.3 9.7 -47.2
Fact TBBull S&PBear FSA 28.48 3.33 13.2 15.0 ...
CS VS Vix ShtTerm VIIX 50.70 5.87 13.1 15.6 ...
Direx Hlthcre Bear3x SICK 42.54 4.86 12.9 15.0 ...
Barc iPath Vix ST VXX 23.41 2.68 12.9 15.4 4.2
ProSh UltSh Indls SIJ 48.60 5.49 12.7 18.0 152.4
ProShs Vix ST Fut VIXY 50.51 5.68 12.7 15.2 ...
Direxion LCapBear 3x BGZ 36.37 4.07 12.6 10.2 148.1
Direx Matls Bear 3x MATS 38.21 4.21 12.4 7.5 ...
ProShs UltSht S&P500 SPXU 16.29 1.78 12.3 9.8 -48.6
ProSh UltSht R2KG SKK 40.70 4.41 12.2 9.7 154.1
ProSh UltSht R2K TWM 44.28 4.30 10.8 9.3 123.6
Fact GoldBullSPBear FSG 31.55 3.03 10.6 26.8 ...
Direxion FinBear 3x FAZ 48.42 4.62 10.5 14.4 245.4
Direxion REst Bear3x DRV 11.43 1.08 10.4 -1.3 -58.6
ProSh UltSht SmCap SDD 46.99 4.39 10.3 9.0 127.7
Direxion TechBear 3x TYP 20.02 1.85 10.2 -1.2 -49.2
ProSh UltShtNasdBio BIS 39.08 3.57 10.1 6.4 -47.4
ProSh UltSht BasMat SMN 17.55 1.60 10.0 6.0 -51.4
ProSh UltraSht MidC MZZ 41.19 3.58 9.5 9.7 132.0
ProSh UltSh Semi SSG 53.17 4.61 9.5 10.3 238.6
ProSh UltShtRMCG SDK 48.57 4.17 9.4 9.9 116.1
ProShs UltShort Dow DXD 17.77 1.45 8.9 6.6 -34.0
ProSh UltSh Oil&Gas DUG 27.21 2.23 8.9 -1.6 -58.0
ProSh UltSh HlthCre RXD 23.69 1.93 8.9 9.6 -38.2
DB Agric DoubSht AGA 16.69 1.33 8.7 -11.9 -62.3
ProSh UltShtRMCVal SJL 52.60 4.21 8.7 8.7 147.0
PwSh Crude DblSht DTO 51.84 4.14 8.7 -1.6 -32.2
ProSh UltShtR2KVal SJH 50.93 4.09 8.7 9.1 146.8
Rydex Inv 2x SP 500 RSW 34.70 2.71 8.5 7.0 -34.7
Prosh UltSht R1KV SJF 31.44 2.44 8.4 7.8 -31.9
ProSh UltShtR1KG SFK 19.98 1.51 8.2 4.4 -39.9
ProSh UltraSht S&P SDS 21.35 1.60 8.1 6.6 -34.7
ProSh UltSh RealEst SRS 14.10 1.05 8.0 2.3 -39.8
ProShs UltPro ShtQQQ SQQQ 23.16 1.72 8.0 -2.1 -59.0
ProShs UltSht Crude SCO 47.62 3.49 7.9 -2.8 218.4
Direx Agbiz Bear 3x COWS 35.36 2.49 7.6 -1.8 ...
Exchange-Traded Funds
FRIDAY CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN
NAME TICKER CLOSE WK 1WK 1MO 1YR
Dow industrials
-4.2%
-3.5%
Nasdaq
-3.6%
-2.1%
S&P 500
-3.9%
-3.5%
Russell 2000
-5.3%
-5.1%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+4.9%
+3.9%
+2.8%
+1.7%
Treasury yields drop
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell close to
its lowest level of the year. Treasury yields drop
when their prices rise, and investors are buying Trea-
surys despite the governments warning that it may
default unless politicians allow it to borrow more.
Many investors dont believe the government will de-
fault. Lower yields pull down mortgage and other
consumer loan rates.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D 0.12 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.11$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 2.72 -0.04 t t 0.06 3.29 2.35
Triple-A corporate Moodys 4.84 -0.12 t t 0.08 5.31 4.24
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.65 -0.05 t t -0.36 4.22 3.47
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.24 0.03 t t 0.14 5.95 4.86
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.12 -0.02 t s -1.22 8.51 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.70 -0.14 t t -0.09 2.46 1.35
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.09 0.06 s s -0.05 0.16
1-year T-Bill 0.25 0.06 s s -0.07 0.34 0.15
6-month T-Bill 0.15 0.08 s s -0.04 0.20 0.04
2-year T-Note 0.34 -0.03 t t -0.24 0.83 0.31
5-year T-Note 1.33 -0.17 t t -0.36 2.39 1.02
10-year T-Note 2.80 -0.16 t t -0.20 3.72 2.38
30-year T-Bond 4.13 -0.13 t t 0.05 4.77 3.53
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
AMF
ARM b +.9 -1.1 7.51 7.38 7.41 -.01
Acadian
EmgMkts d +2.6 +9.1 21.65 16.92 20.73 -.10
AdvisorOne
AmerigoN +2.2 +3.7 14.44 10.99 13.64 -.49
Alger Group
CapApInsI +6.6 +8.8 23.01 16.64 22.08 -.78
CapApprA m +6.6 +8.8 16.12 11.64 15.44 -.54
MdCpGInsI +5.3 +4.1 16.21 11.20 14.95 -.78
SmCpGrthO +3.0 +6.0 36.82 24.61 33.02 -2.33
SmCpInstI +3.1 +5.6 31.94 21.32 28.71 -1.98
Allegiant
UltShtBdI +.3 +3.2 10.05 10.00 10.00 ...
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrA m +6.2 +2.7 16.02 13.29 15.59 -.40
BalShrB m +5.7 +1.9 15.00 12.46 14.60 -.39
BalWlthStrA m +2.6 +3.2 12.55 10.57 12.05 -.26
BalWlthStrC m +2.1 +2.5 12.49 10.52 12.00 -.26
CoreOppA m +8.9 +3.6 13.02 9.44 12.54 -.48
GlTmtcGA m -2.5 +6.9 81.41 60.78 75.20 -3.52
GlblBondA m +3.8 +8.0 8.58 8.29 8.51 +.05
GlblBondC m +3.4 +7.3 8.61 8.32 8.54 +.05
GrowA m +5.7 +3.3 40.29 29.65 38.67 -1.62
GrowIncA m +7.0 +.7 3.69 2.78 3.53 -.15
HighIncA m +5.5 +11.3 9.31 8.76 9.17 -.02
HighIncC m +5.0 +10.4 9.41 8.85 9.27 -.02
IntGrA m +.5 +1.6 16.42 12.99 15.44 -.23
IntlValA m -.7 -4.8 14.78 11.90 13.56 -.34
IntlValAdv -.6 -4.6 15.06 12.15 13.83 -.35
LgCapGrA m +6.1 +7.2 27.62 19.68 26.29 -.84
LgCapGrAd +6.2 +7.5 28.91 20.60 27.55 -.88
MuInCAA m +5.2 +4.0 11.09 10.14 10.69 +.01
MuInNYA m +5.0 +4.3 10.12 9.39 9.86 +.01
MuInNatlA m +5.4 +4.1 10.12 9.33 9.83 ...
SMCpGrA m +9.1 +8.0 7.15 4.41 6.60 -.35
SmMidValA m -.3 +5.8 19.24 13.75 17.61 -.89
TxMgdWlApStAd +1.1 -.2 13.16 10.19 12.35 -.44
WlthApprStr +1.5 +.8 13.09 9.97 12.23 -.45
WlthApprStrA m +1.3 +.5 13.07 9.94 12.21 -.45
Allianz
NFJDivVlA m +4.0 -.5 12.40 9.73 11.65 -.41
NFJDivVlC m +3.6 -1.2 12.44 9.76 11.69 -.41
NFJEqIncD b +4.1 -.5 12.42 9.75 11.68 -.41
NFJIntVlA m +2.1 +5.3 22.38 17.65 20.86 -.43
NFJSmCVlA m +5.2 +6.9 31.65 23.69 30.02 -1.37
NFJSmCVlC m +4.7 +6.1 30.29 22.64 28.69 -1.31
Alpine
DynDiv d +.3 -2.7 5.14 3.92 4.54 -.22
InRelEstY d -2.6 -2.3 27.18 21.75 25.27 -.40
UlShTxAdv x +1.1 +3.0 10.06 10.03 10.04 -.01
Amana
Growth m +1.0 +6.7 26.22 20.64 24.96 -.98
Income m +2.7 +6.5 34.50 27.11 32.40 -1.45
American Beacon
BalAMR +2.1 +3.3 13.01 11.47 12.46 -.26
IntlEqAMR d +4.3 +1.5 18.52 14.44 17.17 -.46
IntlEqInv +3.9 +1.0 18.33 14.15 16.97 -.46
LgCpVlAMR +1.0 +.9 20.86 16.29 19.47 -.75
LgCpVlInv +.7 +.3 20.02 15.64 18.66 -.71
SmCpVlInv +.8 +3.9 21.35 15.00 19.57 -1.03
American Cent
BalInv +4.6 +4.1 16.43 13.92 16.02 -.40
CAInTFBdIv +5.5 +4.4 11.56 10.73 11.29 +.01
DivBdInv +4.0 +6.9 11.16 10.61 10.99 +.07
EmgMktInv d +1.4 +7.9 9.64 7.29 9.11 -.09
EqGrowInv +5.1 +1.6 22.97 17.32 21.84 -1.01
EqIncA m +1.4 +2.7 7.66 6.45 7.24 -.26
EqIncC m +1.0 +2.0 7.66 6.44 7.24 -.25
EqIncInv +1.5 +3.0 7.66 6.45 7.24 -.26
Gift +7.2 +9.4 31.42 21.84 30.13 -1.24
GinMaeInv +4.1 +6.7 11.10 10.72 11.10 +.05
GlGold d -7.9 +11.2 27.26 18.88 24.02 -1.46
GovBdInv +3.6 +6.5 11.50 10.96 11.36 +.06
GrowthAdv m +3.5 +5.9 27.66 20.46 26.35 -1.14
GrowthInv +3.6 +6.2 28.11 20.80 26.78 -1.15
HeritA m +5.7 +10.7 22.99 15.62 21.59 -1.05
HeritInv +5.9 +11.0 23.65 16.03 22.22 -1.07
InTTxFBInv +4.9 +4.7 11.39 10.63 11.13 +.01
IncGrInv +4.2 +.6 26.22 19.96 24.85 -1.12
IncGroA m +4.0 +.3 26.19 19.93 24.82 -1.12
InfAdjAdv m +9.3 +6.9 12.67 11.52 12.67 +.24
InfAdjI +9.4 +7.2 12.71 11.56 12.71 +.23
IntlBd +8.6 +6.2 15.24 13.40 14.98 +.17
IntlDisIv d +3.9 +3.9 11.78 8.31 11.13 -.22
IntlGrInv d +5.6 +3.5 12.19 9.19 11.58 -.18
LS2025Inv +4.1 +4.9 12.40 10.52 12.13 -.24
LgCoVlInv +1.3 -1.2 5.95 4.68 5.55 -.23
MdCpValIv ... +5.6 13.49 10.64 12.51 -.51
NTEqGrIns +4.9 +1.8 10.54 7.97 10.01 -.47
NTGrthIns +3.7 +6.5 12.93 9.57 12.31 -.53
NTLgCmVlI +1.2 -1.2 9.09 7.14 8.48 -.35
OneChAgg +4.3 +4.9 13.01 10.39 12.58 -.34
OneChCon +4.5 +5.0 11.58 10.27 11.41 -.15
OneChMod +4.4 +4.9 12.34 10.33 12.01 -.25
RealEstIv +13.4 +.3 21.50 15.83 20.80 -.70
SelectInv +8.0 +5.9 42.46 30.25 40.81 -1.65
ShTmGovIv +1.0 +3.8 9.89 9.71 9.81 +.01
SmCpValAdv m -1.3 +5.9 9.59 7.06 8.86 -.40
SmCpValIv -1.3 +6.2 9.63 7.09 8.89 -.41
StrAlAgIv +4.1 +5.0 8.17 6.50 7.89 -.22
StrAlMd +4.1 +5.0 6.95 5.78 6.75 -.14
StrAlMd m +4.0 +4.7 6.94 5.78 6.74 -.15
UltraInv +7.6 +5.4 25.30 18.08 24.38 -.92
ValueInv +.7 +1.5 6.14 4.92 5.72 -.22
VistaInv +4.2 +4.0 18.59 12.99 17.42 -.85
American Funds
AMCAPA m +4.3 +4.0 20.44 15.39 19.57 -.71
AMCAPB m +3.8 +3.2 19.52 14.76 18.69 -.69
BalA m +4.6 +4.2 19.07 16.07 18.55 -.42
BalB m +4.1 +3.4 18.99 16.00 18.48 -.42
BondA m +4.1 +3.9 12.56 12.05 12.45 +.06
BondAmerB m +3.7 +3.2 12.56 12.05 12.45 +.06
CapIncBuA m +4.3 +3.4 53.07 46.35 51.13 -.75
CapIncBuB m +3.9 +2.6 53.07 46.31 51.15 -.75
CapWldBdA m +6.5 +7.1 21.53 20.18 21.37 +.17
CpWldGrIA m +2.7 +3.7 38.88 31.09 36.14 -.87
CpWldGrIB m +2.3 +2.9 38.66 30.90 35.94 -.86
EurPacGrA m +2.5 +4.4 45.12 35.64 42.42 -.87
EurPacGrB m +2.1 +3.7 44.65 35.16 41.90 -.87
FnInvA m +3.1 +3.3 40.16 30.82 37.61 -1.46
FnInvB m +2.7 +2.5 40.03 30.70 37.49 -1.46
GlbBalA m NA NA 25.99 25.57 25.65 -.34
GrthAmA m +3.1 +2.8 32.93 25.46 31.38 -1.09
GrthAmB m +2.7 +2.1 31.89 24.58 30.33 -1.05
HiIncA m +5.3 +7.3 11.61 10.89 11.40 -.03
HiIncMuA m +5.3 +2.4 14.26 13.10 13.78 +.01
IncAmerA m +4.6 +3.4 17.74 15.25 16.97 -.37
IncAmerB m +4.2 +2.6 17.60 15.13 16.85 -.37
IntBdAmA m +2.7 +4.0 13.74 13.30 13.61 +.04
IntlGrInA m +4.5 NA 34.29 27.27 31.98 -.56
InvCoAmA m +1.6 +1.4 30.12 23.97 28.34 -1.00
InvCoAmB m +1.1 +.6 29.99 23.85 28.21 -1.00
LtdTmTxEA m +4.2 +4.3 16.04 15.29 15.85 +.03
MutualA m +3.6 +3.1 27.24 22.17 25.92 -.89
NewEconA m +5.0 +5.3 27.54 21.25 26.59 -.74
NewPerspA m +2.4 +5.1 31.04 24.00 29.31 -.84
NewPerspB m +2.0 +4.3 30.55 23.55 28.80 -.83
NwWrldA m +1.4 +9.1 57.43 47.91 55.38 -.71
STBdFdofAmA m +.9 NA 10.18 10.03 10.10 ...
SmCpWldA m +1.2 +5.9 41.61 31.92 39.33 -1.22
TDR2010A m +4.0 NA 9.61 8.75 9.47 -.12
TDR2015A m +3.7 NA 9.70 8.62 9.49 -.15
TDR2020A m +3.6 NA 9.67 8.36 9.40 -.19
TDR2025A m +3.5 NA 9.84 8.16 9.48 -.23
TDR2030A m +3.4 NA 10.11 8.21 9.70 -.26
TaxEBdAmA m +5.2 +3.8 12.54 11.53 12.15 +.01
TaxECAA m +5.9 +3.7 16.63 15.19 16.11 +.01
USGovSecA m +3.4 +5.8 14.79 13.66 14.22 +.08
WAMutInvA m +5.2 +1.7 29.72 23.52 28.32 -1.12
WAMutInvB m +4.8 +.9 29.54 23.34 28.13 -1.11
Aquila
HITaxFA m +3.4 +3.8 11.60 11.04 11.35 ...
Arbitrage
ArbtrageR m +2.2 +4.3 12.93 12.58 12.88 -.04
Ariel
Apprec b +3.8 +6.2 47.12 33.37 44.02 -2.48
Ariel b -.7 +2.9 53.61 37.48 48.24 -3.08
Artio Global
GlobHiYldA b +5.6 +9.1 11.15 10.60 10.79 -.09
IntlEqA b +.8 +.6 31.51 25.20 29.38 -.86
IntlEqIIA b +1.1 +1.5 13.28 10.60 12.41 -.37
Artisan
IntSmCpIv d +3.7 +6.8 21.58 16.43 20.62 -.27
Intl d +7.3 +2.8 24.23 18.31 23.28 +.01
IntlVal d +1.5 +5.3 29.31 22.46 27.51 -.68
MdCpVal +6.7 +7.1 22.79 17.27 21.43 -.63
MidCap +6.9 +10.2 38.34 26.08 35.95 -1.66
SmCapVal +3.9 +6.6 18.61 13.42 17.50 -.75
Aston Funds
MidCapN b -2.3 +9.1 34.58 25.11 31.21 -2.07
MtgClGrN b +4.4 +5.5 26.14 20.54 25.20 -.94
TAMROSmCN b +3.4 +7.1 23.56 16.18 21.87 -1.20
BBH
BrdMktFxI d +1.0 +4.3 10.47 10.37 10.41 -.01
IntlEqN d +5.4 +2.3 14.21 11.63 13.76 -.26
TaxEffEq d +5.5 +7.5 15.80 12.36 15.12 -.60
BNY Mellon
BalFd x +2.6 +4.9 11.69 9.84 11.22 -.26
BondFd x +4.0 +6.6 13.47 12.94 13.35 +.04
EmgMkts -1.0 +10.0 12.40 10.00 11.72 -.14
IntlM +2.3 -.7 11.86 9.27 11.02 -.28
IntmBdM x +3.1 +5.9 13.24 12.81 13.07 +.03
LgCpStkM x +1.8 +2.1 9.48 7.13 8.79 -.39
MidCpStM +3.8 +5.6 13.72 9.26 12.71 -.66
NtlIntM +4.8 +4.8 13.75 12.73 13.31 ...
NtlShTM +1.6 +3.1 13.01 12.85 12.96 ...
PAIntMu +4.5 +4.2 12.96 12.13 12.63 ...
SmCpStkM +2.4 +2.3 12.97 8.84 12.00 -.70
Baird
AggrInst +4.8 +6.2 10.91 10.42 10.77 +.03
CrPlBInst +5.3 +7.8 10.88 10.43 10.78 +.03
IntBdInst +4.7 +6.5 11.31 10.80 11.15 +.04
IntMunIns +4.6 +5.5 11.79 11.21 11.65 -.01
ShTmBdIns +2.2 +4.3 9.81 9.65 9.76 ...
Barclays Global Inv
LP2020R m +4.4 +3.3 16.01 13.69 15.65 -.25
Baron
Asset b +5.6 +4.4 61.72 44.56 58.34 -2.31
Growth b +5.5 +5.7 57.95 40.23 54.03 -2.99
Partners b +1.2 +3.6 22.80 15.47 20.81 -.97
SmCap b +8.6 +7.0 27.42 18.84 25.83 -1.31
Bernstein
CAMuni +3.9 +4.3 14.96 14.09 14.49 ...
DiversMui +3.7 +4.4 14.84 14.14 14.53 +.01
EmgMkts -1.1 +8.3 35.25 28.02 32.92 -.46
IntDur +4.7 +6.9 14.27 13.57 14.06 +.08
IntlPort -.9 -3.9 16.62 13.54 15.48 -.35
NYMuni +3.6 +4.4 14.61 13.94 14.31 +.01
ShDurDivr +1.4 +2.8 12.72 12.53 12.65 -.01
ShDurPlu +1.0 +2.6 11.96 11.86 11.93 ...
TxMIntl -.9 -4.0 16.74 13.64 15.59 -.35
Berwyn
Income d +3.2 +8.5 13.71 12.97 13.48 -.11
BlackRock
BalCapA m +6.3 +2.9 23.51 18.95 22.44 -.64
BasicValA m +1.1 +1.5 27.93 21.38 25.85 -1.00
BasicValC m +.6 +.7 26.17 20.00 24.17 -.94
Engy&ResA m +8.1 +7.5 44.83 26.77 42.49 -1.87
EqDivA m +4.4 +3.6 19.12 14.99 18.13 -.69
EqDivR b +4.1 +3.3 19.21 15.05 18.21 -.70
EquitDivC m +3.9 +2.9 18.74 14.69 17.76 -.68
GlbDynEqA m +3.2 +5.3 13.50 10.61 12.90 -.29
GlobAlcA m +4.0 +6.9 20.75 17.50 20.05 -.27
GlobAlcB m +3.6 +6.0 20.22 17.08 19.58 -.27
GlobAlcC m +3.6 +6.1 19.34 16.35 18.71 -.25
GlobAlcR m +3.8 +6.5 20.08 16.95 19.41 -.26
HiIncA m +5.4 +7.7 4.97 4.54 4.85 -.02
HiYldInvA m +5.2 +8.4 7.95 7.30 7.78 -.02
HthScOpA m +8.2 +8.6 32.53 25.82 30.66 -1.35
InflPrBndA m +8.3 +7.3 11.60 10.54 11.34 +.18
InflPrBndC m +7.9 +6.5 11.58 10.53 11.33 +.19
IntlOppA m +4.2 +4.9 36.24 28.12 34.91 -.54
LCCrInvA m +7.0 +.7 12.53 8.95 11.64 -.65
LCCrInvC m +6.4 -.2 11.57 8.28 10.74 -.60
LatinAmA m -8.6 +14.5 77.62 61.82 68.51 -1.38
LgCapValA m +4.4 -.6 16.58 12.02 15.26 -.85
MidCpValEqA m +2.4 +4.1 12.57 9.30 11.71 -.60
NatMuniA m +5.4 +4.0 10.47 9.48 10.12 ...
NatResD m +5.7 +7.2 72.62 48.60 67.92 -2.73
S&P500A b +3.6 +1.8 16.72 12.89 15.89 -.65
TotRtrnA m +2.9 NA 11.47 10.98 11.19 ...
USOppInvC m +.3 +7.2 38.87 28.55 35.91 -1.89
USOppsIvA m +.7 +8.0 42.71 31.27 39.53 -2.07
ValOpptyA m +5.8 +1.7 21.41 14.40 20.20 -.99
Brandywine
BlueFd -.5 -.4 27.37 19.61 25.52 -1.07
Brandywin +3.5 +.3 30.08 19.53 27.50 -1.46
Bridgeway
UltSmCoMk d +.9 +.1 16.00 11.20 14.91 -.84
Brown Advisory
GrowEq d +6.2 +8.8 14.14 10.14 13.57 -.54
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is d +7.1 +13.2 51.09 32.88 46.85 -2.60
Buffalo
MidCap d +3.2 +7.3 18.56 13.40 17.45 -.85
SmallCap d +.5 +5.3 28.58 20.78 26.34 -1.62
USAGlob d +3.1 +6.6 27.30 20.01 25.90 -1.26
CG Capital Markets
CrFixIn x +4.0 +7.4 8.88 8.27 8.53 +.03
EmgMktEq +.2 +8.9 18.12 14.70 17.33 -.12
IntlEqInv +2.7 +1.4 11.61 8.90 10.86 -.26
LgCapGro +4.2 +5.0 16.09 11.76 15.38 -.61
LgCapVal +3.4 -.1 9.64 7.52 9.07 -.34
CGM
Focus -8.4 +1.7 36.39 24.75 31.86 -1.36
Mutual -5.6 +4.7 30.21 22.74 27.80 -.81
Realty +8.4 +8.5 30.53 21.94 28.92 -1.33
Calamos
ConvC m +1.1 +4.7 20.92 18.20 19.64 -.56
ConvertA m +1.6 +5.5 21.03 18.29 19.74 -.56
GlbGrIncA m +2.6 +5.1 11.56 9.41 11.04 -.24
GrIncA m +4.2 +5.6 34.35 27.35 32.66 -.94
GrIncC m +3.8 +4.8 34.45 27.47 32.77 -.94
GrowA m +3.6 +4.8 58.70 42.58 55.29 -2.36
GrowB m +3.1 +4.0 58.21 42.44 54.73 -2.34
GrowC m +3.1 +4.0 53.27 38.84 50.09 -2.14
MktNuInA m +2.4 +3.3 12.33 11.00 12.19 -.13
Calvert
BalancedA m +3.7 +2.4 28.83 24.56 28.17 -.47
BondA m +3.4 +5.0 16.05 15.37 15.80 +.04
EquityA m +7.7 +5.6 40.25 29.16 38.54 -1.29
IncomeA m +3.7 +4.3 16.32 15.77 16.18 +.01
ShDurIncA m +2.1 +5.0 16.71 16.00 16.52 ...
Cambiar
OppInv +2.1 +2.6 20.38 14.34 18.73 -.90
Causeway
IntlVlInv d +5.9 +2.0 14.08 10.52 13.16 -.23
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b +5.3 +9.0 16.46 11.29 15.36 -.79
Clipper
Clipper +5.4 -1.0 68.26 52.71 65.32 -2.49
Cohen & Steers
Realty +12.3 +2.9 67.46 50.90 65.15 -2.31
Colorado BondShares
COBdShrs f +2.9 +4.3 9.20 8.95 9.08 ...
Columbia
AcornA m +3.6 +6.0 32.30 23.29 29.96 -1.49
AcornC m +3.1 +5.2 29.58 21.50 27.38 -1.36
AcornIntA m +3.0 +7.3 43.72 33.94 41.08 -.62
AcornIntZ +3.2 +7.6 43.82 34.04 41.21 -.62
AcornSelA m -3.4 +4.9 29.34 21.31 26.60 -1.09
AcornSelZ -3.1 +5.2 30.20 21.89 27.36 -1.09
AcornUSAZ +4.0 +4.5 32.32 21.74 29.69 -1.83
AcornZ +3.8 +6.3 33.38 24.01 30.93 -1.53
BondZ +3.8 +6.2 9.62 9.14 9.38 +.04
CATaxEA m +6.1 +4.1 7.73 6.75 7.24 ...
CntrnCoreA m +3.4 +6.3 15.48 11.45 14.75 -.67
CntrnCoreZ +3.6 +6.6 15.56 11.52 14.84 -.66
ComInfoA m -.3 +9.5 48.80 36.01 44.59 -2.29
ComInfoC m -.7 +8.7 40.48 29.99 36.86 -1.90
DivBondA m +3.8 +5.8 5.12 4.94 5.10 +.02
DivBondI +4.0 +6.2 5.13 4.95 5.11 +.03
DivIncA m +3.3 +3.4 14.06 11.30 13.35 -.48
DivIncZ +3.4 +3.7 14.07 11.31 13.35 -.49
DivOppA m +4.9 +3.6 8.58 6.65 8.03 -.32
DivrEqInA m +1.0 +1.1 10.96 8.22 10.13 -.46
EmMktOppA m -1.5 +9.4 10.33 8.36 9.74 -.12
EnrNatRsZ +3.8 +6.7 26.05 17.32 24.00 -1.17
EqValueA m +1.6 +1.3 11.35 8.44 10.53 -.48
FlRateA m +2.8 +3.4 9.11 8.51 8.96 -.02
GlbEqA m +4.3 +2.4 8.08 6.12 7.71 -.23
GlblTechA m -1.1 +8.5 22.24 17.20 20.64 -.91
HYMuniZ +5.8 +2.3 10.11 9.18 9.70 +.01
HiYldBdA m +6.0 +8.2 2.88 2.67 2.84 ...
IncBldA m +5.1 +5.9 10.95 10.01 10.81 -.13
IncOppA m +6.1 +8.1 10.16 9.45 9.76 -.01
IncomeZ +6.4 +7.1 10.02 9.55 10.02 +.09
IntlOpZ -2.4 +1.2 12.67 10.00 11.69 -.32
IntlVaZ +1.5 +.3 15.39 12.78 14.27 -.36
IntmBdZ +3.9 +6.5 9.25 8.97 9.19 +.04
ItmMunBdZ +5.3 +4.5 10.72 10.02 10.50 +.01
LarCaCorZ +2.8 +2.8 14.17 10.76 13.49 -.53
LfBalA m +4.3 +5.8 11.92 9.72 11.57 -.23
LfGrthA m +2.8 +4.3 12.62 9.48 11.94 -.46
LgCpGrowA m +5.0 +4.8 25.60 18.63 24.36 -1.08
LgCpGrowZ +5.1 +5.1 26.18 19.07 24.92 -1.10
LgCpIxA b +3.7 +2.0 26.37 20.30 25.03 -1.02
LgCrQuantA m +6.8 +1.5 6.00 4.52 5.78 -.21
LtdDurCrdA m +3.3 +5.1 10.11 9.89 10.10 +.03
MAIntlEqA m +2.2 +.2 12.97 10.33 12.28 -.25
MAIntlEqZ +2.2 +.4 13.15 10.47 12.44 -.25
Mar21CA m -1.5 +2.2 14.61 10.74 13.39 -.59
Mar21CC m -1.9 +1.4 13.61 10.04 12.43 -.55
Mar21CZ -1.2 +2.5 14.94 10.97 13.71 -.60
MarFocEqA m +4.1 +4.4 24.39 17.95 23.65 -.67
MarFocEqZ +4.3 +4.6 24.94 18.35 24.20 -.68
MarGrIA m +5.5 +3.6 22.34 16.07 21.45 -.64
MarGrIZ +5.7 +3.9 22.76 16.35 21.86 -.65
MdCapGthZ +8.1 +8.7 30.76 20.65 28.78 -1.31
MdCapIdxZ +4.6 +6.4 12.93 9.20 11.75 -.60
MdCpValOppA m +1.3 +3.2 8.63 6.19 7.97 -.40
MdCpValZ +2.8 +3.2 14.81 10.75 13.81 -.62
MdCpVlA m +2.6 +2.9 14.79 10.74 13.79 -.63
MidGrOppA m -1.9 +6.8 12.42 8.65 11.11 -.64
ORIntmMuniBdZ +4.7 +4.3 12.67 11.85 12.35 +.01
PBAggA m +3.6 +3.5 11.00 8.65 10.53 -.30
PBModA m +4.1 +5.1 11.22 9.59 10.92 -.18
PBModAggA m +3.8 +4.3 11.11 9.10 10.70 -.25
PBModConA m +4.2 +5.3 10.99 9.78 10.80 -.10
SIIncZ +1.7 +4.5 10.03 9.89 9.96 ...
SelSmCapZ -4.4 +3.0 18.98 12.91 16.97 -1.22
ShTmIncA m +1.7 +4.2 10.04 9.91 9.98 ...
ShTmMuZ +1.6 +3.4 10.60 10.46 10.54 ...
SmCaVaIIA m +3.2 +3.8 15.40 10.43 14.12 -.79
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
ExtMktIdI d +3.6 +5.9 41.87 29.80 39.06 -2.02
FdSpIntIv +6.3 +7.7 11.39 10.00 11.14 +.12
IntlIdxIn d +3.5 +1.1 38.58 30.34 36.30 -.80
TotMktIdI d +3.9 +3.1 39.77 30.14 37.74 -1.61
First American
RealA m +12.1 +3.9 20.65 15.63 19.97 -.68
First Eagle
FndofAmY b +5.6 +7.1 28.62 21.67 27.34 -.90
GlbA m +4.8 +7.7 49.61 39.95 48.57 -1.04
Gold m -.1 +15.3 35.84 26.19 33.92 -1.06
OverseasA m +4.6 +7.1 24.09 19.78 23.70 -.31
USValueA m +4.9 +5.9 17.69 14.64 17.13 -.48
First Investors
BlChipA m +2.6 +1.0 22.89 18.08 21.62 -.87
GrowIncA m +4.9 +2.6 15.92 11.82 14.99 -.65
IncomeA x +5.2 +4.7 2.58 2.43 2.54 ...
InvGradeA x +5.8 +6.1 9.92 9.37 9.82 +.09
OpportA m +6.6 +4.9 30.90 20.94 28.99 -1.37
TaxEA x +5.1 +4.3 10.11 9.18 9.67 ...
TotalRetA m +4.6 +4.7 15.99 13.48 15.52 -.35
FrankTemp-Franklin
AZ TF A m +5.2 +4.0 11.11 9.93 10.62 ...
AdjUSA m +1.2 +3.5 8.91 8.84 8.85 ...
AdjUSC m +.9 +3.1 8.90 8.84 8.85 +.01
BalInv m -1.6 0.0 50.62 37.41 46.47 -2.17
BioDis A m +12.0 +8.3 79.76 56.88 76.83 -2.63
CA TF A m +5.0 +3.7 7.25 6.48 6.87 +.01
CA TF C m +4.6 +3.1 7.24 6.47 6.86 +.02
CAHY A m +6.2 +3.1 9.73 8.68 9.26 +.01
CAInTF A m +5.5 +3.4 12.40 11.08 11.82 ...
CAInt A m +4.5 +4.0 11.81 10.93 11.39 ...
CO TF A m +6.2 +3.9 12.01 10.65 11.50 ...
CaTxFrAdv +5.0 +3.8 7.22 6.47 6.86 +.02
China A m +3.3 +15.0 42.33 33.67 41.16 -.15
ChinaAdv +3.5 +15.4 42.61 33.90 41.46 -.15
CvtSc A m +2.9 +5.6 16.51 13.29 15.47 -.49
DynaTechA m +6.4 +8.3 33.69 24.22 32.10 -1.28
EqIn A m +2.3 +.7 17.94 14.30 17.01 -.59
FL TF A m +5.0 +4.1 11.69 10.75 11.36 ...
FLRtDAAdv +3.0 +3.4 9.26 8.92 9.15 -.01
Fed TF A m +6.2 +4.2 12.16 10.93 11.76 +.02
Fed TF C m +5.9 +3.6 12.16 10.93 11.75 +.01
FedIntA m +5.0 +4.6 12.08 11.19 11.72 +.02
FedLmtT/FIncA m +2.7 +3.9 10.49 10.25 10.48 +.01
FedTxFrIA +6.3 +4.3 12.16 10.94 11.77 +.02
FlRtDAC m +2.7 +2.7 9.25 8.92 9.15 -.01
FlRtDAccA m +2.9 +3.1 9.25 8.92 9.15 -.01
FlxCpGr A m +2.6 +5.0 52.75 38.97 49.45 -2.27
FlxCpGrAd +2.7 +5.3 53.63 39.53 50.28 -2.30
GoldPrAdv -8.6 +17.6 53.67 38.19 48.65 -1.81
GoldPrM A m -8.7 +17.3 51.50 36.68 46.61 -1.74
GoldPrM C m -9.1 +16.4 49.28 35.19 44.38 -1.66
GrowAdv +2.9 +5.1 48.48 37.19 45.95 -1.90
GrowB m +2.3 +4.1 46.25 35.56 43.81 -1.82
GrowC m +2.3 +4.1 45.75 35.18 43.34 -1.81
Growth A m +2.8 +4.9 48.41 37.14 45.88 -1.90
HY TF A m +6.8 +3.9 10.39 9.31 9.98 +.01
HY TF C m +6.5 +3.3 10.53 9.44 10.12 ...
HighIncA m +6.3 +8.2 2.06 1.94 2.04 ...
HighIncC m +5.4 +7.6 2.08 1.95 2.05 -.01
InSCGrAd -2.6 +7.2 17.81 14.37 16.36 -.33
Income A m +5.1 +5.1 2.30 2.04 2.21 -.04
Income C m +4.7 +4.5 2.32 2.06 2.23 -.04
IncomeAdv +4.7 +5.1 2.29 2.03 2.19 -.04
IncomeB m +4.6 +4.1 2.29 2.03 2.20 -.04
IncomeR b +4.5 +4.7 2.27 2.02 2.18 -.04
InsTF A m +5.7 +3.8 12.19 10.93 11.72 ...
LoDurTReA m +2.4 +5.2 10.48 10.30 10.44 -.02
MATFA m +5.9 +3.7 11.95 10.64 11.41 +.01
MD TF A m +4.9 +3.7 11.73 10.58 11.24 ...
MITFA m +5.4 +3.9 12.22 11.12 11.78 ...
MNTFA m +5.3 +4.4 12.55 11.47 12.16 ...
MO TF A m +5.8 +4.1 12.33 11.14 11.92 ...
NC TF A m +5.5 +4.2 12.51 11.29 12.08 ...
NJ TF A m +5.1 +4.2 12.36 11.13 11.88 +.01
NY TF A m +4.8 +4.2 12.01 10.72 11.48 +.01
NY TF C m +4.5 +3.7 11.99 10.71 11.47 +.01
NYIntTFA m +4.6 +4.4 11.57 10.72 11.19 +.01
NatResA m +8.1 +10.1 45.14 28.84 42.95 -1.65
OHTFA m +5.3 +4.0 12.78 11.50 12.26 ...
OR TF A m +5.7 +4.5 12.22 11.08 11.81 ...
PA TF A m +5.6 +4.2 10.57 9.49 10.18 ...
PR TF A m +5.2 +4.1 12.16 10.77 11.55 +.01
RealRetA x +4.5 +5.7 11.53 10.80 11.42 -.05
RisDivAdv +4.4 +3.0 36.06 28.54 34.24 -1.31
RisDv A m +4.3 +2.7 36.09 28.57 34.26 -1.31
RisDv C m +3.8 +1.9 35.55 28.17 33.73 -1.30
SmCpGI C m +2.1 +5.1 37.10 25.92 34.16 -1.86
SmCpValA m -2.1 +3.3 48.15 33.55 43.65 -2.37
SmCpVlAd -2.0 +3.5 49.53 34.53 44.93 -2.44
SmMCpGAdv +2.7 +6.2 42.73 29.67 39.44 -2.15
SmMdCpGrA m +2.5 +5.9 41.47 28.84 38.26 -2.08
StrInc A x +5.2 +7.7 10.71 10.22 10.64 -.04
StrIncAdv x +5.3 +8.0 10.72 10.23 10.65 -.04
Strinc C x +4.9 +7.3 10.70 10.22 10.64 -.03
TotRetAdv +5.8 +7.0 10.42 10.02 10.40 +.04
TotalRetA m +5.6 +6.7 10.40 10.00 10.38 +.03
US Gov A m +4.0 +6.3 6.88 6.63 6.87 +.04
US Gov C m +3.7 +5.8 6.84 6.59 6.83 +.04
USGovtAdv +4.1 +6.5 6.90 6.65 6.89 +.04
Utils A m +7.9 +4.9 12.72 11.03 12.30 -.29
Utils C m +7.6 +4.4 12.66 10.99 12.25 -.29
VA TF A m +5.6 +4.1 11.93 10.77 11.54 ...
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon A m +2.7 +.3 13.16 10.97 12.57 -.34
Beacon C m +2.4 -.4 13.04 10.81 12.44 -.34
Beacon Z +2.9 +.6 13.26 11.08 12.67 -.35
Discov A m +2.0 +4.7 31.31 26.49 29.76 -.82
Discov C m +1.6 +3.9 31.00 26.18 29.41 -.82
Discov Z +2.1 +5.0 31.71 26.84 30.16 -.83
DiscovR b +1.8 +4.4 31.01 26.23 29.46 -.81
Euro A m ... +3.8 22.76 19.34 21.07 -.64
Euro Z +.2 +4.1 23.22 19.74 21.51 -.66
QuestA m +2.8 +4.1 18.76 15.52 18.06 -.40
QuestC m +2.4 +3.4 18.53 15.41 17.81 -.40
QuestZ +3.0 +4.4 18.92 15.62 18.22 -.41
Shares A m +2.3 +.7 22.28 18.52 21.11 -.61
Shares C m +1.9 0.0 22.03 18.27 20.84 -.61
Shares Z +2.5 +1.0 22.47 18.68 21.30 -.62
FrankTemp-Templeton
BricA m -3.9 +7.9 15.97 12.53 14.60 -.29
DvMk A m +1.0 +7.6 26.96 21.23 25.79 -.34
EmgMktIs x +.9 +8.0 14.35 11.40 13.81 -3.26
Fgn A m +5.3 +3.9 7.89 5.95 7.35 -.19
Frgn Adv +5.2 +4.2 7.80 5.89 7.27 -.20
Frgn C m +4.7 +3.1 7.71 5.80 7.16 -.20
GlBond A m +6.0 +12.1 14.08 13.16 14.04 +.03
GlBond C m +5.7 +11.6 14.10 13.18 14.07 +.03
GlBondAdv +6.1 +12.3 14.04 13.28 14.00 +.03
GlOp A m +4.1 +2.7 19.77 15.33 18.44 -.50
GlSmCo A m +.1 +4.8 7.91 5.98 7.45 -.18
Growth A m +5.7 -.6 20.04 15.21 18.80 -.52
Growth Ad +5.8 -.4 20.05 15.22 18.82 -.52
Growth C m +5.2 -1.4 19.54 14.79 18.29 -.52
IncomeA m +4.4 +6.7 3.01 2.52 2.90 -.04
IncomeC m +3.9 +6.2 3.01 2.51 2.89 -.04
World A m +4.4 +2.1 16.39 12.71 15.50 -.41
Franklin Templeton
ConAllcC m +2.3 +5.0 14.04 12.64 13.78 -.17
ConAllctA m +2.8 +5.8 14.27 12.84 14.01 -.17
CoreAll A m +3.3 +2.5 13.55 10.49 12.79 -.46
EmMktDtOp +6.8 +10.3 12.80 11.86 12.80 +.04
FndAllA m +4.2 +1.6 11.43 9.37 10.74 -.26
FndAllC m +3.8 +.9 11.25 9.24 10.59 -.26
GrAllcA m +2.6 +5.3 16.21 13.34 15.58 -.41
HYldTFInA +6.9 +4.0 10.42 9.34 10.01 ...
TemHdCurA m +6.4 +6.2 10.44 8.90 10.40 +.04
TemMdTaC m +2.5 +5.2 14.58 12.71 14.20 -.24
TemMdTarA m +2.9 +6.0 14.90 12.99 14.51 -.25
GE
ElfunTr +5.9 +4.3 45.85 35.97 43.84 -1.37
ElfunTxE +5.0 +4.8 12.06 11.02 11.60 ...
S&SInc +4.9 +5.8 11.59 11.14 11.59 +.07
S&SProg +3.2 +3.4 43.40 33.87 41.50 -1.38
Gabelli
AssetAAA m +3.6 +5.8 53.83 40.32 50.69 -2.01
EqIncomeAAA m +4.6 +4.1 22.30 17.17 21.19 -.77
GoldAAA m -4.7 +13.5 36.71 27.62 34.06 -1.31
GrowthAAA m +1.0 +2.4 33.47 25.39 31.69 -1.42
SmCpGrAAA m +2.1 +7.5 36.89 26.81 34.63 -1.61
UtilA m +7.1 +5.5 6.71 6.03 6.38 -.23
UtilAAA m +7.2 +5.6 6.66 5.99 6.34 -.22
UtilC m +6.7 +4.8 6.00 5.47 5.68 -.21
Value m +5.0 +4.9 17.39 13.15 16.37 -.71
Gartmore
LrgCapA m +2.3 +2.1 16.07 12.60 15.12 -.69
Gateway
GatewayA m +1.7 +2.0 26.98 24.57 26.31 -.40
Goldman Sachs
BalStrA m +2.9 +3.4 10.76 9.55 10.47 -.14
CapGrA m +3.5 +3.3 22.87 17.68 21.94 -.84
G&IStrA m +3.4 +2.0 11.30 9.51 10.86 -.22
GovtIncA m +3.1 +5.5 15.90 14.78 15.33 +.07
GrIncA m -1.8 -1.2 22.50 17.70 20.57 -.95
GrOppA m +.7 +8.5 25.09 19.09 23.12 -1.01
GrStrA m +3.3 +.6 11.72 9.39 11.11 -.32
HiYieldA m +4.8 +6.9 7.47 7.03 7.31 -.03
LgCapValA m -1.3 -.3 12.67 9.83 11.64 -.58
MidCapVaA m +1.1 +3.8 39.04 28.89 36.29 -1.72
ShDuGovA m +.7 +4.6 10.50 10.20 10.29 +.01
SmCpValA m +3.9 +5.2 43.45 31.03 41.03 -2.03
StrIntEqA m +1.5 -.3 11.22 8.76 10.38 -.31
Greenspring
Greensprretl d -.2 +4.8 25.20 22.66 23.76 -.48
GuideMark
CoFxIncSvc b +3.8 +5.5 9.62 9.30 9.62 +.06
GuideStone Funds
AggAllGS4 +3.8 +1.9 12.87 9.83 12.24 -.44
BlcAlloGS4 +4.1 +4.8 12.83 11.29 12.62 -.17
GrAlloGS4 +3.9 +3.4 13.20 10.86 12.76 -.33
GrEqGS4 +4.7 +4.0 20.70 14.98 19.78 -.80
IntEqGS4 +2.8 +1.6 14.65 11.55 13.81 -.27
LowDurGS4 +1.7 +4.5 13.49 13.20 13.38 +.03
MedDurGS4 +4.4 +7.1 14.48 13.51 14.12 +.10
SmCapGS4 +7.3 +4.2 16.69 11.02 15.51 -.87
ValEqGS4 +3.1 -.2 15.59 11.69 14.40 -.65
Harbor
Bond +4.0 +8.2 12.45 11.89 12.43 +.04
CapApInst +8.6 +6.3 41.22 29.72 39.89 -1.33
CapAprAdm b +8.4 +6.1 40.99 29.56 39.66 -1.33
CapAprInv b +8.4 +6.0 40.71 29.39 39.40 -1.31
HiYBdInst d +4.9 +7.7 11.33 10.80 11.11 -.02
IntlAdm m +3.9 +5.3 66.94 49.94 62.50 -1.29
IntlGr d -2.5 +1.6 13.07 10.34 12.06 -.34
IntlInstl d +4.0 +5.6 67.42 50.32 62.99 -1.30
IntlInv m +3.8 +5.2 66.74 49.76 62.29 -1.29
SmCpGr +2.8 +7.2 14.38 9.97 13.23 -.66
SmCpVal +5.1 +2.4 22.13 15.62 20.59 -1.08
Harding Loevner
EmgMkts d -2.4 +8.7 52.86 43.91 50.58 -.33
Hartford
AdvHLSFIB b +2.5 +3.5 20.77 17.26 20.05 -.51
AdvHLSIA +2.7 +3.7 20.55 17.09 19.84 -.51
AdviserA m +2.5 +3.3 15.65 12.98 15.05 -.38
BalAlA m +3.5 +4.4 12.07 10.11 11.66 -.22
CapAppIIA m +.6 +4.8 15.27 11.13 14.05 -.56
CapApr C m -4.5 +1.1 32.29 25.31 29.37 -1.21
CapAprA m -4.0 +1.8 36.47 28.46 33.24 -1.36
CapAprB m -4.5 +1.0 32.09 25.17 29.18 -1.20
CapAprI -3.9 NA 36.51 28.43 33.29 -1.36
ChksBalsA m +.7 NA 10.04 8.52 9.54 -.23
CpApHLSIA -1.0 +3.9 45.67 34.24 41.93 -1.71
CpApHLSIB b -1.1 +3.6 45.25 33.89 41.52 -1.69
SmCaVaIIZ +3.4 +4.1 15.51 10.50 14.23 -.80
SmCapCrZ +3.5 +5.8 17.49 11.95 16.45 -.84
SmCapIdxA b +3.8 +4.4 19.02 13.38 17.46 -.91
SmCapIdxZ +3.9 +4.7 19.08 13.43 17.53 -.91
SmCpGthIZ +6.6 +8.4 36.99 23.49 33.67 -1.92
SmCpValIA m -.2 +4.1 47.80 34.97 44.70 -2.25
SmCpValIZ ... +4.4 50.20 36.70 46.95 -2.36
StLgCpGrA m +10.8 NA 14.32 9.78 13.67 -.57
StLgCpGrZ +11.0 +9.1 14.43 9.84 13.78 -.58
StrInvZ +2.4 +4.1 20.96 15.21 19.59 -.77
StratAllocA m +4.8 +2.7 10.04 8.46 9.77 -.22
StratIncA m +6.0 +7.5 6.28 5.95 6.18 +.03
StratIncZ +6.2 +7.7 6.21 5.88 6.10 +.02
TaxEA m +6.4 +4.2 13.79 12.35 13.22 ...
TaxEBdA m +5.8 +3.9 3.89 3.51 3.75 ...
TaxEZ +6.4 +4.4 13.79 12.35 13.21 ...
USGovMorA m +6.6 +6.8 5.50 5.18 5.50 +.01
ValRestrZ +.9 +2.8 54.18 39.20 50.72 -1.91
ValueA m ... -.1 12.23 9.50 11.47 -.51
ValueZ +.1 +.1 12.25 9.52 11.49 -.51
Commerce
Bond +4.7 +7.8 20.44 19.73 20.31 +.09
Constellation
SndsSelGrII +8.9 +8.4 11.29 7.76 10.90 -.39
Credit Suisse
ComStrA m +1.3 +.3 10.12 7.39 9.41 -.14
DFA
1YrFixInI +.6 +3.0 10.38 10.31 10.36 +.01
2YrGlbFII +.7 +3.2 10.30 10.13 10.22 +.01
5YearGovI +2.2 +4.7 11.17 10.69 10.95 +.03
5YrGlbFII +4.4 +5.1 11.75 10.78 11.36 +.08
EMktsSoCo -.4 NA 15.50 12.83 14.66 -.19
EmMkCrEqI ... +13.6 23.21 18.47 22.05 -.26
EmMktValI -2.6 +13.5 38.10 31.26 35.07 -.51
EmMtSmCpI +1.2 +16.2 25.24 20.59 24.19 -.17
EmgMktI +.6 +12.1 32.37 25.32 30.66 -.41
GlEqInst +2.6 +3.3 14.76 11.00 13.73 -.53
Glob6040I +3.8 +4.7 13.69 11.38 13.22 -.25
InfPrtScI +10.7 NA 12.21 11.09 12.21 +.25
IntGovFII +4.4 +7.3 12.91 12.09 12.65 +.10
IntRlEstI +8.2 NA 5.59 4.21 5.43 -.06
IntSmCapI +2.0 +3.6 18.94 13.97 17.35 -.52
IntlValu3 +1.6 +1.8 18.91 14.47 17.11 -.55
LgCapIntI +3.0 +1.7 21.80 16.96 20.15 -.56
RelEstScI +12.3 +1.6 25.04 19.04 24.17 -.87
STMuniBdI +1.9 +2.9 10.41 10.21 10.34 +.01
TMIntlVal +1.0 +2.0 16.56 12.59 14.92 -.49
TMMkWVal +3.2 +1.0 16.73 12.02 15.44 -.68
TMMkWVal2 +3.3 +1.1 16.11 11.57 14.86 -.66
TMUSEq +3.9 +2.6 14.81 11.18 14.00 -.59
TMUSTarVal +1.9 +1.7 23.61 16.23 21.86 -1.07
TMUSmCp +3.7 +2.8 25.49 17.32 23.76 -1.27
USCorEq1I +3.6 +3.4 12.09 8.90 11.33 -.51
Income +4.4 +7.1 13.60 13.15 13.53 +.08
IntlStk +.1 +2.5 38.80 30.01 35.76 -.75
Stock +2.2 -.9 118.20 88.26 109.26 -4.34
Domini Social Invmts
SocEqInv m +6.7 +3.1 32.94 24.62 31.56 -1.19
Dreyfus
Apprecia +7.2 +3.4 42.23 32.54 40.95 -1.28
AtvMdCpA f +3.3 -.5 36.88 26.58 33.93 -2.01
BasSP500 +3.8 +2.2 27.98 21.43 26.52 -1.08
BondIdxIn b +4.1 +6.1 10.85 10.38 10.77 +.07
BstSMCpGI +8.8 +7.5 16.19 11.05 15.27 -.78
BstSmCpVl -.5 +2.9 25.11 18.32 22.91 -1.20
CAAMTBdZ +6.0 +3.8 14.90 13.35 14.30 ...
DiscStkR b +2.0 +2.7 33.52 25.24 31.20 -1.38
Dreyfus +2.5 +2.9 9.80 7.41 9.17 -.40
EmergMarI d -4.0 +9.5 13.95 11.60 13.01 -.20
EmgLead -2.2 -2.0 22.39 15.36 ...
EmgMkts m -4.0 +9.3 13.87 11.51 12.93 -.19
GNMA Z b +4.3 +6.3 15.99 15.25 15.99 +.07
GrowInc +2.1 +2.9 15.40 11.52 14.37 -.66
GrtChinaA m -9.6 +16.5 55.00 42.06 45.38 -.66
HiYldI +5.4 +7.7 6.84 6.37 6.67 -.03
IntBndA f +7.3 +11.2 17.26 16.53 17.26 +.28
IntIncA f +4.8 +6.4 13.45 12.94 13.44 +.08
IntMuBd +5.3 +4.4 13.89 13.00 13.61 +.02
IntlStkI +4.6 NA 14.75 11.81 14.33 -.26
IntlStkIx +3.2 +.5 16.44 12.82 15.39 -.34
MidCapIdx +4.5 +6.1 31.27 22.47 29.12 -1.49
MuniBd +5.3 +3.5 11.58 10.53 11.13 +.01
NJMuniA f +5.2 +3.8 13.10 11.86 12.57 +.01
NYTaxEBd +5.0 +4.2 15.22 13.92 14.67 +.01
OppMdCpVaA f +1.7 +8.0 38.37 26.60 34.77 -1.80
SIMuBdD b +2.5 +3.8 13.33 13.02 13.25 +.02
SP500Idx +3.6 +1.9 37.66 29.69 35.82 -1.46
SmCapIdx +4.0 +4.6 22.75 16.07 21.23 -1.11
SmCoVal -1.7 +12.6 32.83 22.39 29.64 -1.54
StratValA f +.4 +2.1 30.96 23.18 28.60 -1.52
TechGrA f -1.7 +8.2 35.24 25.37 31.93 -1.86
WldwdeGrA f +9.8 +4.5 44.68 34.90 43.61 -1.01
Driehaus
ActiveInc +1.4 +6.1 11.35 10.93 11.03 -.07
EmMktGr d +3.3 +11.5 34.42 26.69 33.26 -.31
Dupree
KYTxFInc +5.1 +4.7 7.92 7.33 7.68 ...
Eagle
CapApprA m +2.6 +3.5 29.88 23.10 28.64 -1.03
MidCpStA m -1.1 +4.0 29.41 21.74 27.28 -1.18
SmCpGrthA m +7.5 +9.0 44.54 27.92 40.95 -2.37
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m +3.1 +2.2 10.68 8.55 10.15 -.34
FlRtHIA m +3.4 +4.1 9.50 9.02 9.40 -.02
Floating-Rate A m +2.8 +3.6 9.41 8.97 9.32 -.01
FltRateC m +2.4 +2.9 9.09 8.66 9.00 -.01
USCorEq2I +2.8 +2.9 12.07 8.78 11.22 -.54
USLgCo +3.8 +2.5 10.76 8.29 10.20 -.42
USLgVal3 +3.5 +1.1 17.21 12.50 15.84 -.69
USLgValI +3.5 +1.0 22.48 16.33 20.69 -.90
USMicroI +2.7 +3.3 15.13 10.37 14.11 -.72
USSmValI +1.8 +2.7 28.21 18.93 26.00 -1.36
USSmallI +3.6 +5.3 23.76 16.07 22.07 -1.20
USTgtValI +1.4 +3.5 18.31 12.59 16.84 -.85
USVecEqI +2.2 +2.6 12.00 8.51 11.07 -.54
DWS-Investments
DrSmCpVlA m -.6 +4.5 39.85 29.21 36.57 -1.79
LgCapValA m +2.8 +2.3 18.78 15.17 17.82 -.58
LgCapValS +3.0 +2.6 18.79 15.17 17.82 -.58
DWS-Scudder
BalA m +2.5 +2.6 9.59 8.15 9.25 -.17
CATFIncA m +5.6 +4.1 7.47 6.70 7.16 -.01
CapGrA m +1.8 +4.0 58.29 43.67 55.45 -2.41
CapGrS +2.0 +4.3 58.70 44.02 55.87 -2.44
EnhEMFIS d +1.5 +5.7 11.53 10.54 10.78 +.09
Eq500S +3.7 +2.2153.28 117.98 145.35 -5.92
GNMAS +4.9 +6.9 15.66 15.04 15.59 +.05
GlbTS d +.9 +1.3 25.90 20.24 24.06 -.86
GrIncS +5.5 +2.4 18.11 13.48 17.13 -.77
GvtSc m +4.3 +6.6 8.98 8.62 8.92 +.04
HiIncA m +5.5 +6.9 4.96 4.67 4.85 -.01
HlthCareS d +10.7 +5.9 28.50 21.28 26.96 -1.17
IntTFrS +5.0 +4.7 11.76 10.91 11.47 +.01
IntlS d +1.1 -1.3 49.01 39.15 45.76 -1.12
LAEqS d -8.4 +9.0 53.68 43.56 48.65 -.54
MATaxFrS +5.9 +4.7 14.87 13.29 14.19 -.03
MgdMuniA m +5.2 +4.6 9.25 8.39 8.87 -.02
MgdMuniS +5.3 +4.8 9.26 8.40 8.88 -.02
REstA m +13.1 +2.4 20.57 15.35 19.87 -.70
SPInxS +3.6 +2.1 18.13 13.95 17.20 -.70
ShDurPS +1.8 +4.0 9.64 9.45 9.47 +.02
StrHiYldTxFA m +5.3 +3.8 12.52 11.18 11.93 -.01
StrHiYldTxFS +5.6 +4.0 12.53 11.19 11.95 -.01
StrValA m +.5 -3.8 35.44 27.42 32.76 -1.31
TechA m +2.1 +6.9 14.76 10.60 13.77 -.60
Davis
FinclA m +1.2 0.0 33.73 27.47 32.15 -.70
NYVentA m +.7 +.7 36.90 28.84 34.57 -1.27
NYVentB m +.1 -.1 35.33 27.55 33.01 -1.23
NYVentC m +.2 -.1 35.60 27.77 33.28 -1.24
Delaware Invest
CorpBdIs +6.4 +9.1 6.35 5.76 6.05 +.05
DiverIncA m +5.2 +9.0 9.84 9.14 9.45 +.05
EmgMktA m -3.1 +11.4 17.03 13.18 15.51 -.37
GrowOppA m +14.8 +10.1 26.18 17.32 24.52 -1.12
LgValA m +4.7 +.5 16.67 12.62 15.58 -.65
LtdDvIncA m +3.0 +6.1 9.06 8.83 9.05 +.03
OpFixIncI +5.4 +8.1 9.87 9.31 9.79 +.06
OptLgCpIs +5.5 +3.9 13.21 9.65 12.71 -.43
OptLgValI +5.1 +2.0 11.42 8.73 10.82 -.42
TaxFIntA m +4.1 +4.2 12.12 11.26 11.73 +.01
TaxFMNA m +5.7 +4.3 12.74 11.67 12.37 ...
TaxFPAA m +5.1 +4.4 8.13 7.36 7.81 +.01
TaxFUSAA m +5.3 +4.1 11.64 10.62 11.24 ...
Diamond Hill
LngShortA m +.9 0.0 17.32 14.93 16.40 -.44
LngShortI +1.1 +.3 17.52 15.06 16.60 -.44
LrgCapI +2.4 +2.5 16.12 12.65 15.18 -.69
SmCapA m +1.0 +3.9 27.74 21.63 26.05 -1.03
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEqI +2.2 +2.5 12.33 9.33 11.32 -.33
IntlSCoI +2.9 +4.7 18.73 13.85 17.48 -.43
IntlValuI +1.4 +1.6 20.21 15.46 18.28 -.60
Dodge & Cox
Bal +2.9 +1.7 75.65 60.85 71.48 -2.01
GlbStock +.1 NA 9.72 7.42 8.91 -.26
FltRtAdv b +2.8 +3.7 9.10 8.67 9.01 -.01
GovOblA m +2.0 +5.8 7.65 7.39 7.47 +.01
GtrIndiaA m -11.7 +7.6 29.97 23.65 24.86 -.62
HiIncOppA m +6.0 +6.6 4.52 4.19 4.45 -.01
HiIncOppB m +5.6 +5.8 4.52 4.19 4.46 -.01
IncBosA m +5.7 +7.6 6.00 5.63 5.91 -.01
LrgCpValA m -.2 +.4 19.26 15.43 18.10 -.72
LrgCpValC m -.6 -.4 19.25 15.41 18.09 -.73
NatlMuniA m +5.9 +.6 10.03 8.44 9.13 -.04
NatlMuniB m +5.5 -.1 10.03 8.44 9.13 -.04
NatlMuniC m +5.5 -.1 10.03 8.44 9.13 -.04
PAMuniA m +5.7 +2.3 9.25 8.22 8.80 -.05
PaTxMgEMI d +.5 +11.7 53.81 43.69 51.36 -.47
StrIncA m +3.0 +7.2 8.26 8.13 8.22 +.02
StratIncC m +2.7 +6.4 7.80 7.68 7.76 +.02
TMG1.0 +2.7 +2.1574.45 448.64 544.86 -21.54
TMG1.1A m +2.5 +1.7 25.66 20.07 24.42 -.97
TMGlbDivIncA m +5.3 +1.0 10.51 8.65 9.96 -.23
TMGlbDivIncC m +4.8 +.2 10.49 8.64 9.94 -.23
TaxMgdVlA m +.2 +.1 17.94 14.40 16.94 -.66
WldwHealA m +10.5 +6.7 10.74 8.51 10.33 -.41
FAM
Value +1.5 +2.8 49.50 38.16 46.00 -1.90
FBR
FBRFocus m -.9 +6.5 51.90 40.92 49.39 -1.50
FMI
CommStk +2.6 +8.2 27.67 20.91 25.74 -1.23
Focus +4.5 +8.8 33.81 23.40 31.71 -1.72
LgCap +3.6 +4.9 17.03 13.42 16.17 -.57
FPA
Capital m +8.0 +7.4 47.08 30.86 44.48 -1.70
Cres d +3.5 +6.2 28.71 24.31 27.49 -.48
NewInc m +1.9 +4.1 11.05 10.79 10.82 +.01
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d -12.6 +5.2 36.53 29.21 31.09 -.78
Federated
CapAprA m -1.2 +2.3 20.00 15.93 18.80 -.73
ClvrValA m +3.5 +1.5 15.75 11.97 14.86 -.61
HiIncBdA m +5.4 +8.3 7.77 7.34 7.66 ...
InterConA m +4.1 +3.7 55.09 40.19 51.94 -.82
KaufmanA m -.9 +4.5 5.89 4.56 5.44 -.24
KaufmanB m -1.3 +3.9 5.56 4.30 5.13 -.23
KaufmanC m -1.3 +3.9 5.56 4.30 5.13 -.23
KaufmanR m -1.1 +4.5 5.89 4.56 5.44 -.24
KaufmnSCA m -1.0 +4.5 28.37 20.10 25.94 -1.19
MuniSecsA f +5.4 +3.1 10.34 9.34 9.91 -.01
MuniUltA m +1.0 +2.2 10.05 10.01 10.05 ...
PrdntBr m -5.3 -1.3 5.49 4.23 4.48 +.18
StrValA m +7.0 +.7 4.80 4.02 4.60 -.12
StratIncA f +5.3 +8.2 9.45 8.96 9.30 +.03
TotRetBdA m +3.9 +6.5 11.48 11.02 11.33 +.05
USGovSecA x +2.9 +5.3 7.93 7.66 7.82 -.01
Fidelity
AstMgr20 +3.2 +4.9 13.17 12.26 13.09 -.04
AstMgr50 +3.4 +4.9 16.27 13.86 15.82 -.21
AstMgr85 +2.7 +3.9 14.51 11.22 13.76 -.39
Bal +4.3 +4.3 19.40 16.25 18.85 -.37
BlChGrow +6.2 +6.7 50.03 35.60 48.16 -1.87
BlChVal +.5 -2.0 11.88 9.16 10.86 -.54
CAMuInc d +5.6 +4.1 12.37 11.33 11.98 +.01
CASITxFre d +3.0 +4.3 10.81 10.49 10.71 +.01
CTMuInc d +5.0 +4.7 11.84 11.01 11.55 +.01
Canada d +1.6 +7.8 63.77 48.50 59.06 -3.23
CapApr +1.8 +3.1 27.45 20.53 25.79 -1.21
CapInc d +4.8 +10.1 9.95 8.71 9.57 -.14
ChinaReg d -1.0 +13.0 34.07 27.41 32.18 -.22
Contra +4.8 +5.3 73.22 56.08 70.88 -2.34
ConvSec +2.5 +6.0 27.62 21.65 25.75 -.95
DiscEq +3.3 0.0 24.96 19.05 23.28 -1.00
DivGrow +1.9 +3.7 31.04 22.29 28.96 -1.23
DivStk +3.5 +2.9 16.30 12.27 15.49 -.60
DivrIntl d +2.7 +1.2 32.85 25.37 30.97 -.66
EmergAsia d +4.4 +10.7 32.86 25.94 31.97 -.16
EmgMkt d +1.0 +7.6 27.86 21.97 26.62 -.25
EqInc +1.0 0.0 48.11 36.55 44.36 -1.76
EqInc II +1.1 -.2 19.84 15.10 18.31 -.76
EuCapApr d +2.2 +1.2 21.27 15.46 19.45 -.52
Europe d +2.4 +1.5 35.01 25.74 32.07 -.84
ExpMulNat d +2.2 +2.2 23.65 18.03 22.29 -.90
FF2015 +3.9 +4.4 12.05 10.32 11.74 -.17
FF2035 +3.4 +3.2 12.45 9.80 11.81 -.33
FF2040 +3.4 +3.0 8.71 6.83 8.25 -.23
Fidelity +5.5 +3.4 35.76 26.06 33.90 -1.25
Fifty +4.8 +1.6 19.58 14.52 18.47 -.79
FltRtHiIn d +1.6 +4.6 9.91 9.51 9.80 -.02
FocStk +6.6 +6.0 15.43 10.43 14.55 -.63
FocuHiInc d +5.3 +6.9 9.57 9.14 9.27 -.01
FourInOne +3.8 +3.2 29.24 23.40 28.00 -.84
Fr2045 +3.3 +3.0 10.33 8.06 9.77 -.28
Fr2050 +3.2 +2.7 10.23 7.89 9.65 -.29
Free2000 +3.4 +4.4 12.37 11.53 12.30 -.05
Free2005 +3.5 +4.2 11.38 9.99 11.15 -.13
Free2010 +3.9 +4.6 14.42 12.40 14.06 -.20
Free2020 +3.9 +4.0 14.75 12.28 14.27 -.26
Free2025 +3.7 +3.9 12.40 10.09 11.90 -.27
Free2030 +3.6 +3.3 14.86 11.94 14.21 -.34
FreeInc +3.3 +4.5 11.65 10.89 11.58 -.04
GNMA +4.7 +7.3 11.94 11.30 11.78 +.05
GlbCmtyStk d +.8 NA 18.55 13.39 17.28 -.66
GlobBal d +5.1 +6.6 24.07 19.71 23.43 -.36
GovtInc +3.7 +6.4 10.97 10.26 10.68 +.06
GrDiscov +8.3 +5.6 15.40 10.72 14.82 -.58
GrStr d +4.5 +5.2 22.27 16.09 21.36 -.91
GrowCo +8.8 +8.0 94.85 66.63 90.43 -4.14
GrowInc +2.2 -4.5 19.75 14.82 18.58 -.72
HiInc d +5.4 +8.7 9.24 8.63 9.10 -.02
Indepndnc +4.2 +5.7 26.75 18.57 25.37 -1.06
InfProtBd +9.4 +6.3 12.61 11.39 12.61 +.23
IntBond +4.4 +5.8 10.86 10.45 10.82 +.06
IntGovt +3.3 +5.9 11.21 10.58 10.97 +.05
IntMuniInc d +4.0 +4.6 10.48 9.89 10.21 +.01
IntSmOpp d +2.9 -.9 11.28 8.45 10.69 -.27
IntlCptlAppr d +3.1 +1.6 14.03 10.59 13.29 -.33
IntlDisc d +1.9 +2.2 35.83 27.49 33.67 -.63
IntlSmCp d +5.9 +4.9 23.10 17.14 22.52 -.34
InvGrdBd +4.9 +5.6 7.61 7.31 7.61 +.04
Japan d -3.8 -4.4 11.87 9.69 10.75 -.16
LargeCap +1.6 +3.7 19.10 14.15 17.84 -.77
LatinAm d -3.5 +11.5 60.50 49.52 56.98 -.91
LevCoSt d +1.5 +3.5 31.59 21.51 28.85 -1.28
LgCpVal +2.4 -2.3 11.52 9.00 10.77 -.41
LowPriStk d +6.0 +5.9 42.57 31.56 40.67 -1.32
MAMuInc d +4.9 +4.5 12.32 11.38 11.93 ...
MIMuInc d +4.5 +4.5 12.24 11.45 11.90 +.01
MNMuInc d +4.6 +4.5 11.79 11.08 11.52 ...
Magellan +.4 +.9 77.46 58.10 71.85 -3.21
MdCpVal d +1.5 +2.8 17.57 12.81 16.19 -.81
MeCpSto +2.8 +2.5 10.79 8.16 10.27 -.41
MidCap d +3.6 +4.4 28.44 9.26 28.44 -1.14
MtgSec +4.0 +5.0 11.07 10.69 11.06 +.03
MuniInc d +5.3 +4.4 12.97 11.94 12.61 +.01
NJMuInc d +4.6 +4.4 11.94 11.03 11.55 +.02
NYMuInc d +4.6 +4.6 13.36 12.28 12.89 ...
NewMille +5.9 +6.7 32.26 23.71 30.84 -1.07
NewMktIn d +6.5 +9.6 16.63 15.34 16.15 +.13
Nordic d -1.1 +3.8 38.84 26.40 33.96 -.89
OHMuInc d +4.8 +4.6 11.97 11.11 11.66 +.01
OTC +7.9 +11.3 62.30 42.31 59.27 -2.34
Overseas d +4.1 +.1 35.56 26.89 33.81 -.55
PAMuInc d +4.7 +4.5 11.12 10.30 10.76 ...
PacBasin d +4.3 +7.0 27.42 21.48 27.18 -.04
Puritan +4.5 +4.5 19.18 15.75 18.56 -.39
RealInv d +12.0 +1.7 29.71 22.30 28.76 -.95
RelEstInc d +5.2 +4.8 10.98 9.92 10.75 -.11
Series100Index +3.5 NA 9.45 7.42 9.05 -.35
ShIntMu d +2.8 +4.1 10.82 10.54 10.75 +.01
ShTmBond +1.8 +2.6 8.54 8.43 8.54 +.01
SmCapRetr d +3.6 +9.8 22.78 15.48 20.93 -.82
SmCapStk d -3.7 +6.0 21.72 14.87 18.87 -1.35
SmCpGr d +6.1 +7.0 17.84 12.01 16.65 -.91
SmCpOpp +3.4 NA 12.24 8.12 11.22 -.57
SmCpVal d +.1 +6.1 16.78 12.59 15.62 -.61
StkSelec +2.5 +2.6 28.16 20.64 26.39 -1.06
StrDivInc +7.7 +2.1 11.67 9.44 11.23 -.33
StratInc +5.6 +8.5 11.67 11.00 11.38 +.02
StratRRet d +5.2 +4.5 10.11 8.76 9.94 -.03
StratRRnI d +5.2 +4.5 10.09 8.75 9.92 -.04
TaxFrB d +5.2 +4.7 11.19 10.27 10.82 ...
Tel&Util +7.4 +2.8 17.66 14.46 16.92 -.36
TotalBd +4.8 +6.9 11.16 10.64 11.01 +.05
Trend +8.0 +6.4 75.57 53.44 72.80 -2.77
USBdIdxInv +4.2 +6.0 11.71 11.16 11.60 +.07
Value +1.3 +1.8 75.87 55.56 69.58 -2.70
ValueDis +2.3 +.9 16.04 12.01 14.98 -.66
Worldwid d +4.5 +4.6 20.56 14.95 19.50 -.58
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 +3.1 +4.3 17.52 14.13 16.83 -.37
BalT m +4.0 +3.5 15.99 13.38 15.53 -.31
CapDevO +6.1 +3.7 12.00 8.53 11.34 -.46
DivIntlA m +2.9 -.3 17.47 13.42 16.51 -.35
DivIntlIs d +3.1 0.0 17.75 13.65 16.79 -.35
DivIntlT m +2.8 -.5 17.31 13.30 16.35 -.35
EmMktIncI d +6.5 +9.6 13.89 12.85 13.53 +.11
EqGrowA m +8.0 +4.5 60.58 42.17 58.29 -2.29
EqGrowI +8.2 +4.9 64.58 44.94 62.14 -2.44
EqGrowT m +7.9 +4.3 60.28 41.98 58.00 -2.28
EqIncA m +3.3 0.0 25.01 18.92 23.45 -.86
EqIncI +3.5 +.3 25.77 19.49 24.16 -.89
EqIncT m +3.2 -.2 25.37 19.19 23.79 -.88
FltRateA m +1.5 +4.3 9.92 9.52 9.81 -.02
FltRateC m +1.0 +3.5 9.92 9.52 9.81 -.02
FltRateI d +1.5 +4.5 9.90 9.50 9.79 -.03
Fr2010A m +3.5 +4.3 12.21 10.48 11.91 -.16
Fr2015A m +3.4 +4.2 12.17 10.40 11.85 -.18
Fr2020A m +3.5 +3.6 12.80 10.63 12.38 -.22
Fr2020I +3.6 +3.9 12.88 10.69 12.45 -.23
Fr2020T m +3.3 +3.4 12.79 10.62 12.37 -.22
Fr2025A m +3.3 +3.6 12.46 10.09 11.95 -.26
Fr2030A m +3.1 +2.8 13.11 10.49 12.53 -.29
Fr2035A m +2.8 +2.8 12.51 9.80 11.86 -.32
Fr2040A m +2.8 +2.6 13.38 10.44 12.67 -.35
GrowIncI +2.4 +1.7 18.69 13.97 17.68 -.68
GrowOppT m +8.4 +4.7 39.30 26.89 37.32 -1.84
HiIncAdvA m +5.5 +8.2 10.50 9.21 10.21 -.13
HiIncAdvI d +5.6 +8.5 9.98 8.77 9.69 -.12
HiIncAdvT m +5.6 +8.2 10.55 9.25 10.26 -.12
IntrDiscA m +1.7 +1.9 35.58 27.28 33.41 -.62
LeverA m +1.7 +4.0 38.29 26.20 35.01 -1.59
LeverC m +1.3 +3.2 36.42 25.00 33.24 -1.52
LeverI +1.9 +4.3 38.73 26.53 35.44 -1.61
LeverT m +1.6 +3.8 37.60 25.74 34.36 -1.57
LrgCapI +1.6 +3.7 20.29 15.06 18.99 -.83
Mid-CpIIA m -.1 +5.5 19.17 14.69 17.88 -.60
Mid-CpIII +.1 +5.8 19.42 14.85 18.13 -.60
MidCapA m +1.5 +2.1 21.76 16.15 20.33 -1.10
MidCapT m +1.4 +1.9 21.94 16.31 20.51 -1.10
MidCpIIT m -.2 +5.3 19.03 14.60 17.75 -.59
MuniIncI +5.3 +4.4 13.05 12.00 12.68 +.01
NewInsA m +4.3 +4.9 21.47 16.50 20.79 -.68
NewInsC m +3.9 +4.1 20.43 15.77 19.78 -.65
NewInsI +4.5 +5.2 21.71 16.68 21.02 -.69
NewInsT m +4.2 +4.7 21.21 16.33 20.54 -.67
OverseaI d +3.9 +2.4 20.39 15.11 19.23 -.45
ShFixInI +1.9 +3.0 9.30 9.18 9.30 +.01
SmCapA m +5.5 +7.4 27.83 20.98 26.02 -1.11
SmCapC m +5.0 +6.5 24.75 18.88 23.10 -.99
SmCapI +5.7 +7.7 29.15 21.89 27.28 -1.16
SmCapT m +5.4 +7.1 26.86 20.32 25.10 -1.07
StSlctSmCp d +3.9 +3.8 20.94 13.83 19.23 -.99
StratIncA m +5.6 +8.4 13.09 12.30 12.72 +.03
StratIncC m +5.1 +7.5 13.06 12.28 12.69 +.02
StratIncI +5.7 +8.6 13.22 12.44 12.86 +.03
StratIncT m +5.5 +8.4 13.08 12.30 12.71 +.02
TechA m +.5 +10.2 27.46 19.15 25.14 -1.09
TotBondA m +4.6 +6.5 11.17 10.64 11.01 +.05
TotBondI +4.9 +6.8 11.15 10.62 11.00 +.06
ValStratT m +2.7 +3.5 28.43 20.37 26.60 -.97
Fidelity Select
Banking d -7.7 -9.3 19.65 14.67 17.08 -.63
Biotech d +17.1 +7.3 89.00 61.55 85.44 -3.56
BrokInv d -9.5 -2.4 55.95 42.88 47.45 -1.75
Chemical d +10.3 +14.8 111.04 72.58 105.28 -3.41
CommEq d -7.2 +6.6 30.20 20.70 24.59 -2.04
Computer d +2.4 +12.4 62.42 42.57 57.77 -3.75
ConsStpl d +5.5 +8.7 73.98 60.55 71.43 -1.90
DefAero d +8.0 +5.4 84.35 60.46 78.98 -3.34
Electron d +.1 +4.8 54.98 34.61 48.40 -2.60
Energy d +12.1 +5.7 62.56 37.87 58.52 -2.34
EnergySvc d +17.6 +6.6 89.62 50.46 87.48 -2.04
Gold d -4.2 +14.3 55.28 40.37 48.97 -2.53
HealtCar d +12.0 +6.8146.37 100.51 139.62 -6.33
Industr d +.3 +7.2 26.12 18.32 23.33 -1.35
Leisure d +7.0 +10.0100.86 72.53 97.43 -3.43
Materials d +3.8 +12.4 74.58 51.35 70.46 -2.78
MedDeliv d +17.0 +7.1 61.69 39.12 58.13 -2.98
MedEqSys d +8.4 +9.4 31.96 21.95 29.74 -1.54
NatGas d +7.1 +1.4 37.23 26.42 35.55 -1.00
NatRes d +9.1 +8.6 40.76 25.15 37.90 -1.57
Pharm d +13.6 +8.5 14.14 10.67 13.74 -.39
SelctUtil d +8.4 +3.1 53.59 45.31 52.31 -.85
SoftwCom d +4.7 +11.5 90.51 66.14 85.75 -3.63
Tech d +.8 +10.8105.02 73.15 96.37 -4.20
Telecom d +2.5 +4.1 51.78 39.56 47.55 -2.10
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxInv +3.8 +2.3 48.31 37.17 45.78 -1.86
PERCENT RETURN
SPECIALTY FUNDS YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
BALANCED
INTERNATIONAL
BOND FUNDS
Mutual Fund Categories
Conservative Allocation (CA) 3.69 10.46 5.45 4.16
Moderate Allocation (MA) 3.28 14.09 4.30 3.58
Health (SH) 11.26 27.59 5.91 5.60
Natural Resources (SN) 2.34 29.62 0.30 6.87
Real Estate (SR) 11.06 23.31 3.92 1.20
Technology (ST) 1.20 22.44 8.44 7.88
Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) 3.80 11.88 4.41 4.02
Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) 3.80 13.55 3.69 3.60
Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE) 3.93 14.28 3.76 3.40
Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) -0.77 16.02 3.96 8.96
Europe Stock (ES) 3.43 17.35 -1.32 1.46
Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) 3.23 22.57 3.98 3.91
Foreign Large Blend (FB) 2.48 16.86 -0.91 1.09
Foreign Large Growth (FG) 3.18 20.29 0.88 2.80
Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) 2.86 24.06 4.50 4.44
Foreign Large Value (FV) 2.95 15.30 -1.30 0.33
World Allocation (IH) 3.67 14.91 3.71 4.48
World Stock (WS) 2.90 18.53 2.25 2.86
Interm-Term Bond (CI) 4.28 5.67 7.61 6.06
Interm. Government (GI) 3.73 3.69 6.45 5.85
High Yield Muni (HM) 5.69 3.08 3.39 1.49
High Yield Bond (HY) 5.19 12.14 10.01 7.02
Muni National Interm (MI) 4.44 2.83 4.87 4.12
Muni National Long (ML) 5.37 2.55 4.58 3.40
Muni Short (MS) 2.24 1.76 2.98 3.14
5.7
31.7
8.3
6.6
8.7
32.8
6.3
7.1
3.5
18.0
0.8
-1.4
5.7
26.9
7.0
5.8
3.9
25.3
7.2
4.8
2.9
16.5
2.5
3.5
1.1
18.7
10.4
5.0
1.9
17.2
6.9
2.6
5.9
24.8
4.6
4.8
SV SB SG
MV MB MG
LV LB LG YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
L
A
R
G
E
-
C
A
P
M
I
D
-
C
A
P
S
M
A
L
L
-
C
A
P
VALUE GROWTH BLEND
* Annualized
The blowup of one of this funds top stock holdings has weighed
on recent performance. Sino-Forest Corp. is down about 80
percent this year. Still, the fund has a strong long-term record.
FundFocus
Large Growth CATEGORY
MORNINGSTAR
RATING
ASSETS
EXP RATIO
MANAGER
SINCE
RETURNS 3-MO
YTD
1-YR
3-YR ANNL
5-YR-ANNL
HHHII
$274 million
-4.6
+2.8
+23.1
+4.9
+1.0
1.05%
Stephen Chen
2003-02-01
TOP 5 HOLDINGS PCT
Oaktree Cap Grp 144A 4.5
Google, Inc. 3.93
Merck & Co Inc 3.89
Sino-Forest Corporation Subordinate Voting Share 3.71
Johnson & Johnson 3.69
Davis OppA m RPEAX
Fund Focus
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
M U T U A L S
NORTH AMERICAN
WARHORSE
Exit 1 off Rt. 380
1000 DUNHAM DR.
DUNMORE, PA
www.nawarhorse.com
(570) 346-2453
OFFER ENDS JUNE 30TH
honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A
RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUR OWNERS MANUAL THOROUGHLY. PROFESSIONAL RIDER SHOWN. *1.99% Fixed APR nancing available for customers who qualify for super
preferred credit tier for up to 36 months through Honda Financial Services. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $28.64 for each $1,000 nanced. Offer good on all new and unregistered
CBR1000RR models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings. **$800 Bonus Bucks valid on 2011, 2010 & 2009 CBR1000RR/RA models. Does not
include Repsol edition. Bonus Bucks redeemable only for purchase at dealer on purchase date. No cash value. Non-transferable. Redemption value not to exceed $800. Offer end 6/30/11.
Check with participating Honda Dealers for complete program details. CBR is a trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. 2011 American Honda Motor Coo., Inc. (04/11) 11-1075
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 7D
M U T U A L S
FloatRtI +2.7 NA 9.01 8.59 8.86 -.02
GrOpHLSIA +5.5 +5.2 28.94 20.52 27.28 -.88
HiYdHLSIA +6.4 +8.9 9.77 8.53 9.74 -.02
InOpHLSIA +.5 +5.0 13.31 10.59 12.53 -.28
IndHLSIA +3.7 +2.1 28.54 22.02 27.17 -1.11
InflPlC m +9.1 +6.5 12.20 10.95 11.96 +.24
InflPlusA m +9.5 +7.3 12.32 11.08 12.10 +.24
MdCpHLSIA +1.1 +6.3 28.80 20.79 26.31 -1.47
MidCapA m +.8 +5.6 24.30 17.61 22.19 -1.24
MidCapY +1.1 +6.1 26.64 19.25 24.35 -1.36
SmCoHLSIA +8.0 +5.8 20.69 13.42 19.08 -1.09
StkHLSIA +2.0 +2.5 44.46 33.53 41.80 -1.71
TRBdHLSIA +4.0 +5.3 11.54 10.81 11.33 +.05
TRBdHLSIA b +3.8 +5.1 11.46 10.76 11.26 +.05
TotRetBdA m +3.5 +4.9 10.76 10.36 10.65 +.04
TotRetBdY +3.8 +5.4 10.90 10.50 10.80 +.05
USHLSIA +2.8 +3.3 11.17 10.36 10.75 +.06
ValHLSIA +.4 +2.6 11.68 9.00 10.82 -.49
Heartland
SelectVal m +.9 +5.4 31.69 23.64 29.44 -1.18
Value m +7.0 +4.6 49.29 34.06 46.90 -2.29
ValuePlus m +3.6 +10.7 32.45 22.65 30.89 -1.30
Henderson
IntlOppA m +3.2 +3.4 23.63 17.97 21.77 -.64
IntlOppC m +2.7 +2.6 22.36 16.98 20.56 -.61
Homestead
Value d +4.2 +1.2 34.22 25.78 31.75 -1.36
Hotchkis & Wiley
LgCapValI +.4 -2.6 17.65 13.42 16.28 -.50
MidCpValI -1.0 +2.6 26.50 17.93 23.73 -1.18
Hussman
StrTotRet d +2.3 +7.1 12.86 12.04 12.37 -.08
StratGrth d -1.1 -1.1 13.47 11.84 12.16 +.06
ICM
SmCo +.9 +4.5 32.78 23.02 30.54 -1.47
ICON
Energy +8.0 +7.5 23.11 14.91 21.65 -1.11
ING
GNMAIncA m +4.6 +6.4 9.04 8.71 9.04 +.04
GlREstA m +7.0 +1.3 17.57 14.28 17.22 -.34
TRPGrEqI +5.1 +4.8 59.45 43.35 57.29 -1.97
INVESCO
AmerValA m +3.7 +5.2 30.05 22.12 28.16 -.87
CapDevA m +5.0 +3.0 18.51 12.87 17.22 -.73
CharterA m +4.6 +4.8 17.60 13.91 16.91 -.47
ComstockA m +3.0 +1.3 17.20 13.14 16.09 -.56
ConstellA m +4.3 +.5 25.19 18.73 24.30 -.85
ConstellB m +3.9 -.2 22.55 16.87 21.74 -.77
CorpBondA m +5.3 +6.7 6.95 6.62 6.91 +.06
DevMkt A m +1.9 +12.1 34.78 28.99 33.74 +.13
DivDivA m +2.2 +3.4 13.18 10.51 12.43 -.45
DivDivInv b +2.2 +3.5 13.18 10.51 12.43 -.45
DynInv b +7.4 +5.0 25.54 17.24 23.91 -.99
EnergyA m +11.5 +8.5 47.82 30.18 46.19 -1.37
EqIncomeA m +1.8 +3.5 9.17 7.51 8.67 -.24
EqIncomeB m +1.8 +3.3 9.00 7.37 8.51 -.24
EqIncomeC m +1.5 +2.7 9.04 7.40 8.55 -.24
EqWSP500A m +3.9 +4.3 33.96 25.22 31.93 -1.44
GlHlthCrA m +11.8 +4.7 31.40 23.28 29.86 -1.22
GlS&MGrA m +5.0 +5.0 21.01 16.02 19.98 -.41
GlbCEqtyA m +.2 -.8 14.16 11.24 13.09 -.48
GlobEqA m +6.4 +.2 11.88 8.99 11.43 -.37
GrowIncA m +1.4 +1.7 20.86 15.99 19.38 -.73
GrwthAllA m +4.2 +1.9 11.66 9.77 11.38 -.20
HiYldA m +4.4 +8.4 4.35 4.13 4.26 -.01
HiYldMuA m +5.8 +2.3 9.67 8.64 9.17 +.02
HiYldMuC m +5.4 +1.6 9.65 8.63 9.15 +.02
IntlGrA m +4.9 +4.6 30.19 23.43 28.92 -.62
IntlGrI d +5.2 +5.1 30.61 23.78 29.34 -.63
MidCapGrA m +3.4 +8.3 33.16 23.43 30.78 -1.30
MidCpCrA m +1.9 +5.6 25.34 19.97 23.61 -.87
MuniIncA m +5.1 +2.7 13.56 12.23 12.88 -.01
PacGrowB m +.2 +4.8 22.83 18.64 22.36 -.32
RealEstA m +10.5 +1.8 24.43 19.07 23.59 -.84
SmCapGrA m +7.0 +7.0 33.17 22.26 30.58 -1.68
SmCapValA m +.1 +7.2 19.72 14.03 18.04 -.63
SmCpGrA m +5.6 +5.7 12.71 8.67 11.71 -.71
Summit b +3.9 +2.5 12.89 9.65 12.28 -.49
TxFrInmA3 m +4.9 +5.0 11.59 10.92 11.42 +.01
USGovtA m +2.9 +5.7 9.26 8.82 9.07 +.05
USMortA m +3.8 +4.7 13.25 12.84 13.17 +.02
Ivy
AssetSTrB m +8.1 +9.0 26.30 20.78 25.52 -.69
AssetStrA m +8.6 +9.9 27.32 21.47 26.50 -.72
AssetStrC m +8.1 +9.1 26.44 20.88 25.65 -.69
AssetStrY m +8.6 +9.9 27.36 21.51 26.55 -.72
GlNatResA m +5.6 +5.0 24.76 15.97 22.83 -.59
GlNatResC m +5.2 +4.2 21.47 13.91 19.76 -.51
GlNatResI d +5.8 NA 25.26 16.26 23.31 -.60
GlbNatrlY m +5.7 +5.2 25.06 16.15 23.12 -.60
HiIncA m +6.1 +9.7 8.69 8.25 8.42 -.01
IntlValA m +1.4 +5.5 17.98 13.75 16.81 -.34
LgCpGrA m +5.7 +5.2 14.27 10.54 13.73 -.54
LtdTmBdA m +2.4 +5.5 11.37 11.00 11.21 +.03
PacOppA m +2.6 +11.0 17.89 14.61 17.15 -.29
JPMorgan
AsiaEqSel d +1.3 +11.5 39.72 30.74 38.39 -.23
CoreBdUlt x +4.3 +7.3 11.75 11.35 11.70 +.03
CoreBondA x +4.2 +7.0 11.75 11.35 11.71 +.04
CoreBondC x +3.8 +6.3 11.81 11.41 11.76 +.04
CoreBondSelect x +4.3 +7.1 11.75 11.35 11.70 +.04
CorePlBdS x +5.0 +7.2 8.30 8.06 8.29 +.01
DiversMidCapGrA m+3.1 +6.1 24.04 16.58 22.16 -1.21
EmgMktE d -1.9 +10.7 25.15 20.63 23.94 -.28
EqIdxSel +3.8 +2.2 30.97 23.84 29.35 -1.20
FEmMkEqIs d -1.8 +10.9 25.41 20.83 24.20 -.27
FIntlVaIs d +3.9 +1.4 14.89 11.56 13.99 -.32
GovtBdSelect x +5.4 +7.0 11.32 10.64 11.18 +.06
HighYldA x +4.7 +8.4 8.39 7.82 8.17 -.07
HighYldSel x +4.9 +8.7 8.42 7.85 8.20 -.07
HighYldUl x +5.0 +8.8 8.41 7.84 8.20 -.06
IntlEqSel d +3.0 +1.0 20.94 16.43 19.43 -.55
IntlVlSel d +3.8 +1.2 14.82 11.49 13.91 -.32
IntmdTFIs x +4.1 +4.5 11.21 10.64 10.99 -.02
IntmdTFSl x +4.2 +4.4 11.22 10.65 11.01 -.01
IntrAmerS +4.6 +1.5 25.37 18.84 23.98 -1.02
IntrepidValS +3.0 +.3 25.08 19.01 23.51 -.97
InvBalA m +3.2 +4.9 12.83 11.19 12.50 -.23
InvConGrA x +3.2 +5.1 11.53 10.64 11.38 -.12
InvConGrC x +2.8 +4.5 11.50 10.60 11.34 -.12
InvGrInA m +3.1 +4.2 13.60 11.23 13.10 -.35
InvGrowA m +3.0 +3.3 14.55 11.38 13.84 -.50
LgCapGrSelect +7.0 +7.7 23.10 16.33 22.33 -.77
LgCapValSel +.2 +.4 11.74 9.10 10.91 -.46
MdCpGrSel +3.3 +4.1 25.60 23.41 24.06 -1.05
MidCapGrSel +3.3 +6.4 25.77 17.72 23.76 -1.28
MidCapVal m +3.1 +3.8 25.38 19.05 23.84 -1.05
MidCpValI +3.4 +4.4 25.82 19.38 24.27 -1.06
MktExpIxSel +4.4 +5.1 12.01 8.45 11.17 -.59
MorBacSeU x +4.3 +8.2 11.43 11.22 11.41 ...
MtgBckdSel x +4.3 +8.0 11.43 11.22 11.41 ...
MuniIncSel x +3.9 +4.4 10.21 9.67 9.97 -.02
ReEstSel +10.9 +.5 17.67 13.71 17.09 -.58
ShDurBndSel x +1.4 +4.3 11.08 10.94 11.02 ...
ShMuniBdI x +2.0 +3.3 10.68 10.43 10.60 ...
ShtDurBdU x +1.6 +4.6 11.08 10.94 11.02 -.01
SmCapEqA m +5.3 +8.1 37.83 27.41 35.58 -1.72
SmCapSel +5.5 +8.4 41.19 29.76 38.75 -1.87
TxAwRRetI x +6.4 +3.8 10.39 9.85 10.36 +.04
TxAwRRetS x +6.3 +3.6 10.37 9.84 10.35 +.04
USEquit +2.1 +4.9 10.99 8.42 10.39 -.45
USLCpCrPS +1.4 +6.2 22.11 17.01 20.96 -.87
ValOppsIn +.3 +.2 15.63 12.15 14.57 -.61
Janus
BalJ +4.8 +7.4 26.72 23.87 25.95 -.55
BalS b +4.6 NA 26.72 22.91 25.95 -.55
ContrJ -6.7 +1.3 15.36 12.78 13.60 -.53
EntrprsJ +2.6 +7.8 65.02 46.47 59.84 -3.30
FlxBdJ +4.4 +8.1 11.06 10.34 10.69 +.07
FortyA m +2.8 +6.0 35.77 28.29 34.53 -1.14
FortyS b +2.7 +5.8 35.28 27.93 34.04 -1.13
Gr&IncJ +5.5 +1.7 33.64 26.10 31.87 -1.38
HiYldJ d +5.5 +8.5 9.35 8.41 9.19 -.03
J +2.7 +3.9 31.19 24.48 29.92 -1.05
OrionJ d -4.0 +6.0 12.81 9.88 11.40 -.44
OverseasJ d -11.5 +7.6 53.66 42.96 44.19 -2.30
PerkinsMCVJ +3.5 +6.1 24.66 19.09 23.26 -.80
PerkinsSCVJ +2.2 +8.0 25.96 20.63 24.44 -.95
RsrchJ +4.0 +7.2 31.84 23.63 30.40 -1.21
ShTmBdJ +1.6 +5.1 3.14 3.07 3.10 +.01
TwentyJ +1.8 +6.3 68.99 54.56 66.58 -2.24
WorldwideJ d -.1 +2.6 49.99 39.95 46.40 -1.27
Janus Aspen
Bal Is +5.0 +7.8 30.37 26.10 27.77 -.59
IntlGrIs -13.1 +8.7 59.90 47.72 48.90 -2.44
WldWGrIs +.1 +2.9 32.36 25.76 30.03 -.81
Jensen
Inst +.5 +4.5 29.44 23.02 27.06 -1.28
J b +.3 +4.3 29.42 23.00 27.04 -1.28
John Hancock
BalA m +.8 +6.5 16.07 13.87 15.37 -.35
BondA m +4.9 +7.9 15.91 15.28 15.80 +.06
ClsscValA m +1.5 -3.8 18.18 13.66 16.92 -.58
LgCpEqA m -1.2 +6.7 27.84 21.85 25.68 -1.07
LifAg1 b +2.7 +2.7 13.36 10.19 12.61 -.44
LifBa1 b +3.5 +4.6 13.73 11.67 13.25 -.28
LifCo1 b +4.2 +6.0 13.24 12.52 13.09 -.07
LifGr1 b +2.9 +3.8 13.85 11.16 13.21 -.40
LifMo1 b +4.2 +5.4 13.24 11.91 12.98 -.15
RegBankA m -5.3 -5.9 15.50 12.04 13.87 -.46
SovInvA m +3.1 +2.2 17.12 13.44 16.11 -.65
StrIncA m +5.3 +8.6 6.88 6.42 6.82 -.01
StrIncC m +4.8 +7.9 6.88 6.42 6.82 -.01
TaxFBdA m +5.2 +4.0 10.19 9.28 9.78 ...
Keeley
SmCapVal m +4.0 +2.5 27.77 18.76 25.96 -1.39
SmCpValI +4.1 NA 27.95 24.93 26.14 -1.40
Kinetics
Paradigm d +1.0 +1.7 25.22 18.84 23.55 -.83
LKCM
SmCpEqI d +13.1 +5.6 25.71 15.92 24.31 -1.04
LSV
ValueEq +2.2 -1.1 15.16 11.56 13.86 -.59
Laudus
InMktMstS d +2.7 +5.7 20.78 15.82 19.75 -.52
IntlFxInc d +8.2 NA 12.66 11.32 12.66 +.18
IntlMstrI d +2.5 +5.6 20.78 15.80 19.74 -.53
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d -.4 +11.8 22.42 18.74 21.70 -.13
EmgMktEqO m -.6 +11.5 22.82 19.05 22.06 -.14
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m +9.0 +2.6126.28 87.14 120.87 -3.58
AggGrowB m +8.5 +1.8108.07 75.18 103.39 -3.07
AggGrowI +9.3 +3.0134.39 92.40 128.67 -3.80
AggrsvGrC m +8.6 +2.0 110.13 76.39 105.38 -3.13
ApprecA m +2.9 +3.8 14.82 11.80 14.11 -.58
CrBdFI b +5.4 +6.6 11.82 11.28 11.82 +.07
CrBdInst +5.5 +6.9 11.81 11.27 11.81 +.06
CrPlBdFI b +4.5 +7.2 11.06 10.67 11.05 +.05
CrPlBdIns +4.7 +7.5 11.07 10.68 11.05 +.05
EqIncBldA m +3.2 +1.5 13.71 11.41 12.97 -.49
FdmACValA m -1.4 +.9 14.87 11.12 13.50 -.59
MdCpCoA m +3.4 +5.5 23.57 16.88 22.02 -1.09
MgdMuniA m +6.2 +4.9 16.13 14.47 15.60 ...
MgdMuniC m +5.9 +4.3 16.14 14.48 15.61 ...
MuBdLtdA m +5.4 +4.3 6.55 6.00 6.34 ...
MuBdLtdC b +5.2 +3.6 6.56 6.01 6.35 ...
MuBdNYA m +5.3 +4.8 13.87 12.49 13.39 -.01
OpportntC m -18.3 -6.4 11.81 8.61 9.00 -.50
SpecInvC m -3.6 +.9 34.33 25.34 30.54 -1.48
ValueC m -.9 -6.2 42.42 32.81 38.52 -1.43
ValueInst -.3 -5.3 49.78 38.32 45.40 -1.68
Leuthold
AssetAl m +2.7 +3.6 11.35 9.35 10.75 -.32
CoreInv d +4.4 +5.0 18.39 15.04 17.58 -.58
Longleaf Partners
Intl +1.1 +1.9 16.21 12.97 15.51 -.37
LongPart +6.7 +1.5 31.74 23.60 30.14 -1.15
SmCap +11.5 +6.8 31.17 21.65 29.58 -1.05
Loomis Sayles
BondI +8.0 +8.7 15.00 13.81 14.95 -.04
BondR b +7.8 +8.4 14.95 13.76 14.89 -.04
FixIncI +7.5 +9.6 14.60 12.79 14.59 +.01
GlbBdI +7.6 +8.0 17.50 16.15 17.50 +.10
GlbBdR b +7.4 +7.6 17.34 16.01 17.34 +.10
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m -1.3 -.9 12.45 9.44 11.37 -.56
BalA x +2.8 +4.2 11.31 9.47 10.73 -.28
BondDebA m +5.7 +7.7 8.12 7.48 7.98 -.04
BondDebC m +5.3 +7.0 8.14 7.50 8.00 -.04
CptStrcA m +3.4 +4.2 12.63 10.26 12.03 -.36
DevGrowA m +8.5 +11.6 24.83 15.45 23.11 -1.29
DevGrowI +8.7 +11.9 26.37 16.36 24.55 -1.37
FdmtlEqtyA m +1.9 +4.7 14.05 10.43 13.16 -.69
FdmtlEqtyC m +1.5 +4.0 13.34 9.92 12.48 -.66
FltRateF b +2.5 NA 9.44 9.29 9.29 -.02
HYMuniBdA m +4.4 -.8 11.88 10.64 11.10 -.02
IncmA m +6.3 +8.7 2.93 2.80 2.93 +.02
MidCpValA m +4.0 +3.0 18.23 13.02 17.10 -.92
NatlTaxFA m +6.2 +3.1 10.89 9.71 10.39 -.01
ShDurIncA m +2.8 +6.5 4.68 4.59 4.61 +.01
ShDurIncC m +2.3 +5.7 4.71 4.62 4.64 +.01
SmCpValA m +1.8 +6.8 34.93 24.03 31.99 -1.89
SmCpValI +1.9 +7.1 36.97 25.45 33.88 -1.99
TotRetA m +4.7 +7.1 11.45 10.58 10.95 +.07
MFS
BondA m +5.6 +8.0 13.76 13.24 13.70 +.08
CoreEqA m +3.8 +4.2 19.20 14.58 18.40 -.70
CoreGrA m +4.4 +3.6 19.01 14.48 18.36 -.64
GovtSecA m +3.4 +6.2 10.46 9.99 10.33 +.05
GrAllocA m +4.3 +4.9 14.99 12.03 14.52 -.32
GrowA m +4.3 +7.2 45.26 33.38 43.71 -1.52
IntDivA m +4.2 +4.1 14.66 11.42 14.09 -.20
IntlNDisA m +4.3 +6.3 23.72 18.23 22.80 -.42
IntlNDisI +4.4 +6.6 24.37 18.73 23.43 -.43
IntlValA m +7.1 +3.7 26.76 21.45 26.33 -.14
IsIntlEq +5.3 +4.3 19.94 15.16 18.89 -.35
LtdMatA m +1.8 +3.7 6.27 6.10 6.19 +.01
MAInvA m +3.9 +4.1 20.83 16.09 19.89 -.72
MAInvC m +3.5 +3.4 20.11 15.53 19.21 -.70
MAInvGrA m +4.9 +5.7 16.76 12.17 16.01 -.61
MdCpValI +5.1 +4.7 14.80 10.73 14.01 -.57
MidCapGrI +2.3 +1.9 10.26 7.29 9.62 -.42
ModAllocA m +4.4 +5.7 14.23 12.12 13.92 -.22
MuHiIncA f +5.9 +3.3 7.78 7.03 7.44 ...
MuIncA m +5.2 +4.3 8.59 7.79 8.22 ...
MuLtdMtA m +3.3 +4.1 8.10 7.84 8.04 +.01
NewDiscA m +5.2 +10.6 27.29 17.79 25.09 -1.28
ResBdA m +4.5 +6.7 10.68 10.31 10.67 +.05
ResBondI +4.7 +6.9 10.69 10.32 10.68 +.06
ResIntlA m +5.1 +2.3 16.73 12.86 16.00 -.26
ResIntlI +5.3 +2.6 17.27 13.27 16.52 -.27
ResearchA m +3.2 +4.4 26.90 20.44 25.77 -.96
ResearchI +3.4 +4.8 27.41 20.83 26.27 -.97
TotRetA x +3.1 +3.4 14.85 12.87 14.36 -.30
TotRetC x +2.7 +2.7 14.92 12.93 14.43 -.29
UtilA x +9.2 +9.0 18.25 14.47 17.67 -.33
UtilC x +8.7 +8.2 18.19 14.42 17.61 -.33
ValueA m +2.4 +2.1 24.78 19.42 23.19 -.83
ValueC m +1.9 +1.3 24.55 19.23 22.97 -.83
ValueI +2.5 +2.4 24.89 19.51 23.29 -.84
MainStay
AlCpGrI +4.7 +3.0 26.26 19.47 24.53 -1.16
EquityI +1.8 +1.9 39.47 30.10 36.58 -1.36
HiYldCorA x +5.4 +7.1 6.04 5.76 5.96 -.03
HiYldCorC x +5.0 +6.2 6.01 5.74 5.94 -.02
IntlI +5.2 +1.8 33.18 25.36 30.53 -.41
LgCapGrA m +6.7 +7.1 7.84 5.68 7.52 -.27
MAPI +2.8 +2.7 34.85 26.80 32.78 -1.09
S&PIdxI +3.7 +2.1 31.56 24.37 30.04 -1.22
SelEqI +.9 +2.6 38.19 29.33 35.20 -1.20
Mairs & Power
GrthInv -.4 +3.4 78.14 61.14 71.41 -4.28
Managers
Bond +7.0 +8.0 26.68 25.28 26.68 +.11
MgrsPIMCOBd +4.4 +8.1 10.76 10.26 10.68 +.03
TmSqMCGrI +2.0 +6.7 15.44 11.59 14.32 -.60
TmSqMCGrP +1.9 +6.5 15.31 11.50 14.18 -.60
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS +3.7 +6.2 13.55 12.69 13.27 -.07
PBExtTrmS +3.6 +5.4 16.56 13.86 16.01 -.35
PBMaxTrmS +.5 +4.1 17.76 13.77 16.52 -.64
PBModTrmS +3.6 +5.4 13.59 12.05 13.26 -.20
WrldOppA +3.1 +4.9 9.62 7.42 8.88 -.30
Marsico
21stCent m -1.4 +2.0 15.35 11.26 14.06 -.61
FlexCap m +2.0 NA 14.70 10.76 13.89 -.34
Focus m +4.1 +4.0 19.41 14.24 18.83 -.53
Grow m +5.9 +3.6 21.37 15.33 20.51 -.61
MassMutual
PremIntlEqtyS +5.7 +5.4 16.02 12.10 15.25 -.30
SelBRGlAlcS +3.7 NA 11.51 9.74 11.17 -.19
SelIndxEqZ +4.4 +2.3 12.75 9.80 12.21 -.42
SlSmGrEqS +4.2 +5.4 19.91 13.53 17.97 -1.01
MassMutual Inst
PremCoreBndS +4.8 +6.9 11.49 10.81 11.49 +.08
Masters Select
IntlIntl d +1.4 +4.0 16.61 12.45 15.26 -.47
Matthews Asian
China d -.9 +19.0 31.71 26.27 29.09 -.28
GrInc d +2.1 +10.2 18.68 16.49 18.14 -.17
India d -5.1 +15.9 23.02 18.03 20.39 -.28
PacEqInc d +3.0 NA 14.60 13.03 14.53 -.01
PacTiger d +5.7 +14.6 25.02 20.33 24.78 -.24
Members
BondA m +3.5 +4.9 10.52 10.08 10.43 +.05
BondB m +3.0 +4.1 10.52 10.08 10.43 +.05
DivIncA x +4.5 +4.2 11.92 10.62 11.68 -.21
DivIncB x +4.0 +3.4 11.98 10.67 11.74 -.21
HighIncA x +5.1 +7.3 7.22 6.87 7.10 -.04
HighIncB x +4.8 +6.4 7.31 6.96 7.20 -.04
IntlStk A m +5.1 +1.9 11.60 9.31 11.13 -.25
IntlStk B m +4.7 +1.2 11.42 9.15 10.94 -.25
LgCapGA m +3.3 +4.2 17.28 13.09 16.44 -.70
LgCapGB m +2.9 +3.4 15.85 12.07 15.07 -.65
LgCapVA m +4.7 -1.3 13.19 10.38 12.53 -.49
LgCapVB m +4.2 -2.0 13.01 10.22 12.33 -.48
MidCapGA m +4.9 +3.7 7.17 5.21 6.70 -.21
MidCapGB m +4.6 +2.9 6.59 4.82 6.15 -.19
Merger
Merger m +1.6 +3.5 16.29 15.73 16.04 -.14
Meridian
MeridnGr d +1.0 +8.2 48.86 34.57 45.02 -2.24
Value d -.3 +3.6 30.70 23.08 28.81 -1.26
Metropolitan West
Hi-YldBdM b +4.3 +9.4 11.02 10.37 10.67 -.06
LowDurBd b +2.1 +3.3 8.68 8.39 8.63 ...
LowDurBdI +2.1 +3.5 8.68 8.39 8.63 -.01
TotRetBdI +4.0 +8.6 10.79 10.27 10.51 +.04
TotRtBd b +3.8 +8.3 10.79 10.27 10.51 +.03
Morgan Stanley
FocGrA m +11.4 +9.7 40.47 27.81 39.73 -.61
USGovSecB m +4.8 +3.6 9.58 8.43 8.81 +.05
Morgan Stanley Instl
EmgMktI d -.8 +8.6 27.91 23.13 26.93 -.25
GrwthI +11.9 +8.9 27.57 19.20 27.07 -.45
IntlEqI d +4.6 +2.0 15.02 11.83 14.24 -.33
IntlEqP m +4.5 +1.8 14.84 11.67 14.06 -.33
MdCpGrI +10.1 +11.4 42.69 30.02 41.14 -1.22
MdCpGrP b +10.0 +11.1 41.32 29.07 39.81 -1.18
SmCoGrI d +.1 +5.7 15.53 10.60 14.19 -.45
USRealI +10.3 +2.5 16.27 12.44 15.71 -.56
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp +.4 -3.8 58.49 46.64 54.04 -1.77
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m +6.1 +5.4 31.44 22.35 29.60 -1.39
MdCpCrGrY +6.3 +5.7 32.11 22.79 30.24 -1.43
Nations
LgCpIxZ +3.8 +2.3 26.48 20.39 25.14 -1.02
Nationwide
BdIdxIn d +4.1 +6.3 11.63 11.14 11.56 +.07
DesModSvc b +3.1 +3.5 9.98 8.46 9.62 -.22
FundD m +2.8 +.6 14.84 11.34 13.89 -.60
IDAggSrv b +3.2 +2.3 9.35 7.17 8.80 -.32
IDModAgSv b +3.3 +3.0 9.86 7.90 9.38 -.28
IntlIdxI d +3.0 +.8 8.14 6.36 7.59 -.19
MCMkIxI d +4.3 +6.1 16.60 11.92 15.42 -.79
S&P500Is d +3.7 +2.2 11.45 8.83 10.85 -.44
Natixis
CGMTgtEqA m -5.7 +3.5 11.46 8.79 10.49 -.48
InvBndA m +6.8 +9.0 12.76 11.98 12.64 +.10
InvBndC m +6.4 +8.2 12.68 11.90 12.55 +.10
InvBndY +7.0 +9.3 12.77 11.98 12.65 +.10
StratIncA m +8.1 +8.6 15.59 14.27 15.50 -.08
StratIncC m +7.6 +7.8 15.68 14.34 15.59 -.06
ValI +1.2 +1.8 20.45 15.38 18.84 -.82
Neuberger Berman
GenesAdv b +6.5 +7.1 31.21 21.93 29.41 -1.55
GenesisInv +6.7 +7.4 37.62 26.35 35.46 -1.87
GenesisIs +6.8 +7.6 52.08 36.43 49.10 -2.59
GenesisTr +6.7 +7.3 53.91 37.80 50.81 -2.69
GuardnInv +3.2 +3.7 16.40 11.98 15.31 -.54
PartnrInv +.4 +1.8 29.93 21.90 27.68 -1.13
SmCpGrInv +9.5 +5.4 20.82 13.49 19.57 -.80
SocRespInv +2.9 +4.3 28.13 20.57 26.21 -1.02
New Covenant
Growth +2.6 +1.3 33.62 25.62 31.68 -1.15
Nicholas
Nichol +5.2 +5.2 49.59 37.98 45.74 -1.58
Northeast Investors
Northeast +4.2 +3.9 6.42 5.84 6.25 -.04
Northern
BdIndx +3.4 NA 10.88 10.35 10.68 ...
FixedIn +3.9 +5.8 10.72 10.02 10.35 +.01
GlbREIdx d +4.8 -.5 8.91 7.21 8.62 -.19
HYFixInc d +5.9 +7.1 7.55 7.03 7.42 -.01
HiYMuni +5.5 +.9 8.46 7.64 8.12 ...
IntTaxE +4.6 +4.2 10.74 9.76 10.27 -.01
IntlIndex d +3.1 +.6 11.58 10.10 10.86 -.27
MMIntlEq d +.9 +1.3 10.60 8.43 10.03 -.21
MMMidCap +5.1 +5.5 13.04 9.32 12.24 -.54
MMSmCp +3.4 +3.0 11.40 7.76 10.64 -.52
ShIntUSGv +1.3 +4.3 10.73 10.24 10.45 ...
SmCapVal +2.4 +3.3 16.57 11.87 15.58 -.77
StkIdx +4.4 +2.3 16.89 13.00 16.12 -.54
TaxE +6.0 +4.5 10.95 9.68 10.37 -.01
Northern Instl
EqIdx A +4.4 +2.4 13.56 10.40 12.94 -.44
Nuveen
HiYldMunA m +7.0 -1.5 16.07 13.77 14.92 -.02
HiYldMunC m +6.7 -2.0 16.06 13.76 14.91 -.02
HiYldMunI +7.1 -1.3 16.07 13.76 14.92 -.01
IntMunBdI +4.5 +4.4 9.19 8.70 9.02 ...
IntlValA m -1.6 +3.0 27.27 22.88 25.64 -.53
LtdTmMuA m +3.9 +4.2 11.09 10.68 11.03 +.01
LtdTmMunI +4.0 +4.4 11.03 10.62 10.97 +.01
NWQVlOppA m +1.6 +9.8 36.81 30.73 35.62 -.70
TwIntlValI d -1.5 +3.3 27.40 23.01 25.79 -.53
TwVlOppI +1.7 +10.1 36.94 30.85 35.77 -.70
Oakmark
EqIncI +4.0 +6.2 29.81 24.53 28.84 -.78
Global I d -1.6 +3.8 23.93 18.55 22.13 -.93
Intl I d +.7 +4.1 21.01 16.49 19.55 -.50
IntlSmCpI d -3.0 +3.5 15.20 11.76 13.94 -.50
Oakmark I d +3.8 +4.6 45.29 34.94 42.85 -1.65
Select I d +5.6 +2.7 30.73 23.20 28.98 -1.09
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp +3.3 +9.6 16.95 12.69 15.68 -.65
MuniBd +3.0 +4.7 12.43 11.56 11.90 +.02
NonUSLgCp +.8 +1.0 11.63 8.48 10.70 -.25
RealRet -.5 +5.1 11.60 9.04 10.66 -.17
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m +9.6 -2.8 6.64 5.63 6.27 +.01
ActAllocA m +2.7 +.7 10.29 8.31 9.85 -.24
AmtFrNYA m +5.4 +2.2 12.06 10.25 10.95 ...
CAMuniA m +7.9 -1.2 8.31 7.11 7.75 -.01
CapApA m +3.9 +2.2 47.30 35.63 45.30 -1.95
CapApB m +3.5 +1.4 41.60 31.57 39.83 -1.71
CapApprY +4.2 +2.6 49.53 37.18 47.45 -2.03
CapIncA m +5.6 -1.1 9.02 8.14 8.87 -.09
CmdtStTRY +4.6 -9.1 4.26 3.02 3.84 -.09
DevMktA m -2.8 +14.0 37.42 29.63 35.45 -.32
DevMktN m -3.0 +13.6 36.17 28.68 34.24 -.30
DevMktY -2.6 +14.4 37.05 29.35 35.13 -.30
DevMktsC m -3.2 +13.2 35.91 28.53 33.97 -.30
DiscoverA m +11.4 +8.5 68.32 41.91 62.83 -3.81
EqIncA m +1.8 +5.0 26.53 20.44 24.73 -.92
EquityA m +2.7 +2.3 9.59 7.25 9.07 -.39
GlobA m +3.4 +3.5 67.42 50.89 62.44 -2.12
GlobC m +3.0 +2.7 63.28 47.72 58.50 -2.00
GlobOpprA m +1.4 +5.9 32.57 25.04 30.14 -1.37
GlobY +3.6 +3.9 67.57 51.06 62.62 -2.12
GoldMinA m -5.4 +18.7 51.45 34.38 47.13 -2.59
GoldMinC m -5.8 +17.8 48.74 32.73 44.55 -2.45
IntlBondA m +6.1 +9.2 7.04 6.37 6.81 +.04
IntlBondC m +5.5 +8.4 7.01 6.35 6.78 +.03
IntlBondY +6.1 +9.6 7.04 6.37 6.80 +.03
IntlDivA m +.4 +5.6 13.03 10.40 12.32 -.21
IntlGrY +5.8 +6.0 30.92 23.33 29.53 -.52
IntlGrowA m +5.6 +5.5 31.05 23.40 29.63 -.52
IntlSmCoA m -6.2 +8.0 24.84 17.88 23.12 -.37
LmtTmMunA m +4.9 +3.2 14.70 13.88 14.47 +.02
LmtTmMunC m +4.4 +2.4 14.64 13.82 14.41 +.01
LtdTmGovA m +1.4 +3.2 9.47 9.30 9.39 ...
LtdTmNY m +4.3 +3.9 3.34 3.14 3.27 +.01
LtdTmNY m +3.5 +3.1 3.32 3.13 3.25 +.01
MainSSMCA m +2.8 +3.2 22.74 15.99 21.00 -1.24
MainSSMCY +3.0 +3.7 23.92 16.82 22.09 -1.30
MainStSelA m -2.0 +1.2 13.18 10.63 12.52 -.48
MainStrA m +1.0 +1.2 34.21 27.06 32.72 -1.17
PAMuniA m +6.2 +2.1 11.37 9.89 10.60 +.02
QuBalA m +3.2 +2.6 16.43 13.50 15.87 -.31
QuOpportA m +1.4 +4.9 28.00 24.17 26.76 -.47
RisDivA m +5.0 +4.1 16.91 13.15 16.19 -.63
RisDivY +5.2 +4.4 17.30 13.45 16.56 -.65
RocMuniA m +5.7 +2.5 16.91 14.49 15.54 -.01
RocMuniC m +5.3 +1.6 16.88 14.47 15.52 ...
RochNtlMC m +8.5 -4.8 7.36 6.25 6.90 +.02
RochNtlMu m +9.0 -4.1 7.37 6.27 6.92 +.02
SmMidValA m +3.0 +2.7 35.48 25.48 33.00 -1.33
SrFltRatA m +3.4 +4.3 8.42 8.05 8.33 -.02
SrFltRatC m +3.1 +3.8 8.43 8.03 8.34 -.01
StrIncA m +5.5 +7.6 4.45 4.15 4.37 ...
StrIncY +5.9 +7.9 4.44 4.15 4.37 ...
StratIncC m +5.3 +6.9 4.44 4.15 4.37 +.01
USGovtA m +3.9 +5.4 9.65 9.23 9.52 +.05
ValueA m +1.4 +1.5 24.01 17.94 22.13 -.96
ValueY +1.6 +1.9 24.49 18.33 22.60 -.98
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d +3.6 +7.8 11.92 11.55 11.78 ...
Osterweis d +2.0 +4.5 29.59 23.67 27.63 -.75
PIMCO
AAstAAutP +6.6 NA 11.34 10.48 11.07 +.11
AllAssetA m +5.9 +6.6 12.77 11.96 12.51 +.04
AllAssetC m +5.4 +5.8 12.63 11.83 12.36 +.03
AllAssetI +6.3 +7.3 12.86 12.04 12.61 +.04
AllAssetsD b +6.0 +6.7 12.79 11.98 12.53 +.03
AllAstP +6.1 NA 12.86 12.04 12.61 +.04
AllAuthA m +6.4 +7.6 11.28 10.43 11.01 +.11
AllAuthC m +5.9 +6.8 11.19 10.34 10.91 +.11
AllAuthIn +6.7 +8.3 11.35 10.49 11.08 +.11
CRRtStAdm b +6.9 +4.2 9.58 7.10 9.08 -.06
CmRlRtStA m +6.7 +4.0 9.54 7.08 9.04 -.06
CmRlRtStC m +6.3 +3.2 9.35 6.96 8.85 -.06
CmRlRtStD b +6.7 +4.0 9.57 7.10 9.06 -.06
ComRRStP +6.9 NA 9.68 7.17 9.18 -.06
ComRlRStI +7.0 +4.5 9.69 7.18 9.19 -.06
DevLocMktI +5.7 +7.3 11.27 10.09 11.09 +.02
DivIncInst +5.5 +8.6 11.82 11.18 11.69 +.04
EmMktsIns +5.9 +8.7 11.66 10.92 11.39 +.07
FloatIncI +.9 +2.9 9.22 8.84 8.93 -.03
ForBdIs +3.6 +6.9 10.97 10.31 10.63 +.12
ForBondI +10.0 +10.1 11.62 10.29 11.44 +.23
GlobalIs +8.5 +8.9 10.78 9.55 10.38 +.18
Hi-YldD b +5.2 +7.6 9.54 9.05 9.41 -.03
HiYldA m +5.2 +7.6 9.54 9.05 9.41 -.03
HiYldAdm b +5.3 +7.7 9.54 9.05 9.41 -.03
HiYldC m +4.8 +6.8 9.54 9.05 9.41 -.03
HiYldIs +5.4 +8.0 9.54 9.05 9.41 -.03
InvGrdIns +6.3 +9.9 10.93 10.31 10.81 +.08
LgTmGovIs +7.3 +8.8 11.75 10.00 11.07 +.18
LowDrA m +2.3 +5.4 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDrC m +2.2 +5.0 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDrIIIs +1.6 +5.0 10.34 9.90 10.02 +.04
LowDrIs +2.6 +5.9 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDurD b +2.4 +5.5 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDurP +2.5 NA 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
ModDurIs +3.8 +7.9 11.35 10.51 10.86 +.03
RealRet +8.8 +7.9 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RealRetAd b +8.6 +7.6 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RealRetD b +8.6 +7.4 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RealRetnP +8.7 NA 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RealRtnA m +8.5 +7.4 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RealRtnC m +8.2 +6.9 12.02 11.10 12.02 +.18
RlEstStRetI +25.0 +6.9 5.36 3.84 5.31 -.05
RlRetAIns +14.0 +9.1 12.37 10.66 12.37 +.38
ShTermAdm b +.9 +3.2 9.95 9.85 9.89 ...
ShtTermA m +.8 +3.1 9.95 9.85 9.89 ...
ShtTermIs +1.0 +3.5 9.95 9.85 9.89 ...
StkPlusIs +5.3 +2.7 9.25 7.29 8.70 -.35
ToRtIIIIs +4.4 +8.6 9.87 9.44 9.81 +.03
ToRtIIIs +3.7 +8.3 10.67 10.21 10.60 +.05
TotRetA m +4.0 +8.3 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
TotRetAdm b +4.1 +8.6 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
TotRetC m +3.6 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
TotRetIs +4.3 +8.8 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
TotRetrnD b +4.1 +8.5 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
TotlRetnP +4.2 NA 11.77 10.69 11.10 +.05
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr d +6.3 +8.4 18.79 13.61 17.51 -1.07
Growth d +3.8 +5.2 17.24 12.44 15.99 -.85
Stock d +3.5 +4.2 15.48 11.95 14.66 -.43
Parnassus
EqIncInv +3.5 +7.0 28.61 22.51 27.07 -1.11
Pax World
Bal b +3.6 +2.9 24.21 19.32 23.00 -.62
Payden
EmMktBd d +7.2 +9.3 15.02 14.03 14.81 +.07
GNMA +4.5 +7.1 10.60 10.14 10.53 +.04
HighInc d +5.2 +6.3 7.43 7.05 7.30 -.05
Permanent
Portfolio +8.3 +10.7 49.93 40.20 49.61 -.26
Pioneer
Bond Y +4.6 +7.5 9.68 9.40 9.64 +.03
CulValA m +1.2 +.9 19.73 15.59 18.37 -.57
CulValY +1.4 +1.3 19.81 15.67 18.46 -.57
EqInc A m +6.0 +1.8 28.07 21.35 26.66 -1.08
GlobHiYA m +4.7 +7.4 10.95 9.98 10.60 -.04
GlobHiYY +4.9 +7.8 10.75 9.81 10.42 -.03
HiYldA m +4.5 +7.6 10.82 9.07 10.33 -.22
IndependA m +7.1 +2.2 12.46 8.86 12.03 -.43
MidCpValA m +1.7 +3.4 23.06 17.35 21.48 -.98
MuniA m +6.6 +3.9 13.69 12.07 13.02 -.01
PioneerA m +.9 +1.9 43.93 33.29 41.16 -1.77
PioneerY +1.1 +2.3 44.09 33.41 41.30 -1.78
StratIncA m +4.2 +8.2 11.17 10.71 11.08 ...
StratIncC m +3.8 +7.5 10.93 10.48 10.85 +.01
StratIncY +4.4 +8.6 11.17 10.73 11.08 ...
ValueA m -.2 -2.9 12.26 9.65 11.31 -.42
Principal
BdMtgInst +5.2 +5.3 10.69 10.24 10.66 +.05
DivIntI +3.6 +1.0 11.00 8.34 10.48 -.21
EqIncA m +3.3 +1.8 18.88 15.27 17.78 -.60
HiYldA m +5.5 +8.9 8.24 7.89 8.06 -.02
HiYldII +5.4 +10.0 11.77 10.63 11.30 -.02
InfProI +8.7 +1.7 8.42 7.79 8.42 +.14
IntIInst +3.2 +.8 12.63 9.69 11.91 -.30
IntlGrthI +3.6 -1.1 9.76 7.42 9.30 -.24
L/T2010I +4.7 +3.0 11.92 10.26 11.69 -.15
L/T2020I +4.4 +3.1 12.56 10.38 12.17 -.30
L/T2020J m +4.2 +2.7 12.51 10.33 12.12 -.29
L/T2030I +4.3 +3.0 12.53 10.07 12.07 -.33
L/T2030J m +4.2 +2.5 12.51 10.04 12.04 -.33
L/T2040I +4.1 +2.7 12.79 10.05 12.25 -.37
L/T2050I +4.1 +2.6 12.31 9.53 11.75 -.38
LCBIIInst +2.3 +2.5 10.36 7.96 9.79 -.40
LCGIIInst +4.3 +5.2 9.03 6.87 8.64 -.37
LCGrIInst +5.6 +7.1 10.21 7.36 9.79 -.39
LCIIIInst +1.6 -2.6 11.15 8.61 10.36 -.43
LCVlIInst +2.3 -1.2 11.53 8.98 10.85 -.47
LgCGrInst +1.8 +3.7 8.82 6.55 8.34 -.35
LgCSP500I +3.8 +2.2 9.58 7.37 9.12 -.37
LgCValI +4.5 -.2 10.37 7.86 9.74 -.41
MCVlIInst +2.1 +4.4 14.30 10.62 13.32 -.62
MGIIIInst +6.0 +6.5 12.11 8.13 11.27 -.60
MidCapBleA m +9.0 +7.5 15.14 11.53 14.46 -.48
PrSecInst x +5.4 +6.3 10.32 9.57 10.05 -.09
ReEstSecI +12.8 +2.8 18.74 14.36 18.10 -.64
SAMBalA m +3.4 +4.7 13.54 11.43 13.08 -.29
SAMBalC m +3.0 +4.0 13.40 11.31 12.95 -.29
SAMConGrA m +3.2 +3.5 14.65 11.75 14.00 -.43
SAMConGrB m +2.7 +2.7 14.12 11.29 13.48 -.41
SAMStrGrA m +3.0 +2.7 16.18 12.51 15.32 -.57
SCGrIInst +6.2 +7.8 12.54 7.90 11.47 -.68
SCValIII +1.6 +2.2 10.63 7.41 9.81 -.51
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m +6.2 +6.1 17.54 12.79 16.88 -.66
2020FocZ +6.4 +6.4 18.17 13.21 17.48 -.69
BlendA m +4.7 +4.6 19.01 13.90 18.02 -.83
EqOppA m +3.4 +3.9 15.19 11.34 14.35 -.58
HiYieldA m +5.8 +8.6 5.65 5.32 5.59 -.01
IntlEqtyA m +5.2 -1.4 6.85 5.30 6.51 -.14
IntlValA m +3.0 +1.4 22.79 17.63 21.21 -.54
JenMidCapGrA m +6.0 +7.8 30.80 22.31 29.03 -1.29
JenMidCapGrZ +6.2 +8.1 31.96 23.09 30.13 -1.34
JennGrA m +8.4 +5.9 20.23 14.59 19.57 -.66
JennGrZ +8.6 +6.2 21.02 15.13 20.34 -.68
NatlMuniA m +5.4 +3.8 15.05 13.73 14.55 -.01
NaturResA m +.9 +10.3 62.22 42.17 57.57 -2.31
ShTmCoBdA m +3.0 +6.1 11.72 11.42 11.55 +.03
SmallCoA m +4.1 +6.0 22.83 15.68 21.13 -1.23
SmallCoZ +4.3 +6.2 23.86 16.38 22.10 -1.28
UtilityA m +7.1 +2.1 11.30 9.12 10.85 -.24
ValueA m +2.9 +1.3 16.32 12.22 15.15 -.61
Putnam
AmGovtInA m +5.0 +8.1 9.88 9.44 9.75 +.08
AstAlBalA m +3.6 +3.3 11.69 9.87 11.22 -.25
AstAlGrA m +2.9 +2.8 13.36 10.76 12.66 -.40
CATxEIncA m +5.0 +3.5 8.12 7.22 7.65 ...
DivIncTrC m +2.9 +4.2 8.17 7.85 7.92 +.05
DivrInA m +3.3 +5.0 8.28 7.96 8.03 +.05
EqIncomeA m +4.0 +3.5 16.67 12.65 15.42 -.67
GeoPutA m +3.3 -1.0 12.69 10.83 12.22 -.28
GlbEqA m +8.8 +.8 9.94 7.29 9.50 -.32
GlbHltCrA m +7.3 +3.1 51.85 39.87 48.06 -1.97
GrowIncA m +.9 -.8 14.68 11.17 13.60 -.50
GrowIncB m +.5 -1.5 14.41 10.96 13.36 -.49
HiYldA m +5.3 +8.1 8.00 7.40 7.83 -.03
IncomeA m +5.6 +7.7 6.97 6.68 6.91 +.04
IntlCpOpA m +1.9 +4.7 38.57 27.92 36.22 -.97
IntlEqA m +3.7 -.3 21.83 16.73 20.79 -.50
InvestorA m +2.8 -.1 13.95 10.55 13.12 -.55
MultiCapGrA m +4.0 +3.5 55.49 40.00 52.63 -2.28
NYTxEIncA m +4.3 +3.9 8.74 7.98 8.40 ...
TaxEIncA m +5.2 +4.0 8.73 7.29 8.43 +.01
TaxFHYldA m +5.4 +3.1 12.07 10.96 11.56 ...
USGovtInA m +4.9 +8.4 14.44 13.94 14.38 +.08
VoyagerA m -3.5 +7.4 25.49 18.99 22.87 -1.03
VoyagerY -3.4 +7.7 26.54 19.80 23.85 -1.06
RS
GlNatResA m +4.4 +6.6 41.60 29.07 39.25 -1.88
PartnersA m +.2 +3.2 36.00 25.54 33.15 -1.19
ValueA m -1.5 +2.8 27.62 20.74 25.51 -.91
RS Funds
CoreEqA m -2.3 +5.5 45.58 35.20 41.54 -1.98
EmgMktsA m -4.1 +10.7 27.44 22.96 25.64 -.52
Rainier
CoreEqIns +2.4 +2.3 27.29 20.33 25.77 -1.21
SmMdCEqI +6.0 +3.8 38.15 25.70 35.48 -2.14
SmMidCap b +5.9 +3.5 37.20 25.11 34.58 -2.09
RidgeWorth
HighYI +6.2 +7.5 10.19 9.45 10.01 -.03
IntmBndI +4.0 +6.8 11.03 10.27 10.64 +.07
InvGrBdI +4.5 +5.4 12.56 11.51 12.04 +.01
LgCpVaEqI +.8 +3.1 13.79 10.60 12.85 -.55
MdCpVlEqI +.6 +8.2 13.15 9.21 11.87 -.58
SmCapEqI +2.3 +6.7 15.12 11.04 13.97 -.77
TtlRetBndI +4.7 +7.3 11.17 10.28 10.69 +.08
USGovBndI +.9 +3.9 10.11 10.05 10.10 ...
Royce
LowStkSer m +1.3 +8.4 19.92 13.46 18.50 -1.06
MicrCapIv d +2.0 +8.0 19.30 13.50 17.92 -.76
OpportInv d -2.4 +4.9 13.10 8.83 11.79 -.62
PAMutCnslt m +2.6 +4.4 11.80 8.24 10.89 -.58
PAMutInv d +3.2 +5.4 13.00 9.06 12.02 -.65
PremierInv d +5.8 +9.1 22.95 15.84 21.54 -1.13
SpecEqInv d +.2 +8.1 22.54 16.68 20.91 -.96
TotRetInv d +2.4 +4.5 14.28 10.72 13.43 -.59
ValPlSvc m -.1 +3.0 14.72 10.56 13.41 -.87
ValueSvc m +3.2 +7.8 14.21 9.61 13.05 -.64
Russell
EmgMktsS +.3 +11.2 21.93 17.74 20.90 -.22
GlRelEstS +6.1 +.7 38.69 32.41 37.76 -.74
GlbEqtyS +3.5 NA 9.68 7.32 9.19 -.28
IntlDMktI +2.0 +.3 34.67 26.94 32.33 -.75
ItlDvMktS +2.0 NA 34.64 26.91 32.30 -.74
StgicBdI +4.3 +6.7 11.19 10.56 10.92 +.06
StratBdS +4.3 NA 11.32 10.68 11.05 +.06
USCoEqtyI +1.9 +1.8 30.16 22.72 28.33 -1.15
USCoreEqS +1.8 NA 30.16 22.72 28.32 -1.16
USQntvEqS +7.2 NA 32.13 23.94 30.61 -1.22
USSmMdCpS +2.5 NA 25.30 17.46 23.42 -1.22
Russell LifePoints
BalStrA m +3.5 +3.8 11.09 9.48 10.73 -.18
BalStrC b +3.1 +3.1 11.00 9.41 10.64 -.18
BalStrS +3.6 +4.1 11.18 9.56 10.82 -.18
BlStrR3 b +3.5 +3.6 11.12 9.51 10.76 -.18
GrStrA m +3.2 +2.8 10.69 8.65 10.21 -.25
GrStrC b +2.9 +2.0 10.55 8.57 10.07 -.24
GrStrR3 b +3.2 +2.5 10.73 8.69 10.25 -.24
Rydex/SGI
MCapValA m +2.4 +6.1 35.77 26.94 33.14 -1.45
MgFtrStrH b -1.4 NA 26.76 23.75 25.42 +.23
SEI
DlyShDurA +1.6 +4.7 10.72 10.53 10.69 +.02
IdxSP500E +3.8 +2.2 37.43 28.77 35.47 -1.45
IntlEq A +3.1 -3.1 9.66 7.44 9.07 -.20
IsCrFxIA +4.6 +6.7 11.07 10.66 11.07 +.06
IsHiYdBdA +6.2 +7.8 7.64 7.12 7.54 -.02
IsItlEmDA +6.8 +9.7 11.52 10.64 11.52 +.08
IsItlEmMA -2.3 +8.3 12.62 10.27 11.87 -.18
IsLrgGrA +5.4 +4.2 23.83 17.83 22.85 -.90
IsLrgValA +2.8 -.7 17.69 13.60 16.49 -.68
IsMgTxMgA +3.4 +1.6 13.20 10.05 12.47 -.51
TxEIntMuA +4.6 +4.6 11.48 10.80 11.24 +.01
SSGA
EmgMkts b +1.3 +8.7 23.98 19.04 22.86 -.23
EmgMktsSel b +1.4 +9.0 24.06 19.12 22.96 -.23
IntlStkSl b +2.8 -.4 11.17 8.68 10.37 -.27
S&P500Idx b +3.7 +2.2 22.42 17.27 21.24 -.87
Schwab
1000Inv d +3.8 +2.7 40.64 31.49 38.59 -1.61
CoreEqInv d +3.6 +2.0 18.63 13.81 17.44 -.83
DivEqSel d +4.2 +1.7 14.09 10.87 13.27 -.58
FUSLgCInl d +2.2 NA 10.51 8.02 9.85 -.42
FUSSMCIns d +1.9 NA 11.78 8.11 10.94 -.59
IntlIndex d +3.7 +.9 19.10 15.04 17.86 -.48
S&P500Sel d +3.8 +2.4 21.33 16.50 20.32 -.82
SmCapIdx d +3.7 +5.7 23.55 16.26 21.89 -1.20
TotBdMkt +4.0 +3.7 9.45 9.05 9.40 +.06
TotStkMSl d +4.0 +3.2 24.91 18.93 23.67 -1.01
Scout
Interntl d +2.3 +5.4 35.42 27.24 32.96 -.70
Selected
AmerShS b +.6 +.9 44.52 34.76 41.69 -1.53
American D +.8 +1.2 44.53 34.80 41.74 -1.53
Sentinel
CmnStkA m +4.4 +3.8 34.23 26.03 32.60 -1.12
GovtSecA m +3.4 +6.7 11.24 10.34 10.67 +.04
ShMatGovA m +1.7 +4.5 9.38 9.17 9.27 +.02
SmallCoA m +8.6 +7.3 8.96 6.17 8.42 -.43
Sequoia
Sequoia +11.3 +5.8147.36 114.29 143.88 -3.37
Sit
USGovSec +2.6 +6.1 11.39 11.19 11.38 +.03
Sound Shore
SoundShor +.3 +1.3 34.47 26.44 31.79 -1.05
Spectra
Spectra A m +7.1 +11.3 13.59 9.71 13.05 -.47
Stadion
MgdPortA m -6.3 NA 11.00 9.41 9.64 -.08
State Farm
Balanced +2.9 +4.8 57.34 50.11 54.88 -1.19
Growth +2.0 +3.4 57.76 45.34 53.51 -2.29
Stratton
MoDivREIT d +9.8 +3.5 29.76 23.43 28.71 -1.04
MultiCap d -1.2 +1.1 39.64 29.85 36.69 -1.77
SmCapVal d +7.7 +3.8 55.88 38.59 53.43 -2.43
T Rowe Price
Balanced +4.5 +4.8 20.55 17.14 19.95 -.42
BlChpGAdv b +6.7 +5.1 42.05 30.34 40.64 -1.35
BlChpGr +6.8 +5.3 42.14 30.36 40.73 -1.35
CapApprec +4.0 +5.7 21.83 18.05 21.13 -.60
CorpInc +6.5 +7.0 10.11 9.48 9.95 +.10
DivGrow +3.9 +3.5 24.86 19.18 23.61 -.86
DivrSmCap d +7.5 +8.6 18.37 11.80 17.00 -1.01
EmEurMed d -1.5 +2.6 24.84 18.17 23.08 -.19
EmMktBd d +6.8 +9.0 13.86 13.05 13.58 +.10
EmMktStk d -.3 +9.0 36.99 29.78 35.16 -.46
EqIndex d +3.7 +2.1 36.77 28.29 34.84 -1.42
EqtyInc +1.2 +1.6 25.53 20.00 23.77 -1.01
EqtyIncAd b +1.0 +1.4 25.49 19.95 23.72 -1.01
EurStock d +5.8 +3.9 17.41 12.35 15.87 -.45
FinSer -5.9 -4.1 15.40 11.94 13.34 -.52
GNMA +4.2 +6.6 10.10 9.76 10.09 +.04
GloStk d +2.0 +1.7 19.20 15.07 18.44 -.58
GrStkAdv b +5.1 +4.8 34.77 25.39 33.52 -1.15
GrStkR b +4.9 +4.6 34.34 25.13 33.09 -1.15
GrowInc +3.1 +3.1 21.84 16.74 20.70 -.84
GrowStk +5.2 +5.1 35.09 25.59 33.83 -1.17
HealthSci +15.7 +10.6 37.03 24.73 35.02 -2.01
HiYield d +6.1 +8.5 7.00 6.54 6.86 -.02
HiYldAdv m +5.7 +8.2 6.99 6.53 6.84 -.03
InsLgCpGr +4.8 +6.4 17.84 13.00 17.16 -.63
InstlEmMk d -.2 +9.2 33.75 27.12 32.10 -.42
InstlHiYl d +6.3 +8.8 10.13 9.57 9.93 -.03
InstlLgCV +2.1 +1.6 13.84 10.85 12.89 -.55
IntlBnd d +8.1 +7.3 10.66 9.69 10.58 +.11
IntlBndAd m +8.0 +7.0 10.65 9.68 10.57 +.11
IntlDisc d +4.7 +6.3 47.45 36.33 45.96 -.73
IntlGrInc d +5.0 +1.5 14.86 11.43 13.97 -.33
IntlStk d +2.0 +3.7 15.35 12.08 14.51 -.35
IntlStkAd m +2.0 +3.5 15.29 12.05 14.46 -.34
LatinAm d -8.8 +13.7 57.59 46.21 51.75 -.94
MDTaxFBd +5.2 +4.4 10.77 9.89 10.38 ...
MdCpVlAdv b +3.6 +5.7 25.58 19.80 24.45 -.81
MediaTele +8.4 +13.2 58.18 41.30 56.09 -1.50
MidCapE +3.2 +8.6 31.15 21.79 28.73 -1.43
MidCapVa +3.7 +5.9 25.71 19.92 24.58 -.82
MidCpGr +3.2 +8.5 65.35 47.74 60.43 -2.96
MidCpGrAd b +3.1 +8.2 64.12 46.94 59.25 -2.91
NewAmGro +3.3 +7.8 36.02 26.47 34.08 -1.60
NewAsia d +4.4 +16.7 20.25 16.96 20.02 -.15
NewEra +2.5 +6.3 58.14 39.38 53.49 -2.17
NewHoriz +8.3 +8.5 39.08 25.75 36.26 -1.95
NewIncome +3.9 +7.0 9.81 9.36 9.64 +.04
OrseaStk d +4.6 NA 9.24 7.10 8.72 -.21
PerStrBal +4.6 +5.7 20.30 16.79 19.72 -.41
PerStrGr +4.6 +4.5 24.84 19.49 23.97 -.69
PerStrInc +4.3 +6.1 16.86 14.75 16.55 -.21
R2015 +4.0 +5.0 12.72 10.61 12.37 -.27
R2025 +4.0 +4.6 12.99 10.37 12.52 -.34
R2035 +3.9 +4.3 13.28 10.26 12.71 -.40
Real d +12.1 +1.5 20.10 15.27 19.42 -.68
Ret2020R b +3.7 +4.3 17.43 14.18 16.85 -.41
Ret2050 +3.9 NA 10.58 8.17 10.12 -.31
RetInc +4.1 +5.4 13.71 12.17 13.42 -.18
Retir2005 +4.1 +5.4 12.00 10.57 11.81 -.17
Rtmt2010 +4.0 +5.1 16.31 14.00 15.96 -.28
Rtmt2020 +4.0 +4.8 17.67 14.38 17.10 -.42
Rtmt2030 +3.9 +4.4 18.71 14.67 17.96 -.53
Rtmt2040 +3.8 +4.3 18.92 14.60 18.09 -.57
Rtmt2045 +3.8 +4.3 12.60 9.73 12.05 -.38
SciTech +4.0 +9.9 30.02 20.95 27.88 -1.38
ShTmBond +1.9 +4.6 4.91 4.83 4.87 +.01
SmCpStk +5.0 +6.7 38.74 26.97 36.15 -2.01
SmCpVal d +2.5 +5.2 39.53 28.50 37.05 -1.89
SmCpValAd m +2.4 +5.0 39.27 28.31 36.79 -1.87
SpecGrow +3.8 +4.2 19.27 14.55 18.38 -.64
SpecInc +4.8 +7.0 12.70 12.10 12.62 -.02
SpecIntl d +4.0 +4.3 11.78 9.15 11.18 -.23
SumMuInt +5.1 +4.9 11.64 10.91 11.40 +.01
TaxFHiYld +6.1 +3.1 11.09 10.04 10.66 +.01
TaxFInc +5.3 +4.4 10.17 9.29 9.80 ...
TaxFShInt +3.1 +4.3 5.66 5.51 5.63 +.01
TrRt2010Ad b +3.9 +4.9 16.23 13.93 15.87 -.29
TrRt2020Ad b +3.9 +4.5 17.56 14.29 16.98 -.42
TrRt2030Ad b +3.8 +4.1 18.59 14.57 17.83 -.53
TrRt2030R b +3.6 +3.9 18.49 14.48 17.72 -.53
TrRt2040Ad b +3.8 +4.0 18.79 14.49 17.96 -.57
TrRt2040R b +3.5 +3.8 18.70 14.42 17.86 -.57
TxFIncAdv b +5.1 +4.1 10.18 9.29 9.81 +.01
USBdEnIdx d +4.3 +6.7 11.43 10.95 11.35 +.06
VATaxFBd +5.9 +4.5 11.91 10.87 11.52 -.01
Value +2.5 +2.1 25.63 19.58 23.92 -.98
ValueAd b +2.4 +1.9 25.36 19.40 23.66 -.96
TCW
DivFocN b +1.7 +.5 11.63 8.57 10.72 -.50
EmgIncI x +8.2 +12.8 9.02 8.38 8.98 +.01
SmCapGrI +1.1 +10.6 33.27 22.57 29.66 -1.47
TotRetBdI x +3.7 +9.1 10.44 9.86 9.90 -.04
TotRetBdN x +3.6 +8.8 10.79 10.20 10.24 -.04
TFS
MktNeut d +3.3 +7.8 15.66 13.77 15.17 -.29
TIAA-CREF
BdPIns +4.7 +5.9 10.45 10.06 10.40 +.05
BondIn +4.1 +6.1 10.78 10.24 10.63 +.06
EqIx +3.9 +2.9 10.45 7.92 9.91 -.42
Gr&IncIn +5.7 +5.8 10.01 7.52 9.55 -.42
Gr&IncRtl b +5.6 +5.6 12.13 9.09 11.57 -.51
InfL +9.6 +7.0 11.75 10.83 11.75 +.22
IntEqIdxRet d +3.3 +.8 18.45 14.47 17.34 -.42
IntlE d +3.5 +1.0 18.15 14.25 17.06 -.41
IntlEqIn d -.9 +1.7 10.80 7.82 9.82 -.28
IntlEqRmt d -1.1 +1.5 11.12 8.05 10.11 -.28
LCVal +.4 +1.0 14.21 10.86 13.12 -.55
LgCVIdx +2.3 -.1 13.24 10.32 12.40 -.53
LgGrIns +5.5 +5.3 11.34 8.49 10.87 -.47
Life2015 b +4.1 +4.1 11.75 10.04 11.49 -.22
Life2020 b +3.9 +3.6 11.71 9.78 11.38 -.26
Life2025 b +3.8 +3.2 11.64 9.50 11.23 -.31
Life2030 b +3.7 +2.7 11.55 9.20 11.07 -.34
Life2035 b +3.7 +2.7 11.68 9.09 11.13 -.38
Life2040 b +3.6 +2.9 11.91 9.25 11.33 -.40
LrgeCapVal +.2 +.8 14.16 10.81 13.07 -.54
MidCapGrwthRe +4.7 +6.7 21.53 14.69 19.79 -1.28
MidValIn +4.1 +4.4 18.85 13.98 17.76 -.76
MidValRmt +3.9 +4.1 18.75 13.90 17.65 -.76
SCEq d +4.1 +3.7 16.21 11.04 15.05 -.90
SPIndxIn +3.8 +2.3 15.37 11.92 14.64 -.59
SmCapEqRe d +3.9 +3.4 15.99 10.89 14.84 -.89
Target
SmCapVal +3.7 +5.6 22.86 16.52 21.36 -1.10
Templeton
InFEqSeS +3.4 +3.4 22.33 17.59 20.73 -.42
Third Avenue
IntlVal d +2.4 +1.6 18.74 14.29 17.33 -.52
RealEsVal d +3.5 -.1 24.71 20.38 23.96 -.29
SmCapVal d +3.6 +1.6 22.86 17.17 21.68 -.57
Value d ... +.7 54.81 43.29 51.77 -.12
Thompson Plumb
Bond +4.3 +8.4 11.71 11.28 11.66 +.04
Thornburg
IncBldA m +4.0 +6.8 20.23 17.44 19.21 -.35
IncBldC m +3.6 +6.1 20.23 17.44 19.21 -.35
IntlValA m +3.3 +5.3 30.95 23.52 28.77 -.65
IntlValC m +2.8 +4.5 29.10 22.18 27.05 -.62
IntlValI d +3.5 +5.7 31.63 24.05 29.41 -.67
LtdTMuA m +4.1 +4.6 14.34 13.83 14.30 +.03
LtdTMul +4.3 +4.9 14.34 13.83 14.30 +.02
Value A m +2.8 +2.9 37.64 28.16 34.79 -1.40
Value I d +3.0 +3.3 38.32 28.65 35.46 -1.42
Thrivent
LgCapStkA m +1.8 +.7 23.91 18.25 22.62 -.92
MidCapA m +.9 +4.2 16.67 11.47 15.14 -.87
MuniBdA m +5.6 +4.4 11.53 10.57 11.12 ...
Tocqueville
Gold m -.2 +18.9 91.56 63.64 86.31 -3.88
Touchstone
SdCapInGr +9.3 +9.1 15.91 10.85 15.35 -.56
Transamerica
AssAllCvC m +3.5 +4.2 11.71 10.51 11.49 -.13
AssAllGrA m +3.1 +2.1 13.00 9.94 12.36 -.40
AssAllGrC m +2.7 +1.5 12.71 9.71 12.06 -.40
AstAlMdGrA m +2.9 +3.4 12.77 10.45 12.25 -.31
AstAlMdGrC m +2.6 +2.8 12.72 10.38 12.18 -.31
AstAlModA m +3.8 +4.4 12.40 10.67 12.10 -.20
AstAlModC m +3.4 +3.8 12.35 10.60 12.03 -.20
Transamerica Partner
StockIdx b +3.8 +2.1 9.12 7.02 8.65 -.35
Turner
MidGrInv +5.0 +6.6 39.79 26.53 36.97 -1.91
Tweedy Browne
GlobVal d +1.6 +3.5 25.26 21.18 24.19 -.42
UBS
GlobAllA m +2.0 +2.3 10.59 8.99 10.18 -.21
UBS PACE
IntlEqP d +5.2 -.4 14.17 11.16 13.39 -.28
LgCoVlP d +2.7 +.9 18.21 13.94 17.20 -.48
LrCoGrP d +5.4 +4.5 19.85 14.45 19.06 -.60
StrFInP d +5.7 +9.0 15.06 13.94 14.55 +.13
US Global Investors
GlobRes m -1.3 +4.5 13.01 8.22 11.76 -.57
WrldPrcMnr m -14.5 +7.6 22.94 14.94 19.04 -.88
USAA
AggGrow +4.8 +3.3 36.19 26.14 34.57 -1.40
BalStrat +4.6 +4.1 14.37 12.11 13.80 -.29
CABond +6.7 +3.1 10.51 9.13 9.91 ...
CapGrowth +2.8 +.6 7.30 5.63 6.91 -.21
Cornerst +4.1 +4.0 24.31 20.58 23.53 -.42
EmergMkt -3.1 +9.1 22.33 18.18 20.94 -.29
GNMA +3.6 +6.4 10.35 10.03 10.33 +.03
Grow +2.7 +1.9 15.94 11.73 15.10 -.63
GrowInc +1.7 +2.1 16.29 12.31 15.24 -.68
HYOpp +6.3 +8.4 8.80 8.04 8.60 -.05
Income +4.7 +7.0 13.09 12.64 13.05 +.03
IncomeStk +5.4 -.8 13.29 10.09 12.53 -.49
IntermBd +6.0 +7.5 10.66 10.05 10.60 +.04
Intl +5.1 +3.8 26.98 20.53 25.57 -.40
PrcMtlMin -4.7 +18.5 43.83 32.14 40.87 -2.15
S&P500M +4.3 +2.3 20.43 15.74 19.48 -.67
ShTmBond +1.9 +5.2 9.27 9.15 9.20 ...
SmCapStk +3.4 +3.7 15.18 10.56 14.17 -.76
TaxEInt +5.5 +4.6 13.28 12.34 12.97 ...
TaxELgTm +6.5 +3.7 13.32 11.87 12.76 ...
TaxEShTm +3.0 +3.9 10.77 10.57 10.76 +.01
TgtRt2030 +4.1 NA 12.17 10.22 11.84 -.22
TgtRt2040 +3.5 NA 11.89 9.46 11.39 -.30
Value +2.2 +2.2 14.82 11.10 13.74 -.65
WorldGro +5.3 +4.6 20.62 15.60 19.70 -.52
Unified
Wntergrn m +6.1 +7.2 15.10 12.06 14.87 -.23
VALIC Co I
ForgnVal +4.2 +2.7 10.37 7.95 9.63 -.28
IGrowth +4.6 +5.9 12.06 8.86 11.51 -.48
IntlEq +2.6 0.0 7.04 5.55 6.60 -.16
IntlGrI +5.2 +4.0 12.34 9.38 11.71 -.24
MdCpIdx +4.6 +6.2 23.03 16.34 21.46 -1.10
Scie&Tech +3.9 +9.7 17.81 12.57 16.66 -.63
SmCpIdx +2.3 +3.8 15.90 10.96 14.69 -.82
StockIdx +3.7 +2.0 27.02 21.16 25.72 -1.05
VALIC Co II
IntSmCpEq +1.7 +1.8 14.60 11.06 13.84 -.28
MdCpVal -1.5 +3.0 18.23 13.50 16.63 -.84
SocResp +4.6 +2.4 12.14 9.31 11.60 -.44
Van Eck
GloHardA m +5.0 +11.7 57.73 37.40 54.95 -1.91
IntlGoldA m -5.1 +18.8 25.83 17.40 23.44 -1.34
Vanguard
500Adml +3.8 +2.4125.74 96.73 119.17 -4.85
500Inv +3.8 +2.3125.72 96.71 119.16 -4.85
AssetA +3.3 +1.3 26.44 21.65 25.10 -1.03
AssetAdml +3.3 +1.4 59.37 48.60 56.35 -2.31
BalIdx +4.1 +4.9 22.62 19.23 22.03 -.49
BalIdxAdm +4.2 +5.0 22.62 19.23 22.03 -.49
BalIdxIns +4.2 +5.0 22.62 19.23 22.03 -.49
BalIdxSig +4.2 NA 22.38 19.02 21.79 -.49
CAIT +5.5 +4.3 11.33 10.51 11.05 +.01
CAITAdml +5.5 +4.4 11.33 10.51 11.05 +.01
CALT +5.8 +3.6 11.48 10.40 11.06 ...
CALTAdml +5.9 +3.7 11.48 10.40 11.06 ...
CapOp d -.5 +5.3 36.17 26.59 33.07 -1.45
CapOpAdml d -.5 +5.4 83.55 61.44 76.40 -3.35
CapVal -2.4 +3.2 12.21 8.56 10.76 -.54
Convrt d +.9 +7.1 14.20 11.65 13.33 -.39
DevMktIdx d +3.1 +.9 11.03 8.72 10.37 -.25
DevMktsIdxIP d +3.2 NA 114.06 99.50 107.28 -2.61
DivAppInv +3.7 +3.8 23.00 18.08 21.63 -1.02
DivEqInv +3.8 +2.7 22.43 16.59 21.16 -.93
DivGr +4.9 +4.8 15.71 12.45 14.93 -.52
EMStIxSgl d +.1 NA 40.42 32.34 38.36 -.54
EmMkInsId d +.1 +10.6 31.98 25.59 30.35 -.43
EmMktIAdm d +.1 +10.6 42.03 33.62 39.89 -.56
EmMktStkIdxIP d +.1 NA106.38 95.16 100.98 -1.44
EmerMktId d ... +10.4 31.97 25.54 30.33 -.43
EnerIxAd d +12.7 +7.5 58.97 37.17 56.09 -2.58
EnergyAdm d +11.3 +7.0141.63 97.32 134.64 -4.59
EnergyInv d +11.3 +6.9 75.42 51.81 71.69 -2.44
EqInc +5.3 +2.6 22.40 17.63 21.16 -.90
EqIncAdml +5.3 +2.8 46.95 36.95 44.35 -1.89
EurIdxAdm d +5.0 +1.1 70.05 54.09 64.10 -1.82
EurStkISg d +5.0 NA 27.10 20.94 24.80 -.70
EuroInsId d +5.0 +1.1 29.88 23.07 27.34 -.78
EuropeIdx d +4.9 +1.0 30.06 23.04 27.49 -.78
ExDuTrIxI +6.7 NA 31.21 22.23 26.00 +.72
ExMktIdSig +4.1 NA 39.55 27.63 36.90 -1.91
ExplAdml +5.1 +5.1 77.12 52.08 71.31 -3.92
Explr +5.0 +4.9 82.81 55.92 76.57 -4.21
ExtdIdAdm +4.1 +5.6 46.03 32.16 42.96 -2.22
ExtdIdIst +4.1 +5.6 46.03 32.17 42.95 -2.23
ExtdMktIdxIP +4.1 NA 113.61 103.34 106.03 -5.49
ExtndIdx +4.0 +5.4 45.99 32.13 42.90 -2.23
FAWeUSIns d +2.3 NA101.95 80.26 95.95 -2.28
FAWeUSInv d +2.1 NA 20.32 16.00 19.12 -.45
FLLT +5.7 +4.5 11.74 10.74 11.41 ...
FLLTAdml +5.7 +4.6 11.74 10.74 11.41 ...
FTSESocIs +2.9 +.1 8.17 6.27 7.78 -.30
FTSESocIv +2.8 0.0 8.17 6.27 7.77 -.30
FinIdxAdm d -5.0 -10.0 17.65 13.87 15.56 -.57
GNMA +4.4 +7.0 11.16 10.57 11.01 +.05
GNMAAdml +4.5 +7.1 11.16 10.57 11.01 +.05
GlbEq +3.8 +1.4 19.58 15.05 18.53 -.58
GlbREIInv d +2.9 NA 21.02 18.71 20.70 -.13
GrIncAdml +4.6 +1.1 47.06 35.89 44.56 -1.97
GroInc +4.5 +1.0 28.82 21.99 27.29 -1.21
GrowthEq +5.7 +3.2 11.93 8.84 11.41 -.46
GrowthIdx +5.2 +5.5 34.36 25.63 33.07 -1.26
GrthIdAdm +5.3 +5.6 34.35 25.63 33.07 -1.26
GrthIstId +5.3 +5.6 34.35 25.64 33.07 -1.26
GrthIstSg +5.3 NA 31.81 23.74 30.62 -1.17
HYCor d +6.3 +7.3 5.88 5.57 5.82 ...
HYCorAdml d +6.4 +7.4 5.88 5.57 5.82 ...
HYT/E +5.7 +4.2 10.76 9.82 10.39 ...
HealCAdm d +9.5 +4.2 32.80 24.87 30.84 -1.48
HltCrAdml d +12.1 +4.9 59.75 47.30 57.47 -1.87
HlthCare d +12.1 +4.9141.57 112.06 136.16 -4.43
I-TCBII +6.5 NA 27.25 26.13 27.25 +.21
ITBond +6.3 +7.9 11.87 10.98 11.62 +.12
ITBondAdm +6.4 +8.0 11.87 10.98 11.62 +.12
ITGradeAd +5.7 +7.5 10.51 9.79 10.12 +.08
ITIGrade +5.6 +7.4 10.51 9.79 10.12 +.08
ITTsry +5.2 +7.4 12.08 11.11 11.76 +.10
ITrsyAdml +5.3 +7.6 12.08 11.11 11.76 +.10
InTecIdAdm d +2.9 +7.9 34.32 25.30 32.39 -1.30
InfPrtAdm +9.4 +7.1 27.38 25.02 27.38 +.50
InfPrtI +9.5 +7.1 11.15 10.19 11.15 +.20
InflaPro +9.4 +7.0 13.94 12.74 13.94 +.25
InstIdxI +3.9 +2.4124.86 96.09 118.37 -4.81
InstPlus +3.9 +2.4124.87 96.10 118.37 -4.82
InstTStId +4.0 +3.2 31.14 23.51 29.44 -1.25
InstTStPl +4.0 +3.3 31.14 23.51 29.44 -1.26
IntlExpIn d +.3 +3.6 17.92 13.47 16.72 -.42
IntlGr d +3.1 +4.0 21.17 16.09 19.93 -.44
IntlGrAdm d +3.1 +4.2 67.38 51.23 63.45 -1.39
IntlStkIdxAdm d +2.1 NA 28.57 25.19 26.91 -.63
IntlStkIdxI d +2.1 NA 114.31 100.76 107.68 -2.53
IntlStkIdxIPls d +2.2 NA 114.32 100.77 107.69 -2.53
IntlStkIdxISgn d +2.1 NA 34.29 30.22 32.29 -.76
IntlVal d +.8 +1.4 34.50 27.81 32.43 -.79
ItBdIdxIn +6.4 +8.1 11.87 10.98 11.62 +.12
ItBdIdxSl +6.4 NA 11.87 10.98 11.62 +.12
L-TGBII +6.5 NA 26.86 24.86 26.86 +.38
LTBond +7.4 +8.1 13.22 11.53 12.57 +.21
LTGradeAd +8.0 +8.2 10.04 8.99 9.76 +.18
LTInvGr +7.9 +8.0 10.04 8.99 9.76 +.18
LTTsry +6.4 +7.4 12.80 10.46 11.53 +.20
LTsryAdml +6.4 +7.6 12.80 10.46 11.53 +.20
LgBdIdxIs +7.5 +8.3 13.22 11.53 12.57 +.21
LgCpIdxAdm +4.0 +2.9 31.62 24.16 29.98 -1.22
LgCpIdxInstl +4.0 +2.9130.15 99.45 123.39 -5.03
LgCpIdxInv +3.9 +2.8 25.29 19.32 23.98 -.97
LgCpIdxSg +4.0 NA 27.58 21.07 26.15 -1.06
LifeCon +3.5 +4.5 17.10 15.36 16.76 -.24
LifeGro +3.4 +3.1 23.83 19.06 22.67 -.72
LifeInc +3.5 +5.1 14.52 13.75 14.39 -.09
LifeMod +3.7 +4.1 20.85 17.66 20.13 -.45
M-C400GrIdxI +7.3 NA139.76 130.41 130.41 -6.80
M-C400ValIdxI +2.2 NA128.85 120.16 120.16 -6.02
MATx-ExInv +5.1 +4.4 10.56 9.72 10.23 ...
MatIdxAdm d +1.6 +8.5 45.64 32.60 42.72 -2.00
MdGrIxInv +5.9 NA 27.56 18.92 25.90 -1.29
MdPDisGr +5.1 NA 18.36 15.28 17.68 -.40
MdPDisInv +5.3 NA 17.34 14.98 16.76 -.30
MdVlIxInv +2.6 NA 23.09 17.37 21.38 -1.00
MgC300GrI +5.1 NA101.28 76.74 97.81 -3.47
MgC300IxI +3.9 NA 91.61 70.89 87.09 -3.41
MgC300VlI +2.7 NA 84.01 65.64 77.93 -3.34
MgdPGrInv +4.7 NA 18.91 15.20 18.08 -.52
MidCapGr +6.4 +7.2 21.74 14.98 20.21 -1.06
MidCapIdxIP +4.4 NA 111.65 102.28 104.77 -5.07
MidCp +4.2 +4.8 22.57 16.28 21.17 -1.02
MidCpAdml +4.3 +4.9102.47 73.90 96.16 -4.65
MidCpIst +4.3 +4.9 22.64 16.33 21.24 -1.03
MidCpSgl +4.3 NA 32.34 23.33 30.34 -1.47
MktNtrlIv d +7.1 -.2 10.36 9.51 10.29 -.02
Morg +4.5 +4.3 19.82 14.36 18.85 -.82
MorgAdml +4.6 +4.5 61.49 44.55 58.47 -2.55
MuHYAdml +5.7 +4.2 10.76 9.82 10.39 ...
MuInt +5.0 +4.7 13.99 13.04 13.64 +.01
MuIntAdml +5.1 +4.8 13.99 13.04 13.64 +.01
MuLTAdml +5.5 +4.4 11.37 10.39 10.98 ...
MuLong +5.4 +4.4 11.37 10.39 10.98 ...
MuLtd +2.4 +3.8 11.20 10.95 11.12 +.01
MuLtdAdml +2.5 +3.9 11.20 10.95 11.12 +.01
MuSht +1.2 +2.9 15.98 15.84 15.93 +.01
MuShtAdml +1.2 +3.0 15.98 15.84 15.93 +.01
NJLT +4.8 +4.2 12.03 11.05 11.57 +.01
NJLTAdml +4.8 +4.3 12.03 11.05 11.57 +.01
NYLT +4.8 +4.2 11.43 10.52 11.08 ...
NYLTAdml +4.9 +4.3 11.43 10.52 11.08 ...
OHLTte +5.0 +4.6 12.34 11.27 11.91 ...
PALT +5.1 +4.2 11.38 10.48 11.04 +.01
PALTAdml +5.2 +4.3 11.38 10.48 11.04 +.01
PacIdInst d +.1 +1.0 11.28 9.38 10.81 -.18
PacIdSgnl d +.1 NA 25.59 21.28 24.53 -.40
PacIdxAdm d +.1 +1.0 73.70 61.26 70.63 -1.15
PacificId d ... +.9 11.35 9.36 10.87 -.18
PrecMtls d -1.7 +9.2 28.35 19.77 26.24 -1.00
Prmcp d +2.4 +5.1 71.63 55.28 67.35 -2.53
PrmcpAdml d +2.4 +5.2 74.34 57.38 69.91 -2.62
PrmcpCorI d +3.1 +5.4 15.02 11.35 14.20 -.52
R1000GrIdxI +5.7 NA123.46 112.85 118.42 -4.88
R1000ValIdxI +2.4 NA 119.74 111.18 111.60 -4.71
R2000IdxI +2.4 NA130.63 117.48 120.71 -6.74
R3000IdxI +3.9 NA121.10 115.21 115.21 -4.93
REITIdx d +12.0 +2.3 21.00 16.25 20.27 -.73
REITIdxAd d +12.0 +2.5 89.61 69.36 86.51 -3.10
REITIdxInst d +12.1 +2.5 13.87 10.74 13.39 -.48
REITIdxSg d +12.0 NA 23.92 18.52 23.09 -.83
S-M600IdxI +4.0 NA137.13 127.99 127.99 -6.66
S-TGBII +1.1 NA 25.55 25.52 25.55 +.01
STBond +2.4 +5.2 10.77 10.48 10.68 +.03
STBondAdm +2.5 +5.3 10.77 10.48 10.68 +.03
STBondSgl +2.5 NA 10.77 10.48 10.68 +.03
STCor +2.2 +4.9 10.91 10.72 10.79 +.02
STFed +1.8 +5.0 11.03 10.69 10.89 +.02
STFedAdml +1.9 +5.1 11.03 10.69 10.89 +.02
STGradeAd +2.3 +5.0 10.91 10.72 10.79 +.02
STIGradeI +2.3 +5.1 10.91 10.72 10.79 +.02
STTsry +1.6 +4.5 10.95 10.62 10.81 +.02
STsryAdml +1.7 +4.6 10.95 10.62 10.81 +.02
SdBrdMItP +7.3 +2.1 51.24 37.64 48.55 -2.21
SelValu d +2.7 +4.3 20.68 15.69 19.27 -.83
SmCapIdx +3.5 +5.5 38.92 26.88 35.98 -2.06
SmCapIdxIP +3.6 NA 112.50 101.65 104.03 -5.96
SmCpIdAdm +3.6 +5.6 38.97 26.91 36.04 -2.06
SmCpIdIst +3.7 +5.6 38.97 26.92 36.04 -2.06
SmCpIndxSgnl +3.6 NA 35.11 24.26 32.47 -1.86
SmGthIdx +5.8 +7.7 25.10 16.39 23.18 -1.45
SmGthIst +5.8 +7.9 25.15 16.43 23.24 -1.46
SmValIdx +1.3 +3.1 17.52 12.82 16.21 -.84
SmVlIdIst +1.4 +3.2 17.57 12.86 16.26 -.84
StLCInst +5.9 +1.7 25.38 19.26 24.19 -1.01
StLCPlus +6.0 +1.7 50.16 38.55 47.81 -2.00
StSmCpEq +7.0 +2.9 21.75 14.61 20.20 -1.15
Star +3.9 +4.8 20.35 17.22 19.64 -.36
StratgcEq +7.3 +1.8 21.15 14.58 19.65 -1.11
TWStkIInv d +2.7 NA 21.09 16.48 19.94 -.61
TelSerAd d +2.4 +3.8 37.17 28.93 34.25 -1.63
TgtRe2005 +4.9 +5.5 12.37 11.29 12.31 -.06
TgtRe2010 +4.6 +5.2 23.61 20.83 23.33 -.28
TgtRe2015 +4.1 +4.9 13.18 11.36 12.93 -.22
TgtRe2020 +3.9 +4.5 23.57 19.84 22.96 -.48
TgtRe2030 +3.7 +3.8 23.37 18.82 22.49 -.62
TgtRe2035 +3.6 +3.7 14.18 11.22 13.56 -.43
TgtRe2040 +3.5 +3.7 23.31 18.38 22.26 -.72
TgtRe2045 +3.6 +3.7 14.64 11.60 13.98 -.45
TgtRe2050 +3.6 +3.7 23.21 18.44 22.16 -.71
TgtRetInc +4.9 +5.9 11.73 10.84 11.69 -.04
Tgtet2025 +3.8 +4.2 13.53 11.14 13.10 -.32
TotBdAdml +4.2 +6.6 10.94 10.43 10.83 +.06
TotBdInst +4.2 +6.6 10.94 10.43 10.83 +.06
TotBdMkInv +4.1 +6.5 10.94 10.43 10.83 +.06
TotBdMkSig +4.2 NA 10.94 10.43 10.83 +.06
TotIntl d +2.1 +2.7 17.08 13.43 16.09 -.38
TotStIAdm +4.0 +3.2 34.44 26.02 32.55 -1.38
TotStIIns +4.0 +3.2 34.44 26.02 32.55 -1.39
TotStISig +4.0 NA 33.24 25.11 31.41 -1.34
TotStIdx +3.9 +3.1 34.43 26.01 32.54 -1.38
TxMBalAdm +4.7 +4.6 21.03 18.69 20.64 -.38
TxMCaIn +4.2 +3.0 34.05 25.82 32.40 -1.35
TxMCapAdm +4.2 +3.0 68.52 51.95 65.20 -2.70
TxMGIAdm +3.8 +2.3 61.13 47.04 57.94 -2.36
TxMGIIn +3.9 +2.4 29.75 22.89 28.20 -1.14
TxMInist d +3.1 +1.2 12.71 10.01 11.95 -.29
TxMIntlAdm d +3.1 +1.1 12.70 10.00 11.94 -.29
TxMSCAdm +4.2 +4.9 30.32 21.04 28.31 -1.47
TxMSCIst +4.2 +4.9 30.39 21.10 28.38 -1.47
USGro +5.9 +3.9 20.27 14.70 19.33 -.74
USGroAdml +6.0 +4.1 52.51 38.09 50.07 -1.93
USValue +4.8 -.2 11.27 8.57 10.58 -.50
UtiIdxAdm d +8.2 +3.6 36.78 32.21 35.73 -.82
ValIdxAdm +2.7 +.2 22.78 17.69 21.11 -.92
ValIdxIns +2.7 +.2 22.78 17.69 21.11 -.92
ValIdxSig +2.7 NA 23.70 18.41 21.96 -.96
ValueIdx +2.6 +.1 22.78 17.69 21.11 -.91
VdHiDivIx +5.1 NA 18.28 14.43 17.33 -.70
WellsI +5.1 +6.5 22.85 20.98 22.41 -.22
WellsIAdm +5.2 +6.6 55.36 50.82 54.30 -.52
Welltn +3.7 +5.2 33.11 28.27 31.82 -.69
WelltnAdm +3.8 +5.3 57.18 48.83 54.96 -1.20
WndsIIAdm +3.6 +1.0 50.09 38.41 46.71 -1.86
Wndsr +.3 +.3 14.68 10.99 13.46 -.55
WndsrAdml +.3 +.4 49.54 37.07 45.41 -1.87
WndsrII +3.6 +.9 28.22 21.64 26.32 -1.05
ex-USIdxIP d +2.3 NA107.98 95.21 101.64 -2.42
Vantagepoint
AggrOpp -.4 +4.9 12.34 9.27 11.30 -.55
AllEqGr +3.3 +3.1 21.64 16.45 20.47 -.75
ConsGro +3.3 +4.4 24.77 22.21 24.41 -.30
CorBdIxI x +4.1 +6.1 10.40 9.95 10.30 +.04
EqInc +4.2 +2.4 9.53 7.33 9.00 -.36
GrInc +3.2 +2.8 10.50 8.07 9.98 -.38
Growth +1.6 +1.7 9.36 7.20 8.92 -.36
Intl +6.2 +1.4 10.32 8.08 9.92 -.18
LgTmGro +3.3 +4.0 23.01 18.76 22.12 -.60
TradGro +3.3 +4.2 23.56 19.98 22.90 -.47
Victory
DivrStkA f -.4 +2.5 16.59 12.83 15.49 -.61
InstDivSt +.3 +2.7 11.59 9.01 10.83 -.41
SpecValA f -.6 +2.9 17.70 13.06 16.19 -.82
Virtus
BalA m +4.7 +4.4 14.27 11.74 13.92 -.30
EmgMktsIs +6.4 +12.5 9.72 7.80 9.64 -.05
ForOppX +8.4 +3.7 24.60 20.01 24.21 -.29
MulSStA m +4.4 +6.5 4.91 4.69 4.89 +.01
MulSStC b +4.4 +6.3 4.96 4.74 4.94 +.02
RealEstA m +12.7 +2.1 32.38 24.43 31.24 -1.14
Waddell & Reed
DivOppsA m +2.6 +2.3 16.11 11.85 15.16 -.61
Waddell & Reed Adv
AccumA m +5.2 +3.2 8.15 6.06 7.88 -.27
AssetStrA m +8.7 +10.3 10.45 8.28 10.14 -.27
BondA m +4.1 +5.2 6.46 6.13 6.37 +.05
ContIncA m +5.2 +6.5 8.89 6.96 8.59 -.26
CoreInv A m +7.1 +5.5 6.66 4.76 6.38 -.26
GlbBondA m +2.2 +6.2 4.08 4.00 4.04 +.01
HiIncA m +6.2 +8.2 7.31 6.79 7.20 -.03
MuniBondA m +4.8 +5.0 7.45 6.88 7.21 +.01
MuniHiInA m +5.0 +3.9 4.89 4.50 4.68 ...
NewCncptA m +4.8 +9.9 12.65 8.95 11.77 -.48
SciTechA m +5.4 +9.1 11.67 8.77 10.95 -.36
SmCapA m +7.0 +9.0 18.01 11.69 16.55 -1.13
VanguardA m +5.8 +4.6 8.89 6.55 8.54 -.34
Wasatch
LgCpVal d -.3 +3.4 15.12 11.65 13.77 -.55
Lng/Sht d +2.9 +5.1 13.76 10.81 12.99 -.38
SmCapGr d +4.0 +7.3 44.20 29.97 41.08 -2.13
Weitz
PartVal +4.8 +3.1 22.57 16.73 21.58 -.70
ShtIntmInc +2.3 +5.8 12.57 12.35 12.50 +.01
Value +5.5 +.1 30.97 23.85 29.75 -1.01
Wells Fargo
AdvCpGrI +3.1 +3.3 17.99 12.90 16.96 -.74
AstAlcA f +3.1 +2.4 20.05 16.50 19.18 -.62
AstAlllcA f +5.0 +4.5 12.76 11.07 12.60 -.14
AstAlllcAdm +5.1 +4.8 12.83 11.15 12.67 -.14
AstAlllcB m +4.5 +3.8 12.63 10.93 12.45 -.13
AstAlllcC m +4.5 +3.8 12.36 10.70 12.19 -.13
CmnStkInv +3.2 +7.7 22.81 16.61 21.33 -1.20
EmgMktEqA f +.8 +13.2 23.83 18.89 23.05 -.21
EndSelI +4.1 +3.1 10.89 7.87 10.37 -.43
GovScInst +3.7 +6.5 11.19 10.70 11.06 +.05
GovSecInv +3.4 +6.0 11.20 10.72 11.07 +.05
GrI +12.2 +12.4 40.76 26.80 38.49 -1.64
GrowInv +11.8 +11.8 37.95 25.06 35.82 -1.54
GrowthAdm +12.1 +12.3 39.76 35.12 37.54 -1.61
IntlBdIs +8.4 +9.3 12.40 11.20 12.34 +.19
OmgGrA f +3.4 +10.0 41.19 28.71 38.29 -1.92
OpportInv +1.6 +4.9 42.61 31.07 39.43 -1.99
Otlk2020I +4.1 +4.7 14.59 12.86 14.31 -.16
Otlk2030I +3.7 +4.5 15.48 12.68 14.90 -.34
Otlk2040I +3.3 +4.3 17.32 13.54 16.45 -.52
PrecMetA f -3.0 +15.5 93.72 70.30 85.42 -3.66
PrmLrgCoGrA f +6.8 +9.0 10.38 7.43 9.88 -.39
SCpValInv -1.3 +5.5 34.38 26.41 32.14 -1.63
STMuBdInv +2.4 +3.9 9.98 9.84 9.97 ...
ShDurI +1.5 +5.2 10.52 10.27 10.34 +.01
SmCapGrI -1.3 +8.7 15.34 10.35 13.91 -.96
SmCapValA f -1.3 +5.4 33.83 26.00 31.63 -1.60
SmCpOpAdm +.8 +6.7 37.23 27.40 34.52 -1.78
TotRetBAd +4.9 +7.2 13.17 12.31 12.88 +.07
TotRetBdI +5.0 +7.5 13.16 12.29 12.87 +.08
UlSTMInA f +1.0 +3.2 4.82 4.80 4.82 ...
UlSTMInI +1.2 +3.5 4.82 4.80 4.82 ...
UlSTMInIv +1.2 +3.2 4.83 4.80 4.83 ...
UltSTInI +.9 +2.6 8.57 8.49 8.55 ...
WBGrBl m +3.1 +2.5 12.02 9.35 11.45 -.39
WlthConAl m +2.6 +4.4 11.05 10.14 10.91 -.11
WlthModBl m +2.8 +3.7 11.60 9.90 11.28 -.23
Westcore
PlusBd d +4.8 +6.0 11.03 10.63 10.96 +.03
Select d +3.0 +9.8 23.81 16.41 21.70 -1.35
William Blair
EmgMktGIn -.5 +8.0 16.46 13.29 15.88 -.15
InslIntlG +.7 +2.7 15.14 12.16 14.47 -.30
IntlGrI d +.5 +2.5 23.53 18.92 22.46 -.50
IntlGrN m +.4 +2.2 22.99 18.48 21.93 -.48
Yacktman
Focused d +5.0 +11.0 19.40 15.90 18.57 -.52
Yacktman d +5.4 +9.9 18.21 15.01 17.43 -.49
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
C M Y K
PAGE 8D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011

timesleader.com
CONSEQUENCES,
elections have them.
The terrible spectacle
we are witnessing in
Washington over the
urgent need to raise
Americas debt ceiling
is a direct result of
congressional elections less than one
year ago.
In November, Republicans picked up
an astonishing 63 seats in the House of
Representatives. Their 179-256 minor-
ity status instantly became a 242-193
majority granting them the power to
appoint the House speaker and chairs
of every standing committee.
In April, the new Republican major-
ity passed legislation to undo Medicare
for everyone younger than 55, replac-
ing it with a coupon that senior citi-
zens would carry to insurance compa-
nies, hat in hand, and attempt to pur-
chase some health care coverage.
In July, House Republicans have the
United States, and everyones 401k, on
the brink of economic calamity. Elec-
tions have consequences.
Raising the debt ceiling the statu-
tory level necessary to pay the nations
bills authorized by law and already
incurred is a perfunctory measure.
But these are not your typical Repub-
licans being elected to Congress. Rath-
er, they are a cadre of extremists
fast approaching critical mass in the
House and Senate.
Not since 1948 has a political party
benefited by a shift of 63 seats in the
House. Last year the Senate GOP
gained six seats, increasing its number
to 49 of 100 senators. Two more Senate
seats and Republicans will have a ma-
jority in that chamber as well. Elec-
tions have serious consequences.
The new House majority selected
U.S. Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, to be
their speaker. Before doing so, Boehner
needed to solicit and accept support
from the dozens of far-right members
in his conference. As a result the veter-
an Boehner, certainly no ideologue,
had his hands full, if not tied.
Never was it more evident than on
Tuesday when Speaker Boehner an-
nounced his latest debt ceiling propos-
al to nowhere. Instantly he was op-
posed by members of his own party,
many led by right-wing Congressman
James Jordan, who quickly announced
that Boehner would not have the votes
to pass it. Jordans Ohio congressional
district adjoins that of his speaker.
When will thoughtful Republicans
move to take back their party?
On Wednesday, as the Dow was
dropping 198 points, a frustrated U.S.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., took the
Senate floor to chastise the Republican
fringe opposed to increasing Americas
debt ceiling. And the conservative Wall
Street Journal added, The idea seems
to be that if the House GOP refuses to
raise the debt ceiling, a default crisis or
gradual government shutdown will
ensue and the public will turn en
masse against Barack Obama. Then
Democrats would have no choice but
to pass a balanced budget amendment
and reform entitlements, and the tea
party hobbits could return to Middle
Earth having defeated Mordor.
McCain and the WSJ do not a trend
make, but the intentions of tea party
hobbits are known and Republicans
will have an opportunity to root them
out.
Yet none of this resolves the immedi-
ate crises facing our nation. While
more information might have become
known over the weekend, if no congres-
sional resolution is at hand, President
Obama should put an end to the global
economic uncertainty before markets
open in the morning.
The president should raise the debt
ceiling by executive order. Citing the
14th Amendment to the Constitution
the president can free the American
people, their government and all future
presidents from ever again being held
hostage to the unconstitutional debt
ceiling charade.
Amendment 14, Section 4: The
validity of the public debt of the United
States, authorized by law shall not
be questioned.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
Raise ceiling
through use of
executive power
Kevin Blaums column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
OUR government
with its checks and
balances and need for
consensus makes for
difficult navigation,
even if you are cap-
tain of the ship.
One of the interest-
ing questions to ponder is assessing
how much power a president really
has to resolve critical issues. The rest
of us have the luxury of being out of
the line of fire while this countrys
leaders face the threat that we will
soon be out of money and unable to
pay our bills.
President Harry Truman said the
buck stops here at the presidents
desk and he was right.
Perhaps its too simplistic to view
the presidency this way, but the per-
son in the Oval Office is the ultimate
decision-maker for the government of
our country. He takes the lions share
of the blame or the credit for events
that unfold during his administration.
President Obama shoulders blame
for failing over the last few weeks to
get the consensus he needed to raise
the debt ceiling and he failed to save
the country from the maddening de-
bate over spending cuts vs. tax in-
creases.
As is often the case, the president
cant win. He made a meaningful
attempt to reach an agreement with
the Speaker of the House, Republican
John Boehner. The plan failed but it
brought Obama criticism from those
on the far left of his own party who
believed he had abandoned them and
the progressive Democratic principles
they espouse.
Republicans, meanwhile, even those
he was attempting to appease, do not
believe Obama does enough of any-
thing to help move the country for-
ward.
The internal revolt within the two
parties is almost comical. Liberals say
Obama isnt liberal enough. The tea
party folks say Boehner isnt conser-
vative enough.
At some point Obama will have to
act as if hes the CEO of the country
and support a plan his own or
someone elses. By weeks end, he
hadnt done that; he still seemed to be
waiting for someone else to solve the
problem.
The 2012 election is a long way in
the future, but the president knows
what the defining issue will be in his
campaign for re-election: the econo-
my, and by that I do not mean our
debt level or ability to borrow. The
economy, for purposes of politics, can
be measured in three words: jobs,
jobs, jobs.
The debate over the debt ceiling on
the debt is more philosophical than
real. Jobs are real. The state of the
economy is real. While the debate was
raging over the debt ceiling, news
reports were shouting more bad news:
The United States economy has
slowed considerably this year from a
year ago, said a report from the Com-
merce Department released on Friday.
The news came as Congress wran-
gled over how to put the nation on a
more sustainable fiscal path without
slowing the recovery even more, or
throwing the country back into reces-
sion.
It is unbelievable that a person runs
for president and does not realize
they have to make the tough deci-
sions and solve the problems that
split not only the political parties but
the ranks within the parties. If you
want to be the nations chief exec-
utive, you have to know that the buck
stops with you.
We have problems underlying the
debt ceiling and borrowing crisis.
They are the most serious we face.
The president must find a way to put
people back to work and enable a
recovery of our economy as a whole.
Those are the priorities. The CEO of
the country needs to lead. President
Obama should not get a pass because
his job and the process of democracy
are difficult.
He wanted the job and now he
should do it.
RICHARD L. CONNOR
O P I N I O N
Mr. President,
the buck stops
at your desk
Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of
The Times Leader. Reach him at rcon-
nor@timesleader.com
O
DD, W.Va. For ru-
ral America, the post
office is more than a
convenient place to mail let-
ters. Its income in areas
where jobs are scarce, a place
topaythebills, andattimes, a
neighborhood spot to social-
ize.
FromAlaskatoMaine, resi-
dents in rural areas are hold-
ing their collective breath af-
ter the financially troubled
U.S. Postal Service said this
week it was considering clos-
ing1in10 of its retail outlets
tosave money.
Morethan3,600local offic-
es, branches and stations
could be on the chopping
block. Four of the 203 up for reviewin Pennsylvania are
locatedinLuzerne County.
RockGlenandWestonpost offices, theonlytwosituat-
edinBlackCreekTownship, areonthelist. So, too, is the
post office at BeachHaven, SalemTownshipandthe one
inCambra, HuntingtonTownship.
In the rural West Virginia town of Odd, residents say
gettingbywouldbe difficult without their post office.
I dont have no car, said 59-year-old Betty Ann Whit-
taker, wholivesonSocial Securityandneedstobecloseto
homebecauseshecaresforhermentallydisabledsiblings
andnephews. Her run-downhome at the foot of a moun-
tainsideisjustashortwalkawayfromtheOddPostOffice.
Other Americans who
dontdrive, orareonafixedin-
come like Whittaker, would
face a similar dilemma. In
WestVirginia, thereare150of-
ficesonthelist. Onlysixother
statesTexas, Pennsylvania,
Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa and
Missourihavemoreoutlets
under considerationfor possi-
bleclosure.
InOdd,manyofthe800res-
idents have mail boxes in the
post office, in part, because
mail theft is abigconcern.
Christine Woodlives inan
apartment attached to the
post officeandhas amailbox
there. Her family owns the
building and has been rent-
ingtheofficespacetothePostal Servicefor decades. The
rent helps her paythe bills.
Inthewinters, sometimesyoucantgoout, unlessthey
come andplowwhichtheydont always do, Woodsaid.
The nearest post office, in Ghent, is about five miles
away.
The Postal Service, which has been losing money as
customers use the Internet in increasing numbers to do
business instead of using the mail, said space in local
stores, librariesandgovernmentofficesmaybeusedtoof-
fer postal services insomeareas wherepost offices areul-
RURAL AMERICA WORRIED ABOUT OFFICE CLOSINGS
By HARRY R. WEBER Associated Press
AP PHOTOS
Boxes containing hikers supplies, sent care of
general delivery, await pickup at the post office
in Caratunk, Maine. The U.S. Postal Service
plans to close some rural post offices including
some that Appalachian Trail hikers have come
to rely on for vital supply drops on their trip
from Georgia to Maine.
See POST OFFICE, Page 6E
A man walk away from the Handy Street Post Office after hours in New Brunswick, N.J. The Handy Street
facility is one of fifty retail outlets in New Jersey facing closure as the Postal Service looks to cut costs.
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
I refuse to be a party to
deceiving the American people
yet again.
U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann
The Minnesota Republican running for president
with tea party support on Friday revolted, vowing
not to fall in line with the GOP House speakers plan to raise the
nations $14.3-trillion debt ceiling.
THE BIG news, as far as
the media are concerned,
is the political game of
debt-ceiling chicken that is
being played by Democrats
and Republicans in Wash-
ington. But, however much
the media are focused on what is happen-
ing inside the Beltway, there is a whole
country outside the Beltway and the time
is long overdue to start thinking about
what is best for the rest of the country, not
just for right now but for the long haul.
No matter how the debt-ceiling crisis
turns out, the current economic turmoil in
financial markets around the world should
cause some serious thoughts about the
long run, and about the whole idea of a
national debt-ceiling.
Some people might have been shocked
when the credit-rating firm Moodys recent-
ly suggested that the debt-ceiling law be
repealed, in order to avoid fiscal crises that
can throw world financial markets into
turmoil and injure countries around the
world.
Anyone who wants to show that Moodys
is wrong should be prepared to show the
actual benefits of the debt-ceiling, not its
goals or hopes. That will not be easy, if
possible at all.
Too many policies, programs and in-
stitutions are judged by what they are sup-
posed to do, rather than by what they ac-
tually do and the consequences of their
actions. The United Nations, for example,
survives as a glorious idea, despite how
corrupt, counterproductive and even dan-
gerous its actions are.
The national debt-ceiling law should be
judged by what it actually does. The one
thing that the national debt-ceiling has
never done is to put a ceiling on the rising
national debt. Time and time again, for
years on end, the national debt-ceiling has
been raised whenever the national debt
gets near whatever the current ceiling
might be.
Regardless of what it is supposed to do,
what the national debt-ceiling actually does
is enable any administration to get all the
political benefits of runaway spending for
the benefit of their favorite constituencies
and then invite the opposition party to
share the blame, by either raising the na-
tional debt ceiling, or by voting for unpop-
ular cutbacks in spending or increases in
taxes.
What would happen if there were no
national debt-ceiling law?
Those people who got the political bene-
fits from handing out trillions of dollars of
the taxpayers money (plus borrowed mon-
ey) also would get the clear and sole blame
for the resulting skyrocketing national debt
and all the unpopular consequences.
Those people who want serious and
substantial spending cuts are absolutely
right in what they want. There are not only
government programs that need to be cut,
but also whole government agencies, in-
cluding Cabinet-level Departments, that are
not merely useless but positively harmful
on net balance.
There are a lot of things that could be
cut, and should be cut, instead of default-
ing on the nations debts. But that is not
likely to happen, if Obama and his media
chorus can instead blame the Republicans
for forcing a government shutdown or a
credit default.
Regardless of how the crisis is resolved,
Moodys suggestion of repealing the nation-
al debt-ceiling law deserves some very
serious thought, because that law is the
crucial factor in the political games that
allow big spenders to blame others for the
consequences of their own irresponsibility.
Those people who say that the reckless
spending and reckless borrowing of the
Obama administration are the roads to ruin
are absolutely right.
Too many policies and institutions are
judged by what they are supposed to do,
rather than by what they actually do.
Sky, not the ceiling, is the limit for runaway spending
Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.
COMMENTARY
T H O M A S S O W E L L
TWELVE NEW governors
who ran on anti-tax plat-
forms have now signed their
first fiscal year budgets.
All of them will tell you
they were elected with a
mandate to get their states
fiscal house in order, rein in government
spending and cut taxes. Some of them will
even tell you they view New Jerseys Chris
Christie as their model a primo example
according to Wisconsins Scott Walker of
how a conservative governor governs. This
should alarm you.
Gov. Christie recently vetoed a widely
popular and eminently sensible tax on New
Jersey millionaires. This temporary tax,
affecting a mere 0.2 percent of all households,
would have generated around $500 million,
primarily for public schools. In the same
budget, Christie raised (yes, raised) taxes on
his states working poor by cutting about $45
million from the Earned Income Tax Credit,
which helps people working full-time in low-
wage jobs to make ends meet.
He went on to shred the Democratic legis-
latures budget, which paid for things such as
police protection, a health-care safety net and
college tuition grants. Christie said no to all
of it, insisting the state didnt have the mon-
ey.
And yet he managed to set aside $640
million ($365 million if you accept his revised
math) that he calls a healthy and necessary
surplus necessary to his career, maybe, but
not healthy for his constituents.
New Jersey is one of more than 30 states
that, in 2009, decided temporarily to boost
some taxes to help make up revenues that
were drying up with the recession. Even with
those temporary infusions, states had to
excise billions from their budgets to stay in
the black. Those mostly two-year fixes have
now expired, as have the federal stimulus
dollars that kept many state budgets afloat.
Now, with hospitals, schools and police
forces scarcely shadows of their former
selves, and college tuition up as much as 50
percent and even 100 percent since 2008,
governors such as Christie are hoarding
surpluses while heaping burdens on average
taxpayers, too many of whom remain un- or
under-employed.
In Michigan, with its infamously precari-
ous economy, freshman Gov. Rick Snyder
delivered a particularly irrational budget. He
slashed all kinds of spending, cut business
taxes by more than a billion dollars, then
reduced the states Earned Income Tax Credit
by 70 percent, raising taxes on the states
working poor by more than $260 million
each year. According to our analysis, the
poorest 20 percent of Michiganders will be
hit hardest by the package of tax hikes that
Snyder pushed through. All to pay for alleg-
edly job-creating tax cuts for business, even
as the governor admits he cant guarantee
economy-boosting results.
Governors across the country have signed
budgets like these, with excruciating cuts in
government services, incomprehensible tax
increases for low- and middle-income house-
holds and utterly mystifying tax breaks bene-
fiting businesses and individuals with healthy
portfolios.
Like Christie, each of these governors left
hundreds of millions of available funds (previ-
ous surpluses or projected revenues) un-
spent. They like to call it fiscally responsib-
le, but sitting on millions while raising the
cost of living for low- and middle-income
families and passing the buck to cities and
counties (which is exactly what these
stripped down state budgets do, make no
mistake) is anything but fiscally responsible.
It is, however, politically profitable. And
taxpaying citizens should not fall for this
shell game.
Anti-tax governors fiscally reprehensible, not responsible
Matthew Gardner is executive director of the
Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Readers
may write to him at ITEP, 1616 P St. NW, Suite 200,
Washington, D.C. 20036; website: www.itepnet.org.
COMMENTARY
M A T T H E W G A R D N E R
I
F YOU FOLLOWED the debt ceiling debate last week in
Washington, D.C., and found it (inspiring / dishearten-
ing), youre probably about ready to (cheer / weep) now
that Congress finally appears poised to (take back our
country by restoring fiscal sanity / push the nation over a cliff).
Can you believe how reckless (President Obama / House
Speaker Boehner) has been about this monumental matter? If
nothing else, the crisis again displayed how wrongheaded the
(Democrats agenda / Republicans ideology) is today and the
extent to which Washington remains (dysfunctional / dysfunc-
tional).
No matter where you stand, let your elected federal officials
know how you feel and how you expect them to vote. Call
their capital offices or visit their websites for district office
phone numbers, email addresses and straight-from-the-source
explanations of their views onthe latest debt ceilinglegislation.
U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey, D-Scranton
Phone: (202) 224-6324 or toll free 1-866-802-2833
Internet address: http://casey.senate.gov/
U.S. Sen. Patrick J. Toomey, R-Zionsville
Phone: (202) 224-4254
Internet address: http://toomey.senate.gov/
U.S. Rep. Louis J. Barletta, R-Hazleton
Phone: (202) 225-6511 or toll free 1-855-241-5144
Internet address: http://barletta.house.gov/
U.S. Rep. Thomas A. Marino, R-Lycoming Twp.
Phone: (202) 225-3731
Internet address: http://marino.house.gov/
OUR OPINION: DEBT DEBATE
Your call to be
heard in D.C.
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/Impressions Media
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
PRASHANT SHITUT
President
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
W
E HAVE a boom-
ing gas industry
in Pennsylvania
all right, but
based on a good portion of the
newly released Marcellus
Shale Commission report, its
worth wondering if the major
output of all this drillingis heli-
um administered to our elect-
ed officials.
Theyve been acting posi-
tively dizzy over the prospects
for gas drilling. And were not
just talking about the Corbett
administration, but
also the Rendell ad-
ministration, which
helped usher in the
Marcellus Shale gas
rush in 2008.
Despite the heavy
representation of the
gas industry on the
commission, Corbett
should get some credit for
commissioning a report on an
industry that has exploded in
the past three years. Andwhile
the report reflects the indus-
trys bias, and is notable more
for what it lacks than what it
provides, thereport is at least a
starting point for coming to
grips with the huge impacts
that drillers have had on the
state.
For example, workers stay-
ing in motels long-termmeans
the Endless Mountains region
lost $142,000 in tax revenue
because the lawwaives the ho-
tel tax for those staying in a
motel more than 30 days. Wya-
lusing Township had to in-
crease road workers wages by
20 percent to stay competitive,
and homeless rates are rising
due to housing shortages.
Its in the 17-page list of 96
recommendations where a
fuller picture of the industrys
impact emerges: Recommen-
dations for further work to en-
sure the safety and regulation
of the industry, such as assess-
ments, monitoring, reporting
and regulatory changes would
fall primarily on the shoulders
not only of local municipal-
ities, but also on the state de-
partments of Transportation,
Environmental Protection,
Conservation and Natural Re-
sources, Health
and others . . .
many of which
have just seen
their budgets cut.
So where does
the money come
from to follow
through on the
commissions rec-
ommendations?
That question underscores
the limits of an impact fee
thats limited to localities and
provides the strongest argu-
ment yet for the value of a sev-
erance tax. That could help
fund the state agencies that
will be doing most of the addi-
tional work.
And with no clear figures on
the number of jobs the indus-
try has generated the claims
range from19,000, to a high of
72,000 (from a new hires ac-
count by the Department of
Labor) we cant helpwonder-
ing: Why are we turning our-
selves inside out to make sure
the industry grows before
weve had a clear-eyed, unbi-
ased study that better mea-
sures rewards against impact?
Philadelphia Daily News
OTHER OPINION: GAS DRILLING
Weve just begun
to gauge impact
Wyalusing Town-
ship had to in-
crease road work-
ers wages by 20
percent to stay
competitive
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3E
F O R U M
WERE IN the
midst of a
great four-year
national de-
bate on the
size and reach
of govern-
ment, the
future of the welfare state,
indeed, the nature of the social
contract between citizen and
state.
The distinctive visions of the
two parties social-democratic
versus limited-government
have underlain every debate on
every issue since Barack Oba-
mas inauguration: the stimu-
lus, the auto bailouts, health
care reform, financial regu-
lation, deficit spending. Every-
thing. The debt ceiling is but
the latest focus of this funda-
mental divide.
The sausage-making might
be unsightly, but the problem is
not that Washington is broken,
that ridiculous ubiquitous
clich. The problem is that
these two visions are in compe-
tition, and the definitive pop-
ular verdict has not yet been
rendered.
Were only at the midpoint.
Obama won a great victory in
2008 that he took as a mandate
to transform America toward
European-style social democra-
cy. The subsequent counterrev-
olution delivered to that project
a staggering rebuke in Novem-
ber 2010. Under our incre-
mental system, however, a
rebuke delivered is not a man-
date conferred. That awaits
definitive resolution, the rubber
match of November 2012.
But reversal rollback, in
Cold War parlance is simply
not achievable until conserva-
tives receive a mandate to
govern from the White House.
Lincoln is reputed to have
said: I hope to have God on my
side, but I must have Kentucky.
I dont know whether conserva-
tives have God on their side (I
keep getting sent to His voice
mail), but I do know that they
dont have Kentucky they
dont have the Senate, they
dont have the White House.
And under our constitutional
system, you cannot govern
from one house alone.
Given this reality, trying to
force the issue turn a block-
ing minority into a governing
authority is not just counter-
constitutional in spirit but
self-destructive in practice.
Consider the Boehner Plan
for debt reduction. The Heri-
tage Foundations advocacy
arm calls it regrettably in-
sufficient. Of course it is.
Thats what happens when you
control only half a branch. But
the plans achievements are
significant. It is all cuts, no
taxes. It establishes the prece-
dent that debt-ceiling increases
must be accompanied by equal
spending cuts. And it provides
half a year to both negotiate
more fundamental reform (tax
and entitlement) and keep the
issue of debt reduction con-
stantly in the public eye.
I am somewhat biased about
the Boehner Plan because for
weeks Ive been arguing (in this
column and elsewhere) for
precisely such a solution: a
two-stage debt-ceiling hike
consisting of a half-year exten-
sion with dollar-for-dollar
spending cuts, followed by
intensive negotiations on entit-
lement and tax reform. Its
clean. Its understandable. Its
veto proof. (Obama wont
dare.) The Republican House
should have passed it weeks
ago.
After all, what is the alterna-
tive? The Reid Plan with its
purported $2 trillion of debt
reduction? More than half of
that comes from not continuing
surge-level spending in Iraq and
Afghanistan for the next 10
years. Ten years? Were out of
Iraq in 150 days.
The Congressional Budget
Office has found that Harry
Reids other discretionary sav-
ings were overestimated by
$400 billion.
The Obama plan? There is
no Obama plan. And the
McConnell plan, a final resort
that punts the debt issue to
Election Day, would likely yield
no cuts at all.
Obama faces two massive
problems jobs and debt.
Theyre both the result of his
spectacularly failed Keynesian
gamble: massive spending that
left us a stagnant economy with
high and chronic unemploy-
ment and a staggering debt
burden. Obama is desperate to
share ownership of this failure.
Economic dislocation from a
debt-ceiling crisis precisely
serves that purpose if the
Republicans play along. The
perfect out: Those crazy tea
partyers ruined the recovery!
Why would any conservative
collaborate with that ploy?
November 2012 constitutes the
new conservatisms one chance
to restructure government and
change the ideological course
of the country. Why risk forfeit-
ing that outcome by offering to
share ownership of Obamas
wreckage?
Who wants a piece
of Obamas wreckage?
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
I
n this terrain, the lone motorcycle leaves a literal carbon footprint.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Pete G. Wilcox
and words by Mark E. Jones
EVERY sum-
mer when the
temperature
goes up, people
start stripping
down. At the
risk of sounding
like a prude, I
find it unseemly. Toddlers look
cute in just a pair of shorts. Mid-
dle-age men do not. Most women
dont look good in shorts, period.
Yes, there are starlets strutting
down Sunset Boulevard beautiful
in little short-shorts, but theyre
the exception. I dont see them at
my local grocery store leaning
over the frozen food case. What I
see reaching for the ice cream is
just way too much. Im not talking
about age. Im not talking about
weight. Im just asking for mod-
esty. I dont want to be confronted
with body parts best seen only by
your doctor.
But America is a free country,
and imposing any kind of dress
code starts us down a very slip-
pery slope.
I was hiking in a park with a
friend and she told me howhappy
she was about the lawin France
prohibiting Islamic full-face veils
in public. I was appalled. Its free-
dom of religion, I said, and free-
dom of speech. Its oppression of
women, she replied. Howdo you
know? I asked.
At that moment, two young
women jogged past us in tiny,
stretchy shorts and bikini tops.
Nothing was left to the imag-
ination. They were fit and attrac-
tive, but I found myself thinking
Id almost rather my teenage
daughter wore a burka. One outfit
is as extreme as the other. Both
get second and third looks. Each
conveys an image of the woman
wearing it, a supposition that
might or might not be true.
As for oppression, what sort of
response will the girls in bikinis
get, especially from men? To be
ogled and objectified doesnt do
much for womens equality. You
could argue, as my friend did,
neither does a religion that re-
quires women to be completely
covered. But in a democratic
society, America or France, people
should be free to wear whatever
they want.
Driving in the Fairfax district, I
love to watch Orthodox Jewish
families walking to temple. The
men in their long coats and big
hats, the women in tailored suits
and wigs, and especially the little
boys with curling payos and yar-
mulkes and the tassels of their
prayer shawls flapping.
There is a Buddhist temple in
my neighborhood, and the monks
wear wonderful orange robes and
shave their heads, men and wom-
en alike.
I lived in Utah for seven years,
and Mormon garments, worn
under clothing, cover more skin
than what most people wear in
my Trader Joes. I would find their
nylon jumpsuits oppressive, but
its none of my business.
If we outlawburkas, then we
should ban all manner of religious
dress, including nuns habits and
priests collars. And if were sup-
pressing that personal expression,
where will it end?
A 20-year-old college football
player got on a plane in San Fran-
cisco reportedly wearing his pants
so lowhis whole butt in tight
black briefs, according to one
account showed. I dont know
howhe walked to his seat, but it
was a fashion statement: He must
have thought he looked cool. A
flight attendant took exception
and asked himto pull up his
pants. What happened next is in
some dispute, but eventually he
was arrested. He missed his flight,
but he wasnt charged.
Just days earlier, same airline,
an older man, white-haired, got on
a flight wearing blue womens
underwear, a matching spaghetti-
strap, midriff-baring top, a
cropped see-through sweater and
black thigh highs and high heels.
Airline personnel didnt say a
word.
Now, it was the white-haired
mans right to look ridiculous (up
to a point, which no one has said
he crossed), but the same right
was not extended to the football
player. Was it because the football
player was black? Was it because
he was young? Was it because he
looked gangsta? The flight at-
tendant made a judgment based
at least in part on a pair of sagging
sweatpants. Isnt that repression?
When does one persons ex-
pression become more important
than anothers? An11-year-old was
sent home from school for wear-
ing a T-shirt that read Obama a
Terrorists Best Friend. If another
kid wore a shirt reading Obama
the Best President Ever, some
might disagree, but who would
prevent himfrom sharing his
opinion?
At the mall some years ago I
passed a young woman wearing a
T-shirt bearing a vulgar message
about President Bush almost
impossible to explain to your
9-year-old. But I absolutely defend
her right to wear it.
Yes, I wish my across-the-street
neighbor would put on a shirt
when he stands in his driveway to
smoke a cigarette. His sweaty
chest hair over man-boobs is a
sight I could live without. But
then I remind myself: Summer
wont last forever.
A request, but no more, for summer modesty
COMMENTARY
D I A N A W A G M A N
Diana Wagman is the author of the
novels Skin Deep, Spontaneous
and Bump. She wrote this for the
Los Angeles Times.
Yes, I wish my across-the-
street neighbor would put on a
shirt when he stands in his
driveway to smoke a cigarette.
His sweaty chest hair is a
sight I could live without.
Thanks for plants
for auction tent
I
want to publicly acknowl-
edge those who most gra-
ciously and generously
provided donations and sup-
port to the 2011 Back Moun-
tain Memorial Library Auc-
tions plant booth.
Thank you to these local
businesses and groups that
donated plants and gardening
items: Antosh Greenhouses,
Back Mountain Feed and
Seed, Back Mountain Bloom-
ers, Bloomingdale Gardens,
Darling & Sons Farms and
Greenhouses, Delkanics
Greenhouse, Dundee Gardens,
Edwards Landscaping, Flower
Tent, Golombs Greenhouse,
Hoss Garden Hut, Kettells
Greenhouse, Kimberlys Flo-
ral, Larry OMalia Greenhous-
es, Lehman Nursery, Martin
OMalia Greenhouses, Marys
Flowers & Garden, Penn State
Seed, Rave Discount Plant
Center, Rogers Nursery, Row-
lands Family Greenhouse,
Varsity Landscape, Whirligigs
and More, and Wild Birds
Unlimited.
Thank you to the individu-
als who donated plants from
their yards and gardens: Ste-
phanie Donnelly, Julie McMo-
nagle, Pat Miller, Pam Fen-
drock, Anita Grohowski, Bar-
bara Hovey, Anita Koziel,
Carol McCulloch, Diane OHa-
ra, Chris Bruns, Marilyn Feld-
man, Lois, Regina, Joann
Olenick, Rhyle Stull and Linda
(in memory of Diane Kopacz).
My gratitude also goes to
the booth volunteers who gave
of their time and shared their
gardening knowledge: Anita
Koziol, Carol McCulloch,
Carol Bullock, Chris Chmar-
ney, Linnie Blazes and Sharon
Hinchey.
Thank you to all of those
people who supported the
library by buying flowers,
vegetables, cacti, mini-gardens
and craft items.
Finally, thank you to my
team, whose members spent
weeks potting plants, painting
pots and taking care of the
plant nursery that had over-
taken my driveway and yard.
They hauled plants from my
home to the auction grounds,
helped set up and display the
plants and planters, and then
spent hours at the auction
each day as plant tent volun-
teers: Louise Mattas, Sharon
Shaver and Margaret Dwin-
chick. Ladies, youre the best!
Diana Pickett Berry
Chairwoman, Plant booth
Back Mountain Memorial
Library Auction
Dallas
Dog park gets
put to good use
M
y husband, our pets and I
were displaced from our
home on June 20. Except
for a few days in Chicago (a
pre-planned trip), we have
been staying at the Residence
Inn in Dickson City. There are
a lot of people, along with
their pets, staying there.
I have spent some time
drawing maps and giving
directions to the Abington
Community Dog Park. The
importance of the dog park
has taken on a whole new
meaning, as those who are
here for an extended time
were thrilled to hear about a
facility where their dogs
would be in a protected area.
I have heard many great
stories about how happy a pet
was to finally be able to run
around instead of always
being on lead while walking
the grounds around the inn or
staying cooped up in the
room.
We on the Dog Park Com-
mittee can be proud of the
work that was done to help
the community park become a
showplace, and I thank you all
for letting me be a part of this
endeavor.
Sylvia Tagert
Clarks Summit
JCC far exceeds
quest for care
I
am the mother of four and
find it necessary to send the
word to other parents about
the absolute gem in child
care/development programs
that I have found. The Jewish
Community Centers Kinder-
lach program, directed by
Cheri Greenberg, has been an
absolute blessing in caring
over the last year for my now
3-year-old.
The program has given me
the utmost comfort and sup-
port, as well as a consistent
line of communication that I
found lacking in other pro-
grams. There is a tremendous
feeling of family with an
equal amount of concern for
each child individually.
During my quest for care
last year, Cheri stayed on the
phone with me, addressing
concerns proactively on the
first day rather than reactively.
She gave me her home phone
number, cell number and
office number, as she did with
every parent.
Additionally, just in case we
had lost them along the way,
she sent home the numbers
every Friday along with our
childrens project bags.
She assured me that as my
son cried when I left, she
would hold him and comfort
him until he was soothed and
ready to begin play for the
day. She did just that. I never
once felt uncomfortable or
uneasy about leaving my
prized possession in her and
her staffs care.
The price is extremely rea-
sonable and the comfort I felt
was priceless.
Take my word that there is a
place out there that can love
your child just as much as you.
I could go on for hours about
the swim classes, music days,
library visits, graduation day,
picture days, field trips and so
on, but eventually I would fill
the entire newspaper.
As a final note, the program
is open and welcoming to all
denominations.
Jamie Grobes
Wilkes-Barre
Reader treasures
article on organ
I
thank The Times Leader
very much for the excellent
article and photographs in
the June 26 edition. It was
enlightening to read the histo-
ry of the church organ at St.
Casimir Lithuanian Church in
Pittston (now closed).
The best information is that
Monsignor John Bendik had
the insight to save the magnif-
icent instrument. It also was
wonderful news that the organ
will praise God with superb
music in St. Nicholas Parish in
Wilkes-Barre. Hooray for both
pastors for bringing this
about.
Again, thanks Times Leader,
and special thanks to reporter
Mary Therese Biebel for an
outstanding article about a
90-year-old treasure.
Mercedes (Kizis) Henning
Pittston
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers convey-
ing thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kind-
ness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E R S P E C T I V E S
False assertions
drive debt debate
H
ere we are again, having
yet another national de-
bate based on false prem-
ises. This time its about the
debt limit.
What does the Constitution
say about the issue? The
Congress shall have power
to borrow money ... (Article
I, Section 8). But, read on.
The validity of the public
debt of the United States
shall not be questioned, ac-
cording to the 14th Amend-
ment, Section 4. In other
words, it is unconstitutional
not to raise the debt ceiling or,
perhaps more accurately, the
debt ceiling is unconstitu-
tional.
The president should, if
necessary, invoke the 14th
Amendment and pay the bills
by executive order.
But the premises of this
debate are wrong. Budget
figures usually combine trust
funds with the General Fund.
Thats nonsense, since the
trust funds are separate and
funded independently.
Without that distortion, the
total of the defense budget,
the cost of war thats distrib-
uted across other departments
of government, the portion of
interest paid thats due to
prior unfunded military
spending and extra-budgetary
spending for Iraq and Afghan-
istan accounts for as much as
54 percent of our spending a
total of $1.45 trillion in 2009.
The safety net accounts for
about 30 percent. These fig-
ures are from Analytical Per-
spectives from the 2009 Bud-
get of the United States. Poi-
gnantly, the debt limit was
created in the effort to raise
funds for World War I.
Its one thing to decide as a
nation to sacrifice the eco-
nomic security of our most
vulnerable citizens children,
the elderly, the poor, the
chronically ill, the unemploy-
ed in order to build nations
and empire. Its quite another
to make that decision and
pretend the debt is due to the
safety net.
A trumped-up debt hysteria
at a time like this is a lethal
fraud. Cutting federal spend-
ing in a recession is a national
suicidal ideation.
Wayne Warner
Clarks Green
Face up to debt
and cut spending
T
he Congressional Budget
Offices 2011 Long-Term
Budget Outlook (released
June 22) contains very star-
tling warnings for every Amer-
ican.
The CBO found that not
only will our job-killing debt
eclipse our economy this year,
but also that it grew 83.6
percent under President Oba-
ma. That means every citizen
in this country owes more
than $46,000.
Washington must not wait
to cut spending and lower
deficits. I believe we are on
track to have the same eco-
nomic failures as Greece if we
continue down this road. The
presidents demands for more
borrowing to extend the debt
ceiling and more than $1 tril-
lion in new taxes are not the
answer. I am shocked that he
would even suggest raising
taxes in the middle of an eco-
nomic downturn.
The answer is to cut spend-
ing. We, as a nation, must
make sacrifices and forego our
reliance on the various federal
programs that eat up so much
of our nations budget. The
alternative is to leave this
country worse than we found
it and, most unsettling to me,
heap so much debt on our
children and grandchildren
that they will never have a
chance to have the lifestyle we
did.
Kenn Anderson Sr.
Scranton
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
ers to one published letter every 30 days.
E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
THE 8.7 percent un-
employment rate for
the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton metro area
offers a mixed message
for a regional economy
looking for good news.
It is indeed a positive
sign that our rate of unemployment is
lower than the national average of 9.2
percent, but there is little consolation
when all of us know at least one person
who has lost his or her job in this fragile
economy.
In analyzing why the national rate
remains stubbornly high, two questions
must be answered: How do we measure
unemployment, and why are major
corporations not hiring when they are
mostly flush with cash?
There were positive signs in March
when Pennsylvania added 23,000 jobs.
Two months later, we received sobering
news that employment dropped by
14,000 jobs. There have been similar
anomalies on national unemployment
levels. The national economy added an
anemic 18,000 jobs in June, yet there are
14 million Americans who remain unem-
ployed.
The reduction in hiring nationwide,
though, is not a sign that there will nec-
essarily be a double-dip recession. The
decline in jobs might be accounted for by
the way we measure unemployment.
The Bureau of Labor & Statistics tracks
the civilian non-institutional popula-
tion, which includes everyone not in the
armed services, in school or in prison.
The remaining category classified as
not in the labor force is everyone
else, including what the bureau desig-
nates as discouraged workers those
who want a job but have stopped looking
for one.
This phenomenon explains why the
unemployment rate actually increases
when recessions begin to end. People
who had given up on a finding a job see
that firms are hiring and they re-enter
the job market, thereby increasing the
unemployment rate. Eventually, as the
upturn of the business cycle continues
and the economy expands, these re-
entrants into the labor force, along with
new immigrants and recent college
graduates, find employment.
Its also estimated that major corpora-
tions are sitting on cash roughly the
equivalent to the gross domestic product
of much of Latin America. Why arent
they spending this money on plants,
equipment and training, thereby in-
creasing production and employment?
There are several reasons.
During this Great Recession, Amer-
ican companies learned to operate with
fewer employees. There will come a
time, however, when corporations begin
to reach diminishing returns. As the
demand for their products increases, the
productivity gains they have realized will
no longer sustain the need for increased
production. At that point, more people
will be hired.
Uncertainty is hampering hiring also.
Businesses have been uncertain about
the demand for their products or ser-
vices and do not want to be overextend-
ed if the recession continues.
This type of uncertainty always has
been present in down business cycles.
However, another kind of uncertainty is
more prevalent today than in the past. It
is precipitated by the perceived and real
threat of changes in government policies,
particularly with regard to taxation and
regulation. The fact that the National
Labor Relations Board is attempting to
prohibit Boeing Corp. from occupying its
new multibillion-dollar plant in South
Carolina on the grounds that it cannot
move jobs from Washington to South
Carolina might make companies leery
about opening new facilities and thereby
employing additional people.
A good argument can be made, per-
haps, that increases in select taxes are
necessary to fund programs that most
people believe are necessary, especially
when you consider that corporate and
individual tax rates are relatively low.
This uncertainty over taxes also impacts
consumer demand and delays hiring
decisions.
Finally, health care costs for employers
are increasing rapidly and currently
represent as much as 25 to 35 percent of
the cost of an employees salary and
benefits. Well-intentioned health care
policies often have the unintended conse-
quence of conveying great uncertainty to
employers who continue to see heath
care costs grow.
Try as we might, the American econo-
my can never outfox the business cycle.
Eventually, economic circumstances
whether they are a diminishing housing
market, a declining stock market or
other factors will precipitate a general
decline in the demand for products and
services, which will in turn lead to di-
minished production and unemploy-
ment. We can try to mitigate the reces-
sion with various fiscal and monetary
policies, but this deep recession seems to
be quite resilient.
No matter how we calculate unem-
ployment, there are too many Americans
out of work. Bringing them back into the
workplace needs to be done through
policies that are focused on the long run
and do not create the uncertainty that
has marked many policy decisions to
date.
No matter how you work the numbers, too many people are jobless
COMMENTARY
M I C H A E L A .
M A C D O W E L L
Michael A. MacDowell is president of Miser-
icordia University in Dallas Township, where
he occasionally teaches economics.
Bringing (unemployed Americans)
back into the workplace needs to be
done through policies that are
focused on the long run and do not
create the uncertainty that has
marked many policy decisions to date.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5E
P E R S P E C T I V E S
2
9
8
2
2
5
7
0
1
0
6
4
Manager search
must be first-rate
I
was pleased to see that
Luzerne Countys Home
Rule Transition Committee
decided against adding a
clause to its advertisement
that would have called for
releasing to the public the
names of applicants for the
county manager job.
I think it is far too early in
the process to release appli-
cants names, and doing so
might well hinder some of the
most qualified candidates
from even applying because
they would not want their
names disclosed. We need to
assure the public that the
search has been as broad and
far-reaching as possible.
The transition committees
role is to advertise the posi-
tion and short-list those candi-
dates with the best creden-
tials. The committee cannot
make the actual selection,
because the position will not
be filled until the 11 newly
elected council members take
their seats in January 2012.
Releasing the names of appli-
cants before they even have
undergone thorough reference
checks is not an indication of
transparency, but irresponsib-
ility.
At the point when the seat-
ed council members have had
the opportunity to thoroughly
review the applicants and
create a list of finalists, it
might be prudent to release
the applicants names; but that
decision is a long way off.
Until then we need to let the
process unfold discretely and
allow the candidates the priva-
cy they deserve while the
transition committee conducts
a nationwide search for the
best possible manager.
No decision pertaining to
this new form of government
will be as important as the
selection of a county manager.
If we fail to get this right, the
residents of Luzerne County
will be the losers and the
change in government will
have achieved nothing. The
process itself must unfold in a
thoughtful, responsible way.
Our countys future depends
on it.
Elaine Maddon Curry
Candidate
Luzerne County Council
Drums
Council nominee
favored openness
A
s Luzerne County begins a
new future with home
rule, an important goal of
this new government needs to
be building and restoring trust
with the residents of this
county. A great start should
begin with releasing to the
public the names of the appli-
cants for county manager.
I believe by releasing all the
names of these applicants, it
will provide full transparency
to the public and hopefully
prevent any political friends
from being hired to this top
county post. The benefit of
releasing all the names and
not only the finalists names
is to prevent any highly qual-
ified candidate from being
unnoticed so that some politi-
cal friend can pass up the truly
most qualified person. I do not
believe that politics is dead
yet in Luzerne County.
I do understand the argu-
ment for why names should
not be released. Some people
say that it will prevent highly
qualified candidates from
applying and it can put their
current jobs at risk. This is a
valid argument and I respect
it; but there also is no way
that we can prove that will
happen. I believe this impor-
tant position, which will pay
more than $100,000 in annual
salary, will still attract many
qualified candidates even if
they know their names will be
made known to the public.
The responsibility of county
council is to look out for the
residents of Luzerne County,
not for the jobs of applicants.
I realize that there are peo-
ple who will have different
opinions on this issue. For
those who disagree with my
stance, please understand that
my reasoning for this is solely
driven by a desire to prevent
any person who is highly
qualified for this extremely
important position from being
passed up for some not-so-
qualified, political friend.
As a member of the Govern-
ment Study Commission who
helped to write this home rule
charter, I understand the im-
portance of this county man-
ager position and realize that
if we do not hire the most
qualified person at the start of
this new government, the
future success of Luzerne
County will take that much
longer to achieve.
The key of this new home
rule government is account-
ability, and in order for the
public to hold county council
accountable, the public needs
to be able to see everything
which includes the names of
applicants for the county
manager position.
Rick Morelli
Member, Home Rule
Transition Committee
and
Candidate
Luzerne County Council
Sugarloaf Township
A 5K benefit run
to help Help Line
M
any years ago, Help Line
received a call from a
single mother who didnt
have the money to pay for her
gas bill, which was necessary
to heat her home. The prob-
lem had persisted over several
months, resulting in a fear
that if the gas was shut off, the
children might have been
removed from the home.
The bill was more than
$1,000, which she just didnt
have. To complicate the mat-
ter, she was convinced that
her bill was inaccurate. The
gas company had gone to her
house to address the concern
but could find no error.
The diligence of the Help
Line staff in coordinating
services, working closely with
the Commission on Economic
Opportunity and in advocating
for the young woman resulted
in uncovering a billing error
and no interruption in service.
The young mother became an
advocate for Help Line and
located employment, working
with an organization whose
mission was to help others in
need.
For nearly 40 years, Help
Line has assisted people in
our community around the
clock with needs ranging from
locating resources for utility
assistance to infant nutrition
to care services for the elderly.
The vitality of the program
has consistently grown, as
evidenced by the number of
consumer contacts made:
99,775 in the past year.
The recently adopted state
budget and other funding cuts
have placed Help Line in jeop-
ardy. Reduced staffing has
resulted in reduced ability to
respond to those in need.
While the program continues
to provide service around the
clock, it can no longer provide
advocacy to the extent it once
did.
While we applaud the suc-
cessful efforts of our local
state legislators to partially
restore funds that initially had
been eliminated in the state
budget, Help Line now asks
for your help.
On Aug. 14, Family Service
Association, the parent agency
for the Help Line program,
will hold the Pauly Friedman
5K Family Walk/Run at Miser-
icordia University. All pro-
ceeds from the event are used
to support Help Line.
Registration for the event
begins at 8:30 a.m. at the
universitys Anderson Com-
plex, but pre-registration is
strongly encouraged by con-
tacting 823-5144, extension
309.
Teams are forming now, so
get your friends and your
family to support this worthy
program.
Help Line will continue to
be there for your call; please
respond to ours.
Michael Zimmerman
Executive director
Family Service Association
Wilkes-Barre
Juskie stood tall
in the Heights
T
o all who knew him as
Juskie, this man had a
name: Joseph Kochanski.
But he will be remembered as
Juskie, the Godfather of
Baseball (as one of his former
players noted on Facebook) in
the Heights area of Wilkes-
Barre.
He was a man who put the
neighborhood children above
everything. When Juskie was
at the helm, no child in the
area, in Little League and
Teeners, would go a summer
without being afforded the
opportunity to play Juskie
Ball.
Juskie knew every players
first and last names, knew
their parents and knew where
every kid lived. Juskie treated
every kid with respect wheth-
er it was the all-star or the
beginner. If a kid needed a
glove, he got him one the next
day.
Not only was this guy the
glue that kept both divisions
running smoothly for many
years, he also coached some
pretty impressive Heights
Teeners teams over his tenure.
He knew the game and had a
great knack of being able to
translate his knowledge to the
kids he coached.
There are very few con-
versations dealing with
Heights baseball and GAR
baseball that can start and end
without Juskies name coming
up somewhere in the con-
versation.
Juskie touched so many
lives and will long be remem-
bered and respected by all the
kids he served, and by all of
his peers as well.
Long live Juskie Ball.
Sheldon Owens
Wilkes-Barre
Pay attention or
pay consequences
F
ormer House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi is the one
who would deem a bill
passed and then carefully look
at it afterward to see what was
in it. She is the one who ad-
vocated that no longer would
there be any deficit spending.
The shadow government of
czars and operatives appoint-
ed by Obama without congres-
sional vetting is the scariest.
These bureaucrats were
placed there to implement
Obamas vision of America,
not the electorates vision.
Obama and his cohorts do not
understand free market cap-
italism, the goose that laid
the golden egg for America.
Cut out stupid programs
such as poems in zoos,
shrimps walking on tread-
mills, creating a new foods
chart, etc. Budget deficits are
the result of growing govern-
ment and spending money we
dont have on pet projects.
The question on taxes:
What about the nearly 50
percent of Americans who do
not pay any taxes?
Obamas political genius is
his ability to say things that
will sound good to people who
have not followed the issues in
any detail, regardless of how
obviously fraudulent what he
says might be to those who
have. Shameless effrontery
can be a huge political asset,
especially if uninformed vot-
ers outnumber those who are
informed.
Charlotte Hendershot
Plains Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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timatelyclosed.
But that is little comfort to wor-
riedresidents.
InAlaska, thereare36postoffic-
es under review. One is in Sleet-
mute, a tiny village on the east
bankof theKuskokwimRiver, 250
miles fromAnchorage.
It would leave a big hole, said
SophieGregory, thevillagespresi-
dent andfill-inpostmaster.
Nebraska has 90 facilities up for
possibleclosure.InGrafton,Roxann
Baumann,thetownclerkandalocal
businessowner, saidlosingthepost
office would force residents in the
village of 125 to drive at least eight
milestothenearest post office.
Andsomehikersusepostoffices
inout-of-the-wayplacesjust tosur-
vive. Each year, thousands tra-
versesectionsof the2,650-milePa-
cific Crest Trail, which runs from
Mexico to Canada. Some send
packages of food and other provi-
sions to post offices along the way
topickupandresupply.
At least three rural post offices
along the route are slated for po-
tential closure in California and
Washington, including the last
stop before Canada: Stehekin,
Wash., a wilderness community
reachable only by boat, floatplane
or on foot. Backpackers would
have to carry many more pounds
of food between stops, which
wouldmakethetripmoredifficult
and less enjoyable, said 28-year-
oldHeather Tilert of NewYork.
The eastern Washington town
of Starbuck, population130, adver-
tisesitselfas45minutesfromany-
thingyoucouldwant todoexcept
walk on an ocean beach. Soon
thatmayincludebeing45minutes
froma post office.
Across the country in Maine,
the post office on Cliff Island is
among the 34 slated for possible
closure there. Cliff Island is 10
milesfromthemainlandandtakes
at least an hour and15 minutes to
reachbyferry.
What I havelearnedabout island
surviving as year-round communi-
ties, theyneedthreemainelements.
They needa post office, they needa
school andtheyneedastorefor sur-
vival,resident Cheryl Crowleysaid.
The Postal Service operates
31,871 retail outlets across the
country. In recent years, business
has declined sharply. The agency
lost $8billionlast year.
Onceanofficeisselectedforare-
view, people served by that office
will have 60 days to file their com-
ments. If an office is to be closed,
theywill beabletoappeal.
BackinOdd, letter carrier Tame-
raEskinsandpostofficeclerkMelin-
daDickersoncrossedtheir fingers.
Eskins, whodelivers the mail in
her ChevyBlazer, saidthreeof the
four post offices she collects mail
fromareonthelist forpossibleclo-
sure. She doesnt know what will
happen after her contract to deliv-
er mail is upearlynext year.
Dickersonalsomight beout of a
job.
Ive thought about gettingpeo-
ple to sign a petition to keep it
open, but I dont know if it would
doanygood, shesaid.
POST OFFICE
Continued from Page 1E
AP PHOTO
Mail carrier Tamera Eskins delivers mail to the Odd Post Office in
Odd, W.Va. Eskins is concerned about what will happen when the
post office shuts down. Out of the more than 3,000post offices
around the country slated for reviewfor potential closing, there are
150in tiny West Virginia, the third most in the nation.
Associated Press writers Becky
Bohrer in Juneau, Alaska; Grant
Schulte in Omaha, Neb.; Shannon
Dininny in Yakima, Wash.; Nicholas K.
Geranios in Spokane, Wash.; and
Clarke Canfield in Portland, Maine,
contributed to this report.
DALLAS The most violent
and sensational cases with links
to domestic violence are hard to
miss in the newspaper and on tel-
evision news.
There was Susan Loper, the
Frisco, Texas, mom and fitness
instructor who was killed in
April, allegedly by a former boy-
friend who later jumped into the
Grand Canyon to escape police.
Police were searching for the
husband of Maritza Panameno,
the Irving, Texas, mother of three
whose body was found in the
Trinity River the same month.
And on Saturday, 35-year-old
Tan Do shot and killed his es-
tranged wife, Trini Do, and four
other members of her family at a
childrens birthday party before
taking his own life.
For every one of those high-
profile killings, there are thou-
sands of family violence assaults,
threats and other crimes that no
one hears about. The abuse,
which may start small, often es-
calates over time, according to
experts. Some victims are afraid
to leave their abusers, and re-
ports show that victims can ac-
tuallyface more danger if theytry
to move on.
The operators of womens shel-
ters say that they are now busier
than ever. In addition, those pro-
grams are struggling with fewer
resources because of government
cuts and reduced donations.
This summer, The Family
Place has had to turn away wom-
en trying to escape abuse be-
cause its shelter has been full.
And Genesis Womens Shelter in
Dallas reports record demand,
with 400 names on a waiting list
for counseling.
The statistics are very grim,
said Pat Tosi, chief executive offi-
cer of Hopes Door, a Plano do-
mestic violence program. Peo-
ple dont even want to hear about
this. They dont want to hear that
its all over the place.
The prevalence of domestic vi-
olence means that most of us
probably know someone who is
being abused.
It could be the person check-
ingyouout at thegrocerystoreor
working at the doctors office,
said Derrelynn Perryman, vic-
tims services coordinator for the
Arlington Police Department.
The department files reports on
more than 3,000 family violence
incidents per year, and half of the
citys 14 homicides in 2011 in-
volved family domestic violence.
The violence goes on much
more than most people realize,
said Dallas Police Lt. Diana
Watts. Dallas reported more than
13,000 family violence cases in
2010.
Our caseload is high but it
stays behindcloseddoors. Its not
where we can see it, Watts said.
People are going to jobs every
day bruised from the neck down
where we cant see.
More than 40 percent of Texas
shelters donot haveenoughmon-
ey to meet the rising needs, ac-
cording to an annual survey by
the National Network to End Do-
mestic Violence in Washington,
D.C.
Many shelters have cut servic-
es and staff because of the econo-
my, according to another recent
study by Dallas-based Mary Kay
Inc.
Meanwhile, victims arestaying
longer than they have in the past
at The Family Place, said Paige
Flink, the Dallas agencys execu-
tive director. Those seeking help
cant find jobs or affordable
homes, slowing the pipeline from
the shelter into housing pro-
grams.
It makes it hard to serve as
many people because youre serv-
ing them longer, Flink said.
Some attribute increased fam-
ily violence to the struggling
economy. But local shelter offi-
cials caution that economic fac-
tors alone do not cause someone
to be abusive.
Not having money isnt going
to make him beat you; its an ele-
ment to a situation thats very
tough as it is, Flink said.
Much progress on the domes-
tic abuse front has been made the
past fewdecades, withmore shel-
ters being opened and more laws
passed to protect victims.
There also is more public
awareness and at an earlier
age. Dating-violence programs
are teaching the youngest gener-
ation to recognize red flags for
abusive behavior early on. Many
teens are taught in schools to be
careful with people who are pos-
sessive or withthose whopushto
get into a serious relationship
quickly.
But JanLangbein, executive di-
rector of Genesis Womens Shel-
ter, says she is frustrated that the
violence remains high. Langbein
said friends can do something
about abuse by just checking on
one another. She wishes she had
done that with her friend Mary
Richardson.
The University Park woman
was murdered in1999 by her hus-
band, Timothy Patrick Richard-
son, whostrangledandnearly de-
capitated her. He was sentenced
to 60 years in prison. Langbein
said she did not know her friend
was in danger, and she wonders
whether there were any signs she
may have missed.
I never said, Mary, are you
OK? Langbein said.
People experiencing abuse
may not reach out because they
do not always see themselves as
victims, Flink said. Some blame
themselves for the violence. Oth-
ers may fail to recognize the po-
tential seriousness and conse-
quences.
It either feels verynormal or it
is minimized, she said. Some-
times I think the victim underes-
timates howbadit couldpossibly
get.
Roller rink slayings show
reach of domestic violence
By KIMHORNER
The Dallas Morning News
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
I
n summer, local minds tend
to focus on where theyre go-
ing, away from here. After
all, what is a vacationif not anop-
portunity to get out of town? But
like the Philadelphianwhohasnt
seen the Liberty Bell or the New
Yorker who has yet to climb the
steps of Lady Liberty, you might
not be exactly acquainted with
whats right under
your nose. If your
away vacation is
already over, per-
haps nowis the time to enjoy the
attractions right here at home, ei-
ther by yourself or with friends
who live elsewhere and still have
time and desire to get away
somewhere.
Invite them here, we say.
Times Leader photographers
chose a dozen dont-miss spots
any native Northeastern Penn-
sylvanian would do well to visit,
often, or shouldbeproudtoshow
off to a guest.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
If you dont quite know how to explain King Coal history to a
visitor, let whats left of the Huber Breaker, off Main Street in
Ashley, do the talking. While there, you can see the future site
of the Huber Breaker Northern Anthracite Coal Field Miners
Memorial Park. You might even want to contribute a dollar or
two to the cause.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
The conductor of Diesel Locomotive 664, Paul Rat-
cliffe, talks with engineer Don Young while fueling up
at the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton.
Not taking a train excursion while in Northeastern
Pennsylvania is like not going for a swim while at the
shore, some would argue. Steamtown regularly offers
two-hour Scranton-to-Moscow runs on Saturdays that
include a stopover at a restored 1904 train station.
Call 340-5204 or visit nps.gov/stea for details.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
We also may not have the waves of an ocean, but we
do have falling water aplenty. In fact, Ricketts Glen
State Park, off Route 118 near Dallas Township,
alone contains 22 named waterfalls. Adams Falls
can fairly be called the parking-lot falls for their
easily accessible beauty right below the parking lot.
Check out the upper pool (not for swimming) and
the flat, mossy rocks that almost beckon you to
climb all over them. Wear sensible shoes, and bring
water, however! Exploring anything inside the
breathtaking Ricketts Glen is glorious but poten-
tially strenuous.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
We may not be the Upper Peninsula of Michigan or that Land O Lakes called Minnesota,
but we sure do have our share of restful water. Eagles Mere Lake in Sullivan County, near
the two-mile-square borough of the same name, is one of the most picturesque and has
even secured a spot in the National Register of Historic Places. The lake and town are
lovely enough for the New York Times to have taken notice. In 2006, a reporter for the
Gray Lady wrote: People give their houses names like Kozy Korner and By-Da-Wee and
pick up their mail at the post office. The hub of downtown is the Sweet Shop, part soda
fountain and part casual restaurant. The 114-acre lake is surrounded by hemlocks and
laurel and has a swimming dock, a small sand beach, canoes and sailboats for rent and
an old-fashioned green wooden bathhouse. Jet Skis and gas-powered motorboats are
forbidden. A 26-foot wooden boat dating to the World War I era, the Hardly Able, carries
passengers around the lake.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
The Millennium Circle at the River Common in Wilkes-Barre is about the best evidence we have that downtown isnt what it used to be, and thats a good thing.
Ride a bike, take a stroll, and dont forget to wave to the fishers and kayakers out making the most of the Susquehanna.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Nothing quite speaks to the NEPA spirit of adventure like white-
water rafting along the Lehigh River in Carbon County. Summer-
time is especially easy on all skill levels, as the water is not as
wild, and wetsuits are often optional. Experienced guides from
outfitters such as Whitewater Challengers, Pocono Whitewater
or JimThorpe River Adventures will see to your safety.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Take them out to a ballgame at the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Yankees Stadium. August begins with Bats, Bulls and Braves
face-offs and finishes in the Red, with battles against Red
Wings and Sox. Giveaway fans will want to show up Saturday,
when the first 2000 fans to the gate will score aluminum
sport bottles, or Aug. 27, when jersey bags are the booty.
WELCOME TO NEPA
P L A N A S T A Y C A T I O N
INSIDE:
MORE
PHOTOS,
PAGE 6
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Something is always
kept when you give, and
in todays case, its big.
Perhaps its only a feel-
ing, but it has weight and
impact. Youll carry it with
you for years to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Creativity isnt something
you acquire; its something
youve had all along. Like
Dorothys ruby slippers,
you only need to know
how to access the magic in
order to be transported.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You reduce your expecta-
tions and resign yourself
to accept what comes.
Its not because youre
pessimistic. Its because
you love the feeling of
being pleasantly surprised
by life.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
You are likely to misjudge
your own capabilities,
underestimating your
strength and stamina.
When you feel depleted,
push through. Youll
get a second wind and
accomplish something
remarkable.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Loved
ones have a way of get-
ting under your skin. Only
those who know you best
can say the things that
bother you most. Luckily
for them, you will be in a
merciful mood.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
It is very rare to succeed
on the first try, and it may
also be unlucky. Its far
better to experience the
entire learning curve. Then
youll be able to re-create
your success at will.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Instead of dismissing a
new process as not for
you, think of it as an
exercise and dive right in.
The only way to make sure
youre not submitting to
complacency is to learn
something new.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Youll take a chance and
be very proud of yourself
at the end of it, whether
or not it turns out the way
you hoped it would. Your
ability to be in the moment
is impressive.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). The one you love may
grapple with people you
dont admire. However,
youll adhere to excellent
boundaries. Youll live and
let live. This policy will
prove to be truly brilliant.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Your ability to pace
yourself will prove most
useful. Youll be a rock for
someone you love. You
cant tell now how far this
gesture will reach. This is
one for the decades.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
The look you give people
matters. It may be a tiny
micro-expression, but it
reads loud and clear.
You make your innermost
feelings known, especially
to those who have been,
up until now, quite
unobservant.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Youll be around those
who have little self-control,
and youll realize just how
important it is to maintain
a certain amount of struc-
ture around your daily
activities.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (July
31). You are warm and
inviting. You can be this
way because you dont
have a fear of getting
close to people. August
sees you in the mood to
learn and love. September
and December are high
points for your personal
and professional develop-
ment. A leap of faith leads
to thrilling adventure
in November. Libra and
Scorpio people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are:
30, 1, 14, 39 and 28.
OOHS AND AAHS
Mike Peluso
7/31/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
7/31
7/31
7/31
7/31
7/31
1. Its an interesting and little
understood truism that some people
spread happiness wherever they go,
while others generate it whenever
they go.
2. When I go by to see my lawyer, I
have to face the fact that he has
never given me bad advice. He sells
it to me!
3. My lawyer is a criminal defense
specialist and one of the powerful
partners at the famous firm, Dewey,
Cheatum and Howe!
4. That new golfer in the green polo
is the first guy I have ever seen yell
"fore" while putting.
DEAR ABBY
Moms death interrupts
progress of romance
Dear Abby:
Im a 47-year-
old woman
who started
dating Earl
about three
weeks ago.
We had gotten off to a great
start. We talk easily, were
comfortable with each other
and we seem to share values.
Last week, Earls mom
passed away, which has
made continuing the rela-
tionship difficult. He was
close to her and is going
through a rough time.
Im willing to stick by him
and go through this painful
process with him. I have
been through it myself. Earl
said he still wants to see
me, but because of what hes
dealing with, if someone else
comes along, I should take
that opportunity.
Abby, I dont want to look
for anyone else. I already
care a lot for Earl, but Im
confused about what to do. I
have had enough hurt to last
me the rest of me life, and
I know Earl could tell me
at any time that he can no
longer handle this because of
his situation. Please tell me
what I should do.
Lady in Waiting
Dear Lady In Waiting: You
seem like a nice, but needy
lady. You have known Earl a
grand total of three weeks,
which is not long enough for
either of you to make serious
plans. Right now Earl needs
your support and friendship
more than he needs a ro-
mance, so slow down.
Dear Abby: I have found my
soul mate. We have a new-
born son and are very happy.
We plan to be married next
year, after we have saved
enough for the wedding.
I have been hiding a se-
cret from him. I have had
bulimia for 20 years. Should
I tell him before we marry?
I am terrified it will harm
our relationship. How can
I tell him without hurting
him? Im afraid he wont
understand what it will take
for me to heal myself. Please
advise, Abby.
Keeping It to Myself
Dear Keeping It To Your-
self: You should absolutely
tell him before you marry.
You should also be prepared
to answer any questions he
may ask about your eating
disorder. What would hurt
him and harm your relation-
ship would be to marry him
without his knowing the
facts about your illness. If
he is truly your soul mate,
he wont run away. He will
stand by you and support
you any way he can.
To receive a collection of Abbys
most memorable and most fre-
quently requested poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keep-
ers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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WEDNESDAY, SEPT 7TH - ALAN JACKSON TRIBUTE
THURSDAY, SEPT 8TH - NOMAD: NORTH OF THE MASON DIXON
FRIDAY, SEPT. 9TH - BADLEES
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Parade Around The Grounds To The Horse Arena.
PARADE - SUNDAY, SEPT 11TH
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. Click,
thump, riiiiing! Thats the sound
of something you often hear
about but rarely see: A carousel
rider going for the brass ring.
It happens on a daily basis on
the Looff Carousel at the Santa
Cruz Beach Boardwalk, where
painted ponies have been spin-
ning for a century, a triumph of
tradition in a field dominated by
the pursuit of new thrills.
I love it, says 57-year-oldGer-
ry Watt of Sacramento, who has
been visiting the Boardwalk for
decades and was never too cool
for the carousel, even in my
teens.
The Boardwalk, set beside the
long, golden sweep of Santa Cruz
Main Beach, goes back to 1865
when a man named John Lei-
brandt opened a public bath-
house nearby. Others followed
and soon Santa Cruz was draw-
ing people who wanted to enjoy
the allegedly curative properties
of bathing in salt water.
Restaurants and curio shops,
followed and at the turn of the
20th century, promoter Fred W.
Swanton decided to open a casi-
no and boardwalk that would be
the Coney Island of the West.
The carousel made its debut in
August 1911, built by Charles I.D.
Looff, a master woodcarver from
Denmark. Looff had already
made his name withhis first com-
plete carousel placed at Coney Is-
land in New York.
Back then, rides cost a nickel.
Today, the carousel, which has
been designated a National His-
toric Landmark, costs $3 a spin.
Looff apparently had a puckish
sense of humor. The story is that
he chose the middle initials I.D.
after Ellis Island immigration of-
ficials told him he had to have a
middle name for his I.D.
You can see that humorous
vein in the carousel horses, sever-
al of which boast toothy smiles.
The horses have real horsehair
tails and details ranging from
swords to flashing jewels. Some
have items strapped behind the
saddles, including a sheep and a
pheasant.
Thereare73horses 71jump-
ers plus two stationary horses
that are good for parents with un-
steady young riders as well as
two chariots decorated with the
heads of rams and cherubs.
The big draw of the carousel is
its ring dispenser. Rings were
once handed out by ring boys,
but since 1950, the process has
been mechanized.
The rings mostly steel these
days except on special occasions
when brass-plated ones are used
are dispensed by a long arm
that riders on outside horses can
reach. Yougraba ring, throwit to-
ward the gaping mouth of a large
clownpaintedonabackdropnear
the carousel and, if successful,
are rewarded by bells and flash-
ing lights.
Scoring a hit is a kick, one that
often is denied the left-handed
Watts, although that doesnt stop
him from rushing to secure an
outside horse.
Its really difficult. Theres
something about the trajectory,
he says.
The music has a vintage sound,
provided for 100 years by a 342-
pipe Ruth und Sohn band organ
built in 1894. In 2007, the Board-
walk acquired a Wurlitzer band
organ from the closed Playland-
at-the-Beach amusement park in
SanFrancisco, andthere is a third
small Wurlitzer organ.
The carousel has had its mo-
ment in the spotlight, being fea-
tured in films including The
Lost Boys, The King of Love,
and Sudden Impact.
Along with rides that range
fromkiddie to fairly thrilling, the
Boardwalk has the usual games
of chance, arcades and tempting
goodies, including deep-fried
Twinkies and Oreos.
If youre up for a brief walk, the
Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf is
less than half a mile away, featur-
ing several restaurants and curio
shops.
A fun choice is the take-away
window at The Dolphin at the
end of the wharf which serves up
a tasty clam chowder in a bread
bowl. Fenced holes in the wharfs
planking allows you to get a look
at sea lions that may be basking
below while you wait for lunch.
Watchout for the seagulls; theyll
steal your food if you leave it un-
attended.
Coming full circle, Santa Cruz carousel turns 100
By MICHELLE LOCKE
For The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
A girl rides the Looff Carousel at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk
in Santa Cruz, Calif.
Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk:
400 Beach St., Santa Cruz, Calif.,
http://www.beachboardwalk.com/
or 831-423-5590. Parking $12,
although lots can fill up early on
holidays and warm days. Open
daily through Labor Day, week-
ends through the fall; hours vary
but most summer days, 11 a.m.-11
p.m. No entrance fee. All-day
passes $29.95, individual ride
prices range from $3 to $5.
Getting There: Santa Cruz is
located about 70 miles south of
San Francisco; take U.S. Hwy 101
south to CA 85 south to CA17
south. From the east San Francis-
co Bay area take I-880 south to
CA17.
Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf: 21
Municipal Wharf; http://www.san-
tacruzwharf.com or 831-420-6025.
Open daily.
Dream Inn: 175 West Cliff Drive,
Santa Cruz; http://www.dreaminn-
santacruz.com or 831-426-4330.
Midweek rates start at $349 with
specials available for longer stays.
IF YOU GO
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
timesleader.com
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. A Dance with Dragons. George
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BEST SELLERS
An often
light but still
poignant side
of F. Scott
Fitzgerald is
evident in
this compila-
tion of 19 of
his previous-
ly published
items and ar-
ticles, writ-
ten mostly for
popular mag-
azines during
1920-1940.
Edited by
Fitzgerald scholar James
L.W. West III, the collection
is billed as an autobiography
because the famed American
novelist and short story writ-
er keeps the focus on him-
self, his views and critiques,
his celebrated life and times.
The personal essays are
frequently funny and fast-
paced, particularly during
the 1920s when he enjoyed
huge literary success and,
with his spirited wife, Zelda,
came to embody the Jazz
Age.
But beset by personal
problems and a marital
breakup as the 1930s ground
into the Great Depression, a
somber side of Fitzgerald
shows through in the later
pieces. In a 1936 article for
Esquire magazine, After-
noon of an Author, Fitzger-
ald writes of his growing se-
clusion ... and the increasing
necessity of picking over a
well-picked past.
But this is not The Crack-
Up, the collection of Fitz-
gerald nonfiction published
five years after his death in
1940, which West says paints
Fitzgerald as an apologist
for the 1920s, a chronicler of
remorse and regret, and a
student of failure and lost
hope.
A Short Autobiography
is full of lighthearted prose
as Fitzgerald employs a va-
riety of unconventional
structures a witty self-in-
terview and a guided tour of
a house, for example
along with the serious essays
of a memoirist.
As West notes, many of
these pieces were written for
the paycheck handsome
paychecks, too and at
times its easy for a reader to
tell. But even the self-inter-
view, which Fitzgerald wrote
when he was 23 and didnt
see published in his lifetime,
contains memorable lines:
My idea is always to reach
my generation. The wise
writer, I think, writes for the
youth of his own generation,
the critic of the next and the
schoolmasters of ever after-
ward.
The pieces in A Short Au-
tobiography dont often
evoke the lyrically powerful
prose of The Great Gatsby,
Fitzgeralds iconic American
novel. Still, his gift is evi-
dent, even in a piece on Prin-
ceton University, as he de-
scribes entering the campus:
Two tall spires and then
suddenly all around you
spreads out the loveliest riot
of Gothic architecture in
America.
Fifteen of these 19 pieces
appeared in a 2005 collec-
tion, My Lost City: Personal
Essays, 1920-1940, publish-
ed by Cambridge University
Press and edited by West.
This new volume is more
accessible to the casual Fitz-
gerald reader the hardcov-
er is $25, paperback is $15
and e-book is $9.99, com-
pared with the Cambridge
editions price tag of more
than $100.
Light side
of Fitzgerald
evident in
new book
By KENDAL WEAVER
For The Associated Press
F
or ancient Romans, Carthage Must Be Destroyed hadtobe the wave of the
future if they were to become the unrivaled masters of the Mediterranean
and the lands on its shores. Look at a map.
Carthage, a colony of seagoingPhoenicians fromwhat is nowLebanon, was strate-
gically on the Mediterraneans south coast, halfway between its Middle East home-
land and the entry to the Atlantic. It was building an empire of its own, subjecting
tribes in North Africa, Spain and the big islands of Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica.
The cry to destroy Carthage
was taken up by Cato, one of
Romes most respected sen-
ators. He got intothe habit of us-
ing the slogan as the last sen-
tence of any speech he made
no matter what hed been talk-
ing about. That disconcerting
practice must have helped give
Romans a case of the jitters
when Hannibal, Carthages
greatest general, mountedanin-
vasion of Italy, complete with
African combat elephants. It
went through Spain, southern
France and the Alps, up to the
gates of Rome. That invasion
failed, but a Roman invasion of
Carthage succeeded.
This is a scholars book. Au-
thor Richard Miles teaches an-
cient history at the University of
Sydney, Australia, and writes
here about events long past. He
has to quote copiously from
Greek and Roman historians,
some of dubious reliability and
little concern with todays ideas
of fairness and entertainment.
The victorious Romans got rid
of Carthages own records,
along with temples and other
public institutions. The book
has color photos of the ruins,
made in a suburb of todays Tu-
nis.
Some of the stories are still
teasingly attractive.
Theelephants impressedpeo-
ple. Smaller than the Asian va-
riety, they may still have been
able to carry archers, but they
sometimes panicked and tram-
pled on their own infantry, an
ancient version of friendly
fire. The Romans killed some,
captured some others and
marched them in the triumphal
parades that celebrated their
victories.
Some people marveled that
the Carthaginians got the ele-
phants across the broad Rhone
River in southern France. Poly-
bius, a Greek who wrote Roman
history, may have shared the de-
lusion that elephants couldnt
swim.
...(He) even repeated a story
that some of Hannibals ele-
phants, panicked by the water,
plunged into the river, and
crossed to the other side by
walking underwater on the riv-
erbed and using their trunks as
snorkels, Miles writes.
How ancient Rome built its Mediterranean empire
Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization (Penguin Group), by Richard Miles:

The victorious Romans got rid of Carthages own records, along


with temples and other public institutions. The book has color
photos of the ruins, made in a suburb of todays Tunis.
By CARL HARTMAN For The Associated Press
A Short Auto-
biography
(Scribner), by F.
Scott Fitzgerald
and James L. W.
West III
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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9
2
9
2
9
2
9
2
9
2
999
2
99
2
9
2
9
2
999
2
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2
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2
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2
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9999999999
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222222222222222222222222
155KeenLakeRoad Waymart 1.800.443.0412 www.keenlake.com
Family Owned
and operated
Unique cottages,
some lake front
on 90 acre lake
Fishing, Boating,
Swimming,
Playground and
many scheduled
activities
5
8

C
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EBR
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I
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G

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E
ARS

Mention The Times Leader to save 10% on cottage reservations for July or Aug.
Cottage Rentals Still Available through October! Cottage Rentals Still Available through October!
2
9
8
8
6
6
Your Power Equipment
Headquarters
CubCadet Stihl Ariens
Troybilt Gravely
Lawntractors Mowers Trimmers
Blowers and more
687 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
570-675-3003
Blowers and more
0 6 3003
EQUIPMENT
7
0
1
4
1
4
THERES
OVER $620
IN COUPON
SAVINGS
IN TODAYS
TIMES LEADER.
Start saving on your grocery bills.
Call 829-5000 to subscribe.
SStart saving on your grocery bills
STUCKER TOURS 655-8458
www.stuckertours.com
VERMONT
8/17-20 (3 NITES/4 DAYS)
$
599
ACCOM. AT MIDDLEBURY INN,
LUNCH AT WAYBURY INN,
7 MEALS, VERMONT COUNTRY
STORE, WINE/CHEESE SOCIAL.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
If youve been to Hickory Run State Park near White Haven but bypassed Boulder Field, where on earth is your sense of adventure?
See what the glaciers have wrought as you attempt to keep your balance on this huge expanse of nothing but rocks thats been desig-
nated a National Natural Landmark. Again, sensible shoes are a must.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
AT LEFT: Ithaca, N.Y., might be gorges, but Northeastern Penn-
sylvania is no slouch in that department. The David Wenzel Tree-
house at Scrantons Nay Aug Park provides the perfect lookout
point, as the first-of-its-kind construction in Pennsylvania, com-
pleted by Forever Young Treehouses, sits a spectacular 150 feet
above the Nay Aug Gorge. While in the park area, little ones are
sure to enjoy the inexpensive waterslides that drop into a large,
public pool.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
If youre not afraid of depths, youll enjoy dropping 300 feet in a
small metal car while taking the popular Lackawanna Coal Mine
Tour at McDade Park in Scranton. On a hot summer day, the ride
to see what lies beneath is especially cooling, not to mention
educational. Youll learn about different veins of hard coal, the
roles of mule boy and nipper, monkey vein and the dead chute as
well as all the heroic efforts involved in deep minings history.
Rides are scheduled on demand daily between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Call 1-800-238-7245 or 570-963-6463 for details.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Now does this say postcard or what? The Twin Bridges in Fishing
Creek Township, Columbia County, over Huntington Creek, were
constructed in 1884 for $720 and named after John Paden, who
operated a nearby sawmill. The dynamic duo, one of which is
shown here, can claim bragging rights as the only twin covered
bridges in the United States.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
ABOVE: The Equestrian Center at the golfers paradise called Eagle Rock Resort in Hazle Township
is a most picturesque place to ride horses, or enjoy a ride powered by horses. From10 a.m. until 5
p.m. most days, Country Carriage Service Inc. offers trail rides and pony rides, and, on Saturday and
Sunday nights, horse-drawn carriage rides are a happy bonus. Reservations are a must. Call (570)
384-4899 for exact times, options and prices.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 1G
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
2011 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS AWD
STK #11883
694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117
*TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL.
**DPA - DOWN PAYMENT ASSISTANCE.
Chevy Runs Deep
$
24,799
*
or
$
299
* Lease
For
a Month
+ Tax & Tags
$1999 Due
at Signing
STARTING AT
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
To place your
ad call...829-7130
LOST - SET OF KEYS
Saturday 7/23 on
road somewhere
between Falls Rt 92
and Wyoming Ave.
570-466-6293
Lost American Eski-
mo female dog.
Answers to Meshkia
White with blue col-
lar. Lost in the vicin-
ity of Andover St,
Wilkes-Barre.
REWARD 814-1424
LOST
TIGER PIN
vicinity
Genetti Hotel
$500 REWARD
570-696-6945
LOST, African Spur
Tortoise. Missing
7/20 in Harding
area. 20 pd, 13
long. Small Reward
for return.
(570) 650-5437
120 Found
FOUND, Cat. Male.
White on bottom,
gray/black on top,
green eyes, long
legs. Friendly. Found
on Beach St.,
Scranton.
(570) 575-6280
FOUND. Little boys
Prescription glass-
es, royal blue frame,
strap around back,
Rec Specs. Found in
vicinity of Blackber-
ry Lane of Blueberry
Hills.
570-457-7875
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby
given that Articles of
Incorporation were
filed with the
Department of State
of the Common-
wealth of Pennsyl-
vania on January 19,
2011, with respect
to a nonprofit cor-
poration, Allied
Establishment for
Genetic Investiga-
tions of Sasquatch,
Inc., which has been
incorporated under
the Nonprofit Cor-
poration Law of
1988. A brief sum-
mary of the purpose
or purposes for
which said corpora-
tion is organized is:
charitable, educa-
tional, and scientific
activities relating to
the Sasquatch phe-
nomenon.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby
given pursuant to
the provisions of the
Fictitious Names Act
of Pennsylvania that
an application for
registration of a fic-
titious name was
filed with the
Department of State
of the Common-
wealth of Pennsyl-
vania on February 3,
2011, for the con-
duct of a business
under the fictitious
name of AEGIS
Research Fund, with
its principal office or
place of business at
83 Diebel Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702. The names
and addresses of all
entities who are
parties to the regis-
tration are: Allied
Establishment for
Genetic Investiga-
tions of Sasquatch,
Inc., 83 Diebel Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
BID NOTICE
The Board of Edu-
cation of the North-
west Area School
District is soliciting
sealed bids for the
following:
Trash / Recycling
Collection
Specifications may
be obtained by con-
tacting the North-
west Area School
District Business
Office, 243 Thorne
Hill Road, Shickshin-
ny, PA 18655 (570-
542-4126 Ext.
5000). Sealed bids
shall be in the Busi-
ness Office no later
than 1:00 P.M. on
Wednesday, August
10, 2011 at which
time they will be
opened in public.
The Board of Edu-
cation reserves the
right to reject any
and all bids or to
waive any informali-
ty in the bids
received.
150 Special Notices
ADOPT ADOPT
Loving family offers
your precious child
a life time of love
and happiness.
1-888-600-6341
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
ADOPT: A t r ul y
happy, devoted,
married couple will
give your newborn
endless love,
warmth & a bright
future. Expenses
paid. Call
Christine & John
1-855-320-3840
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
ADOPTION
A happily married
couple longs to
share our hearts
and home with
a newborn. Finan-
cially secure and
loving extended
family will offer
your child every
opportunity for a
lifetime of happi-
ness. Expenses
paid. Please call
Helen and John
1-800-604-1992
150 Special Notices
ADORING FAMILY OF 3
hoping to become 4
promises your new-
born a bright,
secure future filled
with endless love.
Denise & Tony
1-888-515-9347
BOWLING PARTY
JULY 31, 2011
1 TO 6 PM
AT STANTON
LANES
TO BENEFIT
THE R.A.D.
SCHOLARSHIP
$10 TICKETS
WILL GET YOU
3 GAMES OF
BOWLING
WITH SHOE
RENTAL AND
RAFFLE TICKET
Also available
RAD Bracelets
Face Painting
provided by
Lollipop Services
RAD Shirts and
Basket Raffles
DJ MO
PERFORMING
Celebrity
Bartender in the
lounge at
Stanton Lanes!
All tips will go the
R.A.D.
Scholarship Fund!
470 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
For details call
570-824-4661 and
ask for Terry or
visit the Athea
DeGraffenreid
Memorial page on
Facebook
Benefits the
Remember Athea
DeGruffenreid
Scholarship Fund
February 10th is
considered
World Marriage
Day!
bridezella.net
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Dr. Tom O'D.
has done it. The
perfect shot!
Hole in one.
Amazing. Cana-
dian football
amazing. Italian
food amazing.
Becky K. amaz-
ing. Praise
Jesus.
NEW CHILD
CARE CENTER
OPENING IN
AVOCA!
Stepping Stones
Childcare Center,
located at 824
McAlpine St.,
Avoca, PA, is set
to open on Sep-
tember 1st, 2011.
We will be providing
full time, part time,
and before and/or
after school care
for children ages
six weeks to school
aged. Come to our
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, August
6th 12-6PM!
Any questions
please contact
Emily Castanzo
(Owner/Director) at
570-262-5912 or
570-457-4363
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
FOR DIVORCE
CHILD CUSTODY
CHILD SUPPORT
DUI OR
UNEMPLOYMENT
COMPENSATION
REPRESENTATION
Call Attorney
Michael P. Kelly
570-763-0257
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
310 Attorney
Services
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment
Plans
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
in my Kingston
home. Licensed.
Accepting
Lackawanna &
Luzerne CCC.
570-283-0336
340 Health Care
Services
Caregiver for the Elderly
My Speciality is
providing care for
Alzheimers
Patients. Assisting
with personal care,
housekeeping,
cooking meals &
companionship.
Accommodating
Kingston &
Wilkes-Barre Area.
570-606-6551
Leave a message
350 Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Evening hours.
Very reliable.
Experience work-
ing in nursing
home. Call for
more information.
570-823-3979
570-991-0828
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www .
CenturaOnline.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
380 Travel
BROADWAY SHOWS!
Lion King 8/6
Hair 8/27
Jersey Boys 9/10
Wicked 10/19
Godspell 10/22
War Horse 10/22
Book of Mormon
3/10/12
1-800-432-8069
Knoebels 8/3
Mummies Exhibit 8/6
Crooks & Nooks
Tour/Cruise 8/6
Ocean City, NJ 8/10
Philadelphia Zoo 8/13
Washington, DC 8/13
Ellis Island 8/20
1-800-432-8069
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`09 RECON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
$3,800.
(570) 814-2554
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 125 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk mid
size 125cc 4 wheel-
er. Only $995 takes
it away!. Call
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
YAMAHA`02 GRIZZLY
660, Limited edi-
tion, 22 inch ITP,
Chrome wheels.
$3,000
Or best offer.
(570)333-4236
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
CADILLAC 03
DeVille. Excellent
shape, all leather.
$4650. BUICK 03
Century. Great
shape $3400
570-819-3140
570-709-5677
GMC 96 JIMMY SLE
4WD, Hunter
Green, 4 door, CD,
168,000 miles.
$2,100 obo.
(570) 262-7550
MERCURY 00
SABLE
Leather. Moon-
roof. New
inspection. 125K
miles $3,695
PONTIAC `98 GRAND
PRIX SE
112,000 miles,
$1,750
(570) 655-5404
TOYOTA `91 CAMRY
4 door, 5 speed.
Inspected until April
2012. Runs good.
New timing belt.
Just tuned up, oil
changed, cold AC,
new AM/FM CD
stereo. Excel tires.
170K. Needs some
exhaust and body
work. $950 or
best offer!
570-283-9452
570-417-7379,
leave message
409 Autos under
$5000
TOYOTA `91 CAMRY
LE good condition,
no reverse, 4 door,
runs great, new
tires $650. Mike
570-675-4383
Volvo 92 240
Original owner. 125K
miles. Good condi-
tion. Needs rack
and pinion replaced.
$700.
(570) 288-2919
Days Only
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `03 TL
3.2L V6. Auto. 5
speed. FWD. 30+
highway MPG. Silver
with black leather
int. Loaded with
cruise, abs, sunroof,
alloy wheels, fog
lights, traction con-
trol, power windows
& locks, Bose
stereo. Spotless.
Original owner. 82k
miles. Asking
$8,900
570-262-5044
BMW `00 323I
Black w/ tan leather
interior. All power. 6
cylinder. Sun roof.
Recently inspected.
New tires. 140K
miles. $6,800
(570) 868-6986
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $12,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
BMW `03 530 I
Beige with tan
leather interior.
Heated seats, sun-
roof, 30 MPG high-
way. Garage kept.
Excellent condition
86,000 miles.
Asking $11,000.
(570) 788-4007
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $16,695
570-466-2630
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
BUICK `02 LESABRE
4 door sedan. Dark
green. 1 owner. Only
30,000 miles. car is
loaded. Like new.
Asking $5,500. Call
570-466-5796
CADILLAC `02 DEVILLE
84K miles. Charcoal
with tan leather
interior. Recent
head gaskets &
water pump. Drives
great. $3,750. Call
570-417-5979
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,000
570-881-2775
412 Autos for Sale
CENTRAL CITY
MOTORS
319 W. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
HIGHEST QUALITY
VEHICLES
All Guaranteed
Bumper to
Bumper For
30 Days
570-779-3890
570-829-5596
CHEVROLET `00
CORVETTE
V-8. 5.7 liter.
345 Horse Power.
Automatic.
56,000 miles.
Pewter metallic.
Hatch Back.
Glass top.
Air conditioning.
Leather interior.
Power seat,
locks & windows.
Bose AM/FM
stereo.
Cassette/CD Player.
Very good to excel-
lent condition.
$19,700
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
(570) 696-0424
CHEVROLET `01
MONTE CARLO
1 owner. V6. Beauti-
ful, shiny, burgundy,
garage kept. New
tires, brakes &
i nspect i on. Wel l
maintained. Must
see. $3,895. Call
570-313-5538
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$27,900
(570) 288-3256
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
CHEVROLET `90
CORVETTE
Red. Auto. Red
leather. 13,000 orig-
inal miles. Garage
kept. $15,000.
570-379-2681
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The Wyoming Area School District invites
Bids for the following projects. Individual
bid packages are available for each proj-
ect.
Bids will be received for the following proj-
ects:
1. Roofing Replacement at Wyoming Area
Secondary Center
2. HVAC Equipment Repair and Replace-
ment at Wyoming Area Secondary Center
The Owner will receive bids until 10:00
a.m. on Thursday, August 4, 2011, in the
District Administration Office, located at
20 Memorial Street, Exeter, PA 18643,
Attention: Mr. Raymond J. Bernardi,
Superintendent.
Bids received after that time will not be
accepted. All bids will be opened publicly
at that time.
All bids shall be enclosed in envelopes
(inner and outer) both of which shall be
sealed and clearly labeled with the words
"SEALED BID FOR (NAME OF PROJECT
BEING BID ON), name of bidder and date
and time of bid opening, in order to guard
against premature opening of the bid. Fac-
simile bids will not be accepted or consid-
ered.
Copies of the documents may be obtained
at the office of Quad Three Group, Inc., 37
North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania 18701; Telephone 570-829-
4200, Extension 275, Attention: Lynn
Duszak. Documents may be obtained with
non-refundable sum of $100.00 each, plus
cost of shipping and handling. No partial
sets of documents will be obtainable.
All checks for sets of Bidding and Contract
Documents shall be made payable to the
Architect,Quad Three Group, Inc. Cut off
date for issuing Bidding and Contract Doc-
uments shall be Monday, August 1, 2011 at
4:00 p.m.
All bids shall remain firm for sixty (60) days
following opening of bids.
Each contractor and each sub-contractor
shall be licensed in the community where
the work will occur.
The Contract will be written to retain 10%
for each request for payment. When the
Contract is 50% completed, one-half of
the amount retained shall be returned to
the Contractor. However, the Architect
must approve the Application For Pay-
ment. The Contractor must be making sat-
isfactory progress and there must be no
specific cause for greater withholding.
The Owner-Contractor Agreement will be
the Standard Form of Agreement Between
Owner and Contractor, AIA Document
A101, 2007 edition.
The Owner requires that all Bids shall
comply with the bidding requirements
specified in the Instructions To Bidders.
The Owner may, at its discretion waive
informalities in Bids, but is not obligated to
do so, nor does it represent that it will do
so. The Owner also reserves the right to
reject any and all Bids. Under no circum-
stances will the Owner waive any informal-
ity which, by such waiver, would give one
Bidder a substantial advantage or benefit
not enjoyed by all other Bidders.
Bonding companies for Performance and
Payment Bonds must be listed in the U.S.
Treasury Circular No. 570.
A Bid Bond made payable to the Wyoming
Area School District in the amount of 10%
of each Base Bid shall accompany each
bid, executed by the Contractor and a
surety company licensed to do business in
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as a
guarantee that, if the bid is accepted, the
bidder shall execute the proposed con-
tract and shall furnish and pay for a Perfor-
mance and Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the Contract Price as security
for the performance of the Contract and
payment of all costs thereof, upon execu-
tion of Contract. If, after fifteen (15) days
the bidder shall fail to execute said Con-
tract and Bond, the Bid Bond shall be for-
feited to the Owner as liquidated dam-
ages. The Bid Bond of all bidders, except
the three low bidders, will be returned
within ten (10) days after the opening of
the bids.
The Bid Bond of the three low bidders for
each prime contract will be returned with-
in three days after the executed Contracts
and required bonds have been approved
by the Owner.
The successful Bidder will be required to
file a Stipulation Against Mechanic's Liens
prior to commencing work.
Bidders will be permitted to access the
site by appointment only. Contact the
Owners Representative listed in the Pro-
ject Manual.
The Bidding Documents and Forms of Pro-
posal may be examined at the following
site during regular business hours:
Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Wash-
ington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
18701, telephone 570-829-4200, facsimile
570-829-3732.
Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Confer-
ence will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thurs-
day, July 28, 2011, in the Cafeteria of the
Wyoming Area Secondary Center, located
at 20 Memorial Street, Exeter, PA 18643.
The Pre-Bid Conference is not mandatory.
END OF NOTICE TO BIDDERS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID
PROJECT: Willow Grove Street Recon-
struction. Borough of Nuangola, Luzerne
County, PA
ENGINEER: Barry Isett & Associates
ISSUE DATE: Saturday, July 23, 2011
BID DUE DATE: Friday, August 12, 2011,
at 12:00 Noon
DELIVER BIDS TO:
Borough of Nuangola
5150 Nuangola Road
Nuangola, PA 18707
Sealed bids will be received by the Bor-
ough of Nuangola at the aforementioned
time and location for roadway reconstruc-
tion and installation of RCP storm sewer
and associated end walls and construction
of stabilized swale. At the discretion of the
Borough, alternates may also be included
in the contract.
Contract documents may be inspected
and obtained at the Engineers office at
100 West Broad Street, Suite 200, Hazle-
ton, PA, between the hours of 8:30 A.M.
and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday.
Primary bidders may secure Contract
Documents for $50.00 per set after
July 26, 2011. The charge for the Bidding
Documents should be made payable to
Barry Isett & Associates, Inc. and is non-
refundable. Additional sets may be pur-
chased for $50.00 per set (non-refund-
able). Contractors who wish to have the
documents sent via FedEx are asked to
contact Barry Isett & Associates, Inc. at
(570) 455-2999; and upon receipt of a
separate $25.00 check (non-refundable)
for shipping fees made payable to Barry
Isett & Associates, Inc., the documents
shall be sent to the requesting Contractor.
A bid proposal is requested for the follow-
ing contract: Willow Grove Street Recon-
struction. Performance, Labor, and Mate-
rials Payment Bonds are required, as stat-
ed in the Instructions to Bidders. Bid
Security in the amount of ten percent of
the bid must accompany each bid, in
accordance with the Instruction to Bid-
ders. The bids will be opened and publicly
read aloud.
The Labor Standards, Wage Determination
Decision, and Anti-Kickback Regulations
(29 CFR, Part 3) issued by the Secretary of
Labor are included in the contract docu-
ments of this project and govern all work
under the contracts.
Non-discrimination in EmploymentBid-
ders on this work will be required to com-
ply with the Presidents Executive Order
11246 and will be required to ensure that
employees and applicants for employment
are not discriminated against on the basis
of their race, color, national origin, sex,
religion, age, disability, or familial status in
employment or the provision of services.
In addition to EEO Executive Order 11246,
Contractors must also establish a 6.9%
goal for female participation and a 0.6%
goal for minority participation in the aggre-
gate on-site construction work force for
contracts in excess of $10,000, as per the
notice of requirement for affirmation
action as contained in the contract docu-
ments. Attention is called to Section 3 of
the Housing and Urban Development Act
of 1968, 12 USC 179 LU and the Section 3
clause and regulations set forth in 24 CFR,
Part 135.
In compliance with Executive Order 11625
and 12138, the successful bidder must uti-
lize, to the greatest extent feasible, minor-
ity and/or women-owned businesses
located in the municipality, county, or gen-
eral trade area.
The Borough of Nuangola does not dis-
criminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability,
or familial status in employment or the pro-
vision of services.
The Borough of Nuangola is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Davis Bacon Wage Rates shall apply.
A pre-bid meeting is scheduled at the
intersection of Willow Grove Street
and S.R. 3006 (Nuangola Road),
Nuangola, PA, on Thursday, August 4,
2011, at 10:00 A.M. Attendance is
strongly recommended for all poten-
tial bidders.
Palletized Bluestone /
Flagstone Auction
(500) Pallets of Cut Stone /
Landscape Stone
For: Endless Mountain Stone Co.
Susquehanna, PA 18847
(Great Bend Area)
Saturday, August 6, 2011, 9:30AM
Auction To Be Held At Endless Mountain
Stone Co.'s Yard @ 5284 Brushville
Road, Susquehanna, PA 18847. From I-
81: Take Exit 230 (Great Bend) To Route 171
Towards Susquehanna PA, Go Approx. 8
Miles To Susquehanna, Go Over Bridge Take
Right On Brushville Road, Go 3 Miles
To Yard On Left.
(500) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone,
Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc. (500)
Including: Large Quanity of Natural Cleft
Pattern; Tumbled Pavers; Tumbled & Non-
Tumbled Drystack Wallstones; Bluestone
Slabs; Treads / Sills; Landscape Boulders;
Bluestone Tiles; Bagged Gravels; Specialty
Items Including: Waterjet Murals; Bluestone
Patio Kits; Benches; Bluestone Welcome
Stones / Gift Items; Many Other Items; Pal-
letized Stone To Be Sold By The Pallet Or By
Square Ft. And Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pal-
lets & Types Will Be Offered By The Pallet
And Buyer Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling
Arrangements Will Depend On Types, Vari-
eties And Way Stone Is Palletized. Decorative
& Specialty Items Will Be Sold Individually.
Types, Sizes, Selling Terms & Other Pertinent
Info Will Be In Detailed Catalog, Which Will
Be On Our Website @ www.manasseauc-
tions.com, After July 28th.
Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded For
Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Following
Auction, From Monday - Friday 8:00AM -
2:00PM, By Appointment.
Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyers Premium
Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day Of
Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major Cred-
it Card, 3% Discount For Payments Made By
Cash Or Check. Nothing Removed Until Set-
tled For.
Auctioneers Note: This Is The First Auction
Of This Kind In Northern PA. These Are Top
Quality - Endless Mountain Stone Is Reducing
Their Inventory. All Selling Absolute To The
Highest Bidder, Plan To Attend. Smaller Items
& Specialty Items Selling First.
Real Estate For Sale By Private Treaty: 20
Acre Vacant Parcel In Jackson Township,
Wayne County, With 5 Acre Permitted Quarry
- Sold With Gas Royalty Rights. More Info
Contact Butch Coleman @ (570) 465-7200.
Mel & Matt Manasse
PAAuctioneers License # AU571L &AU3517L
Sales Managers & Auctioneers
607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE
Whitney Point, N.Y.
www.manasseauctions.com
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
468 Auto Parts
WHEELS, Five each
94 Jeep Grand
Cherokee OEM Cast
wheels (Gold Trim)
with Center Caps &
P225/70R15 Tires
Mounted. Fit many
93-98 Jeep Mod-
els. One set new
($150), four sets
used in excellent
condition ($125
each). All for $550.
570-443-0545
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITOS
&
GINOS
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW DIRECTORY
Dont Keep Your Practice a Secret!
Call
829-7130
To Place Your Ad
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
310 Attorney
Services
FOR DIVORCE
CHILD CUSTODY
CHILD SUPPORT
DUI OR
UNEMPLOYMENT
COMPENSATION
REPRESENTATION
Call Attorney
Michael P. Kelly
570-763-0257
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
310 Attorney
Services
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment
Plans
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD AUGUST 31
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-pm
Happy Trails!
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET `98
CAMARO
Excellent condition.
3.8L, V8 automatic
with overdrive.
T-top convertible.
Bright purple
metallic with dark
grey cloth interior.
Only 38,200 miles.
New battery. Tinted
windows. Monsoon
premium audio
system with DVD
player. $6,500
(570) 436-7289
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY `03 BLAZER
LS 4WD 2 door
$6,280
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
CHEVY `04 CAVALIER
Sedan. 4 cylinder
auto. Green. 128k
miles. Air, cruise,
power locks, ABS.
Price reduced to
$3,999 or best
offer. Call
570-704-8685
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$13,750.
570-362-1910
CHEVY `07 AVEO LT
Power window/door
locks. Keyless
entry. Sunroof. A/C.
Black with tan
leather interior.
22,000 original
miles. AM/FM/CD.
New tires.
$12,000
(570) 287-0815
CHEVY 07 HHR LT
Moonroof
$13,784
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY 11 MALIBU LT
Moonroof.
7K miles.
$21,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Chrysler 02 Sebring
Convertible. Dark
Blue. Taupe top.
71,000 miles. Great
condition.
$5,900.
MUST SEE!
(570) 675-2975
CHRYSLER 06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
DODGE `06 STRATUS
Only 55K. Brand
new tires, plugs,
wires, oil. Excellent
Condition. $7,495
(570) 562-1963
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
412 Autos for Sale
10 DODGE
CARAVAN SXT
32K, Power sliding
doors, Factory
warranty!
$18,199
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$13,699
08 HONDA
RIDGELINE RTL
32K, Factory
Warranty, Leather
Sunroof
$24,199
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
34K, Red
$16,199
08 CHEVY
IMAPALA LS
4 door, only 37K! 5
Year / 100K
Factory Warranty!
$13,399
07 CHEVY IMPALA
LS
4 door, only 45k / 5
Year 100K Factory
Warranty!
$11,299
01 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR
Executive, 74K
$6,699
08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4, Reg Cab, 63K,
Factory Warranty
$13,999
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W W E E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,300
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `05 RANGER
X-Cab V6 Auto
2WD; $5,980
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
FORD `08 FOCUS
SES. 2 door
hatchback. Low
miles. 1 owner.
$13,990
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
FORD `87 F150
116k, rebuilt trans-
mission, new radia-
tor. Runs great.
$1,250. Call
570-864-2339
TOYOTA `03 SOLARA
Coupe. Auto. Silver.
Power windows &
locks. A/C. Satellite
radio, CD. $6,200.
570-899-5076
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO
Convertible.
Sprint blue, 2 tone
black/brown leather
int. 19 alloys,
330HP turbo (AWD)
08 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX SE
blue, auto V6
08 FORD FUSION SE
grey, auto, V6
07 CHRYLSER SEBRING
Blue, V6, auto
07 AUDI S4 QUATTRO
silver, black leather,
6 speed, 4.2v8,
(AWD)
06 DODGE STRATUS XXT
RED.
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
Maxx White, grey
leather, sunroof
05 JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
01 SATURN LS 300
Blue
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
green, tan leather
nav., AWD
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
99 CHRYSLER
CONCORDE gold
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS black
98 SUBARU LEGACY
SW white, auto,
4 cyl. (AWD)
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
passenger mini van
06 BUICK RENDVEOUS
Ultra blue, tan
leather, 3rd seat
AWD
06 PONTIAC
TORRANT
Black (AWD)
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
05 FORD F150 XLT
SUPER CREW TRUCK
Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4
05 GMC ENVOY SLT
grey, black
leather, 4x4
05 CHEVY EQUINOX LS
Black, AWD
05 GMC ENVOY SLE,
Silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Silver 4 x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
04 GMC TAHOE LT
gray letaher,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 GMC TAHOE LT
grey, silver leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS
red, auto, V6, 4x4
04 DODGE DURANGO
SLT hemi, blue/
grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 LINCOLN AVIATOR
pearl white, grey
leather, 3rd seat,
AWD
04 FORD F-150
Heritage, X-cab,
blk, auto, 4x4
04 NISSAN XTERRA SE
blue, auto, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
passenger mini van
03 FORD XLS ESCAPE
yellow, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR
LX blue, 4 door
mini van
3 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
7 pass. mini van
01 VOLVO V70
AWD, station
wagon, blue grey
leather, 84k miles.
99 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
grey, auto, 4x4
98 EXPLORER XLT
Blue grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
97 JEEP WRANGLER
SAHARA Hardtop,
auto, V6, 4x4
95 CHEVY 1500 XCAB
TRUCK, green 4 x 4
95 GMC JIMMY
2 door, purple 4x4
FORD `90 MUSTANG GT
Must See. Sharp!
Black, new direc-
tional tires, excel-
lent inside / outside,
factory stock, very
clean, must see to
appreciate. $7,800
or best offer. For
more information,
call 570-269-0042
Leave Message
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
FORD 03 MUSTANG
GT convertible.
23k low miles. 1
owner. $13,500
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
412 Autos for Sale
FORD 04 EXPLORER
Sport Trac XLT.
Only 30K miles.
$14,490
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD 08 MUSTANG
V6 convertible.
Auto. Power win-
dows & locks.
44K. Very Clean.
$14,980
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $14,000.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
HONDAS
08 Accord LX
Premium. Gray. 14K
miles. Warrenty.
$17,995
08 Accord LX
Premium. Pearl
Red. 42K. Alloys.
$16,995
08 CRV EX
Green. 25K miles.
Moonroof. AWD.
$19,900
08 Civic EX
Silver, 25K miles.
Moonroof. Alloys.
$16,400
08 Civic LX
Blue. 20 K miles.
Factory warrenty.
$15,800
08 Civic LX
Gray. 26K. 1 owner.
$14,400
04 Civic LX
Blue. 87K. New
Tires. $8,995.
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 03
ELANTRA
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Economy Car!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP 07 CHEROKEE
Only 23,000 miles!
$19,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP 07 PATRIOT
Low Miles!
Only $17,444
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MAZDA `08 MIATA
MX-5 CONVERTIBLE
Red. Power steer-
ing, auto, AC, CD.
ONLY 5,300 MILES.
$18,500
(570) 883-0143
412 Autos for Sale
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
PONTIAC 98 GRAND AM
4 door, 4 cylinder,
automatic.
$1,250
FORD 96 RANGER
Pickup, 4 cylinder,
automatic, $1,450
OLDSMOBILE 99 INTRIGUE
4 door, 6 cylinder,
automatic, $1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
570-825-8253
LEXUS `08 IS 250
AWD Sedan. 17,200
miles. No accidents.
Perfect condition.
Black with leather.
V6 Automatic.
Moonroof. 27 MPG.
Never seen snow.
$26,800
(570) 814-1436
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
412 Autos for Sale
LINCOLN 06
Town Car Limited
Fully loaded.
50,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$16,900.
(570) 814-4926
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA `99 MIATA
MX-5
129,000 miles,
5 speed, 2 door,
air conditioning,
convertible, new
tires, runs excel-
lent, needs nothing,
$4,850
(570) 592-3266
MAZDA 2 `11
Low mileage, 197
miles. Selling due to
death in family. Lime
green. Loaded.
$15,500. Call
570-788-4354
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
MERCEDES-BENZ `06
C-CLASS
Silver with leather
interior. Good condi-
tion. 34,000 miles.
$15,000 Negotiable
(570) 885-5956
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
MERCURY `95
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, V8, fully
loaded, moon roof,
new tires & brakes.
Interior & exterior in
excellent shape. 2
owners. Call
(570) 822-6334 or
(570) 970-9351
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 PAGE 3G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
207-8149 207-8149
Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic www.santocars.com
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Based on 72 month, buy with $$2,495 cash down equal trade in amount plus tax and approved credit. Expires 8/1/11
SANTO VOLVO
Automatic, Power
Glass Moonroof,
Heated Leather
Seats, Premium
Audio, Alloy
Wheels, Keyless
Drive & More
$
24,990*
$
339
BUY
FOR
72
MOS.
STARTING AT:
VOLVO CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SPECIAL PURCHASE
2.9%
APR AVAILABLE
TO 72 MO.
6 YEAR 100,000 MILE BUMPER TO BUMPER WARRANTY 6 YEAR 100,000 MILE 2 HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE 130 POINT SAFETY & MECHANICAL SERVICE COMPLETE CAR HISTORY REPORT
6
TO CHOOSE
FROM
2010 VOLVO S40 2.4i
SU M M ER
C LEA R A NC E
8
1
W YOM IN G A V E . E
X
P
W
A
Y From Cla rks S um m it/S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y - L e fton W yom in g A ve .
From W ilke s -Ba rre to S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y 8 Bloc ks on
W yom in g A ve n ue
R.J. BURN E
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570)342-0107
1-888-880-6537
www.rjb urn e .c om
Mon-Thurs 9-8 Sat 9-4
JUST JUST
AN N OUN CED ! AN N OUN CED !
SP EC IA L LEA SES O R 0% A P R S
L e a s e pr ic e ba s e d o n a 20 11 C TS S dn with A ll W he e l D r ive $ 39,770 M S R P . $ 359 pe r
m o n th plu s 9% s a le s ta x to ta l $ 391.84 pe r m o n th. 39 m o n th le a s e 12,0 0 0 m ile s pe r ye a r.
39 m o n thly pa ym e n ts to ta l $ 15281.76 $ .18/m ile pe n a lty o ve r 39,0 0 0 m ile s . $ 359 do wn
pa ym e n t plu s $ 359 fir s t pa ym e n t plu s ta x a n d ta gs ,To ta l du e a t de live r y is $ 969.65.
Lesee m ustqualify forGM Targeted Private Offer.L e a s e e r e s po n s ible fo r
e xc e s s ive we a r a n d te a r. M u s t ta ke de live r y by 9/0 6/20 11. R e qu ir e s US Ba n k Tie r 1 c r e dit
a ppr o va l. P le a s e s e e s a le s pe r s o n fo r c o m ple te de ta ils .
by Ca dilla c 2011 CTS AW D
A L L W HE E L D R IVE ,XM ,ON S TA R ,P OW E R W IN D OW S ,
P OW E R L OC K S ,P OW E R D R IVE R S S E A T,
$
359
$359
00
Down
39 m os .
OR 0% A P R
60 M os
L e a s e pr ic e ba s e d o n a 20 11 S R X A ll W he e l D r ive L u xu r y $ 42,415 M S R P . $ 459 pe r m o n th plu s 9%
s a le s ta x to ta l $ 499.64 pe r m o n th. 39 M o n th le a s e 10 ,0 0 0 m ile s pe r ye a r. 39 m o n thly pa ym e n ts to ta l
$ 19486 $ .25/m ile pe n a lty o ve r 32,50 0 m ile s . $ 1499 do wn pa ym e n t plu s $ 459 fir s t pa ym e n t,$ 0
S e c u r ity D e po s it. Ta x a n d ta gs du e a t de live r y. Lesee m ustqualify forGM Targeted
Private Offer.L e a s e e r e s po n s ible fo r e xc e s s ive we a r a n d te a r. M u s t ta ke de live r y by 9/0 6/20 11.
R e qu ir e s A lly Ba n k Tie r S c r e dit a ppr o va l. P le a s e s e e s a le s pe r s o n fo r c o m ple te de ta ils .
UL TR A VIE W S UN R OOF ,A L L W HE E L D R IVE ,L E A THE R ,
M E M OR Y P A C K A G E ,HE A TE D S E A TS ,A M /F M /6 D IS C ,
ON S TA R ,XM ,P A R K IN G S E N S OR S
$
459
$1499
00
Down
39 m os .
OR 0% A P R
36 M os
L e a s e pr ic e ba s e d o n a 20 11 E s c a la de with A ll W he e l D r ive $ 70 ,0 45 M S R P . $ 699 pe r
m o n th plu s 9% s a le s ta x to ta l $ 762.21 pe r m o n th. 39 m o n th le a s e 12,0 0 0 m ile s pe r
ye a r. 39 m o n thly pa ym e n ts to ta l $ 29,718 $ .18/m ile pe n a lty o ve r 39,0 0 0 m ile s . $ 2999
do wn pa ym e n t plu s $ 699 fir s t pa ym e n t plu s ta x a n d ta gs ,To ta l du e a t de live r y is
$ 4,217.62. Lesee m ustqualify forGM Targeted Private Offer.L e a s e e
r e s po n s ible fo r e xc e s s ive we a r a n d te a r. M u s t ta ke de live r y by 9/0 6/20 11. R e qu ir e s
US Ba n