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Montgomery County Democratic Committee

Committee Persons Handbook


2010
Adopted 2/1/09
Edited 10/5/09 Edited 6/15/10
Paid for by the Montgomery County Democratic Committee. Printed in House.

Welcome to the Montgomery County Democratic Committee


Your Mission:
Your mission, as a committee person of the Montgomery County Democratic Committee (MCDC), is to help elect Democratic candidates, not just in Washington, but in Harrisburg, in Norristown, and in your township or borough.

Our Mission:
As organizers and staff at MCDC, our mission is to help you be the best committee person you can be. So weve put together this handbook to describe your (and our) responsibilities; outline the structure of MCDC; and provide you with resources to make your job more effective and efficient. Dianna DiIllio
MCDC thanks Betsy Whitman, Steve McCarter, and Bill Leopold for their hard work designing this handbook.

MCDC contact information


Montgomery County Democratic Committee Street address: 21 E. Airy Street, Norristown, PA 19401 Mailing address: P.O. Box 857, Norristown, PA 19404-0857 610-272-2000 Fax: 610-272-2005

info@mcdems.org www.mcdems.org Executive Director.....................Dianna DiIllio, dianna@mcdems.org

My Area Leader: _____________________________________________________

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Table of Contents
What is a Committee Person? ........................................................................................ 5 One size does not fit all................................................................................................ 5 Election Day ......................................................................................................................... 7 Preparation and set up................................................................................................. 7 While the polls are open ............................................................................................. 9 End of the day.............................................................................................................. 11 Your Constituents............................................................................................................ 13 Voter registration lists................................................................................................ 13 VoterWeb: on-line voter data base....................................................................... 13 Introducing yourself................................................................................................... 14 Registering people to vote....................................................................................... 15 Informing your constituents.................................................................................... 16 Maintaining your lists................................................................................................. 16 Your Democratic Candidates ...................................................................................... 18 Circulating Nominating Petitions .......................................................................... 18 Other Candidate Support......................................................................................... 19 MCDC & the Democratic Party ................................................................................... 20 Structure......................................................................................................................... 20 What MCDC can do for you.................................................................................... 21 Get Out the Vote (GOTV) ............................................................................................ 23

Appendices
MCDC Contact Information ......................................................................................... 25 MCDC By-Laws (a Committee Persons summary) ............................................. 26 MCDC Areas...................................................................................................................... 28 Federal Contact Information ....................................................................................... 32 United States Senate .................................................................................................. 32 United States House of Representatives ............................................................. 32
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State Contact Information ............................................................................................ 34 Pennsylvania State Senators.................................................................................... 34 Pennsylvania State Representatives...................................................................... 36 Writing Editorials & Letters to the Editor ................................................................ 39 Tips on Letter Writing ................................................................................................ 39 Contacting Local Editorial Boards......................................................................... 39 Nominating Petitions ..................................................................................................... 41 Absentee Ballots .............................................................................................................. 42 Guidelines for Poll Watchers ....................................................................................... 43 Sample Instructions for Poll Watchers...................................................................... 44 Why We Are Democrats ............................................................................................... 45 Important Contact Information .................................................................................. 47

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

What is a Committee Person?


As a committee person, you are the face of the Democratic Party in your community. Voters will see you at the polls and come to view you as a resource for questions about candidates, issues, and voting. Being visible and accessible to voters is one of the biggest impacts you can make toward establishing a Democratic presence and building a Democratic community in your hometown. A committee person is an elected official of the Democratic Party. Each voting precinct can have up to two committee people, elected by the Democratic voters of that precinct once every four years, in the spring primary of a gubernatorial election year. As such, you assist the county Democratic Party with the business of electing Democratic candidatesat the local, county, state, and national level. You have a vote at your local monthly Democratic committee meetings, at annual county-wide endorsement conventions, and at the county-wide committee meeting and nominating convention held once every four years. (Business at the county levelMCDCis conducted by the executive committee which meets once a month.) Committee people report to their Municipal Chair, or, if no Municipal Chair exists, to their Area Leader. To become a committee person, you must circulate a nominating petition (pp. 18, 42) and obtain at least 10 signatures of registered Democrats living in your precinct. If you are running for the first time, contact your Area Leader (p. 28) or MCDC to obtain a petition and list of registered Democrats. You can also become a committee person by appointment, should a vacancy occur.

One size does not fit all


The more time and energy you have for this job, the greater the benefit to our Democratic candidatesand to your community. But we recognize that not everyone has limitless resources to commit to political work, so we like to think of T-shirt sizessmall, medium, and largeto describe your commitment options. Regardless of which size you fitor grow intoyou will be making a valuable contribution. Size Small: Covering the Basics Provide coverage for your polling place on primary day (spring) and general election day (November). You can ask volunteers to help you out. Attend your Area and/or Municipal meetings (monthly). Attend county-wide endorsement conventions (annually). Circulate a nominating petition and obtain 10 signatures (annually). 5

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Attend county-wide general meeting and nominating convention (once every four yearsyear following a gubernatorial election).

Size Medium: Having a Democratic Presence Meet responsibilities for Size Small committee person. Circulate one or more nominating petitions for local, state, or national candidates and obtain 30+ signatures (annually). Attend a monthly meeting of the MCDC Executive Committee (3rd Thursday of the month; check www.mcdems.org for time and location). Establish a Democratic presence by: o Canvassing precinct regularlyintroducing yourself, registering new voters, distributing literature for candidate(s). o Recruiting poll volunteers & block captains. o Building lists of yard sign hosts. Size Large: Building a Democratic Community Meet responsibilities for Sizes Small & Medium Committee People. Build a Democratic Community by: o Holding house parties for business and/or fun. o Hosting fundraisers. o Building an e-mail list to disseminate information on candidates, elections, MCDC functions and fundraisers. o Recruiting volunteers to circulate petitions, lit drop, and distribute yard signs. Increase voter turnout with GOTV (Get Out The Vote) plan. o Distribute literature door-to-door. o Mail GOTV letters to Democrats in your precinct. o Set up phone banking before and during Election Day. o Set up poll watchers (inside the polls).

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Election Day
In a nutshell, your responsibility on Election Day can be reduced to two activities: Poll Coverage and Maximizing Turnout. Coverage means having at least one person outside the poll to greet voters, distribute sample Democratic ballots and campaign literature, and answer questions. Coverage is vital because it establishes a Democratic presence in your community, and because, in a few instances, can help influence a persons vote. Having a poll watcher inside (pp.44-45) to check off the names of all voters will allow for late afternoon calling to identified supporters who have not yet voted. Poll coverage and other responsibilities are described in detail below:

Preparation and set up


Gather materials Your Area Leader is responsible for providing several materials for E-Day: sample ballots (yellow; to be handed out) specimen ballot (large; white; for display only) campaign literature your precinct street list your poll watcher certificate (You need a watchers certificate to enter the voting area where you can monitor the number of people voting throughout the day, and, where you can get final vote numbers at the end of the day.) You will also need to bring: yard signs and posters (Area Leaders may also help procure yard signs, though many committee people bring signs posted at their homes.) voter registration forms (applicable only for the following election) absentee ballot applications a cell phone (and phone numbers of your Municipal and Area Leader and MCDC office). a calculator (to add up election results at the end of the day) Schedule poll greeters

It is vital that your polling place have coverage for the entire election day7:00 am till 8:00 pm. You and you
committee persons and any volunteers are the best people to do this job. This way, voters in your precinct will begin to see you as the go to person for any campaign and election questions. But 13 hours is a long day, so we encourage you to recruit volunteers.

TIP: Recruiting friends and neighbors to be poll greeters is often a first step in getting them more involved in the Democratic Party.

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Pack water and snacks Its a long day. Youll get hungry and thirsty. Bringing a snack to share promotes good will across the aisle. Dress sensibly Wear comfortable shoes. Youll be standing most of the day. (Its OK to bring a folding chair for occasional rests as long as youre not sitting hidden away, such as behind a table.) Dress in layers. Temperatures can change 20 over a day. (Depending on polling location as you may be inside.) Bring hat and gloves. You lose 80% of your body heat through your head. And, when youre handing out literature, its hard to keep your hands in your pockets. Organize contact information Part of your responsibility is trouble shooting. If you suspect that anything is amiss, and dont feel comfortable handling it yourself, call immediately: Your Municipal or Area Leader, or MCDC office. Lawyers will be on call all day. Prepare an A-frame easel (optional) Having an A-frame easel decked out with campaign literature, yard signs, and Welcome Democrats is not a requirement, but it certainly has a commanding presence at the entrance to a polling place. (You can purchase a plastic A-frame at your local hardware store or online.) Display yard signs and literature Yard signs. Arrive by 6:30 am. If you want prime real estate for signs and an A-frame, arrive earlieror place signs the night before. (Check with your Area Leader about any ordinances or local traditions that would argue against night-time placement.) Campaign literature. Some sites have tables available for displaying literature; if not, you may set up a card table, space permitting.

Note: All political signs or literature, as well as all candidates, campaigners, and committee people must be at least 10 feet from the entrance of a polling place. (Entrance has many interpretations. Consult your Judge of Elections if you have any questions.)

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Introduce yourself to other election workers Outside the polls (volunteers): Republican committee people Candidates & their representatives Inside the polls (official workers; paid): Judge of the Elections* Majority Inspector* Minority Inspector* Clerk* Machine Operator*

* While it is technically legal for a committee person to serve as one of the paid staff on election day, it is never a good idea for a committee person to do this. As a staff person, you would be inside all day, thus unable to provide any poll coverage.
Inside the polls (volunteer): Poll Watcher: a volunteer from a campaign or a party charged with observing the voting process and, often, checking off names of voters as they vote. Unchecked names can be used later in the day to call voters to get them out to the polls. (For more information, see pp. 44-45.)

While the polls are open


Greet voters

Its important to smile and greet every voter as she/he arrives. You might say, for
example, Good morning. Would you like a sample Democratic ballot? Do you have any questions about voting? Explain that the sample ballot is the list of endorsed Democratic candidates. A greeter is usually more effective when standing. However, if you need to sit down part of the time, be sure to be in a prominent location so you can welcome every voter. Promote voting down the ticket Stress the importance of voting for ALL endorsed Democratic candidates. Having Democrats at the local and county levels increases the effectiveness of any elected Democrat up the ticket--from state representative to President. Offer campaign literature Many voters will have made up their minds by the time they come to the poll, but some may seek information on one or more of the candidates. You can offer it with a simple, Do you need information on any of the Democratic candidates?

Exit literature. Sometimes, in a primary election, a candidate will ask you to hand out literature to every voter as she/he exits the polling place.

MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Be prepared to answer questions about voting procedure Frequently asked questions include:

1. How do I vote?
Show specimen ballot (large, white). Point out each office/question to be voted on. Caution against pushing the Choose not to Vote button.

2. Are there any questions on the ballot?


Show specimen ballot (large, white) so the voter can read the question in full. Offer explanatory literature. Point out MCDC endorsed position, if any, on sample ballot (yellow).

3. My name wasnt on the registration list inside. How do I know where I should go to vote?
The Judge of the Election (JoE) has access to all registered voters in Montgomery County and can look up this information. If the JoE refuses or if the voters name is not found, advise the voter that she/he may ask for a provisional ballot and cast a vote that way. If the JoE objects to giving a provisional ballot, call MCDC (610-272-2000) immediately.

4. How do I change my address (or name) on my registration?


Offer a Voter Registration Form.

5. I might be out of town for the general election. How can I get an absentee ballot?
Offer an Absentee Ballot Application form. Note filing date. Point out that voting absentee is a two-step process: applying for a ballot, then casting a paper ballot. Both have strict deadlines and procedures. (See Absentee Ballots, p. 43.)

6. My daughter/son will be going away to college next year. Where should she/he register to vote?
Either place is acceptable. Note: If student registers at parents home but cannot return home to vote, she/he must apply for an absentee ballot. Hand out an absentee ballot, then ask voters name and phone/email so you can give them a reminder about approaching absentee ballot deadlines. (See Absentee Ballots, p. 43.) Be on the lookout You are the eyes and ears of open and honest elections. Mistakes can be made unintentional or intentionalthat can disenfranchise a voter. Below is a list of the most common.

If you witness any of the following, call MCDC (610-272-2000) IMMEDIATELY.


1. 2. 3. 4. Long voting lines. Voter being denied a provisional ballot. Voting machines down or not working. ALL voters being asked to produce ID. The only voters required to provide ID are new voters and anyone voting for the first time at that polling location.

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End of the day


At 8:00 pm the Judge of the Elections (JoE) will check to see if there are any voters in line; anyone in line must be allowed to vote. When the last voter leaves, the JoE will lock the door. Be sure you are on the inside and have your poll watchers certificate with you. (Candidates do not need a certificate to be in the poll after closing.) While tapes from the voting machines are printing, you and any other committee people, watchers, and candidates must stay back from the JoEs table and the machines. (There will usually be a designated table for you to sit at.) As the tapes print, the JoE and other election officials will open and count the absentee ballots. Your job, at this time, is to be patient.

Alert! Absentee
Ballots are NOT to be opened until the poll doors are locked.

Get election results When the tapes have finished printing, you will get the results one of two ways: 1. The judge or one of the other election workers will announce the results from each machine out loud, beginning with the public counter (the number of people who voted on that machine). The worker will then announce the results for each office, stating the name of the office, an identifying code for each candidate, the candidates name, and the number of votes recorded, for example: United States Senator: B11, Robert Casey--203; C11, Richard Santorum--2. Any ballot question(s) will also be announced (in the form of yes and no votes) --OR-2. An election worker will carry one tape from each machine to the table where youre sitting. Trade the tapes back and forth with the Republican committee persons until you have votes from all the voting machines recorded. (Remember to first record the public counter number for each machine,) Either way, record the results on your specimen ballot (large, white). Next, record the total number of absentee ballots cast, then the number of votes cast for each candidate (and for any question). Add these numbers to the totals from the machines. For a primary election only: Get the total count of voters for each party (called the option switch) from each machine and the absentee ballots. (On the machine tapes, this number will be at the bottom.)

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Note: If the election results are not read out loud, then it is your right to request a set of printoutseven if it means staying a little later. Should the judge refuse, notify the Election Board and MCDC. If all else fails, you can get results from the machine printouts that have to be posted outside the polling placeeven if it takes two people and a flashlight!

Report election results to whomever has requested themyour Municipal and Area Leaders, MCDC, and/or a candidate. Take down Remove all Democratic campaign signs from your polling place before you leave. If it is a primary election, save any campaign signs or literature that can be used again in the general election. If possible, please recycle any remaining materials.
Thanks to Jeanne Bland and Penny Cutler for supplying information for End of the Day.

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Your Constituents
The meat of your responsibility as a committee person occurs between election days, reaching out to and serving your constituents. Your constituents are all residents in your precinct of voting ageDemocrats, independents, people not yet registered, even Republicans. You serve by registering people to vote and becoming an information source about election dates; voting rules and procedures; local, state, and national issues; and Democratic candidates. Walk around your precinct and get to know your neighbors. Attend as many community meetings as possible. Become an advocate to help people with their concerns and questions. As you reach out, you create a Democratic presence and, eventually, build a Democratic community. Presence and community say success, and nothing builds more success like existing success.

Voter registration lists


As a committee person, you will receive a printed street list with the names, addresses, and party affiliations of all registered voters in your precinct. As its name suggests, this list is organized by streets, and by even/odd house numbers within a street. You can contact MCDC at 610-272-2000 to receive an excel file of the registered voters in your precinct.

VoterWeb: on-line voter data base


All committee people also have access to a user-friendly, on-line voter data base at www.voterweb.org. VoterWeb allows you to build custom lists for door knocking, mailings, and phone banking. For example: All registered Democrats (good for circulating nomination petitions, see pp. 18, 42) All Republican women under 35 All Democrats who voted in three of the past four elections General reports and functions provided by VoterWeb: On-line voter search Street lists printed in mailing label format Polling place locations (along with driving directions) Polling place look-up by street List of blank houses (addresses with no registered voters) for voter registration efforts Election Day reports available from VoterWeb: Strike lists (alphabetical lists for recording who has votedto be used for GOTV [Get Out The Vote] phone banking. See pp. 24-25) 13

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Voter turnout statistics (helps determine target voter turnout to win) Voter registration statistics (to show annual trends). Other VoterWeb features include: On-line phone bank to track calls List of Volunteer Recruitment Households (households comprised of mostly Democrats) Contact information for candidates running in your precinct. To obtain your password and to get help using VoterWeb, contact MCDC Executive Director Dianna DiIllio at dianna@mcdems.org.

Introducing yourself
Its important to let your constituents know you are their Democratic Committee Person and that youre there to help them. The best way to do this is to walk your precinct and knock on doors. In rural areas, it might be easier to make phone calls. Introduce yourself as a neighbor and a Democratic committee person and explain, in a sentence or two, how you can be of assistance. Be sure to leave contact information so anyone can get back to you with questions or concerns. For your convenience, MCDC can provide you with a sample welcome brochure you can customize, print up, and hand out and/or leave behind if no one is home. TIP: One of the best ways to introduce yourself to Democratic voters is by circulating nominating petitions in mid-February (pp. 18, 42). This may not be the most weather-friendly time to be going door-to-door, so you make a big impression on voters when you do. Plus, you can empower a voter to get involvedsigning a nominating petitionwithout asking her/him for any commitment of time or money. If you are not comfortable with the idea of introducing yourself to perfect strangers, read this Introduction Script aloud to yourself a couple of times. Hi. Im Chris, a neighbor of yours. I live over on the next block. Im the Democratic Committee person for this area. I just want to introduce myself and give you my contact information. Dont hesitate to call me if you have any questions about voting, want information about Democratic candidates, need an absentee ballot, or are looking for a candidate sign for your yard. Oh, by the way, are there any 17-year-olds or other adults in your household who need to register to vote? Anyone who wants to 14

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change registration status from Republican (or Independent) to Democrat? (Ive got some voter registration forms if you need them.) Then, repeat this (true) mantra: Many of the Democrats you meet will be

delighted to meet a fellow Democrat and contact person for their election questions.
Alternatively, you can mail post cards with contact information, though with first class postage, this, of course, can get expensive.

Registering people to vote


Voter registration is one of the most important responsibilities of a committee person and should be an on-going task. Stash a couple of voter registration forms in your glove compartment, your briefcase, your purse, your laptop carrier. Bring them to the polls on Election Day and carry them with you whenever you walk your precinct or canvas for a candidate. As you engage in any discussion on politics, ask if anyone needs to register to vote or wants to reregister as a Democrat. While voter registration should be an on-going task, the best time to focus your efforts on registration is just before the Primary and General elections. Go Door-to-door. The best way to register new voters is to walk your precinct, street list in hand, on a Saturday or a Sunday or on a weekday evening. As you go to each house: Check your street list for the registered voters in a house and ask if there is anyone else who needs to be registered. Ask if there are children about to turn 18. Note: Voters can register anytime after the spring or fall election that precedes their 18th birthday. As you walk: Look for gaps in house numbers. Check to see if there are houses for those missing numbers and if residents are registered to vote. Compare to the list of blank houses available from VoterWeb (p. 13.) Note For Sale signs and jot down address; go back when new people move in. Follow up with another visit or phone call. This is the single most effective method of persuading someone to register to vote.

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Volunteer at a registration table. If you dont feel comfortable going doorto-door as described above, call MCDC to ask if you can set up or help at a registration table at a college campus, shopping mall, or other public venue.

TIP: Many voters registered as Independents do so because they view themselves as independent thinkers. Point out that anyone can be an independent thinker, but Independent registrants disenfranchise themselves from voting for candidates in Primary elections.

TIP: If youre registering voters in the spring, remind people that, in Pennsylvania, only registered Democrats and Republicans can vote for candidates in the primary elections.

Informing your constituents


As you introduce yourself to your constituents, ask for their email address so you can keep them informed on Democratic events, important election deadlines, candidates, and local issues. Send email updates periodically, but sparinglynot more than once a week; twice a week as election approaches. An old-fashioned paper newsletter or a GOTV letter still packs a punch. It takes more time and money than an email update to produce and distribute, but its worth it. Consider your audience as well; you may want to just mail to Super Ds. Plan for it to hit one to two weeks before an election to have maximum impact. If you can organize 10-12 volunteers to drop these newsletters (NOT in mailboxes) in neighborhoods youll save on mailing--the bulk of the expense. You may want to work with your co-committee people to save time and money. We can provide you with ideas to help you get started.

Maintaining your lists


Every election cycle, you will receive an updated copy of your street list from the Board of Elections (through your Area Leader). Even with official updates, youll note that information is not always correct as you walk your precinct or peruse your lists. People move, get married, and die. Information about these changes doesnt always make it to Voter Services in a timely fashion.

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Its important to record any changes you encounter, crossing out names of voters no longer living at the listed address. Send this information to your Area Leader so she/he can notify Voter Services. In addition, you might make note of any households that receive mail at post office box addresses. Enter this information into your VoterWeb file or keep a list of P.O. Box addresses for the next time you or your Area does a mailing.

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Your Democratic Candidates


Part of your job as committee person is to help Democratic candidates run for office in your precinct--be they candidates for school board, county commissioner, state representative, U.S. Senator, or President of the United States.

Circulating Nominating Petitions


Circulating a nomination petition is one of the most important responsibilities you have to your Democratic candidates. Before any candidate can be placed on the
ballot she/he must collect a specified number of signatures. Because most offices require 100 signatures or more, and because the circulation period only lasts three weeks, candidates will need your help collecting these signatures. As a committee person you are expected to circulate at least one petition and obtain at least 10 signatures every year. However, the skys the limit should you wish to circulate additional petitions and collect more signatures. Number of signatures required depends on the office sought: Office* Number of signatures U.S. Congress......................................................1000 State Senate............................................................500 State House ............................................................300 County office..........................................................250 District Justice** ...................................................100 Township or Borough office............................. 10 School Director** .................................................. 10 State Committee people ...................................100 Committee person................................................. 10
*For a complete list of offices, number of signatures, and candidate filing fee, visit www.dos.state.pa.us/elections. **These positions can be cross filed, meaning a candidate can circulate two sets of petitionsone to Democrats, one to Republicans. The latter can only be circulated by a registered Republican.

Rules for collecting signatures There are strict rules for collecting signatures, concerning who can circulate and when, who can sign and information required. Any violation of a rule will invalidate a signature, if challenged. A buffer of 25-50% additional signatures is strongly recommended to ensure that the minimum count is obtained. This is particularly true for a targeted race. 18

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Other Candidate Support


A candidate will introduce her/himself to you at your Area meeting or with a personal phone call. Its important to have this face-to-face meeting or conversation to get a sense of the candidate as a person. Ways you can help a candidate: Hold a coffee, reception, or house party for the candidate to speak to a group of your friends and neighbors. Dont hesitate to invite Republicans and Independents, but let the candidate know she/he might be speaking to a mixed audience. Write a letter to the editor to local newspapers in support of the candidate. (See pp. 40-41 for submission information and tips on letter writing.) In local, county, and state races, citizen endorsements have a significant impact. You can use the candidates literature or website to get specific information. Or contact a candidates office to inquire about specific issues it wants emphasized. Canvas your precinct with or for a candidate. If you like to canvas, dont wait for a campaign to call you; visit www.mcdems.org for contact information for candidates in your precinct.* Distribute literature for the candidate. Commonly called lit drops, this is often done in the evening. Unlike canvassing, the purpose of lit drops is not to engage the voter, but merely distribute printed information.* Increase voter turnout in your precinct. (See the section, Get Out the Vote, pp. 23-24.)

*Warning: Campaign material cannot be placed inside mailboxes!

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MCDC & the Democratic Party


It is MCDCs responsibility to provide you the information, training, materials, and assistance you need to be a strong committee person. It is your responsibility to see that these tools are used effectively to grow Democratic voter registration, increase Democratic voter turnout, and support and elect Democratic candidates.

Structure
Montgomery County is divided into 62 municipalities24 boroughs and 38 townships. Most of these municipalities are divided into wards and/or precincts. Each ward/precinct contains one polling site and may be represented by up to two Democratic committee persons. Montgomery County has 425 polling sites, so MCDC can have up to 850 committee people. (Precinct data is from 2010; numbers may change upon redistricting.) MCDC is divided into 15 sub-committees called Areas (see chart and map, pp. 2830). Many Areas are further divided into sub-committees by municipality. As a committee person, you report to your Municipal Chair (or directly to your Area Leader if you have no municipal chair). Municipal Chairs report to Area Leaders, who, in turn, report to the County Executive Committee and the County Chairperson. Municipal and Area Committees hold meetings throughout the year. One of your most important duties is to attend these meetings. It is here that ideas are exchanged, political strategies discussed, advice given, and questions answered. It is here, also, that you will meet your Democratic candidates and learn of their positions and volunteer needs. The full Montgomery County Democratic Committee meets for endorsement conventions and once every four years for reorganization. MCDC Executive Committee In between the meetings of the full MCDC, the Executive Committee meets the third Thursday of each month to handle the business of MCDC. The Executive Committee comprises the Chair, First Vice-Chair, Second Vice-Chair, Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Executive Director, Area Leaders, and Representatives from each Area. (For a list of members, see pp. 25, 28-29, or visit www.mcdems.org. )

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What MCDC can do for you


Heres a list of specific services MCDC offers to committee people. Access to VoterWeb.org Voter Web is an online voter database, and, as such, is a powerful tool for committee people to create multiple types of lists or labels from their computer. (For examples of lists, see pp. 13-14.) This database is also very useful for looking up a persons party registration or contact information. This system is a free service for committee people. To sign up for access to voterweb.org, contact MCDC. Printouts and electronic files: 1. Street lists of voters (organized alpha-numerically by street and residence number; printed by precinct) 2. Walk lists of voters (organized by logical canvassing routes) 3. Excel lists of voters (good for use in a mail merge) 4. Mailing labels (Please provide blank labels or reimburse MCDC for the cost of using its labels.) 5. Voter Registration Forms and Absentee Ballot Applications 6. List of homes with no registered voters (for voter registration drives) 7. List of individuals who have requested an absentee ballot during an election season (updated daily) 8. Rules and regulations on placement of political signs for each municipality in Montgomery County 9. Municipal Maps showing ward and precinct boundaries (Cost: $5.00 per map) 10. Volunteer lists from past campaigns (if available) 11. Phone lists (we have phone numbers for 70-80% of Montgomery Countys registered voters) 12. Election Day strike lists (good tool for tracking who has voted) Advice and assistance: 1. Help publicizing your event(s) on our website (mcdems.org) calendar. 2. Help obtaining watcher certificates for committee people and volunteers 3. Help setting up automated calls (robo calls) 4. Use of MCDC bulk mail indicia (to reduce postage for political mailings). Members of the Democratic Committee may use with written permission.

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5. General assistance with campaign strategy, finances and fundraising, and get out the vote (GOTV) questions 6. Legal guidance pertaining to political matters 7. Press advice 8. If you do not utilize a Union shop for printing (yard signs, campaign literature, etc.) you must indicate it is done and paid for In House. 9. Contact information for other organizations, campaigns, and elected officials 10. Election Day troubleshooting (MCDC Legal Team). Call 610-272-2000.

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Get Out the Vote (GOTV)


The goal of every election-day is guaranteeing that supporters of Democratic candidates come out to vote. The term Get-Out-The-Vote (GOTV) refers to the last stage of the campaign, occurring over the last week or last 72 hours before election day. Entering the GOTV stage signifies a switch from persuading voters to choose your candidate to making sure all identified supporters actually come out to the polls. The tactics are as simple as 1-2-3-4. 1. Get candidate signs out on the street First, set aside enough lawn signs or posters for your polling place on election day. Next, make sure that ALL other signs for any Democratic candidate are displayed somewhere (for example, key intersections) in your precinct.. Yard signs do not do any good sitting in someones garage. 2. Do one last literature drop (last week before election day) For this step, youll need volunteers who can walk part of your district and leave a flyer or door hanger at individual households. (Material may NOT be placed in mailboxes!) Give each volunteer a list of identified supporters in a neighborhood and a map to accompany the list. 3. Make phone calls or set up a phone bank (last weekend before election day) Get a list of Democrats or other supportive voters and their phone numbers from your Area Leader, Municipal Chair, a campaign, or MCDC. Write a simple script, for example: Hello, this is Chris. Im calling to remind you to get out and vote this Tuesday, November 4. The polls are open from 7am to 8pm. Your polling place is the township municipal building. Do you need a ride to the polls? Make notes about each response. (If the person does not sound supportive of your candidate[s], remove her/him from a list of future contacts over the next several days.) If you need to setup a phone bank with a group of people making calls, talk to your Area Leader or Municipal Chair about a possible location. Sometimes a supporter will allow a group to use her/his office for making phone calls. If that is not available, ask others to either make calls from their homes or to have everyone come to a central location and use personal cell phones. 4. Election Day GOTV Activities If you have volunteers on Election Day that would like to help at the polls, it is always a great idea to have Poll Watchers inside the polling place. The watchers

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job is to not only watch for problems in the polling place, but keep track of who has voted. (For specific information on poll watchers and their responsibilities, see pp. 44). Youll want to supply watchers with a strike list, a list of all registered Democrats in your precinct. The watcher strikes out the names of people as they vote; sections of the strike list can then be ferried to a phone bank a couple of times during the day; for some elections this process will begin around the end of the work-day. Phone callers then call Democrats who have not yet voted. (Strike lists are available through MCDC.)

Note: Each poll watcher needs an official watchers certificate. Ask your Area Leader to request one for each watcher.

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MCDC Contact Information


Executive Officers
Chairman Marcel Groen 610-272-2000 mgroen@mcdems.org 1st Vice Chair Joanne Olszewski 610-277-0137 joanneolsz@msn.com 2 Vice Chair Joe Foster 610-506-1167 jsf130@hotmail.com Treasurer Kelbin Carolina 484-557-2515 kccarolina@gmail.com Recording Secretary Olivia Brady 610-331-3979 olivia.e.brady@gmail.com Correspondence Secretary Gregory Philips 610-337-0546 gwphilips@1129law.com Council to MCDC Brian Gocial 215-569-5424 Gocial@blankrome.com MCDC Consultants Frank Custer Lee Soltysiak
nd

MCDC Headquarters
Montgomery County Democratic Committee 21 E. Airy Street P.O. Box 857 Norristown, PA 19404-0857 610-272-2000 Fax: 610-272-2005

Executive Director Dianna DiIllio dianna@mcdems.org

State Committee Members*


Scott Brown Patrick Costello Deborah Crowe Shirley Curry Mary Jo Daley Ruth Damsker Penny Gerber Vince Gillen Marcel Groen Richard Haaz D. Bruce Hanes D. Gregory Holt Murray S. Levin Caren Moskowitz Beth Suchsland Wendell Young IV
*as of 5/18/10

215-527-5928 215-219-1717

frank@frankleespeaking.net lee@frankleespeaking.net
Information Technology Chair Paul Gallagher 215-328-9104 paul4horsham@hughes.net

Website: www.mcdems.org

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MCDC By-Laws (a Committee Persons summary)


COUNTY COMMITTEES
Rule 2. Election of Committee members. Members of the County Committee shall be elected in the following manner: At the spring Primary Election in each year in which the Governor is to be elected in a regularly scheduled election, two County Committeepersons shall be elected by the qualified Democratic electors of each election district in the County. They shall be elected to serve from the day following the date of election as certified by the Montgomery County Board of Elections until the day following the next Primary Election in a regularly scheduled gubernatorial year, or until their successors are duly elected and certified. Rule 3. Qualifications and requirements of Committee members. Section 1: Qualifications to serve as Committee members or officers shall be as follows: The member shall be an enrolled Democratic elector in the election district which he or she represents, and shall have actual and physical residence and not merely legal residence in said election district. Section 2: No person shall be eligible to serve as a member or officer of the County Committee or any of its subordinate committees who: (a) holds a political appointive office of profit under an administration, city, county, state or national, opposed to the Democratic Party (except positions of a judicial character or those appointed by the courts or notaries public or commissioners of deeds or those whose original appointment to said position was made by a Democratic administration or attained through a merit system or who are currently protected through a merit system or a collective bargaining contract); (b) has entered into an agreement with opponents of the Democratic Party to support such opponents; (c) by voice, vote, financial support or otherwise has, within two years, supported a candidate in a General or Special Election opposed to the duly nominated candidate of the Democratic Party in that election, except as provided in Section 3. Section 3: Those Democratic candidates who file for an office in which cross filing is permitted by law and those persons supporting such candidates are exempt from Section 2 of this Rule.

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Rule 4.

Duties of Committee members. It shall be the duty of Committee members to: a. participate in meetings of the County Committee, and in meetings of the members thereof from their respective Areas and Municipalities; b. increase the enrollment of Democratic electors in their voting districts to its maximum number; c. see that at least one nomination petition shall be properly circulated and filed for each public office for which nominations are to be made at each Primary Election in their respective election districts; d. organize political activity in their election districts thoroughly and effectively to the end of achieving a maximum Democratic vote at the polls and Democratic majorities in the elections; e. champion and work for Democratic principles and integrity within the Party and the administration of government; f. do all things necessary and proper to effectuate these Rules.

Rule 5.

Filling a Committee member vacancy. In case a vacancy occurs on the County Committee through resignation, disqualification, or any other cause, the County Chair(s) shall fill such vacancy as soon as possible; provided however that no vacancy shall be filled between the date herein fixed for the election of members of the County Committee and the next election of County officers. It shall be mandatory upon the County Chair(s) to enforce Rule 3 in filling all vacancies.

The above rules are taken from the MCDC By-Laws. The by-laws were amended on Jan. 15, 2009. MCDC can provide a copy upon request.

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MCDC Areas
Area Area Leader; Contact Info Municipalities; Monthly Meeting 1 2
3
Indian Valley Democrats

Jim Prendergast 484-433-4694 prenderjv@msn.com Elaine DiGilio Hannock 215-234-0325 ehannock@comcast.net Jeanne Bland, 215-256-8335 kitties371@aol.com

Municipalities: Lower Pottsgrove, Pottstown, Upper Pottsgrove, West Pottsgrove Monthly meeting: Varies. Call for more information. Municipalities: East Greenville, Green Lane, Marlborough, Pennsburg, Red Hill, Upper Hanover Monthly meeting: Definitely. Call for date and location. Municipalities: Franconia, Lower Salford, Salford, Souderton, Telford; Upper Salford Monthly meeting: 4th Tuesday of the month, 7:30, Franconia Township Building, 671 Allentown Rd., Franconia Municipalities: Collegeville, Limerick, Lower Providence, Royersford, Skippack, Trappe, Upper Providence, Worcester Monthly meeting: 2nd Thursday of the month, 7:30 IBEW Union Bldg, Ridge Pike, Collegeville

www.ivdems.org
Kevin Dunbar, 610 306-5649 dunbarkl@verizon.net

4
David Fritz, 215-362-0763 weteach2@verizon.net

5
North Penn Democrats

Municipalities: Hatfield Bor., Hatfield Twp., Lansdale, Montgomery Twp., North Wales, Upper Gwynedd, Towamencin Monthly meeting: 4th Mon. of the month, 7:30 pm, North Wales Boro Hall, 300 Church Rd. Municipalities: Horsham, Upper Dublin Monthly meeting: Varies; municipal committees meet more regularly. Call for information. Municipalities: Bryn Athyn, Hatboro, Lower Moreland, Upper Moreland Monthly meeting: varies Issues breakfast: 3rd Saturday of alternating months, 8:00am, Calloways Restaurant, 1902 County Line Road, Huntington Valley (call to confirm) Municipalities: Abington, Rockledge Monthly meeting: 2nd Mon. of the month, 7:30 pm, St. Marks Church, Meeting House & Beverly Rd., Rydal Municipalities: Cheltenham, Jenkintown, Springfield Monthly meeting: Varies; municipal committees

www.northpenndems.org
Deborah Crowe, 215-619-7993 deb_crowe@yahoo.com

www.uddems.org
Howard Rovner, 215-953-2704 215-820-9149 (c) rovnerh@dial-law.com

8
AbingtonRockledge Democrats

Michael Barbiero, 215-481-0604 info@abingtondemocrats.com

www.abingtondemocrats.com
Sean Kilkenny, 215-690-3817 skilkenny@fsalaw.com

www.cheltenhamdemocrats.org meet monthly. www.jenkintowndemocrats.com www.springfield-democrats.org

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MCDC Areas*
Area Area Leader; Contact Info 10
Colonial Area Democrats

Municipalities; Monthly Meeting


Municipalities: Conshohocken, Plymouth, Whitemarsh Monthly meeting: Varies; call for more information. Municipalities: East Norriton, Norristown, West Norriton Monthly meeting: 4th or last Thursday of the month. Call 610-272-2000 for location.

Jason Salus, 484-342-0379 salusje@gmail.com

www.cdems.org
Olivia Brady, 610-331-3979 oeob0304@verizon.net

11

Tom Kohler, (610) 337-8493 tkohler@umdems.org

Municipalities: Bridgeport, Upper Merion, West Conshohocken Monthly meeting: 4th Mon. of the month, 7:309:00pm, Trinity Episcopal Church, 966 Trinity Lane, King Of Prussia Municipalities: Lower Merion, Narberth Monthly meeting: 3rd Tues. of the month, 7:30 pm, Narberth Borough Hall, 100 Conway Avenue, Narberth Municipalities: Ambler; Lower Gwynedd, Whitpain

12

www.umdems.org
Bill Leopold, 610-667-6818 goldpold@aol.com

13

Jill Stein, 610-724-1099 jrstein@comcast.net

www.democratslmn.org
Shelly Waldman, 215-542-1541 shellywaldman1@gmail.com

14

Margaret Phiambolis, 215-628-8227 Monthly meeting: 1st Thursday of the month, 7:30 msplaw@verizon.net pm, Harleysville Bank, 1017 N. Bethlehem Pike, Spring House www.wissahickondems.com Arthur Fairclough, 610-287-2231 sbdems@verizon.net Municipalities: Douglass, Lower Frederick, New Hanover, Perkiomen, Schwenksville, Upper Frederick Monthly meeting: 4th Wed. of the month, 7:30 pm. Call for location.

15

*For information on the Democratic Committees in surrounding counties: Berks County: ........... 610-376-2304 ........www.berksdems.org Bucks County: .......... 215-348-2140 ........www.bucksdemocrats.com Chester County: ....... 610-692-5811 ........www.chescodems.org Delaware County: .. 610-566-6427 ........www.delcodems.com Lehigh County: ........ 610-437-2705 ........www.lehighdems.org Philadelphia: ............. 215-241-7804 ........

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Federal Contact Information


The most efficient method of contacting House and Senate representatives is to make a personal phone call or send a Fax. Letters sent by U.S. Postal Service go through an irradiation process that can often delay delivery and may even damage the contents. Letters sent as e-mail have the potential of being overlooked. Be courteous and concise in your correspondence. Include specific, pertinent information with concrete examples that support your position. If your representative is not listed below, go to www.house.gov and enter your zip code.

United States Senate


Senator Bob Casey (D) 202-224-6324 Fax: 202-228-0604 www.casey.senate.gov Philadelphia office: 215-405-9660 Fax: 215-405-9669 Senator Arlen Specter (D) 202-224-4254 Fax: 202-228-1229 www.specter.senate.gov arlen_specter@specter.senate.gov Philadelphia office: 215-597-7200 Fax: 215-597-0406

United States House of Representatives


Hon. Chaka Fattah (D - 2nd) 202-225-4001 Fax: 202-225-5392 www.house.gov/fattah Main Philadelphia Office: 215-387-6404 Fax: 215-387-6407 Hon. Jim Gerlach (R - 6th) 202-225-4315 Fax: 202-225-8440 www.gerlach.house.gov

Trappe office:
610-409-2780 Fax: 610-409-7988

Hon. Joe Sestak (D - 7th) 202-225-2011 Fax: 202-226-0280 www.sestak.house.gov Media office: 610-892-8623 Fax: 610-892-8628

Hon. Patrick Murphy (D - 8th) 202-225-4276 Fax: 202-225-9511 www.patrickmurphy.house.gov Bristol Office: 215 826-1963 Fax: 215 826-1997

Hon. Allyson Schwartz (D - 13th) 202-225-6111 Fax: 202-226-0611 www.schwartz.house.gov Jenkintown office: 215-517-6572 Fax: 215-517-6575

Hon. Charles Dent (R - 15th) 202-225-6411 Fax: 202-226-0778 www.house.gov/dent East Greenville office: 215-541-4106 Fax: 215-541-4109

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State Contact Information


NOTE: You can determine who your state legislators are by visiting the Pennsylvania General Assembly website at www.legis.state.pa.us.

Pennsylvania State Senators


Hon. LeAnna Washington (D-4th) 717-787-1427 Fax: 717-772-0572 www.senatorwashington.com washington@pasenate.com Philadelphia office: 215-242-0472 Fax: 215-753-4538 Roslyn office: 215-517-1434 Fax: 215-517-1439 Hon. Charles T. McIlhinney Jr. (R-10th) 717-787-6599 Fax: 717-783-7328 www.senatormcilhinney.com cmcilhinney@pasen.gov Doylestown office: 215-489-5000 Fax: 215-489-5200 Hon. Daylin Leach (D-17th) 717-787-5544 Fax: 717-705-7741 www.senatorleach.com leach@pasenate.com King of Prussia office: 610-768-4200 Fax: 610-768-4204 Hon. Bob Mensch (R-24th) (717) 787-3110 Fax: (717) 787-8004 http://senatormensch.com/ bmensch@pasen.gov Quakertown office: (215) 529-1215 Fax: (215) 529-1218 Hon. Vincent Hughes (D-7th) 717-787-7112 Fax: 717-772-0579 www.senatorhughes.com hughes@pasenate.com Philadelphia office: 215-879-6630 Fax: 215-560-3434

Hon. Stewart J. Greenleaf (R-12th) 717-787-6599 Fax: 717-783-7328 www.greenleaf.pasenategop.com sgreenleaf@pasen.gov Willow Grove office: 215-657-7700 Fax: 215-657-1885 Hon. Andrew E. Dinniman (D-19th) (717) 787-5709 Fax: 717-787-4384 www.senatordinniman.com andydinniman@pasen.gov West Chester office: 610-692-2112 Fax: 610-436-1721 Hon. John Rafferty (R-44th) 717-787-1398 Fax: 717-783-4587 www.senatorrafferty.com jrafferty@pasen.gov Collegeville office: 610-831-8830 Fax: 610-831-8837 Pottstown office: 610-469-8390 Fax: (610)469-8394

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State Contact Information, cont.


Pennsylvania State Representatives
Hon. Robert W. Godshall (R-53rd) 717-783-6428 Fax: 717-787-7424 www.bobgodshall.com rgodshall@pahousegop.com Hatfield office: 215-368-3500 Fax: 215-361-4220 Hon. Kate Harper (R-61st) 717-787-2801 Fax: 717-787-2022 www.kateharper.net kharper@pahousegop.com Blue Bell office: 610-277-3230 Fax: 610-270-1677

Hon. Matthew Bradford (D-70th) 717-772-2572 Fax: 717-772-9994 www.pahouse.com/bradford (to send email, go to the website, above) Norristown office: Worcester office: 610-270-1150 610-222-3490 Hon. Marcy Topel (R-147th) (717) 787-9501 Schwenksville office: (610) 287-4181 Fax: (610) 287-4182

Hon. Thomas J. Quigley (R-146th) 717-772-9963 Fax: 717-772-2434 www.repquigley.com tquigley@pahousegop.com Pottstown office: 610-326-9563 Fax: 610-718-5787 Hon. Michael Gerber (D-148th) 717-787-9475 Fax: 717-787-0861 www.pahouse.com/gerber (to send email, go to the website, above) Conshohocken office: 610-832-1679 Fax: 610-832-1684

Hon. Tim Briggs (D-149th) 717-705-7011 Fax: 717-787-0861 www.pahouse.com/briggs (to send email, go to the website, above) King of Prussia office: 610-768-3135 Fax: 610- 768-3112

Hon. Mike Vereb (R-150th) 717-705-7164 Fax: 717-260-6522 www.repvereb.com mvereb@pahousegop.com Collegeville office: 610-409-2615 Fax: 610-409-2619

Continued, p. 38

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State Contact Information, cont.


Pennsylvania State Representatives
Hon. Rick Taylor (D-151st) 717-705-2048 Fax: 717-780-4776 www.pahouse.com/taylor (to send email, go to the website, above) Horsham office: 215-441-1030 Fax: 215-441-1036 Hon. Kathy M. Manderino (D-194th) 717-787-1254 Fax: 717-780-4770 www.pahouse.com/manderlino (to send email, go to the website, above) Philadelphia office: 215-482-8726 Fax: 215-482-9066 Hon. Lawrence H. Curry (D-154th) 717-783-1079 Fax: 717-787-2713 www.pahouse.com/curry (to send email, go to the website, above) Jenkintown office: 215-572-5210 Fax: 215-517-1423 Hon. Brendan Boyle. (D-170th) 717-787-8523 Fax: 717-787-4810 www.pahouse.com/boyle (to send email, go to the website, above) Philadelphia office: 215-676-0300 Fax: 215-676-0310

Hon. Josh Shapiro (D-153rd) 717-783-7619 Fax: 717-780-4754 www.pahouse.com/shapiro (to send email, go to the website, above) Abington office: 215-517-6800 Fax: 215-517-6828

Hon. Paul Drucker (D-157th) 717-705-2003 Fax: 717-772-2943 www.pahouse.com/drucker (to send email, go to the website, above) Wayne office: 610-688-5691 Audubon office: 610-631-2865

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Writing Editorials & Letters to the Editor


Editorials and letters to the editor in local newspapers about Democratic candidates and issues have more of an impact than you might imagine. It helps create a Democratic presence. And its valuable (and free) publicity for our candidates. Note: You do not have to reside in the area of a newspapers circulation to submit a letter to that newspaper. If you want to broadcast your endorsement of a candidate, you can mail/email the same letter or editorial simultaneously to multiple newspapers.

Tips on Letter Writing


1. The purpose for writing should be stated in the first paragraph of the letter. If the letter is endorsing a Democratic candidate, state the candidates name and office. If the letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g. House bill: H.R. _____, Senate bill: S. _____. If the letter is in response to an article or previous letter, include the articles date and title. 2. Be positive and to the point. 3. Include key information using examples to support your position. 4. Mail or fax a copy of your published letter to the candidate youre supporting. Or mail/fax a copy of your letter to MCDC. 5. Always include your name and your contact information so that your submission can be verified.

Contacting Local Editorial Boards


In most cases, letters to the editor can be submitted online by going to the papers web site and clicking on the appropriate icon such as contact us. Listed below is the contact information for newspapers that circulate within Montgomery County.
Allentown Morning Call Allentown 610-820-6500 letters@mcall.com community listing: news@mcall.com The Colonial Fort Washington 215-542-0200 Letters to editor and community listing: emorris@montgomerynews.com
Include your telephone number in the subject line

The Intellegencer Doylestown 215-345-3050 Letters to editor: intell_letters@phillyburbs.com Community listing: intell_news@phillyburbs.com (Use intell as the subject line)

Main Line Life Wynnewood 610-896-9555/ Fax: 610-896-9560 Letters to editor and community listing: tmurray@mainlinelife.com

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Main Line Times Ardmore Letters to editor: sgreenspon@mlt.com Community listing: people@mlt.com Montgomery Life Fort Washington 215-542-0200 Letters to editor and community listing: agreenburg@montgomerynews.com For community listing emails use community listing as the subject line Philadelphia Inquirer Philadelphia 215-854-2000/ Fax: 215-854-4483 Letters to editor: inquirer.letters@phillynews.com The Reporter Lansdale 215-855-8440 / Fax: 215-855-6147 Letters to editor: letters@thereporteronline.com Community listing: lifestyle@thereporteronline.com Spring-Ford Reporter Royersford 610-948-4850

Mercury Pottstown 610-323-3000/ Fax: 610-327-3308 Letters to editor: nmarch@pottsmerc.com North Penn Life Fort Washington 215-542-0200 letters to editor and community listing: ccompton@montgomerynews.com

Phoenix Phoenixville 610-933-8926/ Fax: 610-933-1187 Letters to editor: editor@phoenixvillenews.com Souderton Independent Souderton 215-723-4801 / Fax: 215-723-8779 Community listing and letters to editor: cosproff@montgomerynews.com

Times Herald Norristown 610-272-2500/ Fax: 610-272-1935 Letters to editor: shuskey@timesherald.com Community listing: Pjohns@timesherald.com Valley Item Royersford 610-948-4850

Trend Leader County-wide 610-783-1185

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Nominating Petitions
There is a limited time--three weeks--usually in February, in which petitions can be circulated. As a committee person, you are expected to circulate at least one petition and obtain at least 10 signatures every year. However, the skys the limit, should you wish to circulate additional petitions and collect more signatures.

Note: Circulating petitions is a no-brainer way to empower others to get


involved in the election processits free and only takes a couple of minutes!

Rules for Collecting Signatures


These rules must be strictly adhered to in order for signatures and petitions to be valid. This is especially true in a contested race where an opponent could decide to contest your signatures in an effort to keep you off the ballot. 1. Petitions can only be circulated after the 13th Tuesday before the Primary and only until the 10th Tuesday before the Primary. 2. All petition circulators must be registered Democrats, living within the candidates district for whom they are circulating. 3. Petition signers must write their street addressNOT a post office addressand include the city, township, or borough* in which they live. 4. After signatures are collected, the circulator must sign the back of the petition in the presence of a notary.** 5. Petitions must be submitted on deadlines established and in the collection place established. * Since there are no cities in Montgomery County, all signers will have to put the township or borough of residence. ** MCDC has a notary available in the office at a designated time toward the end of the petition signing period. Some Areas make similar arrangements around the county.

Tip: A signature on a nominating petition DOES NOT commit the signor to vote for that candidate in the primary or general election. Rather, it signifies the signors permission to allow the candidates name to appear on an official

ballot.

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Absentee Ballots
As a committee person, you should be prepared to assist with absentee ballot requests for persons who are already registered to vote but who will not be able to go to their polling place on election day. You can obtain absentee ballots applications from MCDC or from the Montgomery County Election Board.

How to vote by Absentee Ballot


Voting by absentee ballot is a two-step process: 1. A registered voter must first apply for an absentee ballot at least 30 calendar days before the scheduled primary or general election. 2. The voter must return the completed ballot by mail (postmark by stated deadline) or go to the Board of Elections,1 Montgomery Plaza, Swede Street, Suite 602, Norristown, and submit it in person. The voter may not send her/his ballot in with another person.

Who should apply


Any registered voter who has any concern about not being able go to her/his voting location on election day should apply for an absentee ballot. This would include: Military service personnel (and spouse).. Anyone who travels for business or whose job otherwise prevents her/him from voting at the polls. Any Election Day official (Judge of Elections, Majority Inspector, Minority Inspector, Clerk, Machine Operator) who will be absent from her/his municipality of residence. War veterans who are bedridden or hospitalized. Sick or disabled voters unable to attend their polling place or to operate a voting machine. Any county employee whose Election-Day-related job might prevent her/him from voting. Any person who will not go to a polling place on Election Day due to the observance of a religious holiday.

Questions? Have voter call the Board of Elections at: 610-278-3275.


Tell the voter: If it turns out that you are able to vote in person on election day, you MUST go to your polling place, void your absentee ballot, and vote. Poll workers will void the absentee ballot you submitted earlier.

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Guidelines for Poll Watchers


Heres an overview of how poll watchers are appointed and what their roll is during election day.

Who can appoint watchers?


Each candidate is allowed two watchers in every district where the candidates name appears on the ballot. All political parties and political bodies that have nominated candidates are entitled to three watchers per poll. Montgomery County usually received one certificate for each Committee Person (two certificates per polling site); an additional certificate is available upon request.

Who is qualified to be a watcher?


Watchers must be qualified registered electors in Montgomery County. A watchers certificate issued for a particular polling place can be used at any polling place in Montgomery County. (However, if it is also issued on behalf of a candidate, the certificate can only be used in a polling place in which that candidates name appears on the ballot.) A watcher must be able to produce her/his certificate upon request.

How many watchers can be in the polling place?


Only one watcher for each candidate or for each party can be in the polling place at any one time during voting hours.

What does a poll watcher do?


As the name implies, watchers are to watch. They are NOT allowed to electioneer, which means they may not wear buttons, carry signs, or engage in open discussion about the election process while in the building. (If someone wished to electioneer, she/he must be at least 10 feet from the building.) Watchers are to be placed at least 10 feel from the enclosed area of a polling site and remain silent while in the polling place. At the close of the polls on Election Day, candidates may enter the polling place but must remain OUTSIDE the enclosed areaat least 10 feet from the enclosed area where the officials are seated--along with the watchers and constable. The Board of Elections suggests that the Judge of Election place them at a table and give the group a tape from each voting machine to note the election results. Each tape tabulates all the votes and lists the write-in votes from its machine.

Under no circumstance should the watchers, candidates, or constable be at the same table with the judge, inspectors, and clerk.
Questions about watchers?
Call the Board of Elections: 610-278-3275

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Sample Instructions for Poll Watchers


Dear Volunteer Poll Watcher, Welcome, and thank you for helping us to GOTV (Get Out The Vote) and to keep the election process honest and open to all registered voters. Your main job is to check off names of voters as they come in to vote. The list at the end of this binder has names of voters registered as Democrats, independents, and any Republicans identified as voting for the candidate.

A few tips:
Ask the Judge of the Election where you can sit. It must be close enough to the sign-in table so that you can hear each voters name as it is called out by the clerk. If you cant hear the voters name, ask the clerk to repeat the name and/or move your seat closer. If you miss a few names because you take a break or because voters are being processed rapidly, you may read the list of voters that the clerk has written down. Check off each voter in the far left-hand column of boxes.

Your second job is to keep an eye on the election process to make sure all registered votes have equal access to the poll and that the voting process proceeds honestly. The following five pages detail the rules and regulations. Do not worry about knowing them all; I have highlighted areas where problems are most likely to occur. Your mere presence at the poll today will help tremendously to keep the voting process open and honest.

Contact information:
If you have ANY suspicion about ANY practice by a voter or election official, call the Montgomery County Democratic Committee immediately, (610) 272-2000. MCDC has a staff of lawyers available to address your concerns. No question is too trivial! Better to be safe than sorry. For other questions, contact your municipal chair or Area Leader.

At 4:00 pm please take this notebook to the following phone banking site:

123 Main Street, Whoville Home of Chris & Pat Jones, 215-123-4567
Directions to phone banking site and contact information are in the last page of this binder.

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MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

In case you wondered

Why We Are Democrats


Heres Section 17 of The Charter & The Bylaws of the Democratic Party of the United States, as amended by the Democratic National Committee, January 19th, 2002:

We Democrats are the oldest political


party in America and the youngest in spirit. We will remain so, because we enjoy the challenge of government. Time and again, for almost two centuries, the Democratic Party has made government work -- to build and defend a nation, to encourage commerce, to educate our children, to promote equal opportunity, to advance science and industry, to support the arts and humanities, to restore the land, to develop and conserve our human and natural resources, to preserve and enhance our built environment, to relieve poverty, to explore space. We have reached difficult and vital goals.

We recognize that the capacity of government is


limited but we regard democratic government as a force for good and a source of hope.

At the heart of our party lies a fundamental


conviction, that Americans must not only be free, but they must live in a fair society.

We believe it is the responsibility of government to


help us achieve this fair society

A society where the elderly and the disabled can lead


lives of dignity and where Social Security remains an unshakable commitment;

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MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

A society where all people can find jobs in a growing fullemployment economy; A society where all workers are guaranteed without question the legal right to join unions of their own choosing and to bargain collectively for decent wages and conditions of employment; A society where taxes are clearly based on ability to pay;

A society where the equal rights of women are


guaranteed in the Constitution;

A society where the civil rights of minorities are fully


secured and where no one is denied the opportunity for a better life;

A society where both public and private discrimination


based upon race, sex, age, color, creed, national origin, religion, ethnic identity, sexual orientation, economic status, philosophical persuasion or physical disability are condemned and where our government moves aggressively to end such discrimination through lawful means; A society where we recognize that the strengthening of the family and the protection of children are essential to the health of the nation;

A society where a sound education, proper nutrition,


quality medical care, affordable housing, safe streets and a healthy environment are possible for every citizen;

A society where the livelihoods of our family farmers are


as stable as the values they instill in the American character;

A society where a strong national defense is a common


effort, where promoting human rights is a basic value of our foreign policy, and where we ensure that future by ending the nuclear arms race.

This is our purpose & our promise.


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MCDC Committee Persons Handbook, 2/1/09

Important Contact Information


County
Montgomery County Democratic Committee..................... 610-272-2000 Fax: 610-272-2005 info@mcdems.org www.mcdems.org Montgomery County government, general info ................ 610-278-3000 www.montcopa.org Voter ServicesVoter Registration ................................... 610-278-3280 Voter ServicesElection Board ......................................... 610-278-3275 Court House.......................................................................... 610-278-3000 Democratic County Commissioner Joe Hoeffel .................. 610-278-3031

State
PA Democratic Party ................................................................. 717-920-8470 www.padems.com PA Senate Democratic Caucus .................................... www.pasenate.com PA House Democratic Caucus......................................www.pahouse.com Pennsylvania Department of State ..................www.dos.state.pa.us/dos/ Bureau of Commissions, Elections, and Legislation.......................... 717-787-5280 Office of the Governor ...............................................................www.PA.gov

National
Democratic National Committee ........................................... 202-863-8000 www.democrats.org US Senate Democratic Caucus..................................democrats.senate.gov US House Democratic Caucus ...................................democrats.house.gov Office of the President............................................... www.whitehouse.gov

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