Anda di halaman 1dari 7

Systems

VISION ANAM MODEL LAND WATER

Mobility
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Transportation Street Hierarchy V1_Main V3_Shared V4_Land & Waterways

SOCIAL

I ga obere na a kowaputa udi uzo ha gaesi new na eme ihe ha choro ime, ma gwa ha ihe ha ga neme. Obodo Anam di zikwa na udi icho mma ka enwe bulie ha ma jikota ha ncha onu na onudu ha. Ugbo basikolo, motor ga enyere anyi aka iga okirikiri ime obodo ahu, nakwa ire afia na ime obodo a. O ga onyere anyi aka inweta ihe dika motor mabu ugbo, ozo kwa bu iru uyi o ga ebutare onye obuia.
Mobility means access to places but also to information and opportunity. Anam City has been designed to increase connection at all levels. Boats, bikes and buses will help us move around the city to jobs and markets in the city. This will minimize traffic, pollution, and cost to everyone.

ECONOMY ENERGY MOBILITY MOBILITY APPENDIX

. 178

179

MOBILITY

VISION

Transportation
COMMUNITY EQUITY PRODUCTIVITY QUALITY DIVERSITY MOBILITY PROSPERITY VITALITY

I prefer walking to my favorite places if they are close to home.

ANAM

>

Strategies
ANAMs transportation system builds on the existing values and habits of the current residents whose children run safely in their neighborhoods, farmers navigate rivers to market, and masquerades dance through streets. Reflecting the principle building for efficiency, designing for people - a multi-modal street network will address the unified Anam desire for a city with an excellent street network. Although Nigeria has a wealth of oil resources, and is one of the worlds largest producers of petroleum, it is recommended that the Anam City avoid dependence on this resource for environmental, social and economic reasons. The main objective is to implement a redundant network of streets and waterways for maximum efficiency of the range of modes of transportation including:

MODEL

We need clean and safe streets, for children and business women.

LAND WATER

PEDESTRIAN systems and infrastructure NON-MOTORIZED MODES OF TRANSPORT such as bicycles MARINE TRANSPORT SYSTEMS for docks and boating to move goods and people PUBLIC AND PARA TRANSIT that provides systems for transporting groups around the city efficiently and in a cost effective manner MOTORIZED AND PRIVATE VEHICLES and sufficient parking facilities TRUCK AND GOODS MOVEMENT to support economic growth and job creation

Having a bike is an affordable option for me.

SOCIAL ECONOMY

Recommendations
ENERGY

Create an interconnected multi-modal transportation system of paths and transfer nodes supporting pedestrian, vehicular and water transport Preserve and enhance the strong aquatic transportation systems on River Ezichi and new urban canal(s) Prioritize non-motorized (pedestrian, bicycle, and boat) routes through the city for mobility of both people and goods Build upon existing waterways and walkways to take advantage of locally identified and efficient paths Design city cores along main transportation corridors and mass transit nodes
. .

Canoes are ideal for moving short distances especially for transporting goods and during the rainy season.

MOBILITY MOBILITY APPENDIX

180

181

MOBILITY

VISION

Promote social and environmental sustainability as well as a greater sense of community by creating a pedestrian friendly city with safe, accessible and enjoyable streetscapes Regulate commercial drivers and vehicles to maximize safety and minimize pollution Agricultural goods should move by boat and bicycle first, then trucks if necessary Identify specific criteria and regulations by mode type appropriate for Anam New City Design streets for future flexibility

We need safer public transportation that will also reduce traffic and accidents.

BUS STOP
ANAM MODEL LAND

Indicators
Low private car ownership Low incidence of accidents (human/bike/vehicle) Short time between home and workplaces for individuals Maximum 15 minute walk to transit stop and major social amenities Low pollution and clean air locally and regionally Healthy residents High number of bicycles used in the city Small amount of money spent on petroleum products for transportation Proportionally high percentage of vehicles that run on locally produced energy Sufficient parking areas and citizen compliance with parking regulations
There are lots of more efficient ways to move people and goods around the city, like Keke Marwa, Solar Rickshaws and Cargo Bicycles.
WATER SOCIAL ECONOMY

Existing Vehicle Ownership By Type(%)


Motorbike Bike Boat None Car

Ocadas (Motorcycle Taxis) are extremely dangerous and not allowed in Anam for the safety of the whole community.

ENERGY MOBILITY MOBILITY

Making Anam locally relevant and globally accessible.

APPENDIX

10

20

30

40

50

. 182

. 183

MOBILITY

VISION

Street Hierarchy
ANAM

Strategies
The streets in Anam City have been designed with several principle considerations including: Developing LOOPS in transportation systems, road layout and infrastructure for efficiency of time, distances and resources. Design for maximum CONNECTIVITY to increased access, but use OFF SET STREETS selectively as a traffic calming design strategy. SHARED STREETS can be safe and cost effective alternatives to traditional street design for maximum flexibility and adaptability over time. PARA TRANSIT systems will have designated lanes for their use during designated times to decrease traffic and encourage paratransit as a choice. Design FLOOD CAPACITY into the streets with porous materials and water retention areas away from houses and businesses. Use local MATERIALS with low carbon footprints. Design for maximum FLEXIBILITY for the life of the streets.

MODEL LAND WATER SOCIAL

Community Utility Block at Node

ECONOMY ENERGY

V1_MAIN V2_18 SHARE V3_9 SHARE V4_LANE

Canoe Landing The State Road Waterways

MOBILITY MOBILITY

NODE IN SUPERBLOCK
. .

APPENDIX

184

185

MOBILITY

VISION

V1A_Main (one-way loop)


Description
The Anam City Main Street is a flexible right of way that has been designed to adapt and change as the city grows. This section shows the long term vision of the road, where traffic is in one direction only, creating a loop. Flexible lanes allow for different uses depending on the time of day or needs of the city.
PUBLIC SIDEWALK EASEMENT PUBLIC SIDEWALK EASEMENT
SEE BIOSWALE ZONE REQUIREMENTS SEE SIDEWALK REQUIREMENTS

V1B_Main (phase 1: two-way street )


ANAM

Description
As the city begins, this 15 meter Main Road will be used in both directions, with the outer lanes as flexible parking, transit or vehicle lanes depending on the traffic demands in the city. Transit lanes should be prioritized over vehicle lanes whenever traffic is heavy.
PUBLIC SIDEWALK EASEMENT PUBLIC SIDEWALK EASEMENT

SEE BIOSWALE ZONE REQUIREMENTS SEE SIDEWALK REQUIREMENTS

MODEL

(VARIES)

(VARIES)

LAND

FRONT YARD SETBACK

FRONT YARD SETBACK

FRONT YARD SETBACK

FRONT YARD SETBACK

WATER

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

SOCIAL

2.0

3.0

3.0

3.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

3.0

3.0

3.0

2.0

2.0

BIOSWALE ZONE

FLEX TRANSIT ZONE

LANE

LANE

PARKING FLEX LANE

BIOSWALE ZONE

BIOSWALE ZONE

FLEX LANE FOR PARKING OR TRANSIT

LANE

LANE

FLEX LANE FOR PARKING OR TRANSIT

BIOSWALE ZONE

15.0

A. Four Lane Road


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Right-of-Way Width Number of Lanes Pavement Width Pavement Material On-street Parking Bikeway Type Landscape Type Bioswale Type 4 lanes 10 meters

VIA RIGHT OF WAY (R.O.W.)

A. Four Lane Road


1 Right-of-Way Width Number of Lanes Pavement Width Pavement Material On-street Parking Bikeway Type Landscape Type Bioswale Type 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 lanes 10 meters

15.0

ECONOMY

VIA RIGHT OF WAY (R.O.W.)

18 meters maximum, 15 meters minimum

18 meters maximum, 15 meters minimum

Fired earth pavers and asphalt

Flexible lane for parking and/or paratransit lane depending on time/day Flexible with parking lane. May consider 1 m painted bikeway.

V2

Fired earth pavers and asphalt

Flexible lane for parking and/or paratransit lane depending on time/day Integrated with street

MAINSTREET [ONE WAY]


Shade tree planting every 15 meters 2 x 2 meter minimum bioswale on each side

MAINSTREET [PHASE 1: TWO WAY]


2 x 2 meter minimum bioswale on each side

Shade tree planting every 15 meters

V2

ENERGY MOBILITY MOBILITY

Uses Private Public Commercial Goods

Uses

Private Public Commercial Goods

APPENDIX

. 186

. 187

MOBILITY

VISION

V2_18 Shared
Description
A shared street is a type of road that is used more informally by vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles together. This type of streets often allows for balance between public space and circulation, and hildren can play in safety. Bulged planters along the edges can be traffic calming devices. This particular street in the city was designed to be wider as to accommodate potential flooding from the Ezichi or Ogbuani.
SEE BIOSWALE ZONE REQUIREMENTS

V2_9 Shared
ANAM

Description
These small shared streets have a single flexible lane that is shared between pedestrians and vehicles at low speeds. These streets allow access to the laneways and main road ways, but are a tertiary throughway that allows for greater connectivity of both people and cars. The proximity of bioswales (on all streets) will make this street feel like a greenway.

MODEL LAND

SIDE YARD SETBACK

SIDE YARD SETBACK

SIDE YARD SETBACK

WATER

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

SOCIAL

1.5
PAVEMENT CHANGE FOR PEDESTRIANS

1.5
PAVEMENT CHANGE FOR PEDESTRIANS

2.0 3.0 2.0

5.0

2.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

4.0

BIOSWALE ZONE

SHARED LANE

BIOSWALE ZONE

PARKING

LANE

LANE

PARKING

BIOSWALE ZONE

BIOSWALE ZONE

B. Two Lane Road


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Right-of-Way Width Number of Lanes Pavement Width Pavement Material On-street Parking Bikeway Type Landscape Type Bioswale Type

18.0

C. One Lane Road


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Right-of-Way Width Number of Lanes Pavement Width Pavement Material On-street Parking Bikeway Type Landscape Type Bioswale Type 1 lane 5 meters

9.0

ECONOMY

VIA RIGHT OF WAY (R.O.W.)

VIA RIGHT OF WAY (R.O.W.)

9 meters minimum

18 meters maximum, 15 meters minimum 2 lanes minimum, 3 lanes maximum 14 meters

Fired earth pavers and permeable concrete/asphalt grid One fixed parking lane, plus flexible parking lane Shared

Shade tree planting every 10 meters, plus planting in parking lane 2 x 2 meter minimum bioswale on each side

V3

Permeable concrete/asphalt grid None Shared

Shade tree planting every 10 meters 2 x 2 meter minimum bioswale on each side

V4

ENERGY

WOONERF [A]

WOONERF B

MOBILITY MOBILITY

Uses Private Public Commercial Goods

Uses Private Public Commercial Goods

APPENDIX

. 188

. 189

MOBILITY

VISION

V4_Lane
Description
The Laneways are designed primarily for rear access to the parcels in Anam City. This facilitaties fewer crossings of the bioswales on the Main Road, and also provides access for utilities or waste systems. These laneways should be considered a throughway in the city, and will have a greenway-like character. All the pavement will be highly permeable to mitigate the impacts of stormwater.

Waterways
ANAM

Description
Water access and transportation is a major feature of Anam City, both as an existing condition and proposed mode in the new development.

MODEL LAND WATER

Permeable Pavement or Grid

SOCIAL

6.0

LANEWAY

ECONOMY

A. One Lane Road


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Right-of-Way Width Number of Lanes Pavement Width Pavement Material On-street Parking Bikeway Type Landscape Type Bioswale Type 6 meters maximum, 8 meters minimum 1 lanes 3 meters

Permeable grid or fired clay pavers n/a n/a

Shade tree planting every 15 meters MOBILITY MOBILITY n/a

V4

ENERGY

WOONERF B

Uses Private Public Commercial Goods

APPENDIX

. 190

. 191