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Engineering and Technology Prospectus 2011/2012

Undergraduate and Postgraduate study

INSPIRING LEARNING

A world apart from any


other way of learning

Welcome to The Open University. A place where learning is open to everyone. You can choose from around 600 fascinating courses which allow you to study in a flexible way that fits around you.
Bringing learning to life
Weve taken distance learning to a whole new level by using technology such as podcasts, online forums and interactive media to make learning more engaging and inspiring than ever before. Today, we have a vibrant community of 250,000 students using our unique learning methods to achieve their goals.

Dont let anything stand in your way


Learning can be more affordable than you think last year we helped around 42,000 people with study costs. Worried about taking on too much? Dont be. We offer a choice of levels from introductory and short courses to undergraduate and postgraduate certificates, diplomas and degrees. And if you have a disability or medical condition youll find a range of support services designed with you in mind. Does it work? Our students seem to think so because for the fifth year running theyve ranked us amongst the top three UK universities for student satisfaction1.

Discover Britains favourite university for yourself

National Student Survey 2010.

Contents

Why choose The Open University?


Why study engineering and technology with The Open University?

2
5

Becoming an Open University student


Studying with The Open University How much will it cost? How to pay
Financial support If you have a disability or additional requirements

52
52 52 53 53
55 55 56

How Open University study works


Your guide to courses Your guide to qualifications

6
6
7

Your guide to careers in engineering and technology Undergraduate study


Where should you start? Undergraduate qualifications Undergraduate courses

10 12
13 14 24

Studying outside the UK What else you should know

Ordering other prospectuses Contact points for advice and registration

57 Back cover

Postgraduate study
Postgraduate qualifications Postgraduate courses

40
41
48

Open access: other ways to read this publication


You may find it easier to access information from our website at www.open.ac.uk/study. If you would like this publication electronically, please call +44 (0)845 300 60 90 or email us at general-enquiries@open.ac.uk quoting Alternative format in the subject box. Other alternative formats are available on request.
Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

Why choose The Open University?

Why choose The Open University?

The inspiring thing about studying with The Open University (OU) is not just what you learn but how you learn. Weve taken distance learning to a whole new level. Well connect you with the things that inspire you, wherever you are and wherever youve come from.
A totally different way of learning
We are the worlds leading provider of flexible and inspiring learning. What sets us apart from other universities is that were not campus-based. You can study in a flexible way that works for you whether youre at home, at work or on the move. Our innovative materials bring your course to life in many different ways just imagine learning about your favourite subject through podcasts, downloads and DVDs as well as course books. As the UKs largest university, we offer around 600 courses, leading to more than 250 qualifications. Well challenge you, stretch your understanding and make you question ideas that youve always taken for granted its truly world-class learning.

An excellent reputation
The OUs teaching has helped build the University's reputation for academic rigour and quality. The high standards of content and presentation in our courses, created by multi-disciplinary teams, are universally acknowledged. This, coupled with the high standing of many of our research programmes, has led to the global recognition of the OUs qualifications. Our Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) combined with either our Master of Engineering (M03) or our MSc in Engineering (F46) degrees have recently been re-accredited by the Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) for Chartered Engineer status. A pathway through our BEng (Hons), MEng and MSc has also just been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) for the first time, click engineering.open.ac.uk for more information.

Why choose The Open University?

Our BEng (Hons) on its own satisfies the educational requirements for Incorporated Engineer. An accredited honours degree from another institution in combination with either our MEng or MSc in Engineering also fulfils the academic requirements for chartership. These accreditations have been recognised by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST), the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA), the Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers (IGEM), the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE), and the Institution of Engineers of Ireland (IEI). The OU is also a business partner of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). Becoming an Incorporated or Chartered Engineer involves a combination of education and working experience. Once youve studied with us, youll share the well-deserved reputation all our students have for their energy and drive. Employers large and small understand that studying part time while managing work and personal commitments shows determination, adaptability, motivation and a high level of organisational and problem-solving skills qualities that they value highly.

We have specially developed online resources to help


you build the skills and confidence you need to succeed.
To find out more, click www.open.ac.uk/skillsforstudy.
If you need to brush up on your study skills, we also offer
introductory Openings courses, see pages 2425 for
full details.

Top-class teaching
We have an enviable network of around 9000 tutors across the UK, many of whom are practising professionals with strong academic backgrounds, sector specific skills and practical experience. With study materials written by OU academics who are experts in their specialist fields and in distance learning, we provide leading-edge teaching, born out of extensive research and close links with partners such as the BBC. The OUs partnership with the BBC has included collaboration on high-quality TV series including Bang Goes the Theory, Coast, James Mays Big Ideas and Jimmy Doherty in Darwins Garden.

FACT:

Our doors are open to everyone


If you think youve got what it takes to study with us, then so do we. In fact, over 40 per cent of new OU undergraduate students in the UK dont have the formal qualifications theyd need to go through a traditional university application process. Theres no doubt that studying with the OU takes hard work and dedication so you do need determination and commitment but youre in control and nothing else gives you the same sense of achievement.

Choice and flexibility


OU study programmes tend to be less rigid than those at campus-based universities, so you can mix and match courses to build towards a qualification, or just take a single course and not commit yourself any further its entirely up to you. We offer degrees in named subjects but a large number of our undergraduate students graduate each year with an Open degree. This is a BA or BSc where you choose courses from a range of different subjects. It supports study based on personal interest or career development, or both.

Youre never on your own


Although you work in your own environment, youll never be on your own. Youll have the opportunity to meet your fellow students in tutorials and online forums, and through OUSA (our student association). And there are growing informal networks and peer support groups on Facebook. Youll be joining the OUs learning community the largest in the world! Our 13 regional and national centres, alongside 350 tutorial venues in the UK alone, ensure you wont feel isolated.

FACT:

Support throughout your studies


As an OU student youll enjoy full support throughout your studies your tutor will guide and advise you, offer detailed feedback on your assignments, and help with any study issues. Tuition might be in face-to-face groups, via online tutorials, or by phone. Many of our students whove studied elsewhere have said that theyve been better supported at the OU than at their campus-based universities.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

Why choose The Open University?

Value for money


Costs vary from course to course but, unlike some other institutions, our fees include relevant study materials, tuition and assessment. And because your study is flexible, you can earn while you learn.

Support for students with a disability or additional requirements


Our expertise in distance learning, combined with a wide range of multimedia materials and personal support, means that we offer a much more accessible system than traditional forms of study. For more information, see page 55 or click www.open.ac.uk/disability.

FACT:

Over 70 per cent of OU students work while they study.

Sometimes there will be books you have to buy yourself or borrow from a local library, but were careful to limit the cost as far as we can. The only additional costs will be for your own personal equipment, such as a computer and its consumables. We also recommend that you budget for travel, for example to tutorials or examinations. Your family and friends can support your study by buying OU gift vouchers for special occasions. To buy or redeem vouchers, click www.open.ac.uk/vouchers.

FACT:

Around 11,000 of our students have a disability or additional requirement.

Help for carers


We support lots of students who are looking after people for a variety of reasons, in a variety of circumstances. For more information about the support available, click www.open.ac.uk/studying-while-you-care.

FACT:

World-class library
As an OU student youll have free access to the OU library (www.open.ac.uk/library) where information is available to you via the internet, rather than you having to visit in person. This means you can access thousands of online ejournals, ebooks, databases and multimedia resources 24 hours a day, seven days a week, whenever you need it and wherever you are. You can also visit the library at our Milton Keynes campus if youre close enough.

Financial support
Depending on your current circumstances, even if youre in employment, you could be eligible for financial support to help pay towards your undergraduate course fees, study costs and other expenses. To find out more about what support is available at undergraduate and postgraduate level, see pages 5354 or click www.open.ac.uk/financialsupport where you can use our eligibility checker to find out what support you could be entitled to.

Free online resources


openlearn.open.ac.uk offers free access to some of the OUs study materials for you to try for yourself. Units can take between three and fifteen hours of study and you can: follow a structure or dip in and out of materials get support as part of an online learning community use innovative elearning tools. Although it is free to use the site, it will still be necessary to apply separately to the OU if you wish to study the full course with a tutor and formal assessment, and to gain credits. Were one of the first universities to offer free downloadable course materials via iTunes U. In fact, we were the first university to hit 20 million downloaded tracks. For more information, click www.open.ac.uk/itunes.

FACT:

Over 42,000 financial awards were made to OU students last year.

FACT:

Vibrant online community


Platform, our social media website (www.open.ac.uk/platform), gives you the chance to get a flavour of OU life before you sign up for a course. You will find expert comments on issues of the day as well as having the opportunity to meet and chat to the OU community.

Active alumni association


Once youve gained your qualification, you can join the OU Alumni Association, our vibrant and active alumni community with 280,000 members worldwide. You will enjoy many membership benefits, including regular newsletters, good networking opportunities and access to the alumni website.

Why choose The Open University?

Why study engineering


and technology with
The Open University?

While there are few engineers who are regularly in the public eye, the activities of engineers and technologists are central to everything we see around us. We are aware of their contributions that have the power to affect and transform our lives. Just think of everyday products like refrigerators, loudspeakers or any of the equipment used in healthcare. Then there is all that is needed to manufacture and distribute even the simplest of items. Modern life would be quite unimaginable without them. Behind each project is a team engineering, designing, specifying and refining its performance against a wide range of criteria such as function, cost and, increasingly, environmental impact. The need to find successors to them remains key to the UKs economic future. Making the right decisions about engineering and technology can be critical to the success of an organisation or even an entire industry. Yet anyone who has ever tried to develop or implement new and innovative products and technologies knows just how challenging the task can be. Higher education is essential to develop these skills. A qualification in design, engineering or technology from The Open University will give you a firm foundation on which to build a career as a professional designer, engineer or technologist. At the OU, we believe that the combination of studying and working provides a highly effective way of developing the next generation of designers, engineers and technologists. The power of the OUs blended learning approach together with our commitment to student support enables you to appreciate the relevance of your study as you progress in your professional life.

Also, as our engineering qualifications are accredited by the Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) and the Chartered Institution of Building Service Engineers (CIBSE) and now the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), your study will allow you to think about professional membership. It will open your mind to new ways of thinking and give you an insight into the enormous breadth of skills, knowledge and understanding that designers, engineers and technologists draw on in their daily working lives.

Our programmes are designed to be relevant whatever your background


We have qualifications which can suit the many varied backgrounds that exist in the sector. So whether youre a time-served technician with level 3 qualifications, a graduate without the necessary further learning to progress to Chartered Status or an experienced engineer or technologist looking to broaden into technology management, the OU is for you. Our courses and qualifications address the issues of skill development, professional practice and technical understanding, providing you with the confidence that can help you make a difference in your organisation. Our programmes offer you the choice of levels with foundation degrees, undergraduate diplomas and degrees and postgraduate certificates, diplomas, an integrated MEng and a range of MScs. Our curriculum is underpinned by our highly rated research and supported by a network of talented, skilled and knowledgeable tutors, many of whom have their own practical professional experiences to share with you. Whatever your choice of course or qualification, we hope you enjoy your studies with us.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

How Open University study works

How Open University study works

Your guide to courses


You can study a series of courses which can count as modules towards a qualification, or just take a single course and not commit yourself any further its entirely up to you.

What are courses?


A course is a module of study that could last from ten weeks to nine months. With each course you successfully complete youll earn a set number of credits. As you progress through the levels of difficulty, youll grow your knowledge and confidence as well as building up credits that you can combine towards a qualification.

A step-by-step guide to a typical OU course


Choose your course

What are course levels?


Levels are used in education to give an indication of how difficult a course is. The various courses youll study are set at different levels. Our undergraduate courses are at Levels 1, 2 and 3, and these are roughly equivalent to studying in the first, second and third year at a campus-based university. For most of our undergraduate qualifications, we strongly recommend that you begin at Level 1 and that you work progressively through the levels to build up your knowledge and skills. Our Student Registration & Enquiry Service can suggest the best starting point for you, see back cover. Alternatively, you can find out which courses can be studied at each level by going to www.open.ac.uk/study-engtech.

Register and pay dont forget to check the financial support information on pages 5354 you may be able to study for free

Your study materials will arrive and youll be online and have access to a website where you can contact your tutor and other students on your course

FHEQ, SCQF and NFQI levels


You study at home, at work, or on the move Your course may have face-to-face or online tutorials where you can meet other students Across the UK and the Republic of Ireland, there are three main systems which are used to define and describe the levels of courses in higher education. Although these different frameworks express complexity in different ways, they are broadly comparable. The table below shows how OU levels correspond to the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, to the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF), and to the National Framework of Qualifications in the Republic of Ireland (NFQI). OU course level Level 1 Nows a good time to start thinking about your next course Level 2 Typical level of learning First stage of highereducation study Last stage of a foundation degree; second year of a bachelors degree Final year of a bachelors degree Masters degree Doctorate FHEQ SCQF level level 4 5 7 8 or 9 NFQI level 6 6 or 7

Submit your assignments when theyre due your tutor will send you feedback Some students organise informal study groups to support each other

Your course may have a day school or residential school or an online alternative

All your assignments are complete and its time to revise

Level 3 Masters Doctoral

6 7 8

9 or 10 7 or 8 11 12 9 10

Complete your end-of-module assessment or take your examination

Youve passed!
Choose and register for your next course.

How Open University study works

If you have an NVQ or SVQ


If you have an NVQ or SVQ level 4 or above, you may be able to count it towards an OU qualification (see page 9). If you have NVQs or SVQs at levels 1, 2 or 3, you can still study with us, but you wont be able to count these towards your OU qualification. You should probably start with an Openings course (see pages 2425) or other Level 1 course.

Your guide to qualifications


We have more than 250 highly respected qualifications, made up of undergraduate certificates, diplomas, foundation degrees, honours degrees, and postgraduate certificates, diplomas and masters degrees.

What are credits?


Credits measure the student workload required for the successful completion of a study programme or qualification. At the OU, youll be awarded credits after you have successfully completed a course. The credits system used by the OU is aligned to the national Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) system. The CATS system helps you to move the credits you accumulate from one institution to another. So, if you have completed some previous higher-education study at another institution, you may be able to count it towards your OU qualification.

Not sure which qualification is right for you?


Theres no need to decide your long-term learning goals before you start. You can build up your qualification gradually by earning credits for each course you take, so that as your interests develop you can change your mind along the way. You just need to be sure that the courses you choose, particularly the first ones, are right for you in terms of level, study commitment and meeting your aims.

Are there any entry requirements?


For undergraduate courses in engineering and technology you dont need any formal qualifications, or to pass an entry test to study with us. To gain entry to our postgraduate programmes youll normally need an undergraduate degree or equivalent. In some cases you may be allowed to register for a qualification once you have shown that you can study successfully at postgraduate level. However, your previous work experience and study, or qualifications from other higher-education institutions, may all count as programme entry. For more information see the relevant qualification description in this prospectus or click www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate-engtech.

How much time does it take?


One credit represents about 10 hours of study. The table below gives you an idea of the timescales involved. Courses Openings course Short course Residential school course 30-credit course Number of credits 1015 1015 1015 Average time to complete a course Approximately 6 hours a week for up to 20 weeks 1015 hours a week for up to 15 weeks 1 week at residential school (plus some study before and after) 7 8 hours a week for a 9-month course, or 12 hours a week for a 6-month course 16 hours a week for 9 months

Computers and elearning


Using computers and the internet to enhance your study is an essential part of our study programmes. With the exception of some Openings courses (see pages 2425), youll need a computer and regular and reliable access to the internet.

30

60-credit course

60

English for learning


Our courses are taught in English, so your spoken and written English needs to be appropriate for the level of study. If youre not sure whether you can produce a good standard of academic English for your studies, there is some help and guidance at www.open.ac.uk/skillsforstudy/english.

How much time does it take?


Our qualifications are designed to be flexible. So if you want to vary the amount of time you spend studying from year to year, or even take a break for a while, you can. However, there are time limits for some degrees in engineering and technology and the courses that contribute to them may change over time. Its easy to underestimate the time and commitment needed for part-time study, so its a good idea not to take on too much at first. As you become more experienced and confident you can always take on more. When you begin your studies, we strongly recommend you take only one course at a time.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

How Open University study works

What qualifications does the OU offer in engineering and technology?


Undergraduate
Diplomas You can complete a 120-credit diploma as a qualification on its own, or use it to build towards your degree. A diploma shows that you are capable of extended study at university level, and that could be valuable, especially if you want to go on to further professional or academic training or study. A diploma specialises in one area of study, for example in design and innovation. Foundation degrees Foundation degrees, worth 240 credits, are designed and developed with external partners, so you must be working either as a paid employee or as a volunteer in a related-work setting. Foundation degrees are highly valued. A foundation degree could open up opportunities for you to gain professional recognition. And with further study, you could convert your foundation degree to a full honours degree. Most of our foundation degrees are also offered as a Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE). Degrees An undergraduate or bachelors degree is a widely recognised higher-education qualification that can help you progress in your career. While you are studying for your degree you will learn about your chosen subject(s) and develop your analytical, intellectual and writing skills. Degree-level study will demonstrate that you can understand complex information, meet deadlines, work independently and in a team, solve problems and communicate with confidence. We offer two different types of degree; a degree in a named subject and our popular Open degree. Degrees in a named subject For a degree in a named subject, such as our BA or BSc (Hons) Design and Innovation (B61), youll study mainly in your chosen subject, although you can usually include some courses from other subjects too. Almost all these degrees are honours degrees. A 360-credit honours degree is awarded for study at an advanced level; they are divided into four 'classes' (like grades): 1 (first the highest level), 2.1 (upper second), 2.2 (lower second) or 3 (third). An Open degree This is our most popular degree and it lets you choose the combination of courses you study. You can combine a range of courses from similar or different subjects to suit either your particular career or personal interests. For further information please see pages 2223 or click www.open.ac.uk/study-open.

The table below shows a summary of our undergraduate qualifications. Qualification/ Credits total credits at required Level 1 OU Diploma (120) Credits at Level 2 Credits Time required required to complete at Level 3 2 years parttime study 4 years parttime study or 23 years fulltime study1

120 credits from Level 2 and 3 courses 120

120 Foundation degree/ Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) (240) Degree 120 without honours (300) Degree with 120 honours (360)

120

60

5 years parttime study or 3 years fulltime study1 6 years part-time study or 34 years full-time study1

120

120

The timings assume full-time study is similar to that of full-time education (120 credits per year), with part-time study at half this rate.

How Open University study works

Postgraduate
We offer postgraduate certificates, diplomas and degrees. To study our postgraduate qualifications you will normally need to have successfully completed an undergraduate degree (or equivalent). However, your previous work experience and study, or qualifications from other higher-education institutions, may also count as programme entry, or even credit towards the qualification itself. Certificates A postgraduate certificate is designed to provide you with specialised knowledge and gives you a record of academic accomplishment. You will need 60 credits for a postgraduate certificate. Diplomas A postgraduate diploma will involve more study than a postgraduate certificate and will give you the opportunity to specialise in areas that are of particular relevance to you. You will need 120 credits for a postgraduate diploma. Degrees A postgraduate/masters degree builds on a postgraduate diploma by providing an opportunity to carry out an in-depth study for a project or dissertation. You will need 180 credits for an MSc. For information on our postgraduate opportunities see pages 4051 or click www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate-engtech. The table below shows a summary of our postgraduate qualifications. Postgraduate qualification Certificate Diploma Master of Engineering (MEng) MSc Credits required at postgraduate level 60 120 120 (plus 360 at undergraduate level) 180 Time required to complete 1 year part-time study1 2 years part-time study1 3 years part-time study1 33 years parttime study1

Counting previous study towards an OU qualification


Any higher-education level studies youve successfully completed elsewhere may count towards your OU degree or other qualification. We enable you to do this by awarding you a certain amount of transferred credit. By transferring credit gained from previous study, you can reduce the number of credits you need from OU study to achieve your qualification. If you want to transfer credit, we recommend you investigate the option as soon as possible, as transferred credit may affect your choice of courses. To find out whether you are able to use any of your previous study to count towards your qualification, please contact our Credit Transfer Centre. Click www.open.ac.uk/credit-transfer Call +44 (0)1908 653077 Email credit-transfer@open.ac.uk

Academic credit in Europe


If you are looking to use your OU credit in Continental Europe, you may be interested to know of the existence of the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). This is the system commonly used in the EU for measuring study workload. Since the systems dont compare like with like, and ECTS doesnt take account of academic level, direct comparisons are difficult to make. However, broadly, at any given level, 60 OU credits would be worth 30 ECTS points, and 30 OU credits would be worth 15 ECTS points. If you have completed study that is recorded in ECTS points, and you want to count this towards your OU qualifications please contact the Credit Transfer Centre for advice.

The timings assume full-time study is similar to that of full-time education (120 credits per year), with part-time study at half this rate.
1

As well as these taught postgraduate qualifications we also offer research degrees (PhDs etc). For more information see www.open.ac.uk/research-prospectus.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

10

Your guide to careers in engineering and technology

Your guide to careers in engineering and technology


Your route to self improvement, skills development and career enhancement.

The UK has great strengths in its engineering and technology sectors as world leaders in areas such as aerospace, design, motor sports and energy. Engineering and technology both continue to be at the heart of wealth-generating industries and the government is keen to encourage more students to study science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects because it recognises the value to the UK economy of graduates in these subjects.

Career opportunities
Demand for jobs has been created by new technologies, particularly nanotechnology, and graduates can find employment across a whole range of construction, manufacturing and service industries. Around 800,000 people are employed in the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Growth areas are predicted to be: energy/environment telecommunications aerospace civil engineering creative industries. Opportunities exist in research, design and development, commissioning, project management, technical sales and marketing, technical journalism and patent work. To find out more about career opportunities related to engineering and technology visit www.open.ac.uk/careers.

Transferable skills
As well as the specific knowledge gained from studying an OU qualification, youll develop many transferable and work-related skills that are highly valued by employers (often called employability skills). For engineering and technology graduates these include: Solving problems with creative and innovative strategies. Being logical and pragmatic, and interested in the process necessary for a concept to become a product. Having the ability to design and develop economically viable products. Being conscious of global social, cultural and environmental issues. Having attention to detail, numeracy and high levels of computer literacy. Being effective communicators, capable of team working and able to take on responsibility.

Destination statistics
All UK graduates are invited to complete the Destinations of Leavers Survey six months after theyve graduated. Of the OU technology and engineering graduates who responded to the latest survey: 91.6 per cent of engineering graduates and 88.2 per cent of technology graduates were in work. Of the technology graduates who responded regarding the importance of their degree, 40 per cent of those who had not changed employer regarded their degree as a benefit, while 28.6 per cent of those who had changed employer felt it was required or an advantage. Of the engineering graduates who responded regarding the importance of their degree, 50 per cent of those who had changed employer felt it was required or an advantage. 29.4 per cent of the technology graduates were taking further study related to computer operations, production, teaching and engineering. 37.5 per cent of the engineering graduates were taking further study in subjects such as metal work, engineering and health and safety.

Enterprise is an employer that has always recruited from a more diverse pool of talent, and the OU is a good source of talented and experienced people.
HR Director Europe, Enterprise

Your guide to careers in engineering and technology

11

Professional recognition engineering


OU Careers Advisory Service
We have recently had our engineering qualifications re-accredited by the Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE). This accreditation follows our initial 3 year term and will last for 5 years from 1st January 2011. In addition, a pathway through them has been accredited for the first time by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE). It means that the BEng (Hons) (B24 and B65), MEng (M03) and MSc in Engineering (F46) will either partially or fully satisfy the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer as well as fully satisfying the educational requirements for Incorporated Engineer. These accreditations have been recognised by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST), the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA), the Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers (IGEM), the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE), and the Institution of Engineers of Ireland (IEI). Our award-winning website www.open.ac.uk/careers provides information on all aspects of career planning, from deciding on the right career for you, to writing a CV and interview techniques. You can also read real stories from OU students about the ways OU study changed or helped progress their career. Our publication OU Study and Your Career looks at reasons why people study with the OU, the value of OU qualifications, the issues you may want to consider when choosing your course and how to explore your career ideas. You can request a copy from our Student Registration & Enquiry Service or view it on the Careers Advisory Service website at www.open.ac.uk/careers. Registered students or graduates who have studied with the OU within the last three years are eligible for the following services: Careers consultation contact and talk with a careers adviser. Online forums join topic or subject-based forums where you can ask questions and receive replies from a careers adviser and support from other OU students. Employer Showcase find out about employers who are keen to recruit OU graduates. Online vacancy service find a job through our Careers Advisory Service and Graduate Prospects. Information about all the above services is at www.open.ac.uk/careers.

Professional recognition technology


Our technology qualifications, such as the BSc (Hons) Technology (B20), cover a wide range of fields and professional recognition must be achieved with an institution appropriate to your major subject specialisation and expertise. Bodies such as the British Computer Society (BCS), the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Telecommunications Professionals (ITP), to name but three from the many that represent technology professionals, will be able to consider your membership application at a level commensurate with your qualifications and experience. A search of the internet will allow you to find lists of relevant professional bodies both from within and outside the United Kingdom. Our Recognition leaflets tell you about the academic, vocational and professional areas in which Open University study can help you to gain entry or membership, or exempt you from academic requirements. You can view or download them from our website at www.open.ac.uk/recognition.

Support for students outside the UK


Our careers advisory service is predominantly UK and Ireland based, but if you are a student in Continental Europe we can help in providing: sources of career information and guidance help to gain recognition of OU qualifications in European countries general information on career planning and job-seeking skills and strategies. Students based overseas and studying through our partner organisations should check with their host organisation what services are available to them.

Employer sponsorship
Your employer may support your studies in some way. Highlighting some of the key advantages of studying with us will strengthen your case. We can help you make out a case for sponsorship. For more information please call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on +44 (0)845 300 60 90.

FACT:

Over 50,000 employers have sponsored their staff on OU courses.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

12

Undergraduate study

Undergraduate study

You can get a head start to your career by studying with the OU. Our courses and qualifications cover many relevant areas, including computing and information technologies, design, environment, materials and structures. You can also aim for Chartered or Incorporated Engineer status, like many of the 5000 plus students currently working towards an OU engineering or technology degree.

Where should you start? Undergraduate qualifications BA or BSc (Hons) Design and Innovation (B61) NEW Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) BSc (Hons) Technology (B20) NEW Foundation Degree in Engineering (G17) or
Diploma of Higher Education in Engineering (E55) Foundation Degree in Materials Fabrication
and Engineering (G18) or Diploma of Higher Education
in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (E56) Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43) Diploma in Environment and Development (D21) The Open Programme Undergraduate courses Openings introductory courses
to build your confidence Short courses Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

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Find out more online Click www.open.ac.uk/study and enter the qualification or course code into the search box in the top right-hand corner of our website.

B65

Search

Undergraduate study

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Where should you start?


At undergraduate level, the best place to start for almost everybody is with a Level 1 course. But choosing the right type of course at Level 1 is very important.

There are three types of Level 1 course that make ideal starting points: 10- or 15-credit Openings courses 30- or 60-credit key introductory courses 10- or 15-credit Short courses.

Which type of Level 1 course is right for me?


Start with our 60-credit key introductory course Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) or our 30-credit course Engineering the future (T173) if
you are confident about studying at university level.

Start with our 15-credit Openings course Starting with maths (Y162) if

Start with a 10- or 15-credit Short course if

you are new, or returning to study, and need to build your confidence and skills.

you are confident and ready to explore a subject of special interest to you.

Openings courses: are an ideal starting point for new learners offer a gentle introduction to study, in a range of subjects help to build key study skills and confidence for further study give you lots of help from a personal tutor support you all the way have no examinations last a maximum of 20 weeks. See pages 2425 for more information on this and other Openings courses.

Key introductory courses: are a first step towards a qualification give you a firm foundation for further study at Levels 2 and 3 provide plenty of support from a tutor develop your skills and subject knowledge last from six to nine months. See page 28 for details of Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) and page 29 for details of Engineering the future (T173).

Short courses: offer bite-sized chunks of study in fascinating subjects will give you a taster of distance learning provide online and/or telephone study support last from 12 weeks to five months. See pages 2628 for more information and a list of Short courses.

Afterwards, youll be ready to study one of our key introductory Level 1 courses, Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) or Engineering the future (T173).

Register for the next module in your chosen qualification or study Personal and career development in engineering (T191), Discovering mathematics (MU123) or Using mathematics (MST121).

Study another Short course or study Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) or Engineering the future (T173), two of our key introductory Level 1 courses.

How do I decide the best option for me?


The best option for you is one that: is pitched at the right level and pace of learning fits in with the number of hours you can study each week matches your study goals.

So before you decide: read through this prospectus select a subject or qualification that interests you Alternatively, click www.open.ac.uk/study/choosinglevel1 to use our Choosing your first Level 1 course tool or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90 for further information and advice.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Undergraduate
qualifications

Engineering and technology affect almost every part of our lives. A qualification in one of these fields can be your passport to a huge variety of rewarding careers. Qualified engineers and technologists are in great demand all over the world, and are among the most well-paid professionals. Youll need to be imaginative and to enjoy solving problems, but as a graduate engineer or technologist your broadranging skills and knowledge will be highly valued. If you enjoy solving problems and have a good imagination youll find design, engineering and technology stimulating and challenging fields of study.

And 60 credits from the following compulsory Level 2 module: Title Design and designing Code T211 Credits Page 60 32

And at least 60 credits from the following optional Level 2 modules: Art and its histories Business functions in context Business organisations and their environments Communication and information technologies Energy for a sustainable future Engineering: mechanics, materials, design Environment Living in a globalised world Understanding global heritage Understanding systems: making sense of complexity A216 B203 B201 T215 T206 T207 U216 DD205 AD281 T214 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60

32 32 33

Degrees
BA or BSc (Hons) Design and Innovation (B61)
Design and innovation are essential to many different commercial, industrial and public sector activities from designing simple objects to suit everyday needs through to complex machines and the development of public programmes in local government or the NHS. By thinking like a designer and understanding and addressing the many challenges that design teams face, you will learn about design processes, innovation and environmental issues. The Level 1 module Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) introduces you to the fundamental ways designers think and work. At Level 2, the compulsory module Design and designing (T211) gives you a thorough understanding of design process, methodologies and skills. And the compulsory Level 3 module Innovation: designing for a sustainable future (T307) broadens your knowledge of innovation and the societal implications and responsibilities of design.

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And 60 credits from the following compulsory Level 3 module: Innovation: designing for a sustainable future T307 60 36

And at least 60 credits from the following optional Level 3 modules: Art of the twentieth century Earth in crisis: environmental policy in an international context Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice Investigating entrepreneurial opportunities Making sense of strategy Making social worlds Managing complexity: a systems approach Marketing and society Structural integrity: designing against failure The engineering project The environmental web AA318 DU311 T320 B322 B301 DD308 T306 B324 T357 T450 U316 60 60 30 30 60 60 60 30 30 30 60

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Youll also get


The opportunity to achieve a Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43) (see page 20) by successfully completing both Design and designing (T211) and Innovation: designing for a sustainable future (T307).

37 38

Start with
You start your degree by taking the Level 1 module Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101). For this 360-credit honours degree you require: 60 credits from the following compulsory Level 1 module: Title Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century Code U101 Credits Page 60 28

And a maximum of 60 credits of free choice from any OU modules to bring your total number of credits to 360. Within the total, you must ensure that you have at least the required minimum number of credits at each level and no more than 60 from 10- or 15-credit modules (and after 31 December 2014 no more than 30 from Openings modules or the Short course Science starts here (S154)).

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Undergraduate study

15

Suggested pathway for the BSc (Hons) Design and Innovation (B61) using an environmental pathway Level 1
Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) Environment: journeys through a changing world (U116) Design and designing (T211) Environment (U216) Innovation: designing for a sustainable future (T307) The environmental web (U316) Qualification awarded: BSc (Hons) Design and Innovation (B61)

New Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65)


This new BEng (Hons) is a 360-credit honours degree that offers you the opportunity to study general engineering, with some specialisation in one of several engineering disciplines. These include design, environment, materials, mechanics, communications and information technology. In this degree course you will cover a range of techniques, concepts and knowledge required for a professional engineer. Also as part of your early studies you will compile a development plan aimed at helping you to fulfil your personal and professional aims. This qualification replaces the Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B24) which is being withdrawn at the end of 2014.

Level 2

Start with
If you havent studied maths beyond GCSE or equivalent, or feel your maths is very rusty, we recommend you start your studies with Discovering mathematics (MU123) (see page 28). You can then move on to the compulsory 15-credit Level 1 module Personal and career development in engineering (T191) or one of the compulsory 30-credit Level 1 modules, Engineering the future (T173) or Using mathematics (MST121). If you have studied maths at A level or equivalent, and are confident in your mathematical abilities we recommend that you start your studies with one of the two compulsory 30-credit Level 1 modules Engineering the future (T173) or Using mathematics (MST121). This will give you experience of OU study before you embark on the compulsory 15-credit Level 1 module Personal and career development in engineering (T191). For this 360-credit honours degree you require: 75 credits from the following compulsory Level 1 modules: Title Engineering the future Personal and career development in engineering 1 Using mathematics
1

Level 3

Code T173 T191 MST121

Credits Page 30 15 30 29 30 30

If you have started studying the Foundation Degree in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (G18) or the Diploma of Higher Education in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (E56) and wish to transfer before completion to the BEng (Hons) you can count T198 in place of T191. And 60 credits from the following compulsory Level 2 module: Engineering: mechanics, materials, design T207 60 33

And at least 60 credits at Level 2 or above from modules where the code includes T, M or S2. (You may count up to 60 credits from postgraduate T, M or S modules in place of these Level 2 modules.) And at least 60 credits at Level 3 from modules where the code starts with T or MST2. And at least 30 credits at Level 3 from modules where the code includes T, M or S2. Continued on page 16.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

16

Undergraduate study

Continued from page 15. And 45 credits from the following compulsory Level 3 modules: Title Key skills for professional engineers The engineering project
2

Suggested pathway for the BEng (Hons) (B65) using a mechanical design pathway
Engineering the future (T173) Personal and career development in engineering (T191) Using mathematics (MST121) Engineering: an active introduction (TXR120) 36

Code T397 T450

Credits Page 15 30

You must include at least two undergraduate residential school modules or modules with embedded residential schools in total for this degree where the code starts with T, M or S, from the following: Level 1 optional modules Engineering: an active introduction TXR120 SXR103 TXR220 MSXR209 SXR208 SXR207 SXR339 MEXR624 SXR376 SXR375 10 10 10 10 15 10 10 10 15 15 28

Level 1 Level 2

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Practising science Level 2 optional modules Engineering in action Mathematical modelling Observing the Universe Physics by experiment Level 3 optional modules Ancient mountains: practical geology in Scotland Developing mathematical thinking at Key Stage 3 Molecular basis of human disease Plants, pigments and light

Engineering: mechanics, materials,design (T207)

33 34

Design and designing (T211) Engineering in action (TXR220) Structural integrity: designing against failure (T357) Innovation: designing for a sustainable future (T307) Key skills for professional engineers (T397) The engineering project (T450) Qualification awarded: Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65)

And a maximum of 30 credits of free choice from any OU modules to bring your total number of credits to 360. Within the total, you must ensure that you have at least the required number of credits at each level and no more than 60 from 10-credit modules.

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

See engineering.open.ac.uk/pathways for other suggested pathways.

Level 3

Undergraduate study

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BSc (Hons) Technology (B20)


Technology describes everything we do, from browsing the web or watching a DVD, to catching a plane or producing food. This degree gives you a broad perspective on technology, while allowing you to focus on a specialist area of interest. Technology graduates are employed in nearly all sectors of the economy where theres a need to manage the interactions between technologies and people at work, from heavy industry to financial services. It also allows you to study the environment, information technology, design and innovation, and many other areas.

Suggested pathway to the BSc (Hons) Technology (B20)


Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) or

Level 1

Engineering the future (T173) or Environment: journeys through a changing world (U116) or Microsoft server technologies (TM128)

Youll also get


Along the way, you can also achieve a Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43) or Diploma in Environment and Development (D21) (see page 20), depending on which modules you choose.

Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43)

Diplomas

or Diploma in Environment and Development (D21)

Start with
Start by choosing from Engineering the future (T173), Environment: journeys through a changing world (U116) or Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101). For this 360-credit honours degree you require: At least 30 credits from the following optional Level 1 modules: Title Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century Engineering the future Environment: journeys through a changing world Microsoft server technologies My digital life Code U101 T173 U116 TM128 TU100 Credits Page 60 30 60 30 60 28 29 29 30 30

Another one of the diplomas above or further study at Levels 2 and 3 Qualification awarded: BSc (Hons) Technology (B20)

And 120 credits from modules that would either qualify you for one of the diplomas listed on page 20 or the Diploma in Information Technology (D39)1. And 120 credits from modules that would qualify you for the second of the diplomas on page 20. Or 120 credits from any Level 2 or Level 3 modules with T in their codes, Environment (U216)1 or The environmental web (U316)1. Of the 240 technology credits from modules at Levels 2 and 3 specified above, at least 120 credits must be at Level 3. And a maximum of 90 credits of free choice from any OU modules to bring your total number of credits to 360. Within the total, you must ensure that you have at least the required minimum number of credits at each level and no more than 60 from 10-credit modules and after 31 December 2014 no more than 30 credits from Openings modules or the Short course Science starts here (S154).
1

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Foundation degrees

Foundation Degree in Engineering New (G17) / Diploma of Higher Education in Engineering (E55)
This work-based degree combines study of engineering fundamentals, including mathematics and problem solving, with personal development planning and work-related themes such as health and safety and project management. A foundation degree gives you the intermediate technical and professional skills that are in demand from employers, and provides a flexible and accessible way to study. Choose this foundation degree if you are working at a technical level in an engineering capacity and are looking to climb further up the career ladder. Your foundation degree studies will combine traditional academic skills with the needs of your workplace, and can be a route to gaining additional responsibilities or promotion at work. For this foundation degree you study 90 credits from Level 1 compulsory modules and 90 from Level 2 compulsory modules. The remaining 60 credits are gained from modules of your choice at Levels 1 and 2 where the code includes T, M or S of which at least 30 credits must be at Level 2.

For this 240-credit foundation degree you require: 180 credits from the following compulsory modules: Level 1 compulsory modules Title Engineering the future Engineering at work Using mathematics Level 2 compulsory module Engineering: mechanics, materials, design Change, strategy and projects at work T207 T227 60 30 33 31 Code T173 T198 MST121 Credits Page 30 30 30 29 29 30

And 60 credits from Level 1 and Level 2 modules where the code includes T, M or S, of which at least 30 credits must be at Level 2. Please note: Progression to Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) requires at least two residential school modules or modules with embedded residential schools with codes beginning with T, M or S. You might like to include these in your non-compulsory choice of modules or you may have to undertake additional study in order to fulfil the requirement for the BEng (Hons).

Start with
We recommend you start with one of the compulsory 30-credit Level 1 modules either Engineering the future (T173) or Using mathematics (MST121), both of which provide a good introduction to study. Either in parallel with your first module or as soon as possible after you have begun study, you should register on Engineering at work (T198), the first of the work-based learning modules for this foundation degree. We suggest you take the second required 30-credit workbased learning module, Change, strategy and projects at work (T227), as your final module. The foundation degree is a qualification in its own right, but if you wish to progress further you can top up a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) or you could take 120 credits from any other modules at Level 3 and gain a BA or BSc Open degree (BD).

Undergraduate study

19

Foundation Degree in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (G18) / Diploma of Higher Education in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (E56)
This work-based degree is only for students who gain credit through the TWI (Welding Institute) Diploma at Technologist level. It brings together the Welding Diploma qualifications offered by TWI the world centre for materials joining technology and modules from The Open University. A foundation degree gives you the intermediate technical and professional skills that are in demand from employers, and provides a flexible and accessible way to study. Choose this foundation degree if you are working at a technical level, have certified expertise in welding and joining, and are looking to climb further up the career ladder. Your foundation degree studies will combine traditional academic skills with the needs of your workplace, and can be a route to gaining additional responsibilities or promotion at work. For this foundation degree you study 150 credits from Open University modules and your TWI (Welding Institute) Diploma at Technologist level (which you will have completed recently or are expected to complete shortly) contributes the other 90 credits towards this 240-credit qualification.

For this 240-credit foundation degree you require: 30 credits from the following optional Level 1 modules: Title Engineering the future Using mathematics Level 1 compulsory module Engineering at work Level 2 compulsory module Engineering: mechanics, materials, design Change, strategy and projects at work T207 T227 60 30 33 31 T198 30 29 Code T173 MST121 Credits Page 30 30 29 30

And 120 credits from the following compulsory modules:

And 90 credits from credit transferred from your completed TWI (Welding Institute) Diploma at Technologist level. This can be completed at any stage before or during study towards the foundation degree, bearing in mind the eightyear time limit for obtaining the total credits required. Please note: If your first module for the foundation degree is an OU module, the time will start from the start date of that module and you will need to complete the TWI study and other OU study within eight years. If you have already completed the required TWI study before studying any of the OU modules that count towards the foundation degree, then the start date will be the date that you successfully completed the TWI (Welding Institute) Diploma at Technologist level.

Start with
We recommend you start with Using mathematics (MST121) or if you have studied mathematics as part of a previous qualification, you can take Engineering the future (T173) instead. You should also register for Engineering at work (T198), the first of your work-based learning modules, either in parallel with your first module or soon after you begin studying. After having completed your Level 1 study, you continue your study with Engineering: mechanics, materials, design (T207). We suggest you take the second work-based learning module Change, strategy and projects at work (T227) as your final module. The foundation degree is a qualification in its own right, but if you wish to progress further you can top up to a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) with 120 credits from the right modules at Level 3 plus 15 credits from Key skills for professional engineers (T397) to gain 375 credits in total. Or you could take 120 credits from any other modules at Level 3 and gain a BA or BSc Open degree (BD).

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Diplomas

Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43)


Design and innovation is all around us, in everything from the latest fashions to cutting-edge technological equipment. Youll combine academic study with practical activities to develop the creative and logical thinking that successful designing demands. You dont need to have a technical background to get the most from our design modules, and the skills youll gain will be useful in a wide range of professions. The two modules that make up this diploma use examples drawn from a range of design professions to teach basic principles. Both modules have practical and project work elements that enable you to develop your understanding and skills. Youll learn about important design considerations, such as: the need to design for the people who will use the products designing for manufacture the environmental impacts of design. Youll also be prompted to think about how design could lead to a more sustainable future. For this diploma you require 120 credits from the following compulsory modules: Level 2 compulsory module Title Design and designing Level 3 compulsory module Innovation: designing for a sustainable future T307 60 36 Code T211 Credits Page 60 32

Diploma in Environment and Development (D21)


It is clear from recent international debate, not least the Earth summit in Rio de Janeiro, that there is some danger of polarisation between the two topics of environment and development. Richer northern countries may seem more concerned about environment and poorer southern ones about development, when enlightened concern about global human welfare must surely involve both. This diploma encourages you to consider the two topics together. It is a suitable qualification if you do not want to complete a full degree or if you want to obtain an interim qualification on your way to a full degree. For this diploma you require 120 credits from the following compulsory Level 2 modules: Title Environment International development: challenges for a world in transition

Code U216 U213

Credits Page 60 60

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Undergraduate study

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When I left school, girls went into shop work or became secretaries. I never dreamed I would get into engineering!
Id been running a market gardening business with my uncle for years in rural Wales when I started to suffer from arthritis. As the pain in my joints and the cold mornings started to get the better of me, I decided to give up the business and began to wonder what to do next. I was pretty shy and had no qualifications which made it hard to go out there and look for work especially as I had no idea what I wanted to do. One day in the local library someone gave me a leaflet about the OU. I read it and really liked the sound of it. As I was living in rural Wales, distance learning seemed a practical way to improve my qualifications and not having to go to classes appealed to me because I was so shy. I enrolled on a technology course as Id always liked problem solving and was interested in learning about computers. If someone had told me at the time that this would be the start of a journey that would eventually lead me into a career as a senior engineer I wouldnt have believed them but thats exactly what happened. With my improved computer knowledge I went on to do a creative design course and went for a data entry job with a large energy company. When the chap who interviewed me saw Id done the computer-aided design (CAD) course he offered me a CAD position instead. I couldnt believe it. At this point I began to believe that I might really be able to have a career as an engineer. I was loving every minute of what I was learning at work and had the confidence to sign up for the OUs engineering degree. Working in a nice warm office really helped my arthritis too no more bending and lifting! From that moment Ive never looked back. The lead engineer at work saw how hard I was working and invited me to join the companys engineering group. Im now the companys senior integrity design engineer and will soon start working towards Chartered Engineer status. Ive recently started on the Master of Engineering degree with the OU, sponsored by my employer. I cant believe I was once a shy market gardener!

June Arnold, Engineering student

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

The Open Programme


With an Open qualification a certificate of higher education, diploma of higher education or degree with or without honours you choose what you want to study. Our Open Programme is one of the most flexible programmes of study in the UK, letting you build a qualification thats unique to you. You can: tailor a personal qualification around your interests and career needs get a qualification that focuses on one main subject, but with the freedom to mix in a few modules from other areas use successfully completed credit from previous university-level studies elsewhere easily change direction if you started out studying a particular subject but have now reconsidered gain an Open CertHE and Open DipHE, on the way to your Open degree with honours. Each year more than 40 per cent of OU students who graduate do so with an Open degree and many of them are students who have chosen to study engineering and technology modules as part of their degree.

If you are a new or less confident learner start with one of our specially designed Level 1 Openings modules (see pages 2425). You can count the credits you gain from these modules towards the free-choice element of the Open CertHE.

On your way to an Open degree


Open CertHE You will already be halfway towards our Certificate of Higher Education Open (K05) if you complete the compulsory 60 credits of Level 1 study successfully. With an additional 60 credits from any other Level 1 modules, youll be able to claim the certificate. And dont forget that you can include Short courses as part of your Open degree. To find out more about our range of Short courses, see pages 2627. Open DipHE With an additional 120 credits from any Level 2 modules you can go on to gain a Diploma of Higher Education Open (E60) on your way to an Open degree with honours. Level 1 study = 120 credits (maximum) Certificate of Higher Education Open (K05)

Level 2 study = 120 credits Diploma of Higher Education Open (E60) Level 3 study = 120 credits (minimum)

Where to start
Start with one of our 30- or 60-credit key introductory Level 1 modules. For engineering and technology students we recommend Engineering the future (T173) or Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101). This will give you a firm foundation for future studies as well as credits to count towards your qualification. For a full list of our other key introductory Level 1 modules see the Open CertHE at www.open.ac.uk/study-open.

BA or BSc (Hons) Open Degree

Undergraduate study

23

Illustrations of how core engineering and technology modules can be used within your Open degree
If you are interested in studying engineering and technology as the main part of your Open degree and have taken one of our Level 1 modules Engineering the future (T173) or Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101), the following may help you to decide which engineering and technology subject to focus on at Level 2.

Receiving credit for previous study


Any previous higher-education study youve successfully completed elsewhere could count towards your Open DipHE or Open degree. Through credit transfer you could reduce the number of modules youll need to take, and also make a saving in terms of the cost of your qualification. Often students find they can transfer more credit to an Open degree than they can to a degree in a named subject. The amount of credit you can transfer will depend on what you have studied previously and what you intend to study in the future. You are advised to investigate this option as soon as possible. To find out more, click www.open.ac.uk/credit-transfer.

Engineering Level 2 example modules


If youre interested in solving the technical problems of society, from meeting the basic needs for food and shelter to the generation of wealth by trade, then you may wish to consider Engineering: mechanics, materials, design (T207). Engineers see problems as challenges and opportunities. What they appear to be doing is solving problems, but in fact they are busy creating solutions: an altogether more imaginative activity. Analytical, communication, and learning skills are developed in a context that provides grounding for higher-level study; these skills can be further developed in the associated residential-school module Engineering in action (TXR220).

Career relevance and employability


Many employers view an Open degree as a qualification that equips individuals with a broad range of expertise, skills and capabilities. An Open degree could also be considered an advantage given that 70 per cent of graduate-level jobs are open to graduates of any discipline. An Open degree containing a number of our cutting-edge engineering and technology modules will enable you to explore how to design, engineer, and manage in situations where technology and people interact. Your studies will help you to develop a skill set thats in high demand. Employers in many sectors seek people with the numerical skills, creativity, scientific knowledge and team-working experience that graduates with experience of engineering and technology courses possess. This could lead to exciting employment opportunities in business and industry, as well as the public and voluntary sectors your knowledge and expertise will be equally valued in the UK, Europe and further afield. If you are considering a future career in an engineering profession then an Open degree may not be the right degree for you. Instead, you should consider a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) and complete your studies with our MEng (M03). If you find after youve completed an Open degree that you want to focus on engineering then you may be eligible to study for our Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22) and MSc in Engineering (F46). Remember though that you dont need to decide which degree you want to claim until youve completed all the necessary courses, so you can keep your options open until towards the end of your studies.

Technology Level 2 example module


If you are interested in combining academic study with practical activities to develop the creative and logical thinking that successful designing demands, you may wish to consider Design and designing (T211). In this module you will be encouraged to think about how design could lead to a more sustainable future as well as improving your ability to analyse problems and to generate creative ideas. The module sets out to unpick the skills and knowledge of design experts and to help you build up a portfolio of abilities that you can transfer to your own job or career interests. If you discover a subject that really interests you, and find you would like to pursue it more thoroughly, you have the option to either switch to a named degree in that subject or, you might consider completing a named diploma while working towards your Open degree. A named diploma offers a subject-specific qualification in its own right and in engineering and technology, for example, there are two undergraduate diplomas that might interest you: Diploma in Design and Innovation (D43) Diploma in Environment and Development (D21). Click www.open.ac.uk/study-engtech for more information.

Your next step


To find out more: click www.open.ac.uk/study-open call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on
+44 (0)845 300 60 90.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Undergraduate courses
As a graduate engineer or technologist, the job options are all yours. Advances in technology mean there are always opportunities in areas as diverse as cosmetics, communications, energy, health care, manufacturing, music and transport. Or you may choose to work in a particular discipline such as aerospace, chemical, civil or mechanical engineering. You can also use your skills to develop a career in other areas such as design and product development, marketing, project management, research or technical sales. You can study a series of courses which can count as modules towards a qualification, or just take a single course and not commit yourself any further its entirely up to you. But whatever youre thinking of studying, we strongly advise starting at Level 1. Level 2 study is demanding and, like second year study at any university, would be a very challenging place to start. Our students are most successful when theyve done the groundwork that Level 1 is specifically designed to cover.

Openings introductory courses to build your confidence


How Openings courses work
These short, introductory Level 1 courses have been specially designed to help you: find out what its like to study with us; get a taste of a subject area; develop your study skills; and build your confidence. You can use them to prepare for your chosen course, or to help you decide what to study next. They use the same top-quality teaching materials and study support that were famous for, but theyre shorter, and pitched at an introductory level. Theyre also fascinating and fun to do! Openings courses are perfect for new learners with little or no special knowledge or experience of studying. You start with your own general knowledge and interests taking examples from everyday life and gradually build up to the kind of work you could expect at first year university level. Key features include: activities that encourage you to link the discussions in the course to your own experience; core questions and key points that help you to remember what youre reading; and study skills sections that enable you to develop skills such as reading for study purposes, extracting evidence, writing essays and how to reflect on how youre learning. Our new 15-credit courses also provide an opportunity for you to try out learning online; the perfect way to gain the basic computing skills youll need for the next step in your studies.

Timing
Weve made these courses as flexible as possible: most Openings courses start in March, June, September and November each year. Course registrations close up to two weeks before your chosen date, but places go quickly so we advise you to book early each course lasts a maximum of 20 weeks you can fit the course in with your other commitments, as long as you can find approximately six hours a week for study you dont have to go anywhere tutorials are all done by phone.

Tuition and assessment


During the course youll do three short pieces of written work and, if youre studying one of our 15-credit courses, youll also complete an interactive computer-marked assignment (iCMA). Your tutor will send you feedback, and discuss the course material with you in telephone tutorials. You may also be able to keep in touch by email.

Undergraduate study

25

At the end of the course, youll talk about your progress with your tutor and work together to produce a review of your study plans. There are no examinations with Openings courses, instead youll be asked to submit an end-of-module assessment (EMA) which is the third piece of written work. Successful completion of the course will earn you credits which you may be able to count towards an OU qualification.

Introducing environment (Y181)

Credits: 15 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) Environmental concerns often appear in the news, and it can be difficult to tell what matters, or what choices we have. In this friendly introduction to a complicated subject youll consider the effects of human activities, such as farming, focusing upon the scientific and technological aspects of the environment. Topics include the biology of ecosystems and food chains, biodiversity, ecological sustainability and fossil fuels. This Openings course gently introduces you to OU study ideal if youre a beginner or returning to study. It also provides an opportunity to try out learning online; the perfect way to gain the basic computing skills youll need for the next step in your studies.

How to register
If you apply and we have a place on the course you want to study, well accept you. Openings courses are available only to students living in the UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man or those who have a British Forces Post Office (BFPO) address.

Cost
10-credit Openings courses cost 120, rising to 130 from September 2011. 15-credit Openings courses cost 1951. If you rely on state benefits or you have an annual household income of less than 16,845, financial support may be available for free places (terms and conditions apply).
1

Understanding management (Y159)

Credits: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) Most of us, at one time or another, encounter management. It is one of the dominant features of modern working life. Sometimes our experience is one of being managed and at other times we are required to manage, whether we have a formal title or not. But have you ever wondered what management really means? What kinds of ideas and activities make up management? What or who makes a good manager? Or a bad one? And how you can get involved and manage better? This introductory course will help you make sense of management and answer some of these questions for yourself. From March 2012 we are planning a new 15-credit version of this course code Y179.

If you are resident in the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man you will have to pay a higher course fee which is 550 (increasing to 565 from September 2011) for 10-credit courses and 610 for 15-credit courses. For information about registering and financial support: call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service
on 0845 300 60 90
visit our website at www.open.ac.uk/openings request the Openings Prospectus (see page 57).

Openings courses
The Openings courses featured here are those that we think may interest you. We also offer Openings courses covering topics such as the arts, law, psychology, and social sciences.

Learning to change (Y165)

Credits: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) This introductory course is for people who are thinking about making changes in their lives, such as returning to study or taking a different direction at work. It will help you build on what you already know; consider the choices open to you; use your skills and qualities to achieve change; and make plans for the future. There are opportunities to develop your study skills, such as active reading and using evidence, as well as your everyday skills, such as communication, problem solving and organisation. This course is expected to start for the last time in June 2011.

Openings Level 1 Starting with maths (Y162)

Credits: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) Mathematics, as well as being a fascinating subject in its own right, also underpins practically every aspect of modern life. Whether youre keeping tabs on a budget, tackling a DIY project, devising a formula for a spreadsheet or deciding how to present some information graphically, youll need to understand maths. This Openings course introduces a range of key ideas (including using a scientific calculator effectively), to help you tackle everyday mathematical problems at home, work, or in your further studies. Case studies, activities, puzzles, historical snapshots and more recent mathematical discoveries are included, as well as advice on studying generally. From March 2012 we are planning a new 15-credit version of this course code Y182.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Assessment key CMA EMA iCMA TMA Computer-marked assignment End-of-module assessment Interactive computer-marked assignment Tutor-marked assignment

New Digital film school (T156)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 CMA, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

Short courses
If youre ready for study at higher-education level these Short courses will give you a flavour of OU study before you commit yourself to a longer course.

Design and the Web (T183)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 iCMA, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

Digital film school is your chance to join the millions of people around the world who make and share video every day. The explosion of film-making for websites and mobiles gives people and organisations the opportunity to tell their stories and show what they have to offer, at low cost. This 10-week online course is practical, hands-on and fun, built around simple tasks based on real-world briefs and a strong culture of mutual support between students. Our experienced team of film-makers will show you some of the craft secrets that underpin good film-making, and how the professionals stay up to date.

This ten-week online course shows how design principles can be applied to the creation of web pages and websites. It explores the elements of web page design, text, colour, images, and assembling them as layout. The course also covers usability issues such as navigation, access, interactivity, and designing virtual experiences. Creating your own website can be great fun youll publish a website within a week of starting the course. Youll use a web page editor, which we explain how to use in detail. Tuition is via an online forum, where you can seek help and advice, and exchange opinions with fellow students. This course is expected to start for the last time in May 2012. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Digital photography: creating and sharing better images (T189)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 CMA, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

New Digital audio (T150)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 CMA, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

Whether youre new to digital photography or want to improve your existing skills, this ten-week online course will develop your ability to create and share digital images you are proud of. If youre just starting out, youll be able to compare notes with many other people in the same situation. If youre already a keen amateur digital photographer, being part of an active online community will develop your fluency. Visually focused, with text kept to a minimum, the course will develop your technical, visual and creative skills. A series of weekly hands-on assignments allows you to practise the skills youll learn. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Digital audio has completely changed how we capture and listen to recorded sounds. Creating excellent sounding audio tracks to accompany video clips or presentations has never been easier. This ten-week online course will develop your ability to create and share digital audio tracks, whether you are just starting out or want to improve your existing skills. Youll learn how to use an audio editor to create your own tracks. Youll also explore the nature of sound and the changing world of the music industry. As part of an active online community, youll exchange ideas and tracks with fellow students.

Digital worlds: designing games, creating alternative realities (T151)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

From the earliest days of computing, computer games have led the way in exploring how we interact with digital media. In this ten-week online course you will discover how computer games and interactive digital experiences are designed and

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made, marketed and played. Through designing, creating, sharing and reviewing your own games, you will learn how complex games are often constructed from simple building blocks. You will also see how the evolution of communities around computer games helps drive an international industry that extends from casual single player games to interactive online entertainment and serious educational games. This course is expected to start for the last time in October 2011. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

and suit your lifestyle. As well as developing your skills and confidence, the course includes the chance to learn from role models and mentors from SET industries. This course is expected to start for the last time in October 2011.

Robotics & the meaning of life: a practical guide to things that think (T184)
Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 2 iCMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

Linux: an introduction (T155)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

The myth of Linux is based on the misconception that its a difficult operating system to understand, hard to use and has many issues surrounding its quality. As one of the most extensively used operating systems worldwide, the chances are that the website you last visited was running on a Linux supported system. In this ten-week course designed for absolute beginners youll examine the many similarities that exist between Linux and operating systems such as Microsoft Windows. Youll also explore the diverse technology available in the Linux community. Youll be provided with tools to access free versions of Linux and software to install this on your computer. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

This ten-week online course will introduce you to robotics and the design of intelligent machines. You will investigate the relationship between robots and humans, and question what it means for a machine to be intelligent in the context of what it means to be human. Even if you are a complete beginner, you will be able to build simulations of autonomous robots according to easy-to-follow instructions. These will be programmed using special software appropriate for complete novices. You can also choose alternative practical activities that make use of the LEGO MindStorms Robotics Invention kit (not provided). This course is expected to start for the last time in October 2011. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Sustainable Scotland (T123)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 15 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 Feb 2012 register by one week before start date 15 weeks

Return to science, engineering and technology (T161)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 10 weeks

If you have studied or worked in either science, engineering or technology (SET) and youre looking to return to work in one of these sectors, then this ten-week course offers a supportive environment to help you realise your ambitions. Through a series of web-based activities and online discussions, youll analyse your previous experiences and skills, identify new employment opportunities, and develop a powerful action plan that will help you fulfil your aspirations

This 15-week online course takes you on a wide-ranging journey through the many technological, economic and social aspects of sustainability with a focus on how such issues affect Scotland. Online discussion of these issues with your fellow students will be an important learning tool. There will be information from a community of students past and present for you to access; you will also be encouraged to use social bookmarking. Activities throughout the course will help you develop the skills to produce a report on your case studies as the final course assessment. The course is taught entirely online with study support via an online discussion forum. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

The story of maths (TM190)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 2 iCMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011, 01 May 2012 register by one week before start date 10 weeks

Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 5 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

This ten-week online course follows the BBC Four programme The story of maths presented by Professor Marcus du Sautoy. It traces the development of mathematics from its origins in Egypt and Mesopotamia 4000 years ago to twentieth-century Europe and the US. Youll explore mathematical ideas in an historical and cultural context that are explained in an entertaining and accessible way. The television programmes on DVD are accompanied by online and printed commentaries, and Anne Rooneys book The Story of Mathematics. This course can be studied as a one-off, and could be an excellent introduction to further study in mathematics and the sciences. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

This key introductory Level 1 course, packed with new learning innovation, will change your way of seeing and solving complex problems forever. Through a mix of academic and practical work you will develop an understanding of design, acquire new designing skills, and build a portfolio of design projects as a strong foundation for future study or work experience. This online course looks at common principles of design, and ways of thinking which lead to ideas and creative solutions. Within a specially created virtual design studio youll complete many handson activities and interact with your fellow students as you experience a completely different way of learning.

Discovering mathematics (MU123)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 5 TMAs, 5 iCMAs 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Level 1
We recommend you start with one of our Level 1 courses listed below. Youll learn how to study at university level, get a thorough grounding in your chosen area of study and, in addition, youll become a confident distance learner. If you arent sure that youre ready for Level 1 study, look at our Openings courses on pages 2425.

Career development and employability (T122)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 05 Nov 2011 register by 13 Oct 2011 05 May 2012 register by 12 Apr 2012 6 months

Whatever your chosen career, this key introductory Level 1 course will enable you to use your workplace as a context for learning, and develop your ability to apply your learning to improve your practice at work. You will also develop your critical thinking skills and increase your understanding of how to research workplace issues. The preparation of personal, professional and academic development plans will support your development as an independent learner and help you to align your personal and career development aspirations. You must have access to a realistic work environment and be performing a role whether paid or voluntary that you can use as a basis for your studies.

This key introductory Level 1 course will help you to integrate mathematical ideas into your everyday thinking and build your confidence in using and learning mathematics. Youll cover statistical, graphical, algebraic, trigonometric and numerical concepts and techniques, and be introduced to mathematical modelling. Formal calculus is not included and you are not expected to have any previous knowledge of algebra. The skills introduced will be ideal if you plan to study more mathematics courses, such as Using mathematics (MST121). It is also suitable for users of mathematics in other areas, such as computing, science, technology, social science, humanities, business and education.

Engineering: an active introduction (TXR120)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 1 EMA 01 May 2012 register by 30 Apr 2012 1 week residential school and other study

At this residential course you will experience laboratory, field and creative work as carried out by engineers. Youll also gain practical skills invaluable for an engineering, technology or science-based degree: taking measurements, analysing data, seeking and evaluating information, modelling, problem-solving, and design for decision-making. Working in a small team, youll develop these skills through enjoyable, interactive learning activities. You will define your

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learning needs and plan ways of meeting them with the support of experienced tutors. The school is held in a UK university with a choice of dates in July register early if you have a preference, as unfortunately we cant always offer your first choice.

Environment: journeys through a changing world (U116)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 7 TMAs 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Engineering at work (T198)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 4 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Nov 2011 register by 13 Oct 2011 6 months

Engineers develop practical and professional skills at work in ways that arent always formally recognised. If you are currently in engineering-related employment then this course allows you to gain academic credit for learning at work by completing real work-based activities, designed to help improve your work performance and professional development. You will need someone in your workplace, typically your line manager, to authenticate, though not assess, some of your coursework. This course is a compulsory component of the Foundation Degree/Diploma of Higher Education in Engineering (G17/E55) and Foundation Degree/Diploma of Higher Education in Materials Fabrication and Engineering (G18/E56).

Our world is changing fast we are experiencing pressure from climate change, growing demands for finite resources and the extinction of many plants and animals. Environment: journeys through a changing world introduces you to environmental studies and the issues arising from environmental change. It shows how people are seeking positive solutions to environmental challenges where you live, in the Arctic, Africa, the Amazon and China. It also develops the key skills and concepts needed to understand our changing world. You do not need any prior knowledge to study this key introductory Level 1 course, just an interest in the future of our planet.

Make your experience count (U122)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Nov 2011 register by 13 Oct 2011 01 May 2012 register by 12 Apr 2012 16 weeks

Engineering the future (T173)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 5 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

From design concepts to the manufacture of products, this key introductory Level 1 course examines the range of human activity that is engineering. It introduces the context in which engineers operate including issues such as product safety and patent law and looks at current engineering practice. It considers some of the developments in engineering methods and applications that will shape the future. The course is ideal as a general introduction if you simply have an interest in what engineering is and how it is practised in modern society; and also if youre considering studying engineering at higher levels and wish to acquire more specialised skills.

This unique online course enables you to gain 30 credits towards a higher education qualification by drawing on your past life experiences, including non-accredited training courses. Over 16 weeks, you will learn how to analyse and reflect on these experiences in an academic environment, take stock of your skills and plan for your personal and career development. The course is suitable for anyone in paid or voluntary work, planning a career change, or wishing to enter or re-enter the labour market. It is also appropriate for anyone with no particular goal other than to undertake some personal or academic development.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

30

Undergraduate study

New Microsoft server technologies (TM128)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

Personal and career development in engineering (T191)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 15 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 2 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

Microsoft certifications are highly valued in the IT industry. They provide a good starting point if you wish to enter the industry and a way to maintain your skills and advance your career if youre already working in IT. This course offers a sound grounding in the fundamentals of computer networking and server technologies. It also enables you to develop the knowledge and understanding required to become an IT professional working with current Microsoft Windows server technology. On successful completion of this course, and through additional practice exercises, you will be able to take an industry-recognised Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification examination.

Taking an innovative approach, this course teaches and evaluates your general and key skills associated with lifelong learning and career management. You will examine your career position, your qualifications and your learning needs, before compiling a development plan. Depending on your aspirations, youll identify a profile of courses to satisfy the OU regulations for the award of a BEng (Hons) degree. If you also have one of the grades of membership of a professional engineering institution as your target, leading to IEng or CEng, your profile will aim to satisfy the educational requirements of the institution youve selected. You must first satisfactorily complete this course before you take Key skills for professional engineers (T397).

New My digital life (TU100)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 7 TMAs, 7 iCMAs 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Using mathematics (MST121)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 1 (SCQF level 7) 5 TMAs, 3 CMAs 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

While youre learning about tomorrow's technology why not help build it? My digital life takes you on a journey from the origins of information technology through to the familiar computers of today, and on to tomorrows radical technologies. You'll get hands-on experience of designing, building and programming the small, ubiquitous computers that will become increasingly common over the next decade. The profound technological, economic, political and ethical changes brought about by information technology will affect every one of us. This key introductory Level 1 course will help you prepare for that think of it as an online survival kit for the twenty-first century.

This broad, enjoyable introduction to university-level mathematics shows how mathematics can be applied to answer questions from science, technology and everyday life. You will study a range of fundamental techniques, including recurrence relations, matrices and vectors, calculus and statistics. Using specialist mathematical software is an integral part of the course, and you will learn how the speed and accuracy of a computer can be employed to solve practical problems. The skills of communicating results and defining problems are also developed. This key introductory Level 1 course and Exploring mathematics (MS221) will together give you a good foundation for higher-level mathematics, science and engineering courses.

Undergraduate study

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Level 2

New Change, strategy and projects at work (T227)


30 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 05 Nov 2011 register by 13 Oct 2011 05 May 2012 register by 12 Apr 2012 6 months Credits: Assessment: Start: Length:

The concept of change is not new, but being able to understand and contribute positively using project working methods has never been more important. Whatever the origin of change technological developments, globalisation, regulation or deregulation, and so on it can significantly affect our personal and working lives. This course will improve your understanding of the origins, nature and consequences of change. It will also equip you with the knowledge, skills and competencies associated with project working needed to successfully plan practical projects in the workplace that contribute to the broader change programmes that your organisation may need to implement.

Computers and processors (T224)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 4 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Computers, whether in the form of personal computers or invisibly embedded in a wide range of devices, are continuing to change our lives. This course uses examples, ranging from electronic kitchen scales to a robotic milking system, to examine computers and the functions they perform. You will explore the diversity of applications; the fundamental components of the hardware that makes up a computer system; and the basic instructions that are used to make microprocessors perform tasks. The course concludes with a look at PCs covering topics such as operating systems, processors and memory enabling you to identify trends and explain underlying technologies. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

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Undergraduate study

Communication and information technologies (T215)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 5 TMAs, 4 CMAs, 1 EMA 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Designing applications with Visual Basic (MT264)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 4 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

Digital communication and information technologies have become fundamental to the operation of modern societies. New products and services are rapidly transforming our lives, both at work and at play. This course helps you to learn about these new developments, and equips you with the understanding and skills to continue learning about them in the future. You will study the core principles on which the new technologies are built and, through a range of online and offline activities, investigate new topics and technologies. After studying the course youll be in a better position to appreciate the potential of the new technologies.

Design and designing (T211)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 9) 6 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

This course in object-oriented programming will teach you how to design and write small applications using Visual Basic Express. Software applications discussed in the course range from a very simple traffic survey application, to more complex applications that are linked to a database. Roughly one third of the course consists of important practical Visual Basic Express programming exercises, using web-based units. Youll also use printed course books that use a design language similar to Visual Basic (VB), to learn essential programming skills. You should be ready to study computing at Level 2 and ideally have some programming experience.

Energy for a sustainable future (T206)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 6 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

People encounter designed products every day, from bus tickets to buildings. We travel on, wear and even eat products that have been designed. This course introduces the products and practices of contemporary design. Youll learn about the processes that generate products, practise basic design skills, and discover what being a designer involves exploring mass market production like music players and kitchen gadgets, and more specialist contributions such as a Formula One car, solar-heated building or unique wedding dress. If youre already a practising designer, the course will develop your understanding of design principles enabling you to see and compare their application in various fields. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

How can we provide clean, safe, environmentally-sustainable energy supplies for Britain, Europe and the world as a whole during the twenty-first century, despite rising population and increasing affluence? You will study the sustainability problems of our conventional fossil and nuclear fuel use, and how they might be relieved; explore the technological and social possibilities for using energy much more efficiently; and investigate various renewable energy sources (such as solar, wind and biofuels) that significantly reduce effects on the environment. In the course project, you research and write a sustainable energy proposal for your own home, workplace, or community. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

Undergraduate study

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Engineering in action (TXR220)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 1 iCMA, 1 EMA 21 Apr 2012 register by 20 Apr 2012 1 week residential school and other study

Exploring mathematics (MS221)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 4 TMAs, 1 examination 08 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

This residential-school course offers essential practical experience for students continuing in engineering. It adopts the theme of the engineer as a provider of solutions to the technological needs of society and concentrates on the production, analysis, and modelling of engineered components and systems. By its end, you will have a deeper understanding of the interactions between design, manufacture and service performance, usually by optimisation of materials properties. This should be instructive in guiding your further study areas. Where feasible, computer-based techniques are included to support the modelling, design and selection processes. Early registration is recommended if you have a preferred date.

Exploring mathematics builds on the concepts and techniques in Using mathematics (MST121) and uses the same software. It looks at questions underlying some of those techniques, such as why particular patterns occur in mathematical solutions and how you can be confident that a result is true. It introduces the role of reasoning and offers opportunities to investigate mathematical problems. Together with Using mathematics this course will give you a good foundation for higher-level mathematics and physics courses. Even if you dont intend to study further, you will gain a good, university-level understanding of the nature and scope of mathematics.

Engineering: mechanics,
materials, design (T207)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 9) 7 TMAs, 1 examination 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Mathematical methods and models (MST209)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 9) 7 TMAs, 2 CMAs, 1 examination 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Engineering is about extending societys horizons by solving technical problems from meeting basic needs for food and shelter to generating wealth by trade. Engineers prefer to see difficulties as challenges or opportunities they appear to be solving problems, but theyre actually creating solutions: an altogether more imaginative activity. In exploring how technical solutions are created, this course combines the mechanics of solids and fluids with the structure and properties of materials. It includes aspects of engineering analysis, design, and modelling methods, using appropriate mathematical software. Analytical, communication and learning skills are developed in a context that provides grounding for higher-level, more specialised study.

Solve real problems by finding out how they are transformed into mathematical models and learning the methods of solution. This course covers classical mechanical models as well as some non-mechanical models such as heat transfer and population dynamics; and methods including vector algebra, differential equations, calculus (including several variables and vector calculus), matrices, methods for threedimensional problems, and numerical methods. Teaching is supported and enhanced by use of a computer algebra package. You are assumed to have a sound knowledge of mathematics as developed in Using mathematics (MST121) and parts of Exploring mathematics (MS221).

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

34

Undergraduate study

Mathematical modelling (MSXR209)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 2 (SCQF level 9) 2 TMAs, 1 EMA 28 May 2011 register by 20 May 2011 26 May 2012 register by 18 May 2012 1 week residential school and other study

Understanding systems: making sense of complexity (T214)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 7 TMAs, 1 EMA 11 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Mathematics is enjoyable and creative in its own right, but can also be a powerful tool for solving real problems. This week-long residential course equips you to tackle data and sensitivity analysis by introducing you to mathematical modelling. Youll learn to use mathematical software and acquire presentation and group-working skills. Youll also be expected to put together a short technical report. Most of the work will be collaborative, carried out in small groups with a tutor. You should have an understanding of applied mathematics and mechanics equivalent to the first half of Mathematical methods and models (MST209). Unfortunately, we arent always able to offer you your first choice of date. If you have a preferred date in mind, youre more likely to get it if you register early.

You cant always make sense of problems or issues by breaking them into parts. A systemic perspective focuses on different aspects of a situation, but pays attention to the connections and relationships between things and to the different perceptions, priorities and needs of the people involved. This course introduces you to systems thinking and helps you develop an understanding of some of the most important technological, environmental and social systems of our times. Youll learn simple techniques and ways of looking at things that will help you to explore your own understanding of complex issues and communicate your understanding to others. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

The technology of music (TA212)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 2 (SCQF level 8) 6 TMAs, 1 EMA 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

This joint technology/arts course starts with an introduction to music theory and notation and the technological techniques needed in a study of music technology. Youll study the principles of sound and acoustics and how musical terms and fundamentals relate to their physical equivalents. The course also examines the operation and characteristics of acoustic and electronic musical instruments; how music can be represented and stored; the fundamentals of recording; manipulation and transmission of sound; MIDI; current developments; and some associated legal/ commercial issues. You will need a personal computer and a high-quality means of listening to music.

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Level 3
We strongly advise that you do not begin your studies at Level 3. If in doubt, please contact our advisory staff on +44 (0)845 300 60 90.

Engineering small worlds: micro and nano technologies (T356)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 4 TMAs, 1 examination 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice (T320)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Ebusiness is booming as organisations strive to gain efficiencies through improved workflows, resource management, just-in-time provisioning and business relationships. This course explores the driving forces behind such developments, introducing fundamental technologies and protocols upon which new systems and services can be built including Service Oriented Architectures, web services, XML and associated security standards. Case studies illustrate the business strategies behind the deployment of web services and provide insights into future developments. You will explore professional and ethical issues surrounding ICT developments, use software tools to create schemes and web service models, deploy collaborating applications, and consolidate your learning in a final project.

This course demonstrates how matter can be manipulated at the atomic and molecular scale to serve the engineering needs of society for ever-smaller systems acting as intelligent monitors, controllers and micro-environments. It covers: science at the micro and nano scales; engineering micro and nano-scale systems; structural/inertial devices; electronic/ optical devices; and fluidic/biological devices. The course examines how micro and nano technologies are being advanced. Youll also gain a firm grounding in engineering on both micro and nano scales, through the detailed study of how scientific and engineering principles are applied to the design and manufacture of real devices.

Environmental monitoring, modelling and control (T308)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 4 TMAs, 1 EMA 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Electromagnetism: experiments, applications and simulations (SMXR359)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 10 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 1 TMA, 1 CMA, 1 EMA 12 May 2012 register by 11 May 2012 1 week residential school and other study

Electromagnetism is central to our understanding of the physical world and to modern technology. This residential school features experiments that develop your understanding of electromagnetic concepts, showing how our knowledge is based on observations. Youll also investigate modern applications, and use computers both to simulate the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and to solve Laplaces equation. The one-week school will be held at a UK university (probably Sussex), with a choice of dates in July and/or August. Unfortunately, we arent always able to offer you your first choice of date. If you have a preferred date in mind, youre more likely to get it if you register early. This course is expected to start for the last time in May 2012.

This course explores strategies for analysing, defining and controlling environmental pollution. Its main themes are drinking water supply, air quality management, noise control and solid waste. The course builds on Environmental control and public health (T210) (now discontinued). Youll also need strong numeracy skills, a good knowledge of chemistry, and the ability to develop and use computer models. The course considers water treatment processes, demand and quality; atmospheric pollution dispersal, modelling and control; noise prediction schemes and sound insulation; and the development of local waste management strategies. A final environmental impact assessment project brings these topics together. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

36

Undergraduate study

Graphs, networks and design (MT365)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 4 TMAs, 4 CMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Keeping ahead in information and communication technologies (T324)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

This course is about using ideas from discrete mathematics to model problems, and representing these ideas through diagrams. The word graphs refers to diagrams consisting of points joined by lines. These points may correspond to chemical atoms, towns, electrical terminals or anything that can be connected in pairs. The lines may be chemical bonds, roads, wires or other connections. The main topics of mathematical interest are graphs and digraphs; network flows; block designs; geometry; codes; and mathematical modelling. Application areas covered include communications; structures and mechanisms; electrical networks; transport systems; social networks; and computer science. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

Keeping ahead in information and communication technologies (ICT) not only means keeping up to date with rapidly changing technologies. It also means successfully using these new technologies in complex systems in which people play a major part. Therefore this course addresses the two important questions: How do you keep up to date and how can you analyse ICT systems and take account of social factors? This course will equip you with the skills to tackle these questions, in the context of studying several contemporary ICT systems. By the end, you should be well placed as an independent learner to keep ahead in ICT.

Key skills for professional engineers (T397)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 15 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 2 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

Innovation: designing for a


sustainable future (T307)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 5 TMAs, 1 EMA 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

How do successful innovations emerge? How do designers, technologists, managers and end-users create and develop new ideas, designs and inventions? How are these translated into marketable products? This course examines these questions, but its concerns go beyond innovation just for commercial and competitive advantage. It also looks at whether and how innovation can be directed towards ensuring a socially, economically and environmentally sustainable future. Youll work on a project either individually or in a team that makes use of the ideas and methods taught in the course. This course is fully accessible even if you do not have a technical background.

This course is a compulsory module in the Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) and is especially for students aiming for corporate membership of an engineering institution. Building on any personal-development planning from previous studies, it establishes a framework based on your prior experience and matched to your professional aspirations and degree programme. The course develops and assesses your reflective and key skills and prepares you for your continuing professional development. If youre aiming for corporate membership of an engineering institution, leading to Incorporated Engineer or Chartered Engineer status, the context will include your institutions professional review requirements. You must satisfactorily complete Personal and career development in engineering (T191) before studying this course.

Undergraduate study

37

Managing complexity: a systems approach (T306)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 7 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Technologies for digital media (T325)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Are you concerned with leadership; managing change; ethical practice; or improving the way you intervene in situations? Want to learn to think differently and creatively about complex issues and find ways to manage them effectively? Then study this course. You will use the most recent and innovative methods and techniques in systems thinking and practice and apply them to areas including information systems; organisational change and learning; sustainable development and the environment; and professional practice. Working on your own project throughout the course, you will practise and develop your systems thinking and project management skills in an area of your choice. This course is expected to start for the last time in February 2012.

Downloading mp3 music files; exchanging digital photos; reading, watching and listening to news and entertainment on the web or your mobile phone digital technologies are changing the way we conduct our private, social and business lives, and transforming our experience of media out of all recognition. This course investigates how this has come about, looking at the technologies behind digital media as well as some of the social, ethical and legal issues they raise. By the end of your studies, youll understand the possibilities and limitations of the technologies, the direction in which theyre taking us, and how to keep on top of future developments.

New The computing and IT project (TM470)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Structural integrity: designing against failure (T357)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 2 CMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Structural integrity is the study of the safe design and assessment of components and structures under load, and has become increasingly important in engineering design. It integrates aspects of stress analysis, materials behaviour and the mechanics of failure into the engineering design process. The course is well illustrated with case studies, and will be of interest to anyone associated with the design of any component or structure that experiences loading, and will be of benefit in developing skills in the analysis and assessment of product design. It has universal applicability in the UK and across international boundaries.

The computing and IT project enables you to explore computing, information and communications technologies in substantial depth and it is the compulsory project module for our computing and ICT qualifications. It offers you practical experience of independent learning and reflective practice. Youll apply advanced principles and techniques to produce a solution to a problem which you have defined and detail your experience and findings in a substantial report. Youll also be responsible for choosing your own topic, carrying out the project and writing it up, with the help of a supervisor to advise and guide you.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

38

Undergraduate study

The engineering project (T450)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 28 Jan 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

Towards chartership: professional


development for engineers (T398)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 15 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 2 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Oct 2011 register by 08 Sep 2011 9 months

This course satisfies the compulsory project requirement of the BEng (Hons). It gives you an opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you have already acquired in your Level 3 engineering studies, by completing an individual engineering project. Youll choose the theme from a selection of broad project headings: electronic materials, engineering small worlds, environmental monitoring, fluid mechanics, innovation and design, managing complexity, materials failure, radio frequency engineering, solid mechanics and structural integrity. Youll develop the project topic, execute it and then write it up. A tutor will advise and guide you, but youll be expected to produce your work independently, without close supervision. You must have studied one of the prerequisite courses before starting this course. Click www.open.ac.uk/study for more information.

This course is designed for those aiming for Chartered Engineer status, via corporate membership of one of the professional engineering institutions licensed by the Engineering Council. The course extends and assesses your reflective and key skills in the context of your continuing professional development, and includes an opportunity to rehearse the professional review requirements of the institution youve selected. It is a resource-based course, some resources provided and others for you to supply. Although the course can be taken at any time before registering for Team engineering (T885), it is recommended for early in your postgraduate studies. This course is for students starting postgraduate studies in engineering who have not completed Personal and career development in engineering (T191) and Key skills for professional engineers (T397) as part of their undergraduate studies.

The quantum world (SM358)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Level 3 (SCQF level 10) 4 TMAs, 6 iCMAs, 1 examination 04 Feb 2012 register by 05 Jan 2012 9 months

These courses might also interest you


We also offer a number of other courses that are closely related to this subject, which you may be interested in studying. See www.open.ac.uk/study for descriptions:

If youre interested in the fundamental laws of modern physics and how mathematics is used to state and apply these laws, this course is for you. It surveys the physical principles, mathematical techniques and interpretation of quantum theory. The Schrdinger equation, the uncertainty principle, the exclusion principle, fermions and bosons, measurement probabilities, entanglement, perturbation theory and transition rates are all discussed. Applications include atoms, molecules, nuclei, solids, scanning tunnelling microscopy and quantum cryptography. The course also presents recent evidence relating to some of the most surprising and non classical predictions of quantum mechanics. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Level 1
Exploring science (S104) Maths for science (S151) Practising science (SXR103).

Level 2
Environment (U216) The molecular world (S205) The physical world (S207).

Level 3
Developing concurrent distributed systems (M362) Electromagnetism (SMT359) Mathematical methods and fluid mechanics (MST326) Relational databases: theory and practice (M359) Software engineering with objects (M363) The environmental web (U316).

Undergraduate study

39

Im not exactly conventional in my


approach to education, but thankfully neither is the OU!
As soon as I was 16 I left school and jumped feet first into an apprenticeship with an engineering company. I loved messing about with old cars and taking things apart to see how they worked so it seemed like the ideal opportunity particularly as they offered to sponsor me on a degree. The months went by and no degree course materialised. I became impatient and contacted the OU to organise my own degree. At the time I was still only 16 and tutors were worried that I was too young to cope. In the end they agreed that I could do one 60-credit course in my first year to see how I would manage. Gavin Harper, Technology student I took to OU study like a duck to water. I worked hard and quickly proved that I could do it and ended up completing my BSc (Hons) Technology three years later aged 19! It was brilliant particularly as I didnt end up in loads of debt like my mates who were going to campus-based universities around the same time. OU study was a fantastic inspiration. It proves there are no barriers to education and that you really can go as far as you want to. There is so much knowledge out there and I love the idea of being able to acquire it. The materials are simply outstanding too second to none. They are so well written and so well presented, making a potentially complicated subject accessible and easy to follow. Above everything, I think my experience with the OU has inspired me to go on learning. My expectations of what I could achieve have just grown and grown since I began studying with the OU. It excites you, makes you want to keep learning more and more. Im 21 now and doing my PhD, which through a traditional route I wouldnt be able to do until I was 24. After that the OU has already given me so many directions I could go in. Ive wanted to teach science and technology for a long time and tried the Student Associate Scheme which enabled me to work in a classroom to see if I liked the experience of teaching. Id also like to work in the media, in the public communication of science. Being able to share knowledge, make it accessible to all and open doors for people: I find that really exciting the quality of the OU written material constantly inspires me; since starting with the OU Ive now gone on to write seven books myself!

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

40

Postgraduate study

Postgraduate study

Successful innovation depends on the knowledge and skills of both engineers and technology managers. Their imagination, ability to solve problems and technical expertise are behind the hundreds of innovations and developments that are transforming our daily lives. These specialist engineering and technology skills are in great demand throughout all sectors of the economy: public, private and voluntary qualified engineers now rank among the highest paid professionals, according to EngineeringUK.

Postgraduate qualifications Engineering Master of Engineering (M03) Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22) MSc in Engineering (F46) Technology Management Postgraduate Certificate in Technology Management (C49) Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management (E08) MSc in Technology Management (F36) Systems Thinking in Practice Postgraduate Certificate in Systems Thinking in Practice (C72) Postgraduate Diploma in Systems Thinking in Practice (E28) MSc in Systems Thinking in Practice (F47) Postgraduate courses

41 42 43 43

44 45 45 Find out more online Click www.open.ac.uk/study and enter the qualification or course code into the search box in the top right-hand corner of our website.

46 47 47 48

F46

Search

Postgraduate study

41

Postgraduate qualifications
At postgraduate level, making an in-depth study of a topic that interests you can lead in a number of directions. You may be motivated to add to your academic credentials by taking a PhD, for example. Equally, the knowledge and practical experience you gain during your research project means youll also be well placed to take advantage of the many senior engineering and technology employment opportunities available at home and abroad. At the same time, youll be developing capabilities that are highly prized by employers in a variety of other sectors. Among the many other advantages of choosing the OU for your postgraduate studies in engineering and technology are: our cutting-edge approach course content reflects the extensive research carried out by our academic staff, particularly in the areas of structural integrity, forensic engineering and technology management enhanced employability students who carry out research while working in industry demonstrate a high level of commitment thats valued by employers. You should normally hold a degree or equivalent. In some cases you may be allowed to register for a qualification once you have shown that you can study successfully at postgraduate level. Please check the specific entry requirements for each qualification, click www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate-engtech or call the Student Registration & Enquiry Service on +44 (0)845 300 60 90.

Pathways from BEng (Hons) to the Master of Engineering (M03) and MSc in Engineering (F46)
The following shows the pathways from BEng (Hons) to an MSc in Engineering via either a postgraduate diploma or integrated MEng. It also shows how you can enter either with an OU Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) or an equivalent qualification from another higher-education institution.

Start here
Other accredited honours degrees OU Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B24 or B65) Towards chartership: professional development for engineers (T398)

Plus 90 credits chosen from modules in the following subjects:


Computing Manufacturing Environmental decision making Systems thinking in practice Team engineering (T885) Integrated MEng (M03)1 Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22) MSc research course (T802) Engineering Technology management

MSc in Engineering2 (F46)


= Module
1

= Intermediate qualification

= Qualification

For the integrated MEng, all postgraduate study must be completed within four years of graduation with honours. If you gained an honours degree from elsewhere, your degree must be accredited for Chartered Engineer. For the MSc in Engineering, study must be completed within five years of graduation with the Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22) or MEng (M03).

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

42

Postgraduate study

Master of Engineering (M03)


The integrated MEng degree aims to meet the educational requirements of the Engineering Council and relevant engineering institutions as specified in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). It has been accredited by a number of professional institutions as fulfilling the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer status. See the website engineering.open.ac.uk for further information. You can choose from the full range of postgraduate technology modules (with codes beginning T8 or TU8) and include up to 30 credits from computing, mathematics or science (codes beginning M8 or S8), but excluding any project modules. In your final module you will complete an engineering project as part of a team of students in Team engineering (T885), which includes a residential element.

For this 480-credit masters degree you require: An honours degree accredited by one of the licensed bodies of the Engineering Council and the following undergraduate Level 3 compulsory module: Title Towards chartership: professional development for engineers Or the qualification: Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) B65 or B24 360 15 Code T398 Credits Page 15 38

And 60 credits from any postgraduate technology module with a code beginning T8 or TU8, but excluding any project modules . And 30 credits from any postgraduate computing, mathematics, science or technology module with a code beginning T8, TU8, M8 or S8, but excluding any project modules . And 30 credits from the following compulsory module: Team engineering

Youll also get


If you start from scratch with the OU, you will graduate with a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) (B65) after your 360 credits of undergraduate study. If you join us having recently completed an honours degree elsewhere, or have graduated with one of our accredited degrees in computing or ICT, you will get a grounding in personal development planning for professional engineering through our undergraduate course Towards chartership: professional development for engineers (T398).

T885

30

51

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for descriptions.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Planning your studies


You need a total of 480 credits (360 credits at undergraduate level and 120 credits of postgraduate study) to achieve your MEng. You need to complete your MEng within four years of the date your honours degree was awarded. If youre unable to complete your studies within this time, you can take our Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22), which has no such time limit for completion. Team engineering (T885), which includes a residential element, must be your final module.

Postgraduate study

43

Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22)


This postgraduate diploma offers you an opportunity
to study various aspects of professional engineering at
postgraduate level. This diploma also provides a route
to a high level engineering qualification if you fall
outside the entry requirements for our MEng (M03).
If you already hold an honours degree that has been
accredited by one of the engineering institutions licensed
by the Engineering Council, this diploma will take you one
stage further towards fulfilling the educational requirements
for Chartered Engineer registration.
If you do not hold our Bachelor of Engineering (Hons)
(B24 or B65) you will be required to study Towards
chartership: professional development for engineers (T398).
This will give you a grounding in personal development
planning for professional engineering. We recommend that
you take this module first.
For this 135-credit postgraduate diploma you require: If you havent already successfully completed Key skills for professional engineers (T397) as part of your undergraduate studies you will need to pass the following undergraduate Level 3 module: Title Towards chartership: professional development for engineers Code T398 Credits Page 15 38

MSc in Engineering (F46)


The MSc in Engineering will take your engineering education one step further by completing an extended personal research project. It builds on previous study and takes you closer to fulfilling the educational requirements to become a Chartered Engineer.

Planning your studies


You must register on the MSc research course (T802) within four years of completing Team engineering (T885) which is the final module for both the Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering (E22) and the MEng (M03). For this masters degree you require one of the following qualifications: Title Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering MEng Title MSc research course Code E22 M03 Code T802 Page 43 42 Credits Page 60 51

And the following compulsory module:

And 60 credits from any postgraduate technology module with a code beginning T8 or TU8, but excluding any project modules . And 30 credits from any postgraduate computing, mathematics, science or technology module with a code beginning T8, TU8, M8 or S8, but excluding any project modules . And 30 credits from the following compulsory module: Team engineering

T885

30

51

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for descriptions.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

44

Postgraduate study

Pathways to the Postgraduate Certificate (C49), Diploma (E08) and MSc in Technology Management (F36)
Start here
Bachelors degree or equivalent experience Technology management: an integrative approach (T840) plus 30 credits from a choice of optional modules (see opposite) which leads to: Postgraduate Certificate in Technology Management (C49) Technology strategy (T846) plus 30 credits from a choice of optional modules (see opposite) which leads to: Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management (E08)

Postgraduate Certificate in Technology Management (C49)


This postgraduate certificate provides a rounded view of technology management from an operational perspective. Relevant to all economic sectors and types of technology, topics such as the management of technological innovation and technical projects are studied in the compulsory module. The study of one or more optional modules allows you to extend your technology management knowledge and skills in directions of particular personal or professional interest. If technology is a significant success factor in your organisation or role then technology management is relevant to you. You are strongly advised to start your studies with Technology management: an integrative approach (T840). For this 60-credit postgraduate certificate you require: 30 credits from the following compulsory module: Title Technology management: an integrative approach Advanced routing CCNP 1 Analysis and design of enterprise systems: an objectoriented approach Business operations: delivering value Computer forensics and investigations Continuing professional development in practice Creativity, innovation and change Databases in enterprise systems Enterprise and the environment Financial strategy Forensic engineering Information systems legacy and evolution Innovations in elearning Integrated safety, health and environmental management Learning from IS failures Managing knowledge Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction Managing the software enterprise Manufacture materials design Multilayer switching CCNP 3 Optimising networks CCNP 4 Code T840 Credits Page 30 50

And 30 credits from the following optional modules: T824 M885 30 15


T883 M889 U810 B822 or BZX822 M888 T862 B821 or BZX821 T839 T853 H807 T835 T852 B823 or BZX823 TU812 M882 T881 T826 T827

30 15 30 30 15 30 30 30 15 15 30 30 15 30 30 15 30 30 30

48

Then take either the: Research route MSc research course (T802) or the: Professional route The MSc professional project (T847) plus 30 credits from a choice of optional modules (see opposite) which leads to:

48

Information security management M886

MSc in Technology Management (F36)


= Module = Intermediate qualification = Qualification

48

49

Postgraduate study

45

Title Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches Project management Relational database systems Software requirements for business systems Supply chain innovation, strategy and management Systems engineering The information systems toolkit Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change Web systems integration Wide area networks CCNP 2 Working in virtual project teams

Code T889

Credits Page 30 49

MSc in Technology Management (F36)


The MSc in Technology Management course builds on your postgraduate certificate and diploma studies. Its a challenging programme that engages you both academically and professionally, giving you the opportunity to pursue an investigation or piece of research in an aspect of technology management that is of particular interest to you and perhaps also to your organisation. The research module enables you to develop your capability to plan, organise and carry out an extended independent study at masters level and also builds your skills in the written communication of research work.

M865 M876 M883 T882 T837 T851 TU811 M887 T825 M891

15 15 15 30 30 15 30 15 30 15

49 49

51

Planning your studies


You have the choice of a research route or a professional route through this qualification. If you are interested in a more business-oriented qualification, you can take The MSc professional project (T847) and complete your qualification with a module from a short list of relevant options. If you prefer a rigorous research route, the production of a dissertation will develop your academic research skills, and can provide an excellent basis for future doctoral studies that may enhance your career further. Both routes help you to develop essential skills for systematically and successfully addressing technology management issues in your own organisation and in a wider context. You need to complete the MSc in Technology Management (F36) within eight years of starting your first course. For this 180-credit masters degree you require: 120 credits from the following qualification: Title Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management Code E08 Credits Page 120 45

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management (E08)


This postgraduate diploma represents the second qualification level in the technology management programme. The diploma builds on the operational focus of the postgraduate certificate by providing you with concepts and tools to support the effective strategic management of technology. The compulsory module in the diploma links the fields of strategic management and technology strategy. There is also the opportunity to extend your technology management studies by choosing optional modules relevant to your particular interests. The qualification provides an analytical view of strategic issues in technology management, equipping students for senior technology management roles. If you havent already studied Technology management: an integrative approach (T840) then you are strongly advised to begin with this module. The second compulsory module is Technology strategy (T846) which introduces a range of perspectives on the strategy formation process. For this 120-credit postgraduate diploma you require: 60 credits from the following compulsory modules: Title Technology management: an integrative approach Technology strategy Code T840 T846 Credits Page 30 30 50 50

And an additional 60 credits which can be gained by one of two routes: Either the research route: 60 credits from the following compulsory module: MSc research course Or the professional route: 30 credits from the following compulsory module: The MSc professional project T847 30 30 30 30 30 51 48 49 49 49 And 30 credits from the following optional modules: Business operations: delivering value T883 Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches Supply chain innovation, strategy and management Systems engineering T889 T882 T837 T802 60 51

And 60 credits from the optional modules listed under the Postgraduate Certificate in Technology Management (C49).

If you have already counted one of these optional modules towards the Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management (E08), you may count 30 credits from another of the optional modules listed for Postgraduate Certificate in Technology Management (C49).

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

46

Postgraduate study

Pathway to the Postgraduate Certificate (C72), Diploma (E28) and MSc in Systems Thinking in Practice (F47)
Entry
Bachelors degree or equivalent experience Postgraduate Certificate in Systems Thinking in Practice (C72) Postgraduate Diploma in Systems Thinking in Practice (E28)

Postgraduate Certificate in Systems Thinking in Practice (C72)


Taking this qualification will help you to develop your understanding of the nature of complex problem situations and the tools with which they can be tackled. It seeks to change the way in which you think about the situations you face by using insights from cognitive science and established systems tools. You will learn to think more holistically, understanding the roles other people play, taking account of the interconnectedness of the problem and working more collaboratively. You will approach systems thinking in practice from different perspectives by examining key systems thinkers and relating their ideas to your own practice. For this 60-credit postgraduate certificate you require: 30 credits from the following compulsory module: Title Code TU811 Credits Page 30 51 Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change Business operations: delivering value Capacities for managing development Continuing professional development in practice Creativity, innovation and change Development: context and practice Enterprise and the environment Environmental decision making: a systems approach Environmental responsibility: ethics, policy and action Financial strategy Forensic engineering Information systems legacy and evolution Institutional development: conflicts, values and meanings Integrated safety, health and environmental management Learning from IS failures Managing knowledge Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction Marketing in a complex world Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches

MSc in Systems Thinking in Practice (F47)


= Intermediate qualification = Qualification

And 30 credits from the following optional modules: T883 TU870 U810 B822 or BZX822 TU871 T862 T863 TD866 B821 or BZX821 T839 T853 TU872 T835 T852 B823 or BZX823 TU812 B825 or BZX825 T889 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 30 30 15 30 30 30 30 48

48

48

49

Postgraduate study

47

Title Supply chain innovation, strategy and management Systems engineering Technology management: an integrative approach Technology strategy The information systems toolkit War, intervention and development

Code T882 T837 T840 T846 T851 TU875

Credits Page 30 30 30 30 15 30 49 49 50 50

MSc in Systems Thinking in Practice (F47)


The MSc course builds on your diploma studies and provides you with the opportunity to carry out an investigation into an aspect of systems thinking that is of personal or professional interest to you. In carrying out this in-depth investigation you will extend your knowledge of recent research in your chosen area and become competent in relevant research methods. It will also develop your capability to plan, organise and carry out an extended independent study at masters level and also build your skills in the written communication of research work. For this 180-credit masters degree, you require: 120 credits from the following qualification: Title Postgraduate Diploma in Systems Thinking in Practice The MSc professional project Code E28 Credits Page 120 47

Please see www.open.ac.uk/study for description.

If you have studied with us before, you can see which discontinued modules count towards this qualification on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study.

Postgraduate Diploma in Systems Thinking in Practice (E28)


This qualification will enable you to broaden your programme of study to take in concepts from the domain of management and your own discipline area to integrate them into your newly developed patterns of systems thinking and practice. For this 120-credit postgraduate diploma, you require: 60 credits from the following compulsory modules: Title Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction Code TU811 TU812 Credits Page 30 30 51 48

And 30 credits from the following compulsory module: T847 30 51 And 30 credits from the optional modules listed for the Postgraduate Certificate in Systems Thinking in Practice (C72).

And 60 credits from the optional modules listed for the Postgraduate Certificate in Systems Thinking in Practice (C72).

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

48

Postgraduate study

Postgraduate courses
Assessment key CMA EMA TMA Computer-marked assignment End-of-module assessment Tutor-marked assignment

Forensic engineering (T839)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 05 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

An introduction to finite element analysis (T884)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 2 TMAs, 4 CMAs, 1 EMA 05 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

Engineering is at the heart of modern life and engineers now use computers and software in the design and manufacture of most of the products, processes and systems that make up our lifestyles. This course will introduce some of the computational modelling and analysis techniques now used and instil the need for comprehensive evaluation and checking when interpreting results. It covers basic theory, modelling, meshing and analysing component models for stresses, deflections, temperatures and vibrations under operating conditions and loads, treatment of boundary conditions and restraints, with examples of good practice for safe and effective application in use.

Why do products fail? Inadequate materials, poor manufacturing or assembly methods, bad design failure can arise at any stage, giving designers clues as to what failed, why, and how to avoid future failures. Using real case studies, this course examines the principles of good product design and assesses the significance of poor design on the development process. You will work with techniques for analysing product failure, including scientific and engineering tests and observation. You will investigate real catastrophic failures the Challenger space shuttle, the Hindenburg and the Tay Bridge and consider the role of design, manufacturing, materials and communications in these fatal disasters.

Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

Business operations: delivering value (T883)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 01 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

The core of any enterprise is the set of processes that must take place to deliver goods and services that provide value to customers and other stakeholders. To effectively design and manage business operations requires an appreciation of their strategic importance, an understanding of the human and technical factors that impact on their effectiveness, and mastery of appropriate analytical techniques. In this course, concepts and principles are taught using case studies spanning all sectors of the economy: public or private, large or small, manufacturing or service based, and youll have opportunities to apply your learning to your own context. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

This course views change as inescapable in everyday managing in situations ranging from personal to workplace to society in general. Rather than passively accepting change this course will equip you with skills to shape the nature and direction of change. It will develop your abilities to manage change with others so as to avoid systemic failures and improve joined-up actions amongst stakeholders along supply chains, in projects or, even, social activism. It is about learning to use systems thinking and practice to help you engage with change and act accordingly to recognise the interconnected nature of organisations and environments. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Postgraduate study

49

Manufacture materials design (T881)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 05 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

Supply chain innovation, strategy and management (T882)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

Manufacturing processes, selection of materials and design of components are three facets of the same task: making something that serves its purpose efficiently. Unlike many other manufacturing courses, this one emphasises the interaction of the three facets rather than teaching them independently. The course begins by establishing common elements of the three areas. Youll then look at the main routes to manufacture of components: cutting, casting, forming and joining. Finally youll examine case studies from each area. Study materials include study texts and a databank of manufacturing processes with criteria for deciding on process, material and design.

Problem solving and improvement:


quality and other approaches (T889)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 01 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

Supply chains, coordinated on a global scale for producing and marketing goods and services, present a fascinating and important area for study. They are re-shaping contemporary business, technological and socio-economic development. They impact on everyones lives, in both industrialised and developing countries. Supply chains are central to environmental change and to sustainable business practice. Learning how to manage them and their impacts presents fundamental organisational challenges. You will explore these complex issues through an interdisciplinary approach, using varied conceptual and analytical frameworks. The course is highly interactive, using an innovative, multimedia learning environment. An investigative project replaces a written exam. This course is expected to start for the last time in May 2012.

Systems engineering (T837)

Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

Problem solving is a necessary activity for all organisations. However, it is frequently ineffective: chronic problems that were supposedly solved re-emerge, and opportunities remain unrealised. Although many organisations have had early successes with mechanisms for problem solving and improvement, these have often foundered over time. This course provides a wide range of problemsolving approaches, methods and techniques and their underpinning concepts, principles and theoretical backgrounds that will enable you to investigate problems properly; and generate robust, effective solutions that are sustainable. It also explores in depth the nature of problems and solutions, and the management of problem solving and improvement. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Complex systems have many components hardware, software, people, machinery, buildings, all of which interact and many stakeholders with requirements to be met. The essence of systems engineering is that it combines technical, interpersonal and managerial knowledge and skills. By studying this course, practitioners and anyone responsible for or working in the systems engineering environment will gain an understanding of the principles, tools and techniques of a multi-functional approach to increasingly complex systems planning. You will explore the processes of design, development, implementation and management of multi-functional team-based projects. Case studies will provide you with a practical context. This course is expected to start for the last time in November 2011.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

50

Postgraduate study

Technology management: an integrative approach (T840)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at Postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

Technology strategy (T846)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 examination 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 01 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

This course will benefit anyone managing technological change and innovation in either the private, public or thirdsectors. Whether youre a manager, engineer, technologist or scientist, this course will help you build an integrated view of the technological challenges for product and process technologies in the current global economy especially the strategic necessity for faster product life-cycles, continuous improvement and radical innovation. On completing the course you will have gained the skills necessary for critically assessing both established or emerging approaches to technological innovation and developing your own approaches to managing technology at the project and programme level. This course is expected to start for the last time in November 2011. A replacement course is planned. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

This course is for anyone interested in technology strategy in public, private or third-sector organisations. Its relevant to people who have to work within strategic frameworks set by their organisations as well as to those with direct responsibility for developing strategy. The course recognises the unique challenges of technology, resulting in both the planned and emergent formation of technology strategy. To capture this uniqueness the course takes an overview of theoretical perspectives on strategic management, places these in a technological context, and then relates these to a range of practical techniques and approaches relevant to strategy making. This course is expected to start for the last time in May 2012. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Postgraduate study

51

Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 May 2012 register by 31 Mar 2012 6 months

MSc research course (T802)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 60 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Feb 2012 register by 14 Dec 2011 12 months

This course is about managing complex situations. Managing is ultimately about taking action on the basis of your particular understanding of a complex interconnected situation, where others involved may have different understanding, motivation and interests. You will develop your understanding of complex situations using robust tools from the traditions of systems practice to think strategically about change and uncertainty. The situations that you choose to work with in the course to develop your practice with systems tools can either derive from your existing, or aspiring, professional capacity or simply be of general interest to you. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

This research course enables you to gain an MSc by building on the postgraduate diploma (or equivalent) that you already hold. Youll start by developing a detailed research proposal based on a subject area appropriate to your previous study and the MSc you are studying towards. Once your proposal has been approved, youll continue with the research itself, finally writing up and submitting your dissertation. Support is available to you at every stage, via online forums and telephone. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

New The MSc professional project (T847)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 3 TMAs, 1 EMA 01 Nov 2011 register by 30 Sep 2011 6 months

Team engineering (T885)


Credits: Assessment: Start: Length: 30 at postgraduate level (SCQF level 11) 4 TMAs, 1 EMA 16 Sep 2011 register by 19 Aug 2011 27 Jan 2012 register by 14 Dec 2011 9 months

Team engineering aims to develop the essential professional engineering skill of working with others. Youll work as part of a small project team, formed at the first weekend residential school. Projects will encompass a broad sweep of engineering, requiring cooperative development of the knowledge and skills needed to analyse an engineering system and produce a revised specification for that system. Youll work together in a team via email, telephone and FlashMeeting, under guidance from your tutor. Your teams results will be presented and assessed at the second residential weekend school and through submission of a written report.

This highly intensive research-based course, spanning a period of six months, asks you to design, conduct, analyse and report on a research project. You will act as an informed investigator, conducting research in a context that is already familiar to you (probably your employer organisation). You will, however, be expected to apply relevant conceptual, theoretical and methodological material, and design, conduct, and analyse your research in a rigorous fashion and to an appropriate academic standard. While challenging, this course represents a valuable opportunity to engage in and learn from a research scenario of your choosing. This course is also available for study for students resident outside of the European Union, see course description at www.open.ac.uk/study for details.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

52

Becoming an Open University student

Becoming an Open University student

Studying with
The Open University

Ways to register
Online at www.open.ac.uk/study. Call us: In England, Scotland, Wales, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, BFPO addresses outside the UK and all other countries, except the EU, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland: +44 (0)845 300 60 90. In Northern Ireland: 028 9032 3722. In the Republic of Ireland: (01)6785399 or +44 28 9032 3722. In other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland: +44 191 477 6100. To sponsor a group of students, email corporate-enquiries@open.ac.uk or call +44 (0)845 366 6053. For help or advice before registering contact our Student Registration & Enquiry Service (see back cover) or your OU country representative (page 56).

Computers and elearning


With the exception of some Openings courses, youll need a computer and regular and reliable access to the internet, in order to study with us. We will use email to send you important information about your studies. If you dont have an email account we can provide one for you.

Credit for previous study


If youve successfully completed some higher education study elsewhere, we may be able to give you credit for it. You may then need fewer OU courses to achieve your chosen qualification. For more information see page 9 or click www.open.ac.uk/credit-transfer.

How much will it cost?


Course fees depend on what you study and where you live please see the separate Course Fees 2011/2012 leaflet, click www.open.ac.uk/study or, for information about studying outside the UK, see page 55.

UK fees apply if you meet the criteria set out below:


UK national
You are entitled to pay the UK course fee if you are settled1 (see footnotes opposite) in the UK (excluding Channel Islands and Isle of Man) on the first day of your course and you have been ordinarily resident in the UK for the three years prior to the course start date. For those temporarily resident outside the UK, including those eligible to use BFPO addresses, please refer to the Your questions section on www.open.ac.uk/study or contact us on +44 (0)845 300 60 90 for more information. If you are ordinarily resident in the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man then you are not eligible to pay UK course fees.

When to apply
Register for your course as early as you can particularly if you are applying for financial support or wish to make a claim for credit transfer. Registration close dates are on our website at www.open.ac.uk/study, or you can call us for information on +44 (0)845 300 60 90.

Entry and study requirements


There are no formal academic requirements for most of our undergraduate courses, but in order to study at postgraduate level youll usually need an undergraduate degree or equivalent to gain entry. However, even where there are no entry requirements, its a good idea to prepare yourself for study at the appropriate level. The course descriptions at www.open.ac.uk/study will tell you more about our study requirements. If youre studying full time at another institution, you must get written permission from its principal to study with us. You will not be allowed to study more than 120 credits at any one time (including examination resits, deferrals and resubmissions), unless youre attending up to two additional and related stand-alone residential school courses; or if course presentations overlap by no more than one month; or both.

European Economic Area (EEA), Agreed Overseas Territory or Swiss nationals


You are entitled to pay the UK course fee if you are ordinarily resident in the UK; and will be resident in the UK on the first day of your course and have been ordinarily resident in the EEA2, Switzerland or an Agreed Overseas Territory2 for at least the three years prior to the start date of your course; and you are a national of one of these countries.

Dependants and family members of nationals from one of the territories mentioned above
If you are ordinarily resident in the UK, will be resident in the UK on the first day of your course and have been resident in the EEA2 for the three years prior to the start date of your course and are a dependant of a national from one of the above territories, you may be eligible to pay UK course fees. Please refer to the Your questions section on www.open.ac.uk/study or contact us on +44 (0)845 300 60 90 for more information.

Becoming an Open University student

53

Nationals of areas not mentioned above


If you are not a national of any of the above mentioned territories, including if you are a refugee or asylum seeker, and will be resident in the UK on the first day of your course, please contact us on +44 (0)845 300 60 90 for advice on your eligibility to pay UK course fees. Normally and lawfully resided in the UK from choice without any immigration restriction on the length of your stay in the UK.
1 2

Pay by instalments OUSBA pays your full fee at registration and you repay the loan in monthly instalments over the length of your course, starting a month after your course begins. Currently, interest is charged at 5.0 per cent (APR 5.1 per cent). Find out more at www.open.ac.uk/ousba or by calling +44 (0)8457 697937.

For a list of EEA countries and Agreed Overseas Territories, please refer to the Conditions of Registration on our website at www.open.ac.uk/our-student-policies. You may be required to send in relevant documentation to support your application to pay UK course fees for any of the above scenarios. If you are not sure if you are eligible to pay UK fees, contact our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on +44 (0)845 300 60 90.

OU gift vouchers
OU vouchers make an inspiring present, ideal if youre looking for an unusual gift for someone special. Or ask family and friends to support your own study by buying vouchers for special occasions. To buy or redeem vouchers, click www.open.ac.uk/gift-vouchers.

Tesco Clubcard reward tokens


You can convert your Clubcard vouchers into reward tokens to pay towards undergraduate courses at Level 1. To find out more about the terms and conditions of this scheme running in the UK and the Republic of Ireland click www.openuniversity.co.uk/clubcarddeals.

You may also need to budget for:


travel to tutorials and residential schools we can sometimes offer a choice of sites but you may need to travel some distance. set texts for most courses, the main teaching texts are included in the fee. Sometimes, those texts are supported by books that you have to buy yourself or borrow from a local library. computer access you need regular and reliable access to the internet and a computer (with the exception of some Openings courses). equipment for some courses you may need use of a television; DVD or audio-CD player; or a scientific calculator.

Sponsorship
If youre studying for vocational reasons your employer may be willing to pay part or all of your fees. Call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on +44 (0)845 300 60 90 for further information and advice.

Financial support
Financial support for students studying undergraduate courses
The OU and the national governments of the UK fund a range of financial support services to help you with the costs of studying. The type and level of support available depends on your household income, whether you receive certain state benefits and where you live (see below). Find out more at www.open.ac.uk/financialsupport where you can use our eligibility checker to find out what support you could be entitled to.

How to pay
Depending on your income you may qualify for some financial support in fact, many of our undergraduate students are able to study for free (see Financial support for students studying undergraduate courses opposite). If you are paying some or all of the cost yourself, you can pay in full when you register, by credit or debit card or by cheque in EU currencies, Swiss francs or US dollars. Its easiest to register online at www.open.ac.uk/study with a credit or debit card. We don't accept Maestro International, Amex or Diners cards. If youve studied with us before we also accept payment by bank transfer.

If you live in England, Wales or Northern Ireland


Depending on your income and your course of study, youll
be eligible to apply for:
Fee grant and course grant if you are on certain benefits or
have a household income below 30,0001 (plus allowances,
where applicable) you can apply for support towards your
course fees and study costs.
Allowances are given for a partner and dependent children.
These are 2000 for a partner, 2000 for your first child and
1000 for each further child.
For example, if you have a partner and two children who are
financially dependent on you, you could have a household
income of up to 35,0001 and be entitled to receive some
financial support.
Continued on page 54.

Open University Student Budget Account (OUSBA)


UK, EEA and Switzerland students can also defer or spread the cost with a loan from Open University Student Budget Accounts Ltd (OUSBA): Register now, pay later OUSBA pays your full fee direct to us. You repay OUSBA interest-free and in full just before your course starts.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

54

Becoming an Open University student

Continued from page 53.

If you live with your parents, their income will not be included in any assessment of your household income. You will need to be studying between 30 and 120 credits worth of courses to qualify (usually with a minimum of 30 credits for any one course). Access to Learning Fund students with a household income below 28,0651 (plus allowances, where applicable) can apply for assistance from the Access to Learning Fund. This fund is provided to assist students who are facing higher than expected costs as a result of their study. It cannot be used to pay for course fees, but will support course-related costs such as travel, childcare, computer purchase and internet access. Funding may be limited and is allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.
1

ILA Scotland 200 learner account ILA Scotland is a Scottish Government scheme for anyone aged 16 or over living in Scotland studying at undergraduate level. If your personal income is 22,000 or less a year, or youre on certain benefits, you can claim up to 200 a year towards a wide range of courses, where the amount of study is less than 40 credits. You will need to have successfully opened an ILA Scotland learner account before you register with us and should allow a minimum of 21 days for your account to be set up before the final registration date of your course. For the most up-to-date information, click www.ilascotland.org.uk. Part-time fee grant (formerly known as ILA Scotland 500 learner account) if your personal income is 22,000 or less a year, or youre on certain benefits, you can claim up to 500 a year towards the course fee if you are studying at least 40 credits a year. You will need to have successfully completed the application process for a part-time fee grant before you register with us and should allow a minimum of 21 days before the final registration date of your course. For the most up-to-date information, visit the Student Awards Agency for Scotland website at www.saas.gov.uk. We recommend that you check whether you are eligible for a fee waiver before applying for a part-time fee grant or ILA Scotland learner account. To find the most up-to-date information on the financial support available to students in Scotland visit our website at www.open.ac.uk/financialsupport, email scotland@open.ac.uk or call 0845 300 60 90.

Based on 2010/11 figures. To find the most up-to-date information on the financial support available to students in England, Wales or Northern Ireland visit our website at www.open.ac.uk/financialsupport, email general-enquiries@open.ac.uk or call 0845 300 60 90.

If you live in Scotland


Depending on your income and your course of study, youll be eligible to apply for: Part-time fee waiver if you are studying an OU undergraduate course and are on certain benefits or have a household income of under 16,510 (or more if you have dependants) you could qualify for a course fee waiver, which will cover the total cost of your course fees, so you pay nothing. Allowances are given for a partner and dependent children. These are 2000 for a partner, 2000 for your first child and 1000 for each further child. For example, if you have a partner and two children who are financially dependent on you, you could have a household income of up to 21,510 and the fee waiver scheme will pay your fees. If you are under 25 and not married/in a partnership or with dependent children, we may take your parents income into account if you have not been self-supporting for three years or on benefits in your own right. Students who qualify for the part-time fee waiver, and who are studying a 30- or 60-credit course at Level 1, may also be entitled to a computer provided under our computer provision scheme.

Financial support for students studying postgraduate courses


If you are studying towards a taught masters or doctorate you wont be eligible for financial support towards your course fees or towards most study costs. However, if you are resident in Scotland, we recommend you check with the Student Awards Agency for Scotland whether courses at SCQF level 11 will be eligible for a part-time fee grant (formerly ILA Scotland 500 learner account) for the 2011/12 academic year. For the most up-to-date information, click www.saas.gov.uk.

Other help
If you are an OU graduate, support may be available from the Crowther Fund. In addition, if you have particular financial difficulties, you may be eligible for some course expenses. The Crowther Fund (OU graduates only) The Crowther Fund is intended to help OU graduates build upon their OU degrees, either by formal study or research or by generally broadening their experience through a period of voluntary work. The fund doesnt take account of financial circumstances. The application closing date is 28 February each year. For further information, please email ou-crowther-fund@open.ac.uk.

Becoming an Open University student

55

If you have a disability or additional requirements


When you register for a course, well ask you whether you have a disability, health condition, mental-health disability or specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) that might affect your studies or examinations. If you do, well direct you to more detailed information about the services we offer. For information and advice about all services for students with disabilities, click www.open.ac.uk/disability.

Aland Islands1 Andorra Austria Belgium Bulgaria Channel Islands Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany
1

Gibraltar Greece Hungary Iceland Isle of Man Italy Latvia Liechtenstein1 Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Monaco
1

Norway Poland Portugal Republic of Ireland Romania San Marino1 Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Vatican City State1.

Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) UK students only


Disabled Students Allowances help with study costs that result directly from your disability or specific learning difficulty. Allowances are not means-tested and may go towards specialist equipment (such as an adapted computer), non-medical study support (for example, a sign-language interpreter; a note-taker or a dyslexia support worker) or other related expenses. You can also apply for help with study-related travel costs that directly result from your disability. Eligibility and allowances depend on where you live and what youre studying. In England, Wales or Northern Ireland you may be eligible for a DSA if youre studying at least 30 credits towards an OU undergraduate or postgraduate qualification that lasts for more than one year. In Scotland you must be studying at least 60 credits towards an OU undergraduate or postgraduate qualification that lasts for more than one year. If you are eligible for a Disabled Students Allowance the University will only provide study support that cannot be provided by the allowance. If you live in England, Wales or Northern Ireland: call our DSA Office on 01908 654136 (voice telephone) 01908 659955 (textphone) or email dsa-queries@open.ac.uk. If you live in Scotland: call our Disability and Additional Requirements Team on 0131 226 3851 or email scotland@open.ac.uk.
1

Netherlands

Examination centres not available in these locations.

For more information please contact either your OU country representative (see page 56) or the applicable OU office (see back cover).

Fees
If youre not eligible to pay a UK course fee (see page 52), your fee will be higher than the UK fee. Higher fees are charged if you are a resident of one of the countries/ territories listed above or are a resident of a country anywhere else in the world where OU courses are offered. Fees are higher outside the UK because the University needs to cover the extra costs of operating and supplying services outside the UK. These costs include running offices in Dublin and Brussels and the additional costs of operating in more than one country in respect of all aspects of the University's services to students, including the provision of examinations, additional residential and day schools, retaining students, and additional financial charges. Additional costs are allocated across all students in a given territory, and are not calculated on a course-by-course basis. To work out how much your course will cost, see www.open.ac.uk/study or refer to the separate Course Fees 2011/2012 leaflet.

Tuition outside the UK


Tutorial support will usually be provided by online forums or email. There may be an opportunity for a face-to-face tutorial meeting depending on the number of students in your area, and you may also be able to organise your own informal student support group. Once we know how many students are registered on your course we can confirm tutorial arrangements.

Studying outside the UK


Residence
Most courses are open only to residents of the countries/ territories listed above right. Some courses, however, are available for world-wide study. Where this is the case, it is indicated in the course descriptions in this prospectus.

Examinations
Not all courses have an examination, but for most of those that do theres at least one examination centre in the countries listed above. An overseas examination fee is charged if you do not take your examination at the centre allocated to you. Continued on page 56.

Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

56

Becoming an Open University student

Continued from page 55. The overseas examination fee is charged if you: sit your examination at an additional centre closer to your home sit your examination in a country other than those listed on page 55, regardless of the course fee paid have paid UK fees but want to sit your examination at a centre in one of the countries listed on page 55 have paid UK fees but have a home address in Continental Europe. The overseas examination fee will be 204 for examinations held before 31 July 2011. From 1 August 2011, this fee will be 210. For further information and advice, contact The Open University in Europe (see back cover).

What else you should know


Equality and diversity
We are committed to fulfilling our vision of a fair and just society. We are creating an inclusive university community and a society where people are treated with dignity and respect, where inequalities are challenged and where we anticipate and respond positively to different needs and circumstances so that everyone is able to achieve their potential. The Open Universitys equality scheme sets out our policy and commitment and is available from Our policies on our website at www.open.ac.uk/our-student-policies.

Course software
Some course software for use with Microsoft Windows is tested only on UK English versions.

Open University Students Association (OUSA)


You automatically become a member unless you choose to opt out for more information, click www.ousa.org.uk.

OU representatives outside the UK


OU country representatives can give you more information and advice, and coordinate arrangements for tutorials and examinations. Republic of Ireland Enquiry and Advice Centre (01)6785399 ireland@open.ac.uk Austria 01 533 2390 austria@open.ac.uk Belgium 02 644 3372 belgium@open.ac.uk France 02 32 56 65 07 france@open.ac.uk Germany (North) 040 42883 2478 germany-north@open.ac.uk Germany (Central) 0221 1626 235 germany-central@open.ac.uk Germany (South) 089 4583 5354 germany-south@open.ac.uk Greece 22970 26069 greece@open.ac.uk Italy 02 813 8048 italy@open.ac.uk Luxembourg 44 40 91 801 luxembourg@open.ac.uk Netherlands 070 360 7443 netherlands@open.ac.uk Spain (91)577 7701 spain@open.ac.uk Switzerland 022 361 5774 switzerland@open.ac.uk

Students under the age of 16


Very exceptionally, the University will consider applications from particularly gifted students who are under the age of 16. Applicants will be invited for an informal interview with their parent/guardian at their nearest regional or national centre. Acceptance will be at the discretion of the University.

Our statements of service


These cover careers advice, complaints, queries and appeals against our decisions, support for disabled students, general student support and guidance, and equal opportunities. You can find out more at www.open.ac.uk/our-student-policies.

Data protection
We record your personal information when you contact us and use this to manage registration, study, examination and other student services. When you register, well tell you more about how we process and use your personal information.

Recording phone calls


We may record our phone calls with you to make sure that weve carried out your instructions correctly and to help us improve our services through staff training.

Freedom of information
Information about the University can be found in our publication scheme, click www.open.ac.uk/foi. You have a general right to information we hold that is not in our publication scheme.

Enquiries from students in other countries


If you live in an EU country not listed above, please contact The Open University in Europe (see back cover). Wherever you are in the world, you may be able to study some of our qualifications and courses directly with the OU or through one of our educational partners or by buying our course materials from a local distributor. Click www.open.ac.uk/worldwide to find out what is available in your area.

Events near you


Come and meet us at one of our events in the UK and Europe. We host a number of events giving you the opportunity to meet with OU staff and discuss what its like to study with us, and to find out what courses we have to suit your needs. For details of events near you, click www.open.ac.uk/events.

Ordering other prospectuses

57

Ordering other prospectuses

This prospectus is one of a series describing our programmes of study.


If you would like to find out more about our other qualifications and courses,
and youre living in the UK or any of the countries listed on page 55, please
order one of our prospectuses listed below:

Undergraduate Prospectus
An introduction to studying with The Open University This prospectus is a brief overview of the subjects we offer, providing answers to your questions about studying with the OU, and explaining how you can work towards a qualification. However, if you already know which subjects interest you, choose from our range of subjectspecific prospectuses instead.

Subject-specific prospectuses
Arts and Humanities Prospectus Childhood and Youth Prospectus Computing and ICT Prospectus Education Prospectus Environment, Development and International Studies Prospectus Health and Social Care Prospectus
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Languages Prospectus Law Prospectus Mathematics and Statistics Prospectus Psychology Prospectus Science Prospectus Social Sciences Prospectus The Open University Business School Prospectus

Openings Prospectus
Introductory courses to build your confidence Our Openings programme offers a choice of short, introductory courses covering a wide range of interesting and relevant topics. The courses are ideal if you dont have any experience of higher education or you haven't studied for some time.
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Initial teacher education


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Professional Graduate Certificate in Education Prospectus

Short Course Prospectus


In this prospectus youll discover our range of Short courses in arts, business, digital technology, science and social sciences. Theyre fascinating to study in their own right, and can also count towards most of our undergraduate degrees.
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Postgraduate Prospectus
To find out more about our postgraduate qualifications and courses in your choice of subject, choose from our range of subject-specific prospectuses listed above. Alternatively, log on to our postgraduate prospectus online at www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate.

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Research Degrees Prospectus


Our Research Degrees Prospectus (PhDs, etc.) is wholly online at www.open.ac.uk/research-prospectus.

To download or order a printed prospectus

www.open.ac.uk/prospectus +44 (0)845 300 60 90 email general-enquiries@open.ac.uk


Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call +44 (0)845 300 60 90

Student Registration & Enquiry Service The Open University PO Box 197 Milton Keynes MK7 6BJ United Kingdom

Contact points for advice and registration

In England, Scotland, Wales, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, BFPO addresses outside the UK and all other countries, except the EU, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland
For further information or to register for a course: Click www.open.ac.uk/study or Call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on

In other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland


For further information: Click www.open.ac.uk/europe Email europe@open.ac.uk For advice before you study contact your country representative (see page 56) or The Open University in Europe on

+44 191 477 6100


To register for a course, call The Open University in Europe on

+44 (0)845 300 60 90


Lines are open (UK time): Monday to Friday 08:00 to 20:00 Saturday 09:00 to 17:00 Calls are charged at the UK local rate when calling from a UK landline. Email general-enquiries@open.ac.uk

+44 191 477 6100

For Welsh speakers


If you would prefer to discuss your study needs in Welsh, please contact: The Open University in Wales, 18 Custom House Street, Cardiff, CF10 1AP Phone 029

In Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland


For further information or to register for a course: Click www.open.ac.uk/study or In Northern Ireland Call our office in Belfast (110 Victoria Street, Belfast BT1 3GN) on

2047 1170

Email wales@open.ac.uk

I siaradwyr Cymraeg
Os ydych yn siarad Cymraeg a byddain well gennych drafod eich anghenion astudio drwy gyfrwng y Gymraeg, cysylltwch : Y Brifysgol Agored yng Nghymru, 18 Heol y Tollty, Caerdydd, CF10 1AP Ffn 029

028 9032 3722


In the Republic of Ireland Call our Enquiry and Advice Centre in Dublin on

2047 1170

Ebost wales@open.ac.uk

(01)6785399 or our office in Belfast on +44 28 9032 3722


Email ireland@open.ac.uk

The Open University is incorporated by Royal Charter (RC 000391), an exempt charity in England and Wales and a charity registered in Scotland (SC 038302). While we have done everything possible to make sure the information in this publication is accurate, it may change due to regulations or policy, or because of financial or other reasons. Designed by DigforFire DMG. Printed by Sterling, an ISO 14001 printer, using vegetable based inks on FSC certified paper, www.sterlingsolutions.co.uk. Copyright 2011 The Open University. SUP 025937

Engineering and Technology Prospectus 2011/2012

Important information Fee changes in England from 1 September 2012


As you may know, the Government is introducing changes to the way higher education in England is funded. In future, grants will no longer be paid directly to universities; instead there will be increased support for students to help them pay for the costs of their tuition. Starting your OU studies after 1 September 2012? If you live in England and are thinking of taking your first Open University undergraduate module on, or after 1 September 2012, your fees will be changing. For further details, click www.open.ac.uk/fees2012. Already an OU student or starting your OU studies before 31 August 2012? For current undergraduate students, including those who register for modules starting before 31 August 2012, we are committed to helping you complete your studies at a cost and pace consistent with your initial expectations. For further details, click www.open.ac.uk/fees2012. Living in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland or outside of the UK? These changes will only affect new and current undergraduate students in England. The University has not yet announced its fees from 1 September 2012 in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and outside the UK. For updates and further information regarding arrangements for fees outside England, click www.open.ac.uk/fees2012.

Engineering and Technology Course Fees 2011/2012

INSPIRING LEARNING

Course Fees 2011/2012


The fees for all the courses described in the Engineering and Technology Prospectus are supplied in this leaflet. For advice choosing the right course and qualification for you, click www.open.ac.uk/study or call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on +44 (0)845 300 60 90 (Monday to Friday 08:00 to 20:00 and Saturday 09:00 to 17:00 UK time) or email general-enquiries@open.ac.uk. Were here to help. All prices shown are in UK pounds sterling.

Title An introduction to finite element analysis (T884) Business operations: delivering value (T883) Career development and employability (T122) Change, strategy and projects at work (T227) Communication and information technologies (T215) Computers and processors (T224) Design and designing (T211) Design and the Web (T183) Design thinking: creativity for the 21st century (U101) Designing applications with Visual Basic (MT264) Digital audio (T150) Digital film school (T156) Digital photography: creating and sharing better images (T189) Digital worlds: designing games, creating alternative realities (T151)

Start dates

UK ()

ROI () 1695

Other () 1800

05 May 2012 1310

01 Nov 2011 1310 01 May 2012 1310

1695 1695

1800 1800

05 Nov 2011 05 May 2012

400 400

785 785

890 890

How to pay
We have several ways to help you pay fees please see page 53 of the Engineering and Technology Prospectus. Depending on your circumstances, you may be able to take advantage of our financial support services and apply for a grant for your course fees and for help with study costs please see page 53 for full details.

05 Nov 2011 05 May 2012 28 Jan 2012

400 400 770

785 785 1390

890 890 1540

Studying outside the UK


If youre not eligible to pay a UK course fee (please see page 52 of the Engineering and Technology Prospectus), your fee will be higher. We accept payment in the currencies of all European Union countries, in Swiss francs and in US dollars. Its easiest to register online and pay with a credit or debit card. Well use the exchange rate which applies on the day we process your registration agreement, except for payments in euros, which are subject to a monthly exchange rate.

04 Feb 2012 04 Feb 2012 01 Oct 2011 01 May 2012 01 Oct 2011 04 Feb 2012

450 700 205 205 700 700

835 1320 395 395 1320 1320

940 1470 440 440 1470 1470

01 Oct 2011

450

835

940

Key
N/A Not Applicable Other includes all countries outside the UK and
ROI where we accept students, see page 55 for
more information
ROI Republic of Ireland

01 Oct 2011 01 May 2012 01 Oct 2011 01 May 2012 01 Oct 2011 01 May 2012

205 205 205 205 205 205

395 395 395 395 395 395

440 440 440 440 440 440

01 Oct 2011

205

395

440

Title Discovering mathematics (MU123) Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice (T320) Electromagnetism: experiments, applications and simulations (SMXR359) Energy for a sustainable future (T206) Engineering at work (T198) Engineering in action (TXR220) Engineering small worlds: micro and nano technologies (T356) Engineering the future (T173) Engineering: an active introduction (TXR120) Engineering: mechanics, materials, design (T207) Environment: journeys through a changing world (U116) Environmental monitoring, modelling and control (T308) Exploring mathematics (MS221)

Start dates 01 Oct 2011 04 Feb 2012 04 Feb 2012

UK () 400 400 450

ROI () 785 785 835

Other () 890 890 940

Title Innovation: designing for a sustainable future (T307) Introducing environment (Y181)

Start dates 04 Feb 2012

UK () 700

ROI () 1320

Other () 1470

12 May 2012

620

880

880 Keeping ahead in information and communication technologies (T324) Key skills for professional engineers (T397) Learning to change (Y165)

01 Jun 2011 01 Sep 2011 01 Nov 2011 01 Mar 2012 01 Jun 2012 04 Feb 2012

195 195 195 195 195 450

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 835

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 940

04 Feb 2012

700

1320

1470

01 Oct 2011

500

755

850

01 Nov 2011 21 Apr 2012 28 Jan 2012

400 620 400

785 880 785

890 880 890

01 Jun 2011

120 245 245 400 400 700

N/A 435 435 785 785 1320

N/A 480 480 890 890 1470

Linux: an 01 Oct 2011 introduction (T155) 01 May 2012 Make your experience count (U122) Managing complexity: a systems approach (T306) Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812) Manufacture materials design (T881) Mathematical methods and models (MST209) Mathematical modelling (MSXR209) Microsoft server technologies (TM128) MSc research course (T802) 01 Nov 2011 01 May 2012 04 Feb 2012

01 Oct 2011 04 Feb 2012 01 May 2012

400 400 620

785 785 880

890 890 880

28 Jan 2012

700

1320

1470

01 Nov 2011

1310

1695

1800

01 Oct 2011 04 Feb 2012

700 700

1320 1320

1470 1470

05 Nov 2011

1310

1695

1800

04 Feb 2012

700

1320

1470

28 Jan 2012

700

1320

1470

08 Oct 2011

400

785

890

28 May 2011 26 May 2012 01 Oct 2011

465 500 450

860 880 835

860 880 940

Forensic 05 Nov 2011 engineering (T839) Graphs, networks and design (MT365) 04 Feb 2012

1310 400

1695 785

1800 890

01 Feb 2012

1935

2555

2705

Title My digital life (TU100)

Start dates 01 Oct 2011 04 Feb 2012

UK () 770 770 500

ROI () 1390 1390 755

Other () 1540 1540 850

Title Technology management: an integrative approach (T840) Technology strategy (T846)

Start dates 01 Nov 2011

UK () 1310

ROI () 1695

Other () 1800

Personal 01 Oct 2011 and career development in engineering (T191) Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889) Return to science, engineering and technology (T161) Robotics & the meaning of life: a practical guide to things that think (T184) Starting with maths (Y162) Starting with maths (Y182) Structural integrity: designing against failure (T357) Supply chain innovation, strategy and management (T882) Sustainable Scotland (T123)

01 Nov 2011 1310 01 May 2012 1310 04 Feb 2012 735

1695 1695 1120

1800 1800 1225

01 Nov 2011 1310 01 May 2012 1310

1695 1695

1800 1800

The computing and IT project (TM470) The engineering project (T450)

28 Jan 2012 01 Nov 2011

735 1485

1120 1870

1225 1975

01 Oct 2011

205

395

440

The MSc professional project (T847) The quantum world (SM358)

01 Oct 2011

205

395

440

04 Feb 2012

400 205 205 700

785 395 395 1320 1695

890 440 440 1470 1800

The story of maths 01 Oct 2011 (TM190) 01 May 2012 01 Jun 2011 01 Sep 2011 01 Nov 2011 01 Mar 2012 01 Jun 2012 04 Feb 2012 120 130 130 195 195 400 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 785 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 890 The technology of music (TA212) Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811) Towards chartership: professional development for engineers (T398) Understanding management (Y159) Understanding management (Y179) Understanding systems: making sense of complexity (T214) Using mathematics (MST121) 04 Feb 2012

01 May 2012 1310

01 Oct 2011

735

990

1085

01 May 2012 1310

1695

1800

01 Oct 2011 01 Feb 2012

200 200 1310 2085 2085 450

455 455 1695 2470 2470 835

550 550 1800 2575 2575 940

01 Jun 2011 01 Sep 2011 01 Nov 2011 01 Mar 2012 01 Jun 2012 11 Feb 2012

120 130 130 195 195 700

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 1320

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 1470

Systems 01 Nov 2011 engineering (T837) Team engineering (T885) Technologies for digital media (T325) 16 Sep 2011 27 Jan 2012 04 Feb 2012

01 Oct 2011 28 Jan 2012

400 400

785 785

890 890

While we have done everything possible to make sure the information in this price list is accurate, it may change
due to regulations or policy or because of financial or other reasons.
Student Registration & Enquiry Service, The Open University, PO Box 197, Milton Keynes, MK7 6BJ.
www.open.ac.uk/study. SUP 025938