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This questionnaire is constructed as part of an academic research inquiry for the aim of reviewing and criticizing some Quantitative

Approaches of Architectural Aesthetic Assessment. This simple questionnaire aims for an impressionistic reliability test of Architectural Aesthetic Evaluation for the listed down buildings. It does not need any special prerequisites or backgrounds. A Likert test is offered to indicate the preference for these buildings. Participants of laymen (non-architects), architectural students, and architects are targeted for this preference and a reliability test to have their impressions of the selected case study. This questionnaire aims to check the approximate consensus of the evaluation of the buildings of the case study. The value you write for every building reflects your evaluation of these buildings. Additional illustration for the buildings is attached in a PDF file. (questionnaire. PDF) from the link http://www.2shared.com/file/2906823/1b3f429a/questionnaire.html Please just type the value you consider for every building listed below referenced to this simple Likert scale. List of Buildings MADRASA OF AL-SULTAN HASSAN ALEXANDRINA BIBLIOTHEQUE BLADES RESIDENCE BURJ AL-ARAB CARTIER FOUNDATION CHIKATSU ASUKA HISTORICAL MUSEUM COMMERZEBANK FACULTY OF ECONOMICS FACULTY OF JOURNALISM IN PAMPLONA HAGIA SOFIA HOLOCAUST HISTORY MUSEUM THE KINGDOM CENTER OUB CENTER PETRONAS TOWERS 1- v. UGLY 2- UGLY 3- Average 4- BEAUTIFUL 5- v. BEAUTIFUL http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/architecturegeneral/thread/44242e0e-8b64-4dae-945606fe8c31536a

The subject under discussion concerns the existence of an automatic aesthetic evaluation. When we encounter an object like an artwork or an architectural structure that activates an aesthetic response, does the associated evaluation appear in our mind as an automatic process? From the broad field of aesthetic appraisal, we will be considering a specific aspect that refers only to the positive and negative affects related to an individual's preference between two art styles (figurative vs. abstract) and two architectural styles (classic vs. contemporary). The hypothesis is that there is a preexistent preference within the visual arts and architecture that can clearly be identified using implicit measurements. Results from two experiments that were conducted with the use of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) showed that participants' reaction times were faster in associating positive words to figurative art and classical architecture (the so-called compatible task) than to abstract art and contemporary architecture (the socalled incompatible task). The results are in line with the hypothesis that aesthetic preferences can also be experienced automatically. Prototypicality (i.e., the degree to which an object is representative of a general class of object), familiarity and the relative simplicity of figurative art and classical architecture (compared to abstract art and modern architecture) can explain the shorter reaction time and as a consequence, an implicit aesthetic preference for these kinds of stimuli.

The automatic aesthetic evaluation of different art and architectural styles. Mastandrea, Stefano; Bartoli, Gabriella; Carrus, Giuseppe The subject under discussion concerns the existence of an automatic aesthetic evaluation. When we encounter an object like an artwork or an architectural structure that activates an aesthetic response, does the associated evaluation appear in our mind as an automatic process? From the broad field of aesthetic appraisal, we will be considering a specific aspect that refers only to the positive and negative affects related to an individual's preference between two art styles (figurative vs. abstract) and two architectural styles (classic vs. contemporary). The hypothesis is that there is a preexistent preference within the visual arts and architecture that can clearly be identified using implicit measurements. Results from two experiments that were conducted with the use of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) showed that participants' reaction times were faster in associating positive words to figurative art and classical architecture (the so-called compatible task) than to abstract art and contemporary architecture (the so-called incompatible task). The results are in line with the hypothesis that aesthetic preferences can also be experienced automatically. Prototypicality (i.e., the degree to which an object is representative of a general class of object), familiarity and the relative simplicity of figurative art and classical architecture (compared to abstract art and modern architecture) can explain the shorter reaction time and as a consequence, an implicit aesthetic preference for these kinds of stimuli. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)

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Design Objectives o Accessible o Aesthetics Understanding the Language and Elements of Design Engage the Integrated Design Process Design Awards o Cost-Effective o Functional / Operational o Historic Preservation o Productive o Secure / Safe o Sustainable Building Types Space Types Design Disciplines Products & Systems

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Aesthetics
by the WBDG Aesthetics Subcommittee Last updated: 10-30-2010 Within This Page

Overview Emerging Issues Major Resources

Overview

In The Ten Books of Architecture the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius stated that a building should meet obligations of commodity (utilitas), firmness (firmitas), and delight (venustas). Commodity addresses how a building serves its function and can be made more useful to the occupants. Firmness means endurance, or a building's ability to stand up to natural forces over time. Delight refers to aesthetics. Because Vitruvius's three standards of architecture are still accepted as benchmarks of excellence, it is important to note that a work of architecture's success is not predicated on aesthetic accomplishment alone. Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy devoted to beauty. It dissects the visual compositional elements like proportion and line, as well as other formal qualitiesauditory, tactile, olfactory, thermal, and even kinestheticthat achieve beauty. Moreover, aesthetics involves studying concepts that may underlie the stamp of beauty, such as political context or expression of status. In the case of architecture, underlying concepts may also include imageable form, a sense of place, and interpretation of available technology. Not surprisingly, then, theories of beauty vary to reflect currents of thought in societies. It is free of specific values.

Figure 1: Left Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel (more) Right Jose V. Toledo U.S. Post Office and Courthouse, Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. Credits: Finegold Alexander + Associates, and GSA. Specific values comprise style. Phrased another way, just as theories of beauty change according to generation or culture, so do the ways that beauty is manifested. The early 21st century is a remarkable period in architecture because it permits both pre-modern historical styles in great variety (Classicism and its many iterations, including Romanesque, Gothic, Victorian, Craftsman, Art Deco, Postmodern) as well as Modernist forms, which now have their own traditions. Meanwhile, forms of contemporary architecture are continually evolving; they cannot be pinned down as a style until a critical mass of buildings has consistently satisfied one set of compositional and conceptual criteria. This variety of appropriate expression can be seen in these two examples of federal building projects.

Figure 2: Left: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Satellite Operations Facility, Suitland, MD. Credits: Morphosis and GSA. Right: Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse, Cleveland, OH. Credit: GSA Because contemporary architecture does not abide one stylein fact, contemporary culture advocates diversity of styles, even in cases of historic preservation, and encourages the development of new architectural languagesdesigners agree that aesthetically successful architecture comes from an integrated approach. By correctly formulating a project's purpose, seeking inspiration in its programmatic requirements, and engaging in team-wide design reviews, an architect most effectively arrives at a solution that is as delightful to the senses and to the intellect as it is cost-effective, secure/safe, sustainable, accessible, and functional/operational. Not only is architectural achievement contingent upon meeting all three of Vitruvius's obligations, but also those obligations mutually reinforce one another. Good architecture achieves useful, humane, and economical results, regardless of what that result looks like. With an eye to such integration, an architect makes aesthetic decisions in full collaboration with the client, building users, other consultants, and the public. Therefore it is important for the client and building users to be well informed about the possibilities of architecture. This will enable them to assist the architect and design team in conceiving a building design that will meet the client's and users' needs. One way to become acquainted with the possibilities of an architectural commission is to become familiar with a number of buildings of the same type. In addition, this branch of the WBDG is designed primarily to help those not familiar with architectural design terminology to understand the basic process, techniques, and language by which architectural concepts become reality. Toward that end, the following strategies are recommended:

Understanding the Appropriate Language and Elements of Design Architects use specific terminology to describe fundamental elements of a building, and to assess its design quality. A client's fluency with this vocabulary improves the architect's application of the elements it represents. Engage the Integrated Design Process An integrated design process interlaces the multiple design disciplines that inform a building. A series of steps can provide an orderly flow to this dialogue, and the full and constructive participation of all members of the design and delivery team will help assure the best results.

The design awards programs of professional societies, the federal government, and industry trade associations offer additional insight into aesthetic values at a given time in history. For more information see Design Award Programs.
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Emerging Issues
Anti-terrorism and High-Performance Buildings Building Information Modeling (BIM)
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Major Resources
Federal Agencies

Department of Defense (DOD) o DODUFC 3-120-10 Interior Design o U.S. ArmyInstallation Design Guides o U.S. Army Corps of EngineersEngineering and Design Regulation - Interior Design ER 1110-345-122 o NAVFACMIL-HDBK 1190 Facility Planning and Design Guide, Chapter 5, Section A.1, 1987 o U.S. Air ForceAchieving Design Excellence (PDF 2.1 MB) and Architectural Compatibility Guidelines (PDF 740 KB) and Air Force Interior Design Guides General Services Administration o Facilities Standards for the Public Buildings Service, P-100, Chapter 1, Section 2 Standard Form 330, Architect-Engineer QualificationsArchitects and engineers use this form to present their qualifications and experience when seeking federal projects and emphasizes qualifications-based selection for the procurement of A/E services. This form replaces SF 254/255.

Organizations

National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC)The National Capital Planning Commission provides overall planning guidance for federal land and buildings in the National Capital Region U.S. Commission of Fine ArtsThe Commission of Fine Arts was established by Congress in 1910 as an independent agency to advise the Federal and District of Columbia governments on matters of art and architecture that affect the appearance of the nation's capital.

Associations

The work of many building professionals impact aesthetics decisions. These include architects, landscape architects, interior designers, lighting designers, and engineers. In part to help define the boundaries of professional and aesthetic responsibility, each of these professions is represented by a national trade association. In most cases, the trade association or organization publishes industry guidelines about the legal, ethical, and aesthetics role of their members in the building design process.
Profession Architects Association The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Design Society of American Registered Architects National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) International Interior Design Association (IIDA) National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD)

Landscape Architects Interior Designers

Lighting Designers

Professional Engineers American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and AirConditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) American Society of Sanitary Engineering (ASSE) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Structural Engineers Association International (SEA) Planners American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) American Planning Association (APA)

Others

ASIS International Associated General Contractors (AGC) of America Audio Engineering Society (AES) Building Commissioning Association Building Owners & Managers Association International (BOMA) Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) Foodservice Consultants Society International (FCSI) International Facility Management Association (IFMA)

Publications

The Aesthetic Movement by Lionel Lambourne. London, England: Phaidon Press Limited, 1996. ISBN 0714830003. Architectural Graphic Standards, 11th Edition by Charles Ramsey and Harold Sleeper. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2007. Architecture For Dummies by Deborah K. Dietsch and Robert A. M. Stern. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2002. The Four Books of Architecture by Andrea Palladio and translated by Robert Tavernor and Richard Schofield. Dover Publications, 1965. Design Professionals and the Built Environment: An Introduction by Paul Knox (Editor), Peter Ozolins (Editor). February 2001. ISBN: 0-471-98515-5.Brings together many of the world's leading names from the UK, USA, Europe, and Asia; this is the first book to fully reflect the move towards a more synthetic approach in professional and student courses. A History of Interior Design, 3rd Edition by John Pile. August 2009. ISBN: 978-0-470-22888-3. Much like the history of art, the history of interior design encompasses numerous styles, movements and the international political and social developments that have informed or challenged its evolution. This lavishly illustrated book will be of interest to anyone who appreciates interior design as well as antiques, furniture design, textiles, decorative objects and the general evolution of the space where we work and live. Interior Design, 4th Edition by John Pile. March 2008. ISBN: 0132321033. Extremely comprehensive on all elements of interior design including codes. Textbook standards. Interior Design Illustrated, 2nd Edition by Francis D. K. Ching, Corky Binggeli. October 2004. ISBN: 0-471-47376-6.Ching's illustrated introduction to interior design is now completely revised to be even more clear and accessible. It includes new and updated material on finishes, furnishings and textiles, lighting, sustainability, acoustics, workstations, and much more. Interior Graphic Standards, 2nd Edition by Corky Binggeli, Patricia Greichen. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010. On the Art of Building in Ten Books by Leon Battista Alberti and translated by Joseph Rykwert and Neil Leach. MIT Press, 1988. A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa, Murray Silverstein, with Max Jacobson, Ingrid Fiksdahl-King, and Shlomo Angel. Oxford University Press, 1977. Space, Time and Architecture: The Growth of a New Tradition, Fifth Revised and Enlarged Edition (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures) by Siegfried Giedion. 2003.

The Ten Books on Architecture by Pollio Vitruvius and translated by Morris Hicky Morgan. Dover Publications, 1960.

Samples of Great Buildings and Architecture

Architecture and Interior Design Through the 18th Century: An Integrated History by Buie Harwood, Bridget May and Curt Sherman. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall, December 2001. Exceptionally comprehensive, this single-source reference allows readers to compare and contrast architecture, interior design, interior architectural features, design details, motifs, furniture, space planning, color, lighting, textiles, interior surface treatments, and decorative accessories through many centuriesfrom antiquity to the 18th centuryfrom the many regions of the world. The Art of Landscape Detail: Fundamentals, Practices, and Case Studies by Niall Kirkwood. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., August 1999. A fresh, holistic approach to the theories, approaches, and practices of landscape detail. With the support of a wealth of graphic and written material taken from historic and contemporary landscape design work, Kirkwood clearly demonstrates the role that landscape detail plays in the design process. Going beyond theoretical considerations, the book outlines landscape detail as a primary design activity, both pragmatic and poetic, using a range of built landscape design examples. The Evolution of American Urban Design: A Chronological Anthology by David Gosling. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., December 2002. Covering a 50-year span, the book seeks to identify built urban design projects and traces the evolution and separation of American urban design theories up to the end of the twentieth century. It includes contemporary designs, projects, and writings in an attempt to identify future directions of the next century. The Great Buildings Collection The Phaidon Atlas of Contemporary World Architecture is a gorgeous new compendium of recent design from around the globe. This coffee-table book is so heavy, it's sold in its own carrying case. Weimar University's Innovative Housing (in German) Website allows you to search by criteria, architect, or name of project. Pick "Kriteriensuche" or "Suche". If you have trouble reading a foreign site, try using the Babelfish translator to get a crude approximation.

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http://www.architeacher.org/aesthetics/archi-main.html

http://books2.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=/ebooks/ebooks0/tf/2009-12-01/7/0203981405 THE AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE: ITS MEANING IN FUNCTIONAL PSYCHOLOGY ELIZABETH KEMPER ADAMS, 1907, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS http://books2.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=138327

Aesthetics and the environment: the appreciation of nature, art, and architecture
By Carlson, Allen http://books2.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=/ebooks/ebooks0/tf/2009-12-01/7/0203981405

Summary
"Aesthetics and the Environment" presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature-in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that a scientific understanding of nature can enhance our appreciation of it, rather than denigrate it.

Innovative Approach to Aesthetic Evaluation Based on Entropy


Authors: Bostanci, Seda1; Ocakci, Mehmet2

Source: European Planning Studies, Volume 19, Number 4, April 2011 , pp. 705-723(19) Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group Abstract: This paper describes an objective research method for the evaluation of cities in aesthetic terms. The evaluation in the research is carried out via urban skyline scale. The aesthetic value is brought into numerical quantity by adapting the visual codes of the design elements that compose the urban skyline. The connections and correlations between the visual codes represent the information capability of the urban skyline. The relation and the fictional order of the structure and landscape integrity, composing the urban skyline, define the aesthetic qualities of city. Entropy, according to the information theory, is the quantification of the information amount of the coded data. Skyline coding models connected to the formal aesthetic design criteria with the developed entropy approach are to be discussed in terms of their contributions to urban design researches. In this research, the skylines of Istanbul's various urban areas are evaluated by using entropy as an innovative method in urban design applications. For obtaining measurable quantitative aesthetic values for urban skylines, these values have been compared with each other. In accordance with this, it has been determined that Istanbul's urban identity attributes and skylines that represent its historical structures have more informational aesthetic value than other urban patterns. So, there is proximity between quantitative values of entropy and informational aesthetics. It has been proved that, based on formal aesthetic criteria, aesthetic qualities of cities are measurable with the entropy approach.
An Experimental Study of Aesthetic Response to Geometric Configurations of Architectural Space Ahmet Vefik Alp Leonardo Vol. 26, No. 2 (1993), pp. 149-157 (article consists of 9 pages) Published by: The MIT Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1575901