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GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS

FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION

BUSINESS PAGE 10

GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN
GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN

GOV.BROWN UNVEILS NEW PENSION PLAN

STATE PAGE 5

GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN

CARDINALS STAY ALIVE

SPORTS PAGE 11

Friday Oct. 28, 2011 Vol XII, Edition 62

www.smdailyjournal.com

Setback for county jail plans

State to San Mateo:Don’t apply for construction money

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo County was not invit- ed by the state to apply for up to $100 million in jail construction funds, money that could have cov- ered more than half the building’s price tag and slash the ongoing debt. The California Department of

Corrections notified local officials Wednesday that the county was not invited but could still apply anyway.
Corrections
notified
local
officials
Wednesday that
the county was
not invited but
could still apply
anyway.
The
county
ranked
low
in
part
Greg Munks
because it was
GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN

Dave Pine

competing

against

other

large

counties

and

sends

the

fewest

inmates

to state prisons,

said

Sheriff

Greg Munks.

“I

was very

optimistic

and

now

I’m

very

GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN

Deborah Bazan

disappointed,”

Munks

said,

saying

the

county

was

essentially

“punished”

for

its

size

and

incarceration

rate.

The

county

sends

approxi-

mately 560 inmates to state facili- ties. Deputy County Manager Mary McMillan echoed disappointment low incarceration was the basis as well as the county competing in the “large county” categories. The top cutoff for medium size was 700,000

and San Mateo County has 738,000

See JAIL, Page 24

GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Chiaki Kikuchi,right,shows photos of the aftermath in Japan from the earthquake and tsunami earlier this year to students at Odyssey School in San Mateo Thursday afternoon.

Eliminating the language barrier

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

“Were your roads and streets dam- aged?” 13-year-old Abbey Vixie asked referring to the aftermath of the March earthquake and tsunami in Japan. The event made international news. For San Mateo’s Odyssey School com- munity, the news caused fear and worry. Odyssey has long had a sister relation- ship with Tokiwagi, a school in Sendai badly damaged by the two natural events. Annually, Odyssey students trav- el to Japan in the spring while the

Tokiwagi students visit California in

October. San Mateo students didn’t trav-

el to Japan last year due to the damage. Instead, students created the Tokiwagi Sendai Quake Odyssey Relief Fund. But the partnership wasn’t damaged by nature’s fury. Thirteen girls from Japan have been staying with Odyssey families and learning about American culture since Oct. 22. Seventeen-year-old Chiaki Kikuchi told Vixie the roads had in fact been damaged; then used her laptop to show photographs. On Thursday, students from both

schools sat on the floor of an Odyssey classroom in two circles simply talking. The visiting students will give a talk Saturday during which they’ll field ques- tions from the community. Children and adults alike will provide the questions, explained Hiroshi Imase, Odyssey’s Japanese teacher. Odyssey students were trying to provide practice questions before the event. Students from both schools benefit from the partnership, Imase said. It’s a chance to practice English and Japanese while learning about a different culture,

See VISIT, Page 24

Investors guilty of rigging real estate auctions

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Three San Mateo real estate investors and one who does business in the county have pleaded guilty to rigging public foreclosure auctions outside the courthouse in Redwood City by agreeing not to bid against each other, according to the Department of Justice. Troy Kent of San Mateo, Henry Pesah of Burlingame, James Doherty of Hillsborough and Laith Salma of San Francisco, were among eight Northern California real estate investors who pleaded guilty for their roles in two separate conspiracies between November 2008 and January 2011. The men agreed not to bid against each other for foreclosed properties auctioned off outside the county courthouse in Redwood City and in San Francisco County. Instead, they kept the winning price low which, in turn, federal prosecutors say, damaged the real estate market and defrauded those expecting a fair marketplace.

See FRAUD, Page 24

City and communications company tangle in court

Judge to rule if Burlingame moratorium on wireless devices applies to ExteNet

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Whether Burlingame’s temporary ban on wireless communi- cation devices applies to a company which applied before the council’s vote on it will be decided next week, Judge George Miram said during a preliminary hearing Thursday morning. In September, the Burlingame City Council unanimously approved a 45-day moratorium on wireless communication devices which also covers previous applications. The tempo- rary ban was recently extended another 90 days. It’s the action

of covering applications already in the works which communi-

See COURT, Page 24

GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN
GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN
GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN
GILEAD 3Q NET GROWS FOSTER CITY COMPANY’S INCOME RASIES TO $741.1 MILLION BUSINESS PAGE 10 GOV.BROWN
  • 2 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“If liberty means anything at all,it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

— George Orwell (Eric Blair),English author (1903-1950)

This Day in History

  • 1886 The Statue of Liberty, a gift from the people of France, was dedicated in New York Harbor by President Grover Cleveland.

In 1636, the General Court of Massachusetts passed a legisla- tive act establishing Harvard College. In 1776, the Battle of White Plains was fought during the Revolutionary War, resulting in a limited British victory. In 1858, Rowland Hussey Macy opened his first New York store at Sixth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan. In 1919, Congress enacted the Volstead Act, which provided for enforcement of Prohibition, over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt rededicated the Statue of Liberty on its 50th anniversary. In 1940, Italy invaded Greece during World War II. In 1958, the Roman Catholic patriarch of Venice, Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, was elected pope; he took the name John XXIII. In 1962, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev informed the United States that he had ordered the dismantling of missile bases in Cuba. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter and Republican presidential nominee Ronald Reagan faced off in a nationally broadcast, 90-minute debate in Cleveland. In 1991, what became known as “The Perfect Storm” began forming hundreds of miles east of Nova Scotia; lost at sea dur- ing the storm were the six crew members of the Andrea Gail, a sword-fishing boat from Gloucester, Mass. Ten years ago: The families of people killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack gathered in New York for a memorial service filled with prayer and song. Gunmen killed 16 people in a church in Behawalpur, Pakistan. United Airlines replaced embattled chairman and chief executive James Goodwin with board member John Creighton. The Arizona Diamondbacks gained a two-games-to-none lead in the World Series, defeat- ing the New York Yankees 4-0.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is 56.

Birthdays

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actor Joaquin Phoenix is 37.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actor Nolan Gould is 13.

Jazz singer Cleo Laine is 84. Actress Joan Plowright is 82.

Musician-songwriter Charlie Daniels is 75. Actress Jane Alexander is 72. Singer Curtis Lee is 70. Actor Dennis Franz is

  • 67. Pop singer Wayne Fontana is 66. Actress Telma Hopkins is

  • 63. Olympic track and field gold medalist Bruce Jenner is 62.

Actress Annie Potts is 59. The president of Iran, Mahmoud

Ahmadinejad, is 55. Rock musician Stephen Morris (New Order) is 54. Country/gospel singer-musician Ron Hemby (The Buffalo Club) is 53. Rock singer-musician William Reid (The Jesus & Mary Chain) is 53. Actor Mark Derwin is 51.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

PETER MOOTZ/DAILY JOURNAL

A scene from ‘Of Men and Mavericks’ was shot in San Mateo Thursday causing some street closures throughout the day near the 25th Avenue business district.The movie is about Santa Cruz surfer Jay Moriarity and his mentor Frosty Hesson,played by Gerard Butler of ‘300’fame.

Tennessee dog missing for three months turns up in Michigan

ROCHESTER HILLS, Mich. — Jim Arrighi last saw Petey, his 4-year-old Jack Russell terrier, in the backyard of his Erin, Tenn., home. That was in July, and the 73-year-old retired electrician had nearly given up on seeing his pet again when he learned the dog turned up safe about 500 miles away in suburban Detroit. A Michigan Humane Society volun-

teer was expected to return Petey to

Arrighi Thursday morning. “This is just a little town and every- body is buzzing about it,” said Arrighi’s daughter, Tyanne Morrison. Most of Erin’s roughly 7,000 residents know one another, and many of them would recognize Petey, which is why Arrighi, Morrison and their friends sus-

pect he was pooch-napped by an out-of-

towner. Morrison believes Petey left his yard “and somebody picked him up.” “We searched. We knew someone had gotten him,” she told the Associated Press by phone on Wednesday. “We got on 4-wheelers and went all over the area. There had been some more dogs over the last few months that were miss- ing.” While struggling with the loss of his dog, Arrighi also lost his wife, Juanita, who suffered from pulmonary disease and died Oct. 12.

In other news ...

“Since my mother passed away, even I told him ‘why don’t we go to the pound to give a home to a puppy that don’t have a home,”’ Morrison said. Last week, a homeowner in Rochester Hills, about 20 miles north of Detroit, saw Petey in his backyard and took him to a Humane Society animal care center. As it does with every recovered dog and cat, the Michigan Humane Society scanned Petey for an implanted microchip, which led the organization to its owner, spokesman Kevin Hatman

said. Arrighi, who has been staying at Morrison’s home since his wife died, was thrilled to receive the call, she said. “He thinks my mother, who is in heav- en, sent the dog back to him,” Morrison said. She said their local veterinarian likely recommended Petey get a microchip. “It was only about $70 total,”

Morrison said. “Now, a lot of people are inquiring about it.” The Michigan Humane Society rec- ommends that all pet dogs and cats get microchips implanted, in addition to making sure they have collars and iden- tification tags. “It’s wonderful when we see microchip reunions, including those that seem like miracles,” said Marcelena Mace, shelter manager at the Rochester Hills Center for Animal Care. “It really proves that no matter how far your pet may travel, a microchip can help him

find his way home.” Microchips, which also are implanted in pet cats, are about the size of a grain of rice and typically injected near the animal’s shoulder blade, said Adam Goldfarb, director of pet care issues with the Washington, D.C.-based Humane Society of the United States. The chips do not have their own power sources and only can be found and read with a scanner.

Puppy rescued from top of train gets new home

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Four firefight- ers in a South Carolina town plucked a frightened black lab puppy from the top of a double-decker freight train car and delivered her to a new, loving home. “We don’t know how long she was up there,” Liberty assistant fire chief Chris Rowland said Tuesday. “She was scared. She was ready to come down.” Rowland’s team of four firefighters was called Sunday evening after Tina Parker of nearby Pickens spotted the pup while she and her family were stopped at a red light and saw the train pass by. Parker said she saw what she thought was trash on the top of the train, but then it started moving and she realized it was a small dog. “There’s no question it was a puppy,” Parker said. She called 911 and followed the train to Liberty about six miles away.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. RGFOO ©2011
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RGFOO
©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
DILEY
GIAEMP
NAASTV
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles:
FILMY HUNCH
INDIGO
RITUAL
Yesterday’s
Answer:
After being dealt a horrible poker hand, he
knew he was sitting in a — FOLDING CHAIR
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Lotto

Oct. 25 Mega Millions

13 33 40 44 46 8 Mega number Oct. 26 Super Lotto Plus 15 20 25
13
33 40 44 46
8
Mega number
Oct. 26 Super Lotto Plus
15
20
25 40 41 20
Mega number

Fantasy Five

3 20 24 26
3
20
24 26

Daily Four

3
3
7
7
3
3
0
0

Daily three midday

 
2
2
1
1
6
6

Daily three evening

 
3
3
2
2
6
6
27
27

The Daily Derby race winners are No. 09 Win- ning Spirit in first place;No.08 Gorgeous George in second place;and No.11 Money Bags in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:42.07.

Local Weather Forecast

Friday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s. East

winds 5 to 10 mph

...

Becoming north in the

afternoon.

Friday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. North winds 5 to 15 mph.

Saturday : Sunny. Highs around 70.

Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.

Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.

Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s. Sunday night through Wednesday: Mostly clear. Lows around 50. Highs in the mid 60s. Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows around 50. Thursday: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in the mid 60s.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402

Publisher: Jerry Lee

jerry@smdailyjournal.com

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twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Editor in Chief: Jon Mays

jon@smdailyjournal.com

scribd.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal

 

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To

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Events:

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As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

3

County Times to live on

Parent company decides paper worth saving

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo County Times has survived its parent company’s consolidation ax and will continue to print daily editions under its cur- rent masthead. The Bay Area News Group had planned to fold the County Times into a section of the San Jose Mercury News starting next week after making company-wide layoffs. Yesterday, however, BANG announced it will continue to print under the County Times masthead and also keep the Oakland Tribune and Contra Costa Times distinct editions. BANG had considered folding several of its smaller dailies into larger regional editions and was set to turn the Oakland Tribune into the East Bay Tribune next Wednesday in a cost-saving effort. The company announced yesterday it decid- ed to abandon those plans but layoffs are still coming to its newsrooms across the Bay Area, however. Companywide, BANG had previously said

it needed to layoff about 120 employees and

was considering closing its Walnut Creek pro-

duction facility. About 25 journalists will be laid off next week, BANG’s Managing Editor Bert Robinson told the Daily Journal yesterday. The company had originally said it would need to let go of about 40 journalists. The company decided to keep the County Times masthead because “readers have a con- nection with the newspaper,” Robinson said. “We got a lot of blowback from our readers about the mastheads.” Top BANG officials met internally Friday about the mastheads before making the announcement, he said. San Mateo County Times Editor Glenn Rabinowitz could not comment yesterday on the company’s decision to keep the masthead intact. Staff at the San Mateo office did say, how- ever, it expects to continue covering local issues from an office here in the county, although it might not be from its current space on Ninth Avenue.

BANG employs about 320 journalists in its Bay Area newsrooms and another 1,000 employees in sales, production and other areas. The company is looking to save money on its print editions and gain more revenue from its online and mobile editions. Keeping the County Times alive “is extremely good news on many levels,” said former Times reporter Marshall Wilson, the current public communications manager for San Mateo County. “A vibrant and competitive local media writing about local people, events and institu- tions helps to connect a community,” he said in an email to the Daily Journal. “I worked at the Times when the paper celebrated its 100- year anniversary, long before the Internet and smartphones dramatically changed the busi- ness model. Although no one can say how news will be delivered in the future, I think it’s fun to imagine the name living on for another 100 years.” The San Mateo County Times was estab- lished in 1888.

Dodgers say Giants fan’s attackers liable in suit

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Two men accused of brutally beating San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow in a Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day should be held liable for potentially tens of millions of dollars in a fam- ily lawsuit, an attorney who represents the team and its owner said Thursday. Lawyer Jerome Jackson filed a cross-com- plaint last week that argues Marvin Norwood and Louis Sanchez — not the Dodgers— are to blame for the brain damage that Stow suf- fered in March. Both Norwood and Sanchez

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 3 County Times to live on Parent

Bryan Stow

have pleaded not guilty to one count each of may- hem, assault by means likely to produce great bodily injury, and battery with serious bodily injury. Jackson also predicted that if the case goes to trial, jurors could decide

that Stow himself shares some of the blame.

“I’ve been doing these cases for 23 years and I have never seen one

yet which it didn’t take at least two people to tango,” Jackson told ESPNLosAngeles.com. “One of the things the jury will be asked to do is to determine what percentage of fault various individuals have for this event,” Jackson told the website.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 3 County Times to live on Parent

Police reports

Snap, crackle ...

A person heard rapid “pops” or fireworks coming from a marsh area east of a train station on the intersection of Huntington and Sylvan avenues in San Bruno before 5:22 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 12.

REDWOOD CITY

Theft. Halloween decorations were stolen on Hillview Avenue, before 10:07 a.m. Monday, Oct. 24. Theft. Equipment and tools were stolen on Douglas Avenue before 12:57 p.m. Monday,

Oct. 24. Theft. A copper shark and other items were taken from a front door on Woodside Road before 1:51 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24. Theft. Jewelry was stolen on Woodside Road before 3:52 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24. Burglary. Jewelry, a laptop, an Xbox and other items were stolen from a residence on Alden Street before 5:16 p.m. Monday, Oct.

24.

Grand theft. Jewelry, clothes and other items were stolen on Vera Avenue before 5:57 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24. Burglary. A purse was taken from a vehicle on Harrison Avenue before 6:01 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24.

FOSTER CITY

Burglary. Two LCD screens with a combined value of $2,000 were stolen from a vehicle on Shell Boulevard before 8:36 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25. Theft. A bicycle was stolen from a covered parking area on Catamaran before 4:17 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 3 County Times to live on Parent
  • 4 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

School boundary change approved

Vote required to finalize district switch of 47 San Mateo homes

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Changing the school assignments of 47 San Mateo homes — a move that could impact four districts financially — was given preliminary approval Tuesday but needs to go to a vote to be finalized. The County Office of Education is working with County Counsel on the next steps and who will need to be part of the election. Earlier this summer, Mark Bendick submitted a neighborhood petition to change the school assign- ments for the homes on Fairmont Drive. Students are currently zoned to attend Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary and Sequoia Union High school districts. Under the pro- posal, students would instead attend the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary and San Mateo Union High school districts. On Tuesday, the San Mateo County Committee on School District Organization gave a preliminary OK to the plans. “We are extremely pleased with the decision that was rendered, par- ticularly as the committee was unan- imous during its review and approval of each of the nine crite- ria,” Bendick said.

That decision would be final if all

the districts supported the move,

said Nancy Magee, administrator of board support and community rela- tions. Only one district, San Mateo- Foster City, favors the move. Belmont-Redwood Shores and Sequoia are both opposed while San Mateo Union has decided to stay neutral, said Magee. To obtain a hearing on the propos- al, Bendick gathered signatures from 25 percent of the registered voters in the area. He previously shared his hope that the four dis- tricts will be amenable to the change noting it’s a small number of houses with none of the children currently enrolled in their assigned district. The petition aims to move proper- ties within 2020 to 2098 on Fairmont Drive and 2025 to 2089 on Fairmont Drive. The location of the homes, by De Anza Boulevard and on the north side of State Route 92, makes walk- ing to the assigned Belmont schools difficult. Since the mid 1980s, fami- lies have been able to choose which of the four districts they would like to send their children. Many fami- lies in the neighborhood have cho- sen to have students attend schools in San Mateo.

Local briefs

Federal money available for county waterway projects

Community groups, educators, environmentalists and others may be eligible for up to $3,000 in fed- eral grants for projects that improve San Mateo County’s waterways, according to the San Mateo Countywide Water Pollution Prevention Program. The program announced yester- day having $15,000 in community action grants for projects that enhance and protect the health of local watersheds, creeks, the San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The SMCWPPP is a feder- ally mandated program to reduce the amount of pollution entering local storm drain systems. Last year, six county organiza- tions received funding for projects including school curriculum devel- opment, community environmen- tal education, habitat restoration and cleanup events. The application deadline is Nov. 18. To receive a packet visit www.flowstobay.org or call 372-

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL School boundary change approved Vote required

Coastside Fire Protection District and Cal Fire responded to a structure fire at 12599 San Mateo Road in Half Moon Bay Thursday.

to the curb. Marroquin struck his head and

should on the light pole and was

12599 San Mateo Road just before 9 a.m., according to Cal Fire. Arriving firefighters reported smoke coming from the house and found flames in a rear bedroom wall. Good Samaritans had apparently started to put out the fire before firefighters arrived, and the flames were quickly contained. No one was injured, according to Cal Fire. Units from the San Mateo County Fire Department, the Central County Fire Department and the Half Moon Bay Volunteer Fire Department responded. The cause remains under investi- gation.

  • 6245. transported by South San Francisco paramedics to San Francisco General Hospital.

UPS worker crashes motorcycle into light pole

Police do

not believe speed or

alcohol were factors in the crash.

A 37-year-old Pacifica resident suffered major head trauma after crashing his motorcycle into a light pole around 3:30 a.m. Thursday in South San Francisco, police said. Jorge Marroquin, a UPS worker was leaving work, heading north on Gull Road when his motorcycle hit a raised curb on the side of the road and then a light pole adjacent

Fire causes $20K in damage to home

A

fire caused an estimated

$20,000 in damage to a house in Half Moon Bay Thursday morn- ing, according to Cal Fire officials. Coastside Fire Protection District units responded to reports of fire at a one-story house at

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL School boundary change approved Vote required
Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL School boundary change approved Vote required
Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL School boundary change approved Vote required

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

5

Brown unveils pension overhaul

State lawmakers balance taxpayers, public employees

By Judy Lin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday unveiled his plan for over- hauling public retirement benefits requiring California lawmakers to tread carefully between protecting taxpayers and the public employees who serve tax- payers. While Republican lawmakers were cautiously optimistic, Brown received a more tepid response from his fellow Democrats who hold a majority of seats in both the state Assembly and Senate. Some public employee union leaders who hold a lot of influence in the Legislature quickly lined up to oppose his plan. “Some of the governor’s proposals go too far and run the risk of undermining retirement security for thousands of California school bus drivers, special education aides, custodians, school cafe- teria workers and their families,” said Allan Clark, president of the California School Employees Association, in a statement. The Democratic governor is seeking to move new state workers to a hybrid system where guaranteed benefits are combined with a 401(k)-style plan. He would raise the age civil state employees are eligible for full retirement benefits from 60 to 67. Newly hired public safety employees would have to work beyond the current minimum retirement age of 50 depend- ing on their ability to perform the job. While Brown’s plan deals mostly with

Pension overhaul proposal

• Require all new and current employees to contribute at least 50 percent of their retirement costs,shifting the burden from public employers, some of whom currently make the entire contribution.This portion of the proposal would be phased in.Employers and employees would be barred from suspending contributions. • Form a mandatory “hybrid”risk-sharing pension plan for new employees. New plan would include a reduced,guaranteed defined benefit, a defined contribution portion such as a 401(k)- style plan, and Social Security.The goal would be to replace 75 percent of an employee’s salary, based on a 30-year career for public safety employees, or 35 years for non-public safety employees. • Raise the age state employees are eligible for full retirement benefits from 60 to 67 to align with Social Security.The administration has not calculated a minimum retirement age,which is currently 55. Raise the retirement age beyond the current 50 years for newly hired public safety employees to an age based on their ability to perform the job and maintain public safety. • For new employees,calculate pension benefits based on the highest average annual compensation for three years, rather than the

current one-year system. Benefits would be calculated based on regular, recurring pay and would not include special bonuses, unused vacation time or overtime. • Bar all employees from buying service credits known as air time, to boost retirement service credit for time not actually worked. • Add two independent, public members with financial expertise to the board of the California Public Employee Retirement System board. Replace the State Personnel Board representative on that board with the director of the California Department of Finance. Brown also will recommend that other public retirement boards make similar changes. • Prohibit retroactive pension increases based on earlier retirement or higher benefit levels for all employees. • Require new state employees to work for 15 years to become eligible for any state-funded health care premiums and 25 years to qualify for the maximum state contribution to those premiums. State-provided retiree health care premium coverage would end at Medicare eligibility age, when the state would fund only Medicare premium coverage and limited “wrap- around”health care benefits.

new state hires, he also wants current employees to contribute at least half of the cost of their pension benefits because some local government workers current- ly put in nothing of their own. “Applying this is going to take some care,” Brown said at the state Capitol in outlining his 12-point plan. “But I’ve laid out what I think is a minimum that every plan in California ought to meet — at a minimum protects taxpayers while being fair to the employees.” Brown’s finance director Ana Matosantos estimated that changes

would reduce the state’s contributions by $4 billion to $11 billion over the next 30 years as the plan is implemented. She said all other aspects of government — from courts and schools to cities and counties — would see their own savings, too. The Brown administration said it was still working out finer details of the pro- posal but the governor said he is asking the Legislature to put a measure on a statewide ballot so the changes would impact both state and local government employees.

Woodside bookkeeper imprisoned for tax fraud

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORTER

The former longtime bookkeeper who stole millions of dollars from the San Carlos family who employed her was sentenced this week to 46 months in prison for tax evasion and ordered to pay more than $6 million to her victims and the U.S. government. Ann Ray, also know as Georgia Engelhart, must repay her former employers $4.76 million and also pay the U.S. Internal Revenue Service $1.27 million for never reporting the embez- zled funds as taxable income. Federal

prosecutors say she hid a total of

$3,785,773.83 from the IRS during a six-year period. Ray pleaded no contest in August to six felony counts of tax evasion with the understanding she would receive the prison term and restitution order. On Wednesday, Ray was formally sen- tenced, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Ray, 67, and now living in Antioch, worked for 34 years as the bookkeeper for several businesses owned by a San Carlos family identified as “T” in court

records. Federal prosecutors said Ray began embezzling small amounts in the 1980s but the amounts grew to hundreds of thousands of dollars each year by 2004. She continued until May 2009, writing checks from the companies’ bank accounts to her personal credit cards which she then used for items including vacations and gambling. She also falsified the books and records and created false inter-company transfers, according to the plea agreement. She was charged July 8 in federal court and pleaded guilty July 19.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 5 Brown unveils pension overhaul State lawmakers
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Sex offender addresses tied to foster homes

By Juliet Williams

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — More than 1,000 addresses for foster homes run by the state Department of Social Services and three of California’s county agencies match addresses found in the state’s sex offender registries, according to a state auditor’s report released Thursday. The auditor’s office said that three years after it told Social Services officials to begin using the California Department of Justice’s sex offender registry to identify offenders who might be living or working near foster children, the department still wasn’t checking the database. State Auditor Elaine Howle said about 600 of the addresses were tied to high-risk sex offenders. The department, which oversees the 58 county child welfare programs and more than 85,000 licensed facilities, was noti- fied of the matches in July. Since then, Social Services and county agencies have investigated 99 percent of the matching addresses and found six cases in which registered sex offend- ers were living or present at licensed facilities.

Deficit panel looking at benefits and taxes

By David Espo and Andrew Taylor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Rival deficit-cutting plans advanced by Republicans and Democrats on Congress’ secretive supercom- mittee would mean both smaller-than-expected cost of living benefit increases for veterans and federal retirees as well as Social Security recipients — and bump up taxes for some indi- viduals and families. The changes would reduce deficits by an estimated $200 bil- lion over a decade, a fraction of the committee’s minimum goal of $1.2 trillion in savings. A final decision by the panel on legislation to reduce deficits is still a few weeks off, and given the political difficulties involved, there is no certainty the 12 lawmakers will be able to agree.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 5 Brown unveils pension overhaul State lawmakers
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 5 Brown unveils pension overhaul State lawmakers
  • 6 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin and Vice Mayor Rich Garbarino continue to draw in dona- tions in their re-election, according to campaign finance statements released Thursday which cover Sept. 25 through Oct. 22. Garbarino has raised a bit more pulling in $6,214 in donations during this period and a total of $20,971 dur- ing this calendar year. Donations include $100 from Councilwoman Karyl Matsumoto; $250 from the San Mateo Building Trades Council; $100 from Liza Normandy, South San Francisco Unified School District trustee; $250 from the Sheet Metal Workers Union; $500 from the Carpenters Union; $100 from Supervisor Carole Groom; $500 from Clear Channel; $1,000 from the California Real Estate PAC; and $100 from Sims Architects. He has spent $6,935 during the same period including $4,156.80 to Advance Business Forms for cam- paign literature; $2,027.76 for postage and fliers from the U.S. Postal Service; $496.66 to Political Data Inc. for campaign parapherna- lia; $193.94 to the city of South San Francisco for reimbursement for the Project Read fundraiser; and $61.61 to Elaine Garbarino for food for mail preparation. Mullin has raised $6,009 during this period creating a total of $19,315 for the calendar year. His donations include $100 from AFSCME AFL- CIO Local 829; $200 from City Treasurer Richard Battaglia; $100 from BOWL & Partners; $100 from Daly City Councilman David Canepa; $500 from Clear Channel; $100 from Councilman Pedro Gonzalez; $100 from Groom; $100 from Hillsborough Councilwoman Christine Krolik; $100 from Matsumoto; $100 from MTK Communications; $100 from Normandy; $500 from Operating Engineers Local Union No. 3; $250 from the San Mateo County Building and Construction Trades Council; and $250 from the Sheet Metal Workers’ International Association Local No. 104. He spent $12,499.03 in the same period including $1,035.69 to Alpha

Press for literature; $250 to Sharmin Bock for District Attorney; $250 to the League of Women Voters of Northern and Central San Mateo for civic donations; $100 to Dennis McBride for Redwood City School Board; $1,403.16 to himself to expenses including filing costs and

website; $329.93 to Safeway for fundraiser costs; $350 to the San Mateo County Democratic

Committee for literature; $100 to the U.S. Postal Service for a post office box; and $8,670.25 to Winning Directions for campaign literature. Challenger Johnny “Midnight” Rankins is not fundraising for his campaign.

*** A candidate for the San Mateo City Council, Maureen Freschet, has spent nearly $12,000 on her elec- tion campaign despite the fact she and current Mayor Jack Matthews are running unopposed for two open seats on the council, as longtime Councilman John Lee is being termed out. She has spent most of her money, about $6,300, with San Jose- based Pacific Printing for mailers.

Matthews has spent a total of $89.55 on his re-election campaign. *** Paul McCarthy, who is challeng- ing four incumbents for a seat on the Redwood City Council, raised $54.26 in non-monetary contributions for the finance reporting period of Sept. 25 to Oct. 22. According to the forms due yesterday, McCarthy received business cards in that amount from Catherine McCarthy of Apple Computer Marketing. Incumbent Alicia Aguirre raised $2,873 in donations this period, bringing her total to date to $10,926. She has spent $11,737 to date, leaving her with $3,427 in debt. Her dona- tions include $1,000 each from the

California Real Estate Political Action Committee and the Bay Area Gardeners Association, $500 from CAA Tri-County, $250 from Northern California Carpenters

Regional Council, $100 from Friends of David Canepa and $250 from Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos. Her expenses include literature,

polling and advertising.

Councilwoman Rosanne Foust

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin

raised $2,674 this period, for a $10,342 total. Foust spent $9,363 to date and started with a $11,649 bal- ance, leaving her with $8,373. Foust’s donations include $500 from CAA Tri-County, $100 from Friends of David Canepa, $100 from Planning Commission Chair Janet Borgens and $250 from PG&E. Her expenses include a $500 contribution to

Redwood City Residents to Protect City Services, literature and polling. Councilwoman Barbara Pierce

raised $4,629 this period, for a total of $8,024 to date. She spent $7,178.36 to date and ended with a $9,582.75 cash balance. Her donations include $500 from CAA Tri-County, $250 from

Plumbers and Steamfitters Local 467, $250 from PG&E and $1,000 from the California Real Estate PAC. Her expenses were literature and advertising. Councilman Ian Bain is also run-

ning in the Nov. 8 election. His state- ment was not immediately available. *** In the race for city clerk in Belmont, incumbent Terri Cook has raised more than $6,800 for her re- election bid and has spent about $3,745 on her campaign so far. She has another $5,900 in the bank to spend on her campaign leading up to the Nov. 8 election. Her biggest expense has been with Accurate Mailings out of Belmont for about $2,100. Her opponent, current

Belmont Vice Mayor Dave Warden

has raised $3,570 on his campaign and has spent $3,069 so far. He has

another $1,743 to spend on his cam- paign. His biggest expense has been with Pacific Printing out of San Jose for about $1,250. Mayor Coralin Feierbach contributed $100 to his campaign.

***

In the race for three seats on the

Redwood City Elementary School

District Board of Trustees, incum- bents Alisa MacAvoy, Dennis McBride and Shelly Masus are shar- ing costs for signs. McBride raised $6,791 this period including a $1,000 self loan; $100 from former county superintendent Jean Holbrook; $100 from Atherton Councilman Jerry Carlson; $250 from former county counsel Tom Casey; $100 from county Supervisor Don Horsley; $100 from Jim Lianides, superintendent of the Sequoia Union High School District; $150 from county Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos; $250 from fellow trustee Maria Diaz Slocum; $100 from SamTrans CEO Mike Scanlon; $100 from Carrie Du Bois, San Carlos Elementary School District trustee; $200 from the Children’s Cardiology of the Bay Area; $100 from Redwood City Councilwomamn Alicia Aguirre; $200 from Redwood City Councilwoman Rosanne Foust; $100 from Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo; $100 from South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Millin; $100 from Gordon Lewin, former Sequoia Union High School District trustee; and $100 from Redwood City Councilman Jeff Gee. Masur has raised $4,152.80 during this period including a $3,000 self loan; $100 from Foust; $100 from the San Mateo County Labor Council; $100 from state Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto; and $250 from the Northern California Carpenters Regional Council. MacAvoy has raised $4,071 this period which includes a $2,200 self loan, $100 from Foust and $100 from Gee. All three incumbents received $250 from the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local No. 467. Plumbers and Steamfitters Union

Local No. 467. They have all also spent the bulk of their funds with Terris Barnes and Walters for liter- ature, Pacific Print Resources for printing and the post office for postage.

Challenger Lea Cuniberti- Duran is not raising funds. *** Fel Amistad has raised the most in the bid to join the San Mateo-Foster

City Elementary School District

Board of Trustees. Amistad has raised $8,040.35 this period, with $1,330.35 coming from a self loan. In total, Amistad raised $14,776.13 this calendar year and spent it all this period. Amistad received $100 from for- mer assemblyman Gene Mullin and $100 from Daly City Councilman David Canepa. He spent $11,030 for consulting services offered by Strategies; $743.23 at Wilmes Signs; $88 on postage; $433.40 at Vista Print for campaign literature; $859.05 with Political Technologies for campaign literature; $785.92 with Flying Colors LLC on photography; and $655 for advertising with the Lagonian. Challenger Audrey Ng raised $2,689 in donations this period bring- ing her total to $4,019. She received $250 from the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local No. 467; $150 from the Sheet Metal Workers Union; $250 from San Mateo Councilman David Lim; and $250 from Carpenters Union No. 217. Ng spent $1,414 during this period with most of it, $1,389, going to Pacific Printing for postcards and postage. Incumbent Colleen Sullivan loaned herself $1,000 during this period raising a total of $2,276.78. She spent $404.54 this period at Big Daddy’s Signs on campaign litera- ture.

*** Margi Power, who is hoping to join the Hillsborough City School District, raised $5,352 this period, which includes $2,277 in nonmone-

tary donations for a kickoff party and fundraiser. Power received $100 from

Hillsborough Councilwoman

Christine Krolik and $500 from her- self. This period, she spent $5,958.80 including $2,980 at Lahlouh for mailers and postage and $540 at Baclano Art for yard signs. Incumbent Greg Dannis raised $1,084 this period, bringing his total to $4,184. This period he spent $1,577 at Copyman for literature and postage. Challengers Steven Gans and Michael Forbes are not raising funds.

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin
Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin
Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin

 

Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL South San Francisco Mayor Kevin Mullin

THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE/NATION

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies

REUTERS

Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies on the street after being injured during a demonstration in Oakland.

Vigils held for injured protester

Injured vet spent day at work, nights at protest

By Terry Collins and Jason Dearen

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Iraq War vet- eran injured during a clash between police and anti-Wall Street protest- ers this week wasn’t taking part in the demonstrations out of economic need. The 24-year-old Scott Olsen makes a good living as a network engineer and has a nice apartment overlooking San Francisco Bay. And yet, his friends say, he felt so strongly about economic inequality in the United States that he fought

for overseas that he slept at a protest camp after work.

“He felt you shouldn’t wait until

something is affecting you to get out and do something about it,” said friend and roommate Keith Shannon, who served with Olsen in Iraq. It was that feeling that drew him to Oakland on Tuesday night, when the clashes broke out and Olsen’s skull was fractured. Fellow veterans said Olsen was struck in the head by a projectile fired by police, although the exact object and who might have been responsible for the injury have not been definitively established. Now, even as officials investigate

exactly where the projectile came from, Olsen has become a rallying cry for the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators across the nation, with Twitter users and protest web- sites declaring: “We are all Scott Olsen.” In Las Vegas, a few dozen protest- ers held a vigil for him. A handful of police officers attended, and protest- ers invited them back for a potluck dinner Thursday night. “We renewed our vow of nonvio- lence,” organizer Sebring Frehner said. Another round of vigils were organized for Thursday night, including one in Oakland.

Will it last?

Summer growth calms recession fears

By Martin Crutsinger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A summer of modest economic growth is helping dispel lingering fears that another recession might be near. Whether the strength can be sus- tained is less certain. The economy grew at an annual rate of 2.5 percent in the July- September quarter, the Commerce Department said Thursday. But the growth was fueled by Americans who spent more while earning less and by businesses that invested in machines and computers, not work- ers. The expansion, the best quarterly growth in a year, came as a relief after anemic growth in the first half of the year, weeks of wild stock mar- ket shifts and the weakest consumer confidence since the height of the Great Recession. The economy would have to grow at nearly double the third-quarter pace to make a dent in the unem- ployment rate, which has stayed near 9 percent since the recession official- ly ended more than two years ago. For the more than 14 million Americans who are out of work and want a job, that’s discouraging news. And for President Barack Obama and incumbent members of Congress, it means they’ll be facing voters with unemployment near 9 percent. “It is still a very weak economy out there,” said David Wyss, former chief economist at Standard & Poor’s. For now, the report on U.S. gross domestic product, or GDP, sketched

a more optimistic picture for an

economy that only two months ago

seemed at risk of another recession. And it came on the same day that European leaders announced a deal in which banks would take 50 per- cent losses on Greek debt and raise new capital to protect against defaults on sovereign debt. Stocks surged on the European deal and maintained their gains after the report on U.S. growth was released. The Dow Jones rose 340 points to close at 12,209. The Dow hadn’t closed above 12,000 since Aug. 1. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index is close to having its best month since 1974. If higher stock prices lead con- sumers to feel more confident about their wealth, they may spend more. That could help sustain economic growth. The GDP report measures the country’s total output of goods and services. It covers everything from bicycles to battleships, as well as services such as haircuts and doctor’s visits. Some economists doubt the econo- my can maintain its modest third- quarter pace. U.S. lawmakers are debating deep cuts in federal spending next year that would drag on growth. And state and local governments have been slashing budgets for more than a year. Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan was blocked by Republicans, mean- ing that a Social Security tax cut that put an extra $1,000 to $2,000 this year in most American’s pockets could expire in January.

THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies
THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies
THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies
THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies
THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 7 REUTERS Scott Olsen,an Iraq war veteran,lies
  • 8 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Perry may skip some debates

By Will Weissert

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AUSTIN, Texas — Rick Perry may skip some upcoming GOP presiden-

8 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Perry may skip some debates By

Rick Perry

tial debates, side- stepping a cam- paign staple that hasn’t been kind to the Texas gov- ernor in his first two months on the national

stage. It’s a deci-

sion that ulti-

mately could cause other Republicans to bow out of the more than half-dozen face-offs scheduled between now and the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3. Perry does plan to participate in a Nov. 9 debate at Oakland University in Rochester, Mich. — his sixth — but he hasn’t committed to any others beyond that as political advisers hun- ker down to determine how best to proceed. He’s juggling fundraising and retail campaigning with only two months before the first votes in the Republican nomination fight are cast. “We haven’t said no, but we’re looking at each debate,” campaign spokesman Mark Miner said Thursday. “There are numerous — 15, 16, 17 — debates, and we’re tak- ing a look at each one and we’re mak- ing the appropriate consideration.” He said that “while debates are part of the process, they’re just one part.” Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, considered the Republican candidate to beat because of his leads in national polls, fundraising and organization, also has not committed to debating beyond Michigan.

Europe’s debt deal pleases markets

By Gabriele Steinhauser and Sarah DiLorenzo THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BRUSSELS — European leaders clinched a deal
By Gabriele Steinhauser
and Sarah DiLorenzo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — European leaders
clinched a deal Thursday they hope
will mark a turning point in their
two-year debt crisis, agreeing after
a night of tense negotiations to have
banks take bigger losses on
Greece’s debts and to boost the
region’s weapons against the market
turmoil.
After months of dawdling and
half-baked solutions, the leaders
had been under immense pressure to
finalize their plan to prevent the cri-
sis from pushing Europe and much
of the developed world back into
recession and to protect their cur-
rency union from unraveling.
World stock markets surged high-
er Thursday on the news. Oil prices
rose above $92 per barrel while the
“We have reached
an agreement,which I believe lets
us give a credible and ambitious and
overall response to the Greek crisis.”
— French President Nicolas Sarkozy
euro gained strongly — a signal
investors were relieved at the out-
come of the contentious negotia-
tions.
“We have reached an agreement,
which I believe lets us give a credi-
ble and ambitious and overall
response to the Greek crisis,” French
President Nicolas Sarkozy told
reporters. “Because of the complex-
ity of the issues at stake, it took us a
full night. But the results will be a
source of huge relief worldwide.”
Sarkozy later called his Chinese
counterpart Hu Jintao and pledged
to cooperate to revive global
growth, but there was no word on
whether Beijing might contribute to
Europe’s bailout fund.
The fund’s chief executive is due
to visit Beijing on Friday to talk to
potential investors. Beijing has
expressed sympathy for the 27-
nation European Union, its biggest
trading partner, but has yet to com-
mit any cash.
The strategy unveiled after 10
hours of negotiations focused on
three key points. These included a
significant reduction in Greece’s
debts, a shoring up of the conti-
nent’s banks, partially so they could
sustain deeper losses on Greek
bonds, and a reinforcement of a
European bailout fund so it can
serve as a (euro) 1 trillion ($1.39
trillion) firewall to prevent larger
economies like Italy and Spain from
being dragged into the crisis.
After several missed opportuni-
ties, hashing out a plan was a suc-
cess for the 17-nation eurozone, but
the strategy’s effectiveness will
depend on the details, which will
have to be finalized in the coming
weeks.
President Barack Obama, who
had been increasingly pressuring
Europe to get its act together in
recent weeks, welcomed the plan —
but pointedly noted that the U.S.
was looking forward to its “full
development and rapid implementa-
tion.”

Study questions outsourcing red-light camera programs

By Joan Lowy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — One out of every five Americans lives in a com- munity that pays a for-profit compa- ny to install and operate cameras that record traffic violations. A pro- consumer group says that practice could end up putting profits ahead of safety and accuracy. Some contracts require cities to share revenue with camera vendors on a per-ticket basis or through other formulas. Suffolk County, N.Y., for example, diverts half of the

revenue from its red-light camera

program to its vendor, according to

the report being released Thursday by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. Another type of agreement — conditional “cost-neutral” contracts — also contain provisions that link payments to the number of tickets issued, although the payments are capped, the report said. Under these contracts, local governments pay a monthly fee to a camera vendor. If ticket revenues fail to cover the ven- dor’s fee in any given month, cities may delay payments.

Medicare premiums up — but not as much as expected

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Good news for seniors: The government says Medicare’s basic monthly premium will rise less than expected next year, by $3.50 for most. It could be good, too, for President Barack Obama and Democrats strug- gling for older Americans’ votes in a close election. At $99.90 per month, the 2012 Part B premium for outpatient care will be about $7 less than projected as

recently as May. The additional

money that most seniors will pay

works out to about 10 percent of the average Social Security cost-of-liv- ing increase they’ll also be due. Some recently enrolled younger retirees will actually pay less. They were charged $115.40 a month this year, and they’ll see that go down to

$99.90.

The main reason for lower-than- expected premiums seems to be the connection between Social Security COLAs and Medicare. Some also cite a moderation in health care costs.

8 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Perry may skip some debates By
8 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Perry may skip some debates By
8 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Perry may skip some debates By

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

9

No on Measure H

  • I n June 2010, the San Mateo County Community College District asked voters to pass a par-

cel tax measure that would cost proper- ty owners $34 a year to provide $6 mil- lion a year for local students’ education. State budget cuts had their way with the district at a time when many were using the district’s three campuses to obtain their associate of arts degree or get job training. That need has not changed. The need for such educational resources is now at a premium. County voters were generous with the measure and with previous bond measures that helped shift the shape of the campuses and provide new facilities. In 2001, vot- ers approved the $207 million Measure C and, in 2005, they approved the $468 million Measure A. Now, the district is asking voters to approve Measure H, which would gen- erate $564 million in bonds for addi- tional improvements to the campuses of Skyline College, the College of San Mateo and Cañada College. The cost would be approximately $12.90 a year per $100,000 assessed value of a prop- erty. For a $500,000 house, that would equal $64.50 a year. District officials contend the bond is needed because the state has eliminated all matching fund- ing for facilities improvements and that a portion of the money would go to a sinking fund for equipment replacement that is currently taken from the general fund. That amount is approximately $1

Editorial

million to $2 million which would then be freed up for general classroom expenses. The county’s three community col- leges are a tremendous resource and demand for the classes provided at the school are at an all-time high. However, saddling the electorate with an addi- tional debt for improvements on top of bond measures already passed is not the right choice right now. And the small amount that would be freed up for gen- eral expenses does not justify the tremendous expense of such a large- scale bond that will take years to pay off. A better alternative right now might have been to pass an additional parcel tax to fund staff or a significantly smaller bond that would create a sink- ing fund for equipment replacement so additional resources could be placed directly into the classroom. The worst-case scenario if Measure H does not pass is that the district would not have access to that $1 million to $2 million a year and that students would have to study in state-of-the-art build- ings paid for with previous bonds next to ones that are 50 years old. For now, that’s a scenario we should be able to live with — particularly in these tough times when many property owners are facing increased expenses along with diminishing income.

Endorsements

Previous Daily Journal endorsements • San Mateo County Community College District Dave Mandelkern, Patricia Miljanich, Karen Schwarz • Sequoia Union High School District Carrie Du Bois, Olivia Martinez, Lorraine Rumley • San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District Audrey Ng,Colleen Sullivan • Hillsborough City Elementary School District Greg Dannis,Margi Power • Redwood City Elementary School District Shelly Masur,Alisa Greene MacAvoy,Dennis McBride • San Bruno Park Elementary School District Jennifer Blanco,Joseph Capote • San Carlos Elementary School District Adam Rak,Seth Rosenblatt • Belmont City Clerk Terri Cook • Belmont City Council Eric Reed,Christine Wozniak • Millbrae City Council Marge Colapietro,Robert Gottschalk,Lorrie Kalos-Gunn • Redwood City Council Alicia Aguirre, Ian Bain, Rosanne Foust, Barbara Pierce • Foster City Council Art Kiesel,Steve Okamoto,Herb Perez • Burlingame City Council Jerry Deal,Terry Nagel • San Carlos City Council Ron Collins,Randy Royce • San Carlos treasurer Michael Galvin • South San Francisco City Council Rich Garbarino,Kevin Mullin

Letters to the editor

Doubting Thomas

Editor, For those doubting Thomas Elliot of San Mateo (“Internet communication” published in the Oct. 21 edition of the Daily Journal) who questions the valid- ity of Tonopah Solar receiving a $737 million loan from the federal govern- ment, all you need to do to fact check is search online by typing, “Tonopah Solar receives federal loan,” and oodles of stories will pop up. If Mr. Ellitot can not manage, allow me to help. Simply go to capolitical- news.com and there it is. But perhaps that is too “right wing” of a source and therefore unreliable. Okay, go to www.8newsnow.com. They have it too. Not good enough? How about the source of the loan? Go to federalregis- ter.gov. In so far as Nancy Pelosi’s brother- in-law being the number two man at Pacific Corporate Group (PCG), he is listed on its website. Really. Go see. And yes, Tonopah Solar is a subsidiary

of California-based SolarReserve. And yes, PCG is an investment partner with SolarReserve. There is one thing Elliot was right about. As an elected official, I am care- ful to check my sources. That said, we all make mistakes and I can stand to be corrected when I’m wrong. But really, Mr. Elliot should do some sluething before he implies I simply goosed an online story to make the Obama admin- istration, Senator Harry Reid and the former Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, look bad.

Families not FARs

Matt Grocott

San Carlos

Editor, Keep families in Redwood City. The Residential Hillside Zoning Codes as proposed by Redwood City planning staff will drive families out of Redwood City (“Development rules

cause ire” in the Oct. 19 edition of the Daily Journal). The Floor Area Ratio (FAR) house size restrictions that city staff wants to impose on homeowners in the hills will prevent families from adding on to their homes to make room for a new baby or to take care of an aging parent. I’ve lived in Redwood City for more than 60 years and we’ve never needed these kinds of restrictions on existing homes before, which is why we have such a vital, family-oriented community. Planning staff should take out the FAR restrictions in the proposed RH Zoning Code and allow the current lot coverage code to remain in place so that Redwood City will continue to be a family-friendly community — not one that is suffocated by government restrictions that prevent residents from investing in their homes and properties.

Edna J. Mangini Redwood City

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek, Copy

Jerry Lee, Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter

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Guset perspective

A new day in San Carlos

By Andy Klein

A pproximately two years ago, when I was elected to the San Carlos City Council, we were faced with a very difficult decision. We could continue

to cut the city budget and city services and still possibly face bankruptcy. Or we could restruc- ture our city and find a way to provide services that would be, not only eco- nomically feasible, but sustainable long term as well. After two public work- shops in March 2010, I, along with my fellow councilmembers, decided to take the “road less traveled” and began to restructure our city. Since that time, I have written two other guest perspec- tives. In my first guest perspective, “San Carlos at a Crossroads,” I detailed the tough economic situation that San Carlos faced and how, after a decade of continual cuts, the City Council had begun to look at other options. In my second guest perspective, “The New San Carlos,” I described the decision to restructure our government and detailed the successful partnerships we had established with the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office and Gachina Landscaping. Now, after just over a year of exploring ways to fix our structural deficit, the city of San Carlos finds itself with a budget surplus and a bright financial future. San Carlos was able to save money through a variety of partnerships and employee concessions. The partnership between the city of San Carlos and the San Mateo County Sheriff’s

THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 9 No on Measure H I n

Office saves $2 million annually while increasing police services and the police presence in our town. The contract San Carlos has with Gachina Landscaping saves $600,000 annually while increasing the maintenance to our parks. Our current city employees each gave back 5 percent to 8 percent of their salaries and benefits, saving the communi- ty more than $500,000 annually. However, even with all of these changes, we still needed more to correct the budget deficit. The final piece of the puzzle was the dissolution of the Belmont-San Carlos Fire Department and the return of the San Carlos Fire Department. San Carlos had been well served for more than 30 years by the South County Fire Department that was renamed to the Belmont-San Carlos Fire Department in 2007. The decision to dissolve the joint fire department came down to cost. San Carlos could not afford to pay the sharply ris- ing expenses (more than 30 percent in just five years) dur- ing an economic downturn when the city’s revenues were flat and in some cases dropping. The lack of control of these rising costs and how fire services were delivered made looking for a new way to provide the service absolutely vital. After a number of public meetings, public input and debate, the City Council voted 5-0 to bring back the San Carlos Fire Department and share its management with Redwood City. This new partnership would save San Carlos $1 million annually and save Redwood City another $1 million per year while maintaining current fire service levels and provide an opportunity for enhanced fire servic- es down the road. On Oct. 1, San Carlos was proud to launch the new city fire department. San Carlos has high hopes for this great partnership with our longtime friends in Redwood City. Specifically, we want our fire depart- ment to be fiscally sustainable, mutually beneficial for San Carlos and Redwood City, and deliver a high level of qual- ity service throughout the community. None of the decisions or changes made were easy for the council or the community. However, after the loss of four revenue measures, these changes are what the public demanded and we have delivered on their request to “live within our financial means.” Now, after more than a decade of cutbacks and budget deficits, San Carlos finds itself on the other side of the storm. We have begun by adding more police services, building a new playground and creating more opportunities for public input and out- reach. Adding services and repairing infrastructure is now a welcome conversation in San Carlos. It has been too long since we have been able to give proper attention to these issues. Special thanks is owed to the city staff of San Carlos, the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office, the staff of the San Carlos Fire Department, the staff and Council Members in Redwood City and the Redwood City Fire Department. Without these talented people none of this would have been possible. Finally, I want to give a thank you to the citizens of San Carlos and the members of the City Council. This is a great day for our community and with- out your support it would never have come. As your mayor, I’m proud to tell you that San Carlos has so much to look forward to in the weeks and months ahead. Clearly the best is yet to come in the City of Good Living!

Andy Klein is the mayor of San Carlos.

  • 10 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow 12,208.55 +2.86% 10-Yr Bond 2.3950% +0.1920 Nasdaq 2,738.63 +3.32% Oil (per barrel) 93.73 S&P 500
Dow
12,208.55
+2.86%
10-Yr Bond 2.3950% +0.1920
Nasdaq 2,738.63
+3.32%
Oil (per barrel)
93.73
S&P 500 1,284.59 +3.43%
Gold
1,735.50

Stocks get a lift

By David K. Randall and Stan Choe

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — An agreement to con- tain the European debt crisis electrified the stock market Thursday, driving the Dow Jones Industrial average up nearly 340 points and putting the Standard & Poor’s 500 index on track for its best month since 1974. Investors were relieved after European leaders crafted a deal to slash Greece’s debt load and prevent the crisis there from engulfing larger countries like Italy. The package is aimed at preventing another financial disaster like the one that happened in September 2008 after the collapse of Lehman Brothers. But some analysts cautioned that Europe’s problems remained unsolved. “The market keeps on thinking that it’s put Europe’s problems to bed, but it’s like putting a three-year old to bed: You might put it there but it won’t stay there,” said David Kelly, chief market strategist at J.P. Morgan Funds. Kelly said Europe’s debt problems will remain an issue until the economies of struggling nations like Greece and Portugal grow again. Commodities and Treasury yields soared as investors took on more risk.

Wall Street

The euro rose sharply against the dollar. Stronger U.S. economic growth and corporate earnings also contributed to the surge. The government reported that the American economy grew at a 2.5 percent annual rate from July through September on stronger consumer spend- ing and business investment. That was nearly double the 1.3 percent growth in the previous quarter. Banks agreed to take 50 percent losses on the Greek bonds they hold. Europe will also strengthen a financial rescue fund to protect the region’s banks and other struggling European countries such as Italy and Portugal. “This seems to set aside the worries that there would be a massive contagion over there that would have brought everything down with it,” said Mark Lamkin, head of Lamkin Wealth Management. The Dow Jones industrial average soared 339.51 points, or 2.9 percent, to 12,208.55. That was its largest jump since Aug. 11, when it rose 423. All 30 stocks in the Dow rose, led by Bank of America Corp. with a 9.6 per- cent gain.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE Hertz Global Holdings Inc.,up 86 cents at $11.87 Citing current market conditions,the car rental company said it is dropping its bid for rival Dollar Thrifty Automotive Group Inc. Sony Corp.,up $1.45 at $22.06 The electronics company will buy a 50 percent stake in mobile phone maker Sony Ericsson from partner Ericsson for $1.46 billion. OfficeMax Inc.,up 22 cents at $5.49 Despite a drop in revenue, the office supplies retailer said that its third-quarter net income rose 7.8 percent as it cut costs. Walt Disney Co.,up $1.23 at $36.28 The media company will launch a free-to-air version of its Disney Channel in Russia that will reach about 40 million homes. Time Warner Cable Inc.,down $5.46 at $65.17 The New York-based cable company said that its third-quarter earnings slipped 1 percent as higher expenses offset rising revenue. Skechers USA Inc.,down 75 cents at $13.48 The footwear maker said that its third-quarter profit fell 77 percent, driven by weak revenue from its toning-shoe business. Nasdaq Urban Outfitters Inc.,up $1.66 at $27.89 A Citi analyst upgraded the retailer’s shares to “Buy”from “Neutral”citing a new strategy that may lead to higher profit in 2012. Akamai Technologies Inc.,up $3.67 at $27.45 The online content delivery company said its third-quarter income rose 6 percent as revenue grew on higher demand for streaming.

Electronic Arts 2Q loss expands

By Ryan Nakashima

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Video game maker Electronic Arts Inc. said Thursday that its second-quarter loss expanded from a year ago due to higher costs, even as revenue grew. It raised its sales forecast for the all- important holiday season slightly above analyst estimates. CEO John Riccitiello said sales of “Battlefield 3,” which launched two days earlier, were “very strong.” The net loss in the three-month period ending on Sept. 30 grew to $340 million, or $1.03 per share. Last year, the compa- ny had a quarterly loss of $201 million, or 61 cents per share. EA said costs for

marketing, research and development

increased from last year.

Excluding stock compensation costs, acquisition expenses and other costs, adjusted earnings came to 5 cents per share, beating the adjusted loss of 4 cents per share expected by analysts polled by FactSet. Adjusted revenue, which accounts for deferred revenue from games with online components, rose 17 percent to $1.03 billion from $884 million, helped by sales of its sports games “FIFA 12” and “Madden NFL 12.” That also beat the $955 million expected by analysts. “Our results reflected a tremendous performance by our EA Sports titles and a strong showing on a new game on the Facebook platform, ‘The Sims Social,”’ Riccitiello said on a conference call with

analysts. “We’re now focused on our biggest title for the holiday.” The company said it expects adjusted revenue in the current quarter through December of $1.55 billion to $1.65 bil- lion, with the midpoint slightly higher than the $1.59 billion expected by ana- lysts. EA lifted the bottom end of its full- year adjusted earnings. It now expects a range of 75 cents to 90 cents, instead of 70 cents at the low end. Analysts were already expecting 89 cents. The results didn’t satisfy investors after a broad rally by stocks Thursday. Shares in the Redwood, Calif.-based company were down 80 cents, or 3.3 percent, at $23.50 in after-hours trading after closing up 11 cents at $24.50 in the regular session.

Gilead 3Q net grows 5 percent

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOSTER CITY — Gilead Sciences

Inc. said Thursday its net income rose 5 percent in the third quarter as sales of its HIV drugs continued to rise. Gilead said its net income grew to

$741.1 million, or 95 cents per share,

from $704.9 million, or 83 cents per

share. Excluding one-time charges the

company said it earned $1.02 per share. Revenue rose 10 percent, to $2.12 bil- lion from $1.94 billion. Analysts had forecast a profit of $1.01

per share and $2.11 billion in revenue, according to estimates compiled by FactSet. Revenue from the company’s HIV drug Atripla grew 7 percent to $794.7 million, while revenue from its HIV drug Truvada rose 11 percent to $744.7 million. Sales of Viread, which is approved for hepatitis B and HIV, increased 5 percent to $192.9 million. The company also reported $19 million in sales of its HIV drug Complera, which was approved in

the U.S. in August. Gilead said revenue from its pul- monary arterial hypertension drug Letairis grew 31 percent to $79 million and revenue from its angina drug Ranexa rose 36 percent to $82 million. Royalty revenue decreased 23 percent to $55.8 million as sales of the flu treat- ment Tamiflu fell. Shares of Gilead Sciences rose 62 cents to $42.11 on Thursday, and in aftermarket trading, the shares dipped 11 cents to $42.

Higher prices boost Big Oil 3Q profits

By Chris Kahn

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Higher oil prices have masked a slow-

down in production among the biggest

oil companies.

Exxon Mobil, Royal Dutch Shell and

BP reported a surge in quarterly profits this week even though they’re producing less oil from fields around the world, including a combined 7 percent decline in the third quarter that just ended. Each company has devoted billions of dollars to finding new petroleum deposits, but it could be years, even decades, before those investments translate to more oil

and natural gas.

Experts say smaller companies will

need to step up to satisfy growing world

demand. China, India and other develop- ing nations are expected to push the global appetite for oil to a record 90 mil- lion barrels per day next year, enough to outstrip supplies. Three years ago, a severe drop in oil supplies helped push oil prices to above $147 per barrel, saddling airlines and shipping companies with high fuel costs. Gasoline prices soared above a national average $4 per gallon. “We’re not at the point where oil prices are going to go bananas” and spike like they did in 2008, said Ken Medlock, an energy expert at Rice University.

Business brief

3Q profit surges at Deckers, maker of UGG boots

GOLETA — Deckers Outdoor Corp. said Thursday that third-quarter profit rose 48 percent on higher sales of its UGG boots. The results beat expecta- tions, and the company raised its fore- cast for full-year earnings.

AMD 3Q beats Street

SUNNYVALE — Chip-maker Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said Thursday that it had a profit in the third quarter, reversing a loss, thanks to strong demand for chips in laptops and from emerging markets like China and India.

ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE
ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE WITH SWEEP OF CARLMONT >>> PAGE 12
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2011
<< Jerry Rice Jr. to make first start for UCLA, page 12
• Terra Nova can clinch co-title with win, page 14
ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE

Battle for first

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

As a football team, there isn’t a better place to be than in the driver’s seat. And Friday night, the two teams at the top of the Peninsula Athletic League Lake Division find themselves in a position to grab the proverbial steering wheel and drive straight into the Central Coast Section playoffs. When you’re Carlmont and Capuchino, battling for that lone CCS playoff berth, that is an awe- some thing. “It’s all at stake for Cap too,” said Carlmont coach Jason Selli. “I think for Cap, this is their championship game as well. So, like I told you guys last week, every game is a big game. It’s huge for Cap and they’re doing very awesome this year.” Carlmont comes into the contest 3-0 in league play, following a pre- season where they went winless and had many doubters relegating them to the bottom of the division with- out ever taking the field. The same can be said about Capuchino, who is 2-0 behind a couple of mega- ultra-Godzilla-like games by run- ning back Justin Ewing. “That’s the beauty of high school football,” Selli said. “I mean, that you can keep coaching, you keep pushing forward, you have to go through your daily grind no matter what your preseason schedule is and just try to keep getting better. Hopefully you put yourself in a position where the kids are having a good time and you’re competitive and you get games like this which are exciting.”

See GOTW, Page 13

ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE
ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

The winner of the Capuchino-Carlmont matchup will be the team that can stop the opposing running game.Cap’s Justin Ewing,top,has rushed

for 587 yards in the last two games, while Carlmont’s Joe LaSala, above, spearheads the Scots’attack.

Prep, M-A meet in crucial Bay matchup

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Sacred Heart Prep (2-1 PAL Bay, 6-1 overall) at Menlo-Atherton (3- 0,5-2),7 p.m.

The Gators are coming off a tough 21-20 win over King’s Academy last week. … The Bears topped Jefferson 21-7. … Sacred Heart Prep has beaten M-A the last two years — 28-24 last year and 48- 14 in 2009. … Last week was the second in a row in which Sacred Heart Prep squeezed by an oppo- nent for a win. In their last two games — against Burlingame and King’s Academy — the Gators have won by a combined four points. … After averaging 31.6 points in their first five games, the Gators are aver- aging 19.5 in their last two. … Since throwing for a combined 598 yards in back-to-back games, SHP QB Jack Larson has combined for just 128 yards passing in his last two games. … Conversely, the Gators’ ground attack has re-found its groove, rushing for a season-high 309 yards last week. … M-A rushed

Best Bets

ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

M-A running back Taylor Mashack is ranked 14th in CCS in rushing, according to MaxPreps.com, having rushed for 712 yards and 10 touchdowns this season.

for 270 yards and three TDs in its

win

last

week,

led

by

Taylor

Mashack’s

135

yards

and

two

scores on just 12 carries. … A Bears

win tonight would setup a show-

down for the Bay Division title against Terra Nova next week. … While the M-A offense gets a lot of the praise, it’s the Bears’ defense that is shutting down opponents. They have the Bay Division’s best, allowing just over 13 points in league play and under 17 points for the season. … The Bears are riding a four-game winning streak.

Burlingame (0-3 PAL Bay,2-5 over- all) at Jefferson (0-2,1-6),7 p.m.

The Panthers suffered their sec- ond-straight heartbreaking loss, dropping a 35-28 decision to divi- sion-leading Terra Nova last week. … The Indians kept M-A defense in

check most of the game, but didn’t

have enough offense, falling 21-7. … The time is now for both these squads. The Bay Division’s fourth automatic CCS berth is up for grabs and the winner of this game will have the inside track to capturing it. … Burlingame rushed for 309 yards last week. … The Panthers trailed

See PREVIEWS, Page 16

Cards 10, Rangers 9

St. Louis forces a Game 7

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS — David Freese homered to lead off the bottom of the 11th inning, and the St. Louis Cardinals forced the World Series to a Game 7 by rallying from two-run deficits against the Texas Rangers in the 9th and 10th on Thursday night. Freese hit a two-run triple just over a leap- ing Nelson Cruz to tie the score 7-7 in the ninth inning against Neftali Feliz. Then, after Josh

ALL BUT OVER: WITH ONE WEEK TO PLAY, M-A VOLLEYBALL ALL BUT WRAPS UP BAY TITLE

David Freese

Hamilton put Texas ahead with a two-run homer in the 10th off Jason Motte, Ryan Theriot hit an RBI groundout in the bottom half and Lance Berkman tied it 9-9 with a single. Freese’s shot to center came off Mark Lowe. Game 7 is Thursday night. Texas had built a 7-4 lead in the seventh when Adrian Beltre and Nelson Cruz hit consecutive home runs off Lance Lynn, and Ian Kinsler added an RBI single off Octavio Dotel. Allen Craig’s second homer of the Series cut the gap in the eighth against Derek Holland. In the ninth, Albert Pujols dou- bled with one out off Feliz and Berkman walked on four pitches. Craig took a called third strike, and Freese fell behind in the count 1-2. He sliced an opposite-field drive, and when Cruz jumped, the crowd of 47,315 at Busch Stadium couldn’t tell at first whether he caught it. Feliz then retired Yadier Molina on a flyout to right, sending the game to extra innings. With Texas ahead 3-2 in the Series and one win from its first title, the Rangers also wasted 1-0, 3- 2 and 4-3 leads. The Cardinals made three errors in a Series game for the first time since 1943, and Rangers first baseman Michael Young made two, with each team allowing two unearned runs. Matt Holliday was picked off in the sixth at third base by catcher Mike Napoli, thwarting the Cardinals’ attempt to go ahead, and he had to leave the game because of a bruised right pinkie. Hamilton’s RBI single had put the Rangers ahead in the first off Jaime Garcia, Berkman’s two-run homer gave the Cardinals the lead in the bottom half and Kinsler’s run-scor- ing double tied it 2-all in the third. Cruz reached when Holliday dropped a flyball leading off the fourth and came home when Napoli singled for his 10th RBI of the Series. Berkman then got to first on a throwing error by Young starting

See SERIES, Page 13

  • 12 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

M-A sweeps Scots

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

For a team that was 11-0 heading into the league’s final three games of the season, the Menlo-Atherton girls volleyball team knew there was still some things it needed to work on. So the Bears reminded themselves of that. Heading into Game 3 of their match up against Carlmont, the Bears broke their huddle by yelling, “finish.” “A large part of volleyball is momentum,” said M-A coach Jen Wilson. “And last year, our team struggled with being able to finish and being able to execute. And this year, that has been one of our big focuses, really knowing how to fin- ish the last five points of a game. We needed to focus, not let it slide and not play sloppy just because we have a lead — playing at a high level all the time.” For the 2011 season, the Bears appear to be a playing a level above the league competition. Thursday, they had a second--place, one-loss Carlmont team on their schedule and, with the exception of Game 1, made it look relatively easy, defeat- ing the Scots 25-23, 25-13, 25-20. The win for the Bears moves them a clear two games ahead of the Scots with only two games left in the reg- ular season. “The last few practices, we’ve really worked on staying com- posed,” Wilson said. “And really stepping up in situations where it’s a

“Last year,our team struggled with being able to

finish and being able to execute.And this year, that has been one of our big focuses,really knowing how to finish the last five points of a game.”

— Jen Wilson,M-A volleyball coach

big game and we really need to come out and play hard. We’ve also been working on, as a team, being more aggressive. Not necessarily aggressive hitting, but being aggres- sive just in our attitude — really try- ing to be strategic with every play. They’re playing smarter, they’re seeing the court, they’re adapting and making changes during the match like they need to do. It’s help- ing us a lot.” A focused and determined Bears team is a dangerous one. They appeared to start Game 1 that way, managing a five-point lead through- out. But M-A hit a snag that almost cost them the game. Down 20-14, Carlmont caught fire and changed all they way back, eventually earn- ing a 22-20 advantage. It took an Ali Spindt kill to restore order, and some hitting errors down the stretch by Carlmont cost them the game and the momentum. “I thought all three games were the same,” said Carlmont coach Chris Crader. “We played really well in stretches, and we played really poorly in stretches. And in the first game, our really well stretch was a little longer and they didn’t play well in a stretch there. Overall, I didn’t prepare us well enough to do what we needed to do.”

After taking Game 1, the Bears took control from the get-go in Game 2 and didn’t let go. They built a 4-0 lead behind the play of Sarah Collins. Sarah Altman and Pauli King had huge kills in the middle of that game which the Bears won comfortably 25-13. King led the Bears with four kills in the frame. In their first match up this season, Carlmont’s Shelby Vance led all players with 20 kills. In Thursday’s showdown, it appeared the M-A defense keyed on the Scots’ star out- side hitter. “She’s a great player all the way around,” Wilson said. “She can hit from the back row, she can pass well. So we just tried to overload her. We tried to serve to her so she had to think about passing before they had to think about hitting. We really tried to have our blockers focused on her, penetrate the net and just get in front of her and take her out of the game.” The strategy worked, with Vance getting her numbers (12 kills), but not taking over the game like she is known to do. Game 3 was a little closer, but only for a bit, with M-A maintaining a seven-point lead through much of the game before winning it 25-20 and sweeping the match.

Rice Jr. will get first start at UCLA

By Greg Beacham

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — The name on the back of Jerry Rice Jr.’s UCLA jersey is an awfully heavy thing for a walk-on receiver to carry on his shoulders. The Bruins are grateful it hasn’t slowed him down at all, because it’s

time to see what the son of the NFL’s greatest receiver can do.

12 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL M-A sweeps Scots By Julio Lara

Jerry Rice Jr.

After nearly three years on

the

practice

squad doing the

grunt

work

expected from any walk-on, Rice is expected

to play in the

Rose Bowl for

the first time on Saturday when the Bruins host California. “I’ve been pretty mentally pre- pared for a long time,” Rice said after ditching his practice-squad gear and wearing his own jersey — No. 88, not his dad’s famed No. 80 — during practice this week. “I know the playbook a lot, but it’s going to be different,” Rice said. “I know when it gets closer to the game, I’m going to get more anx- ious, more excited, more nervous, all those things will come up, so I make sure to keep level-minded and be ready for anything.” Rice’s opportunity arose after four top UCLA receivers — Taylor

Embree, Randall Carroll, Shaquelle

Evans and Ricky Marvray — were

suspended by the Pac-12 for partici- pating in a brawl last week at Arizona. The Bruins’ roster is envi- ably deep with receivers, but the sus- pensions put Rice onto the depth chart right behind starters Nelson Rosario and Josh Smith. “Jerry has a golden opportunity,” UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel said.

“Jerry Rice Jr. has done everything

we’ve ever asked him to. He just needed an opportunity, and now he’s got one. He’ll play every play if we ask him to.”

Rice has been hard at work to earn this opportunity ever since arriving at UCLA in 2009. His coaches and teammates say he has none of the

attitude or entitlement that might be

expected from the namesake of the San Francisco 49ers’ Hall of Famer, and his talent has grown to the point that he earned a scholarship for next year. “If you didn’t know his name was Jerry Rice, you wouldn’t know he was his son,” UCLA quarterback Kevin Prince said. “He’s just a real- ly cool guy, a great teammate. Obviously, when your dad is the best receiver to ever play, you’re going to know the position, and you’re going

to know how

to

play. ...

He’s got

good hands and good route-running skills. I think he’ll fit in just fine. He doesn’t have quite the speed that Randall has. He doesn’t use his body like Taylor does, but he has the abil- ity to catch the ball and get open.”

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12 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL M-A sweeps Scots By Julio Lara

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

13

SERIES

Continued from page 11

the

bottom

half

and scored on

Molina’s grounder.

Freese dropped Hamilton’s popup to third leading off the fifth, and Young lined a pitch from Fernando Salas to the gap in left-center. An error by Young on Holliday’s sixth- inning grounder was followed by three straight walks, including two by Alexi Ogando.

Colby Lewis allowed four runs — two earned — and three hits in 5 1-3 innings.

Texas got far better swings against Garcia than it did in Game 2, when

he allowed three hits in six shutout innings. This time, he gave up five hits and two walks, throwing 59 pitches, and seven of the first 13

Texas batters reached base.

Just 24 of the 61 previous teams with 3-2 leads won Game 6, but 41 of those 61 teams went on to win the title. Eighteen teams trailing 3-2 in the best-of-seven format bounced back for championships, including 12 that swept the last two games at home.

In an effort to provide more pro- duction behind Pujols, Cardinals manager Tony La Russa moved Berkman to cleanup and dropped slumping Holliday down to fifth.

Rangers manager Ron Washington moved the hot-hitting Napoli up one spot to seventh and had Craig Gentry

hitting eighth, as he did in Game 2.

Four Cardinals Hall of Famers, wearing cardinal red sports jackets, stood at home plate before the game. Red Schoendienst, Lou Brock, Bob Gibson and Ozzie Smith. And then the greatest Cardinals player, 90- year-old Stan Musial, was driven from the right-field corner to the plate in a golf cart. Wearing a red sweater and Cardinals warmup jack- et, he greeted his fellow Hall of Famers and watched 2006 Series MVP David Eckstein throw out the ceremonial first pitch.

Texas went ahead 10 pitches in. After starting with a called strike, Garcia walked Kinsler on four straight pitches, and Elvis Andrus’ hit-and-run single put runners at the corners.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the

REUTERS

David Freese watches the game winning home run against the Texas Rangers during the 11th inning in Game 6 of the World Series.

GOTW

Continued from page 11

For the Scots and the Mustangs, they don’t get much more exciting than Friday’s game. They Daily Journal Game of the Week kicks off at 3 p.m. today at Carlmont.

Carlmont has found success in the regular season by playing some stout defense. In three games against San Mateo, Mills and Hillsdale, the Scots have held their opponents to an average of 13 points per game. In their four preseason losses, that number was 33. They’ll have their hands full on defense this week, trying to contain running back Justin Ewing, who in two PAL regular season games has averaged 42 carries, 299 yards and three touchdowns.

“They have one hell of running back,” Selli

said. “He’s an awesome kid. Obviously, we want to do whatever we can to stop him and their passing offense. “Watching him on film, I feel he’s the best

back we’ve faced in the league, maybe even

all year to be quite honest,” he said. “He’s a positive back. What I mean by that is, if you watch him, it doesn’t matter if one yard or two yards or three yards, he just keeps grinding it out every single play the same. His attitude is great. He finishes every run off all the way and he have to commend a kid like that. That’s what’s making them so great right now.” But the Scots have done a commendable job in stopping some great Lake Division backs already. In San Mateo’s Michael Latu, the Scots held him to only 40 yards rushing. And the Scots put a cap on the high-powered Hillsdale offense just a week ago. Some of that recent defensive success can be credited to the play of Joe Lasala, a two- way player for Carlmont who most recently

has stepped his game up on defense. But that is direct correlation to the rushing success of guys like Marquise Harris and Mark Concilla, who have taken the load off Lasala on offense. “I think it’s great having him fresh on defense,” Selli said of No. 44. “I think it also has to do with football shape. He was off last year and didn’t play. He worked hard in the offseason. And he’ll be the first to admit he wasn’t in football shape, ready to take on a two-way role. He plays hard every single play. He never takes a play off.” Both teams will try to impose their will run- ning the football Friday afternoon. While Ewing will get the bulk of the load for Cap, Carlmont’s approach is more about spreading the wealth. “It’s going to play itself out,” Selli said. “You never really know what’s going to hap- pen when the game starts, so you just kind of go with it.” The play on the field may be unpredictable,

but the magnitude of this game isn’t in ques- tion. If Carlmont wins, they have a loss to give with a tough match-up against an El Camino team who could possibly come in with only one loss the following week. If Capuchino wins, two games await, one against Hillsdale and the other against Mills who is struggling to stay healthy and hasn’t won a league game.

“They understand the importance of it,” Selli said of his team. “We’ve talked about it in our preparation for this week. We’ve spent a lot of time looking at what are all the posi- tives about Capuchino. You don’t have to say too much to get your guys focused on the importance of the game when you see a qual- ity opponent like Capuchino, a well-coached opponent. I told the guys they’re coming in ready to rock and roll and they have a back to do it. Our guys are excited, and they feel good about the team, but we’re definitely not over confident.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 13 SERIES Continued from page 11 the
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  • 14 Friday Oct. 28, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tigers can clinch at least co-title with win

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

King’s Academy (0-2 PAL Bay, 3-4 overall) at Terra Nova (3-0,5-2),7 p.m.

The Knights came up just short against Sacred Heart Prep last week, falling 21-20. … The Tigers got past Burlingame, 35-28. … King’s Academy decided to roll the dice and go for a 2-point conversion against the Gators last week and lost the gamble. … Knights’ RB Booker Robinson rushed for a team-high 142 yards on 15 carries and also caught the TD pass that got his team within a point with under two minutes to play. … In their final two non-league games before division play started, the Knights scored a combined 102 points, both wins. In their last two games — both losses — the Knights have scored a total of 41 points. … No one on the Terra Nova side believed the Tigers played all too well in their win over Burlingame, despite putting up 35 points. … Senior QB Chris Forbes threw for “only” 199 yards last week. He did rush for four TDs, however. … According to the teams that report their stats to MaxPreps.com, Forbes leads CCS in passing with over 2,000 yards.

Woodside (1-2 PAL Ocean, 4-2-1 overall)

at South City (1-2,5-2),7 p.m.

The Wildcats dropped a 35-20 decision to Aragon last week. … The Warriors suffered a gut wrenching 22-19 defeat to Half Moon Bay. … Woodside was without five starters in their loss last week. … QB Ricki Hoffer and WR Byron Castillo did their best to pick up the slack. Castillo, arguably one of the fastest players in the PAL, finished with six catches for 136 yards and two TDs. Hoffer was 16 for 30 for 269 yards. He threw the two scoring passes to Castillo and rushed for another. … South City racked up 438 yards of total offense, but once again, found it tough to punch it into the end zone. … The Warriors, after opening the season with five straight wins, have now dropped two in a row. … After averaging 30 points per game in their first five wins, the Warriors have averaged just over 20 points in their two losses.

Hillsdale (1-2 PAL Lake,2-5 overall) at Mills (0-2,1-6),3 p.m.

The Knights lost to undefeated Carlmont 35-21 last week. … The Vikings were drilled by El Camino, 41-14. … After tying the score at 7, Hillsdale gave up three straight scores

14 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Tigers can clinch at least co-title

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Woodside receiver Byron Castillo had six catches for 136 yards and two touchdowns last week.

and trailed Carlmont 28-7 at halftime. … The Knights managed only 223 yards of total offense, with QB Yannis Tsagarakis throwing for 157 yards and a TD. … Mills QB Harshal Lal returned to the lineup, after missing sever- al weeks with an injury, and threw two late TD passes. He threw for 76 yards — 75 of which came on the two scoring plays.

San Mateo (0-3 PAL Lake,0-6-1 overall) at El Camino (2-1,4-3),3 p.m.

The Bearcats were outscored in a 41-32 loss to Capuchino. … The Colts ran over Mills last week, 41-14. … This game could turn into an offensive shootout. … San Mateo rolled up 502 yards of total offense last week, with QB Trevor Brill throwing for 401 yards and five TDs. … WR Andrew Ho had a monster game, catching 10 passes for 226 yards and four touchdowns. … In three of their last four games, the Bearcats have scored 46, 33 and 32

points. In those games, they’ve allowed 54, 42

and 41. … El Camino RB D.J. Peluso ran roughshod over Mills last week, rolling to 214 yards rushing and scoring five TDs. … The 41 points scored was a season high for the Colts.

PREVIEWS

Continued from page 11

35-14 outscored the Tigers 14-0 in the fourth quarter to put a scare into Terra Nova. … Jefferson was held to just 14 yards rushing, but QB Marcel Evans threw for 250 and the Indians’ only touchdown. … The Indians have he worst scoring offense in the Bay Division. In league games, they are averaging less than nine points per game. Their overall mark isn’t much better, averaging right around 14 points per game for the season.

Menlo School (1-2 PAL Ocean,5-2 overall) at Aragon (2-1,6-1),7 p.m.

The Knights earned their first Ocean win of the season last week, downing Sequoia 42-28. … The Dons won their second straight divi-

sion game last week, a 35-20 win over Woodside. … Menlo’s sophomore QB Jack Heneghan continues to impress. He threw for over 360 yards and four TDs in last week’s

win. … The 42 points scored was a season

high for the Knights, which has scored a com- bined 42 in their previous two games — both losses. … Aragon continues to have the best ground attack this side of Serra. Last week, the Dons rushed for 323 yards, led by Victor Jimenez’s 105 yards and three TDs on 21 car- ries. … Aragon’s 35 points was its second- largest output of the season, behind a season- opening 50 the Dons hung on San Mateo. … Since Ocean Division play started, the Dons are scoring an average of 31 points while allowing 24.

Sequoia (1-2 PAL Ocean,4-3 overall) at Half Moon Bay (3-0,4-3),7 p.m.

The Cherokees suffered a debilitating 42-28

14 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Tigers can clinch at least co-title

loss to Menlo last week. … The Cougars won a wild 22-19 decision over South City. … Since opening Ocean play with a 32-28 win over Aragon, Sequoia has dropped two straight and three of its last four. … The Cherokees racked up over 300 yards on the ground last week, led by Josh Lauese’s 209 yards on just 18 carries. He had scoring runs of 20 and 73 yards. … The Sequoia defense has given up 42 points the last two weeks, its worst performances of the season. … Half Moon Bay was, once again, led by Wes Walters — on both offense and defense. He rushed for 174 yards and three TDs, but also broke up a potential game-winning pass in the end zone on the final play of the game. It was the second week in a row the Cougars needed to make a final defensive stand to secure the win.

Sports briefs

Fans to be checked by metal detectors at NFL games

NEW YORK — Security personnel at NFL games will begin using hand-held metal detec- tors as part of the screening process before fans enter the stadiums. Beginning Nov. 20, the detectors will be used at stadium gates because “we are always striving for ways to improve our security pro- cedures at all of our stadiums,” an NFL spokesman says. The Green Bay Packers and Cleveland Browns already have used them this season. The league has done so at every Super Bowl since 2002 in New Orleans. In addition to fans, media and working per- sonnel will be subject to the screenings, which will be phased in “so they will not necessarily be immediately used at every gate,” the spokesman adds.

14 Friday • Oct. 28, 2011 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Tigers can clinch at least co-title

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Friday Oct. 28, 2011

15

10/30 11/6 11/13 11/20 11/24 12/4 12/11 vs.Browns @Wash. vs.Giants vs. Arizona @ Ravens vs.St. Louis
10/30
11/6
11/13
11/20
11/24
12/4 12/11
vs.Browns
@Wash.
vs.Giants
vs. Arizona
@ Ravens
vs.St. Louis
@ Arizona
1 p.m.
10 a.m.
1
p.m.
1:05 p.m.
5:20 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
CBS
FOX
FOX
FOX
NFLN
FOX
FOX
10/30
11/6 11/10 11/20
11/27
12/4
12/11
vs.Broncos
@ Chargers
@ Vikings
vs. Chicago
@ Miami
@ Packers
Bye
1:15 p.m.
5:20 p.m
10 a.m.
1:05 p.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
CBS
CBS
CBS
FOX
CBS
CBS
10/28 10/29 10/31
11/3
11/5 11/10 11/12
@ Detroit
@ Islanders
@ Rangers
vs.Wild
vs.Phoenix
vs.Pens
vs.Preds
4:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4
p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
VERSUS
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL

LOCAL SCOREBOARD

GIRLS’TENNIS PAL team tournament Aragon 7,Terra Nova 0

SINGLES — Kaede Ishikawa (A) d.Clara Oh 6-0,6- 0; Samantha Wong (A) d. Maddie McAndrew 6-0, 6-0; Victoria Sun (A) d. Monica Corpio 6-0, 6-0; Melissa Ma (A) d.Victoria Moung 6-0,6-0.DOUBLES — Amy Jiang-Christina Hsu (A) d.Ashley Martyn- Sierra Dockery 6-0,6-1;Alyssa Lim-Stacy Ozorio (A) d.Cameron Longsgoen-Miranda Steinberg 6-0,6- 0; Emily Yip-Jamie Ahn (A) d. Kristee Song-Lina Le

6-2,6-0.

WBAL Sacred Heart Prep 4,Crystal Springs 3

SINGLES — Nordman (SHP) d.Chui 6-1,6-2;Hemm (SHP) d.Chen 6-1,6-2;Tsuei (CS) d.Bokman 7-5,7- 5; Schulz (SHP) d. Milligan 6-0, 6-2. DOUBLES — Marshall-Sarwal (SHP) d.Luh-Leroy 2-6,6-2,(10-8); Wang-Kereszti (CS) d. K. Ackley-L. Ackley 6-4, 7-5; Casey-Jones (SHP) d.Chu-McCrum 7-5,6-3.Records — Sacred Heart Prep 16-5 overall.

GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL Hillsdale def. Westmoor 25-17, 25-16, 25-18

(Highlights: W — Fiame 10 kills; Chew 13 assists;

Mopas 18 digs). Records — Westmoor 4-8 PAL Ocean,16-16 overall;Hillsdale 10-2.

Menlo-Atherton def.Carlmont 25-23,25-13,25-

  • 20 (Highlights: C — Duba 14 digs, 2 aces; Vance

  • 11 kills, 9 digs, 2 blocks; Ramulo 4 kills, 3 blocks).

Records — Menlo-Atherton 12-0 PAL Bay, 20-4 overall;Carlmont 10-2,18-8.

BOYS’WATER POLO Menlo School 20,Woodside 5

Menlo 9 7 1 3 — 20 Woodside 1 3 1 0 — 5

Menlo goal scorers — Hale 5;Rosales 4;Wilson 3; Haaland, Avery 2; Lucas, Ho, Walker, Rozenfeld.

Menlo goalie saves — Dillon 1; Lazar 4. Records — Menlo School 4-0 PAL Bay,14-5 overall.

Hillsdale 14,San Mateo 8

Hillsdale 6 3 4 1 — 14 San Mateo 2 1 3 2 — 8

Goal scorers: H — Dorst 5; Jolly, Sweeney 3; Hof- fert 2;Amaya.SM — Halet 6;McCall,Babbs.

GIRLS’WATER POLO Hillsdale 12,San Mateo 5

Hillsdale 2 2 5 3 —

12

San Mateo 2 1 1 1 —

5

Goal scorers:H — Dachauer 4;Souther 3;Durney 2;Solis,Ross,Tognotti.SM — Grimes 2;Middlekauff, Low,Oey.

COLLEGE

WOMEN’S GOLF

Cañada 361,Fresno 361,Reedley 367,West Hills DNF

Moffett Field,par 73

C — Mehreen Raheel (C) 82 (medalist); Josslyn Congress 87;Tayler Woods 92;Hannah Murray 100.

WEDNESDAY GIRLS’GOLF WBAL championships at Poplar Creek

CCS team qualifiers — Sacred Heart Prep —

Rachael Henry 73; Kennedy Shields 77; Shelby Soltau 81;Emma Dake,Micaela Hutter 92.

Individual

qualifiers:

Miranda

Wiss

(Mercy-

Burlingame) 84;Caroline Broderick (Menlo School)

87.

GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL Menlo School def. Mercy-SF 23-25, 25-18, 25-

17, 25-18 (Highlights: MS — Frappier 17 kills; Huber 14 kills, 7 digs; Merten 40 assists, 17 digs). Records — Menlo School 6-2 WBAL,20-6 overall.

TRANSACTIONS

MLB

American League

KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Re-signed LHP Andrew Dobies, LHP Edgar Osuna, RHP Mario Santiago, C Cody Clark, INF Irving Falu, INF John Whittleman and OF Paulo Orlando to minor league contracts.

National League

MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Sent LHP Mitch Stetter outright to Nashville (IL).

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Exercised the 2012 and 2013 contract options on RHP Adam Wainwright.

NFL CHICAGO BEARS—Released S Chris Harris. NHL

COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Recalled D David Savard from Springfield (AHL). Activated D Theo Ruth from injured reserve and assigned him to Springfield.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Sent C Nazem Kadri to Toronto (AHL). Recalled G Ben Scrivens from Toronto.

Professional Bowlers Association

PBA—Announced the retirement of chief execu- tive officer and commissioner Fred Schreyer, who will continue to serve as a senior advisor. Named Geoff Reiss chief executive officer. Promoted Tom Clark to commissioner,effective November 1.

Women’s Professional Soccer WPS—Terminated the magicjack franchise. COLLEGE

AMERICAN U.—Signed men’s basketball coach Jeff Jones to a contract extension through the 2015- 16 season.

CALIFORNIA—Named Solly Fulp deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer.

DEPAUL—Announced freshman basketball G Macari Brooks withdrew from school.

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON—Named Deb Solfaro sen- ior associate athletics director and Amanda Livsey and Michael Kellner assistant athletic trainers.

HAMILTON—Named Kate DeSorrento women’s basketball coach. SAINT MARY’S (CAL.)—Signed women’s soccer

coach Kai Edwards to a contract extension through

2015.

WHATS ON TAP

FRIDAY

FOOTBALL

Capuchino at Carlmont,Hillsdale at Mills,San Mateo at El Camino,3 p.m.;Burlingame at Jefferson,King’s Academy at Terra Nova,Sacred Heart Prep at Menlo- Atherton,Menlo at Aragon,Seuqoia at Half Moon Bay,Woodside at South City, Serra at Bellarmine, 7 p.m.

GIRLS’TENNIS

PAL Team Tournament

Menlo-Atherton-Carlmont winner at Aragon,4 p.m.

SATURDAY

FOOTBALL

City College San Francisco at College of San Mateo, 1 p.m.

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Pittsburgh

8

2

2

18

36

24

Philadelphia

5

4

1

11

36

35

New Jersey

4

2

1

9

16

16

N.Y.Rangers

3

3

2

8

16

18

N.Y.Islanders

3

4

1

7

16

20

Northeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Toronto

6

2

1

13

30

29

Buffalo

6

3

0

12

27

19

Ottawa

5

5

0

10

31

39

Montreal

3

5

2

8

25

28

Boston

3

6

0

6

20

21

Southeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Washington

7

1

0

14

31

16

Florida

5

4

0

10

23

23

Tampa Bay

4

4

2

10

32

35

Carolina

3

3

3

9

24

30

Winnipeg

3

5

1

7

26

35

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Central Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Chicago

5

1

2

12

27

20

Detroit

5

2

0

10

20

18

St.Louis

5

4

0

10

25

24

Nashville

4

4

1

9

21

26

Columbus

1

8

1

3

23

34

Northwest Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Edmonton

5

2

2

12

18

15

Colorado

6

3

0

12

28

24

Minnesota

3

3

3

9

20

23

Vancouver

4

5

1

9

24

29

Calgary

3

4

1

7

19

22

Pacific Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Dallas

7

3

0

14

25

22

Los Angeles

6

2

1

13

22

16

Anaheim

5

3

1

11

21

22

San Jose

4

3

0

8

21

17

Phoenix

3

3

2

8

22

25

Two points for a win,one point for overtime loss or shootout loss.

———

Thursday’s Games

Pittsburgh 3,N.Y.Islanders 2,SO Montreal 2,Boston 1 Buffalo 4,Columbus 2 Toronto 4,N.Y.Rangers 2 Winnipeg 9,Philadelphia 8 Ottawa 4,Florida 3 Nashville 5,Tampa Bay 3 Anaheim 3,Minnesota 2 Los Angeles 5,Dallas 3 Edmonton 2,Washington 1 New Jersey at Phoenix,late

NFL STANDINGS

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

East

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

New England

5

1

0

.833

185

135

Buffalo

4

2

0

.667

188

147

N.Y.Jets

4

3

0

.571

172

152

Miami

0

6

0

.000

90

146

South

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Houston

4

3

0

.571

182

131

Tennessee

3

3

0

.500

112

135

Jacksonville

2

5

0

.286

84

139

Indianapolis

0

7

0

.000

111

225

North

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Pittsburgh

5

2

0

.714

151

122

Baltimore

4

2

0

.667

155

83

Cincinnati

4

2

0

.667

137

111

Cleveland

3

3

0

.500

97

120

West

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

San Diego

4

2

0

.667

141

136

Oakland

4

3

0

.571

160

178

Kansas City

3

3

0

.500

105

150

Denver

2

4

0

.333

123

155

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

 

East

 

W