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2 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011

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Issue No. 2011-303
3 NEWS
Page 3 Union reps claim mayor wont talk settlement
Page 5 DPW employees son used city trailer
Page 7 Balloon release starts Red Ribbon Week
Page 10 Simonsons escape charges advanced
12 ARTS
Page 12 Homebrewers unite, plan Nov. 5 event
Page 14 Mystery at the Masonic set
Page 17 PHOTOS: OMalley Halloween party
20 SPORTS
Page 20 Burkes championship plan pans out
Page 23 Lady Comets in district soccer final
Page 26 No mercy for losing football teams
Page 27 Local tennis teams out of state play
GO Lackawanna Editor
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JASON RIEDMILLER
PHOTO / FOR GO
LACKAWANNA
Scranton resi-
dent Johnathan
Houck of Scran-
ton was among
those attending
the annual
OMalley Hallo-
ween Party at
McDade Park
last week. PHO-
TOS: Page 17.
When one
of Sylvester
Stallones mo-
vie characters
were refer-
enced out of
context last
week, I didnt think too much of
it.
Two references to the charac-
ter, along with Saturdays Octo-
ber snow, make me think that
rapture seeking Harold Camp-
ing might not have been too far
off with his recent end of days
prediction.
Stallones iconic role as John
Rambo began in 1982 with
First Blood where, if you ask
the Internet Movie Database,
he portrays a mentally unstable
Vietnam veteran.
Of the two men apparently
seeking Sylvester over the last
two weeks, one is a bit more
likely in my book.
Union Attorney Thomas Jen-
nings called Mayor Chris Do-
herty Rambo for his one-man
war against union arbitration,
armed with Act 47 rather than
an AK-47.
Escaped prisoner Michael Si-
monson allegedly told Lacka-
wanna County detectives that
after fleeing from the county
prisononSept. 28, he wouldgo
Rambo, hide in the woods for a
few days, and head south of the
border.
Call me crazy, but the admit-
ted murderer fits the action he-
ro stereotype a bit more than
the mayor. The mayors running
rituals could put himin a better
spot to flee from some Michael
Bay-esque explosions, however.
Its so very odd for such a spe-
cific character from pop culture
to appear twice in the same
week and in the same city.
Was there a weekend on
Spike TV that no one told me
about?
Is 2008s rehashing of one
mans battle against injustice
through firearms being re-re-
leased in 3-D with special bul-
let time edits that take viewers
on a ride with each shell
through the innards of Burmese
infantry soldiers who kidnap
Christian aid workers?
Perhaps not, but I can practi-
cally hear the late Don LaFon-
taine narrating the trailer for
the film that pulls us all from fi-
nancial ruin.
One man facing millions of
debt. Another facing life in pris-
on. Coincidence brought them
together, but their adventure
will tear you apart.
I wonder if Stallone would
star in a film dedicated to the
mockery of his iconic titles.
Perhaps we could enlist the
help of Rocky impersonator
Mike Kunda, the West Scranton
native and author who has
chronicled his aim to become
the heavyweight champion of
the world, to change roles for
two months of production.
A blockbuster film with the
proceeds going to the city is one
financial solution I havent
heardfromeither the legislative
or executive arms of the city.
Who knows if it could work?
Of course, Im joking.
But only a little.
Stallone leaves unusual mark on city
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES wishes
he was Don LaFontaine. Email him
at chughes@golackawanna.com.
BEHIND THE
BYLINES
C H R I S T O P H E R J .
H U G H E S
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Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 3
SCRANTON City Council gave
final approval to a $3.2 million sub-
mission for 2012 community plan-
ning and development programs to
be funded under the Community
Development Block Grant, Home
Investment Partnership, and Emer-
gency Solutions Grant programs
on Tuesday.
Vice President Pat Rogan read a
list of councils agreed amend-
ments to the submission, including
significant increases to street pav-
ing, blight removal, and other im-
provement projects while remov-
ing funding for arts and entertain-
ment programs such as the Scran-
ton Jazz Festival and First Night
Scranton.
Council said these amendments
were based on the immediate
needs of both the city and its resi-
dents, who attended a public hear-
ing last month to voice their oppo-
sition to a proposed public park on
the site of the former Lincoln-Jack-
son Elementary School among oth-
er funding allocations.
The line item for $350,000 to
tear down the empty facility and
construct a parkthat wouldinclude
playground equipment, a pavilion,
and green space was removed com-
pletely from councils final submis-
sion after residents told council
that the park would only foster on-
going crime issues in the neighbor-
hood.
They also felt that the park
would be neglected as the nearby
Fellows Park and Allen Park alleg-
edly have been for years.
Council had to allow 30 days to
pass before final passage of the leg-
islation.
One resident who lives directly
across the street from the former
school, Michael Passero, invited
neighbors and Councilman Jack
Loscombe to his home on Acade-
my Street hours before the final
vote to discuss these continuing
problems.
Neighbors talked about increas-
es in local gang activity and strings
of recent robberies in the formerly
quiet West Scranton neighbor-
hood, labeling it a war zone, as
well as citywide issues such as the
citys $6 million budget deficit and
taxes.
Council amends,
passes federal
funding plan
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
S
CRANTON Council and
union representatives agreed
on one clear message during
Tuesdays meeting: Mayor Chris Do-
herty must finally negotiate withthe
unions to avoid catastrophic con-
sequences, including major layoffs
and tax increases following a union
win regarding arbitration rights.
The 6-1 Pennsylvania Supreme Court
ruling on Oct. 19 put to rest a decade-long
battlethat delayedmillions of dollars inar-
bitration awards under the Policemen and
Firemen Collective Bargaining Act, or Act
111, stating that the distressed municipal-
ities act, or Act 47, does not supersede Act
111. The city is already facinganestimated
$6 million budget deficit this year, among
other financial issues.
Everybodys sayingits awin. Its not re-
ally a win. All the Supreme Court did was
reaffirm our rights to collective bargain-
ing, which weve said from day one since
this started. The problem is that this has
been retracted for so long that the dollar
amount has swollen to huge numbers,
E.B. Jermyn Lodge No. 2 of the Fraternal
Order of Police President and Scranton
Detective Sgt. Bob Martin told council.
We want to help resolve this. Were not
here to bankrupt the city. Thats the last
thing we want to doWe didnt pick this
fight. Someone else picked this fight.
John Judge IV, secretary of Internation-
al Association of Fire Fighters Local 60,
concurred, sayingthat theunions haveal-
ways extendedtheolivebranch tocityad-
ministration.
When this Supreme Court award came
downlast week, none of the members that
I spoke to in my local said anything about
the money. They were concerned, primar-
ily, about what this department is going to
be like after Mayor Doherty got through
with it knowing that they lost the court
case. Inthat spirit of cooperation, we want
to come to the mayor and work things
out, Judge explained.
At a meeting with the Pennsylvania De-
partment of Economic and Community
Development and the Pennsylvania Econ-
omy League on Monday, Judge said Busi-
ness Administrator RyanMcGowanasked
the mayor if he would be willing to nego-
tiate incremental payments with the
unions.
We were basically told no, Judge con-
tinued. Weve alreadyheardfromhim. He
said, Absolutely not.
International Association of Fire Fight-
ers Local 60 President and Scranton Fire
Lt. Dave Gervasi added that he has heard
that Dohertys plan is to raise taxes up to
100 percent, implement massive public
safety layoffs, and borrow money to pay
thebill all at once, whichhecalledunreal-
istic. Council President Janet Evans
agreed.
The mayor has proclaimed, almost im-
mediately, a significant tax increase and
significant cuts in public services, and evi-
dentially, his target once again is the po-
lice and fire departments, and I dont be-
lieve that is the proper way to approach
the situation, Evans said.
Councilman Frank Joyce said that the
administration currently estimates the
long-delayed settlement to be anywhere
from $6 to $10 million. Councilman Pat
Administration plan to cut workers, raise taxes likely to stick
RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA
IAFF Local 60 Secretary John Judge said unions were told Mayor Chris Doherty would absolutely not meet to discuss last
weeks Supreme Court ruling worth millions of dollars for city police and fire department employees.
Unions: Doherty wont negotiate
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
See COUNCIL, Page 11
4 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
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ILKES-BARRE -
A federal judge
postponed the
sentencing of former Lacka-
wanna County Commission-
ers Robert Cordaro and A.J.
Munchak on Thursday, cit-
ingCordarosnewlegal coun-
sel as the basis for the delay.
U.S. District Judge A. Ri-
chard Caputo announced
his decision after 40 min-
utes of in-chamber discus-
sions held Thursday after-
noon that was expected to
discuss leniency sought in
the sentencing originally
set for Monday, Oct. 31.
Cordarodidnot namethenew
counsel that will represent him
in his sentencing and appeal.
It was a decision that I made
with Atty. (William) Costopou-
los, and I think the judge very
fairly gave new counsel the op-
portunity to do what they need
todo, Cordarosaidonthe steps
of the Max Rosenn United
States Courthouse Thursday af-
ternoon.
Caputo said Cordaros new
counsel has until Nov. 3 to enter
an appearance. If they fail to do
so, sentencing for both men is
moved to Nov. 14.
If counsel does appear, they
will have 60 days from that date
to file supplemental objections
to a presentence investigation
report dated Sept. 20.
Prosecutors will have 14 days
to respond, and sentencing will
beheldsevendays later, pushing
the sentencing for the corrupt
commissioners as far back as
mid-January.
Because Munchak was tried
jointly with Cordaro, his sen-
tencing will also be postponed,
Caputo said.
Guilty verdicts on 18 of 33
counts against Cordaro and
eight of 21counts against Mun-
chakwere handeddownonJune
21 after less than eight hours of
deliberation.
The decision followed an 11-
day trial that outlined how the
two former Republican county
leaders used their positions to
arrange personal payments in
exchange for lucrative county
contracts, at times using a West
Scranton funeral home director
as a so-calledbagman todeliv-
er cash-stuffed envelopes.
One such arrangement even-
tually led to the loss of more
than$900,000infederal funding
for the construction of an inter-
modal transportation center in
downtown Scranton after a bid-
ding process was violated.
In motions filed Wednesday,
Munchaks attorney, Chris Po-
well, cited a lifetime of commu-
nity service including the dona-
tion of more than 22 gallons of
bloodas part of thebasis for leni-
ency in his sentencing.
Courts have recognized ex-
ceptional charitable, civic and
community service as a basis for
downward departure, Powell
wrote in one of the three mo-
tions filed Oct. 26.
While Cordaro admitted
Thursdays decision delays the
inevitable, he said it does so for
good reason.
Its a day of reckoning thats
coming. I didnt really have any
reason to want to delay it just to
delay it, Cordaro said. I just
want the best opportunity to
present our case both for sen-
tencing and appeal.
I think the judge very fairly gave new counsel the opportunity to do what they need to do.
Robert Cordaro, convicted county commissioner on sentencing delay, possibly until January 2012.
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Former Lackawanna County Comissioner Robert Cordaro discusses his impending sentencing outside the Max Rosenn U.S. Cour-
thouse on Thursday..
New Cordaro counsel delays sentencing
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
SCRANTON The League
of WomenVotersof Lackawan-
na County hosted a Scranton
City Council candidate debate
on Thursday evening, giving
the three candidates one final
public forum to express their
views tovoters beforetheNov.
8election.
Moderated by LWV board
member Jean Harris and held
in the Moskovitz Auditorium
in the DeNaples Center at the
University of Scranton, the
hour-and-a-half debate was re-
corded by Electric City Televi-
sion to be shown on Comcast
Channel 19 as well as online at
www.lwvlackawanna.org.
Each candidate was given
time to introduce themselves
and their respective platforms
before discussing issues such
asthecityscurrentbudgetdef-
icit, union negotiations, the
media and transparency, pub-
lic safety, and the state take-
over of Harrisburg.
Eachcandidatewithhisplat-
formislistedalphabetically, by
last name:
Jack Loscombe, who is
listed on both the Democratic
andRepublicantickets,wasap-
pointed to council to fill a va-
cancyinJanuaryof 2010. Since
then, hesaidhehasbeenlisten-
ing to the needs of city resi-
dents carefully wherever he
goes and pledged to continue
working for the citizens of
Scranton. As a retired fire cap-
tain, he feels his past work ex-
periencehas givenhiminsight
into the citys public safety is-
sues.
Bob McGoff, a Democrat
who has served on council for
over five years, said his goal is
to help city legislators and ad-
ministration work past their
political and personal agendas
to find common ground and
worktogethertowardsthebet-
terment of thecity. Asaretired
teacher and the councilman
with the most experience, he
feelsthathehaslearnedtodeal
with a wide variety of people,
each with their own ideas and
Council
candidates
offer plans
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
See DEBATE, Page 8
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Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 5
SCRANTON The son of a
23-year employee of the citys
Department of Public Works
used a city-owned vehicle in a
commercial drivers license test
last month.
Don Richardson, hired in
April 1988, drove the citys
flatbed trailer to the Penn-
DOT Photo and Exam Center,
81 Keystone Industrial Park,
Dunmore, to allow his son,
Donny, to apply for his CDL
License, according to a letter
from City Controller Roseann
Novembrino to City Council
dated Oct. 11 and a phone in-
terview with DPW Director
Jeff Brazil.
According to Novembrinos
letter, Donny Richardson took
the test with a Class A vehicle
registered to the city of Scran-
ton on Sept. 20.
Brazil said Friday that he au-
thorized the use of city equip-
ment because he respects the
work his employees complete.
Its rare, Brazil saidof the re-
quest to use city equipment.
I authorized it because the
father, the employee, is one of
those guys who, when Im in
the middle of a snowstorm
and everybodys going home,
hes the guy that who asks,
Do you need me for a few
more hours? These guys give
me their all.
The equipment was used
when Mr. Richardson was off
the clock, according to Bra-
zil.
The use of DPW equipment
for private matters follows
the termination earlier this
year of Scranton Sewer Au-
thority employee Paul Lu-
dovici for the alleged use of
authority equipment to re-
move dirt at a West Scranton
home.
Ludovici was allegedly hired
as a private contractor and giv-
en permission to use city equip-
ment by a supervisor whose
identity could not be con-
firmed.
City equipment
used in drivers
license testing
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
SCRANTON - The 7-year-
old boy whose parents are
charged with locking him in a
coffin in a now-condemned
Green Ridge home sat on the
stand Monday amid several
hours of testimony. The
young man alleged several
times that his stepfather,
Brian Sleboda, locked me in
the basement with lots of
scary stuff including on the
night of Sept. 26 when his
cries prompted neighbors to
call police.
The first grade student
said he was placed in a chair
in the basement once and was
able to open a door into the
kitchen of the Raines Street
home where he also lived
with his mother, Lori Gardn-
er.
When Sleboda found the
boy, he allegedly sent him
back to the basement and put
him in a homemade, plywood
coffin that was surrounded
by fake vampires and skele-
tons.
The second time, they
locked it, he said, barely
able to see over the top edge
of the witness stand. I was
crying a lot down there. I
wanted to come back up, and
I was crying very loud.
After opening the coffin,
the boy discovered the door
to the kitchen was now
locked. He then struggled to
open a locked door leading to
the backyard.
He had a difficult time
cracking the code, Scran-
ton Ptlw. Melissa Forsette
testified, adding that he had
been placed in the basement
six times prior to Sept. 26.
When he was down there be-
fore, he had tried to open the
lock. He said, God told me
how to crack the code.
The boy testified that when
he got outside the basement,
he was embarrassed to enter
the yard because he was bare-
foot and wearing a diaper
with no pants. Neighbors
who heard his cries from a
doorway leading into the
yard called police.
When Forsette arrived
shortly after Ptlm. Jason
Knoch, the young man
hugged her and asked, Are
you here to help me?
Later, the boy asked if offi-
cers knew what street they
were on. Officers told him
they knew he lived on Raines
Street, and he pointed to the
numbers on his mailbox so
they could find him if he were
ever hurt again.
I dont want my momto go
to jail, but I dont want her to
hurt me anymore, the boy al-
legedly told Forsette.
According to testimony
from Scranton Detective
Vince Uher, Gardner told him
in an interview after she and
Sleboda surrendered to po-
lice that she put her son on
the top step of the basement
stairs for letting his 1-year-
old brother out of his play-
pen, closing but not locking
the door behind her.
Uher said the home was
condemned based solely on
the conditions of the base-
ment where the boy was sent
for punishment, which alleg-
edly had raw sewage flowing
out of a non-working toilet,
charred beams visible above
missing ceiling tiles showing
signs of a prior fire, and ex-
posed wires.
Charges against both Sle-
boda, 32, and Gardner, 26, of
endangering the welfare of
children and unlawful re-
straint were held for county
court after the Oct. 24 pre-
liminary hearing before Ma-
gisterial District Judge Alice
Hailstone Farrell.
The boy is currently in fos-
ter care.
Charges forwarded in bizarre abuse case
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
Gardner Sleboda
He said, God told me
how to crack the code.
Scranton Ptlw. Melissa Forsette
On how a 7-year-old boy said he
was able to open a door leading to
his backyard from his basement.
PITTSTON TWP. For 65 years, the
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Air-
port has been led by a board thats made up
of the three county commissioners from
the neighboring counties of Lackawanna
and Luzerne.
But that could change soon, and for the
better, in the opinion of one present board
member.
I think weve waited a long time for this
day, said Lackawanna County Commis-
sioner Mike Washo. He said the time has
come to have board members making deci-
sions based on whats best for the airport,
not the two counties.
Were talking about whats good for Lu-
zerne County; whats good for Lackawanna
County. Hopefully, the day will come when
the discussion is about whats good for the
airport.
The airports Bi-County Board of Com-
missioners voted Tuesday to move forward
with a process that would dissolve the
board and replace it with an airport author-
ity. Before that happens, much needs to be
decided.
Forming the authority seems to have the
support of the commissioners ineachcoun-
ty, as all five of thempresent votedto direct
solicitor John OBrien to proceed with the
process for drafting articles of incorpora-
tionandinformingtheFederal AviationAd-
ministration and Pennsylvania Depart-
ment of Transportation of their plans. Lu-
zerne County Commissioner Marianne Pe-
trilla was not present.
Other matters are not as clear.
In addition to whether to form the au-
thority, the commissioners in each county
must determine how many members will
serve on the authority, how many years
they will serve, and what qualifications
they should have.
Public hearings in each county will be
held in late November or early December
so commissioners can get feedback on the
plan. Each countys commissioners will
thenmeet separately to vote onresolutions
creating the authority and approving the
articles of incorporation.
If both boards of commissioners approve
the resolutions, they will appoint the newly
createdauthoritys initial members as early
as December.
OBrien said he is leaning toward recom-
mending the authority makeup be the
same as the current Bi-County Board
with three representatives fromeach coun-
ty. Though county commissioners would
appoint the first authority members, the
soon-to-be-seated Luzerne County Council
would be responsible for that task starting
in January.
Lackawanna County Commissioners
would continue to make appointments in
the future.
Washo said he is glad to be involved in
securing the airports future.
Airport Director Barry Centini said he
would support the change, if it were made.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Were talking about whats good for
Luzerne County; whats good for
Lackawanna County. Hopefully, the
day will come when the discussion is
about whats good for the airport.
Lackawanna County Commissioner Mike Washo
Changing who runs WBS airport may fly
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Mom offers thanks to Rep.
Murphy
Representative Kevin Murphy,
D-Scranton, is the prime
sponsor for Zacharys Law
(HB 601). The Bill creates a
mandatory minimum sen-
tence of 13 years for persons
convicted of third degree
murder of a child.
I wanted to express my sin-
cere gratitude for Rep. Mur-
phys hard work and dedi-
cation to this Bill.
Zacharys Law was passed
unanimously in the Penn-
sylvania House Judiciary
Committee on October 25.
One year ago, Rep. Murphy
was approached with this
proposal for change and, from
that first meeting, Rep. Mur-
phy committed himself and
his wonderful staff to the
cause.
Zacharys Law is named in
honor of my son Zachary, who
was murdered at the hand of
a child abuser when he was 14
months old. The year that
followed my sons death was
eye opening. I assumed that if
you murdered a child, you got
a lengthy sentence.
However, third degree murder
in Pennsylvania carries a
minimum sentence of as little
as six years in jail.
A child is innocent. They
depend on adults to love and
care for them. Murder of a
child is the most heinous
crime I can think of. It certain-
ly warrants a sentence of
higher than six years.
HB 601 will change the land-
scape of Pennsylvania and
how those who murder chil-
dren are punished. Rep. Mur-
phy not only stood up for the
memory of my child but also
for every child across the
commonwealth by supporting
a new mandatory minimum
sentence.
I look forward to the journey
our bill will continue to travel
and the continued support of
Rep. Murphy.
Sincerely,
Christine McLaughlin
Former Dickson City resi-
dent
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
TMG Health broke ground
on its future National Oper-
ations Center in the Valley
View Business Park on Fri-
day, Oct. 21. The facility will
be a three-story, 150,000
square foot building with the
opportunity to expand to
210,000 square feet, and
housing for up to 1,500 local
employees. Construction is
expected to be complete in
the third quarter of 2012 by
Verus Partners.
The growth of TMG
Health allows our company
to continue its economic
commitment to Northeastern
Pennsylvania by offering
quality job opportunities to
the local community, said
Jack Tigue, president and
founder of TMG Health. The
construction of our new Na-
tional Operations Center is a
tribute to our dedicated em-
ployees, especially our North-
eastern Pennsylvania employ-
ees, who have contributed to
both the success and growth
of our company.
TMG serves health plans
across the nation in the Medi-
care Advantage, Part D and
Managed Medicaid Markets.
Headquartered in King of
Prussia, the company cur-
rently has locations in Dun-
more; Scranton; and Amaril-
lo, Texas.
COURTESY PHOTO / SLIBCO AND MICHAEL STRAUB
Shown are, from left, Steve Yokimishin, Governors Action Team; Jim Watson and Steve Rock, TMG; State Sen. John Blake; Jim Ka-
dela, chair of TMG Healths Board of Directors; Jack Tigue, TMG; Austin Burke, Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce; Lackawan-
na County Commissioners Corey OBrien and Michael Washo; Harry Forbes, regional office director of the Governors Northeast
Regional Office; and Pat Acker, chair of SLIBCOs Board of Directors.
TMG breaks ground for center
Shine ALight on Lung Cancer vigil, Tues., Nov.
1, Latour Roomof Marywood University. Event is
free, registration requested at www.lungcancer-
alliance.org/shinealightonlungcancer. Info: Karen
Arscott, (570) 348-6211, ext. 2175.
27th annual sportsmens banquet, Wed., Nov.
2, 6 p.m., Inn of the Abingtons, Route 524, Dal-
ton. Cost: Membership and dinner, $50; family
membership and two dinners, $90 and $25 for
each additional. Proceeds used to restore and
protect grouse and woodcock habitat through
Ruffed Grouse Society. Info: (570) 983-9918,
www.ruffedgrousesociety.org.
Habitat for Humanity silent auction and beer
tasting, Thurs., Nov. 3, 5:30-8:30 p.m., POSH
at the Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton. Cost: $40. Info: info@habitatlacka-
wanna.org.
Senior fair, hosted by PARep. Ken Smith,
Thurs., Nov. 3, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., North Pocono
Senior Center, 12 John J. Michaels Dr., Coving-
ton Township. Info: (570) 342-2710.
Celebrity bartending event to aid the Boys
and Girls Clubs of NEPA, Fri., Nov. 4, 5-7 p.m.,
Whiskey Dicks, 308 N. Washington Ave., Scran-
ton. Cost: $10.
East Meets West, United Cultures Lead-
ership Institute speaker series, Fri., Nov. 4,
6-9 p.m., Vintage Theater, 119 Penn Ave., Scran-
ton.
Benefit for a Friend, Sat., Nov. 5, 5-10 p.m.,
Dante Literary Society, 1916 Prospect Ave.,
Scranton. Cost: $10. Proceeds benefit the chil-
dren of late West Scranton resident Michael
Duffy. Info: Gary Ford at (570) 840-2596, Jay
Roche at (570) 241-3921.
Cheers to Hope, Pancreatic Cancer Action
Network fundraiser, Sat., Nov. 5, 6-10 p.m.,
Clarion Hotel, 300 MeadowAve., Scranton.
Cost: $25. Info: psavage@pancanvolunteer.org.
Fight for Sight, benefit for 3-year-old Jake
Paff, Sat., Nov. 5, 8 p.m.-midnight, Mollys Cozy
Corner, 1324 Prospect Ave., Scranton. Info:
(570) 344-9981.
Neighborhood meeting, Sat., Nov. 5, 2-5 p.m.,
St. Patricks Church lower meeting room, 1403
Jackson St., Scranton. Info: (570) 878-7368.
NEPABlogger meet-up, Sun., Nov. 6, 6-11 p.m.,
Metro Bar and Grill, 1174 Memorial Highway,
Dallas. Info: http://nepablogs.blogspot.com.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
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Arguments heard in political
firing suit
WILKES-BARRE U.S.
District Judge A. Richard
Caputo heard arguments from
Atty. James Scanlon, repre-
senting the city of Scranton,
and Atty. Johanna Gelb, repre-
senting Leo DAngelo, the
citys former director of com-
munity planning at the Office
of Economic and Community
Development.
DAngelo alleged in a May 12
suit that he was cut from the
citys budget, amended and
approved by City Council,
because of his political support
for Mayor Chris Doherty.
Wednesdays hearing fol-
lowed a July motion to dismiss
the suit from the city on the
grounds of legislative immuni-
ty. Gelb argued in an August
response that is not immune
from suit and did not claim to
be in its motion, arguing in-
stead on behalf of City Coun-
cil, who is not named in the
suit.
- CHRISTOPHER J.
HUGHES / GO LACKAWAN-
NA
Sno Mountain at least $4.6
million in debt
SCRANTON Sno Moun-
tain, the Philadelphia-based
company that bought the
ever-struggling Montage
Mountain ski resort from Lack-
awanna County in 2006, has
some serious struggles of its
own to the tune of at least
$4.6 million in outstanding
debt.
State Department of Com-
munity and Economic Devel-
opment spokeswoman Theresa
Elliott said the company has
not made a monthly payment
on a $5 million loan since
Sept. 23, 2010. Prior to that,
Sno Mountain had made 15
monthly payments, though
some of those were partial.
The amount due each month
should be $70,670, Elliott
said.
Sno Mountain LLC bought
Montage Mountain for $5.1
million, promising to turn it
into a year-round recreation
center through a $14 million
infusion, with $8 million ear-
marked for addition of a water
park. The company applied for
the DCED money through its
First Industries and Machines
fund. The fund is geared
toward improving tourism in
the state.
Elliott said the loan was for
seven years at 5 percent in-
terest, and that DCED is
discussing the lack of pay-
ments with Sno Mountain.
We have been in contact
with the company and are
working with them to make
the loan balance current.
The resort struggled since
it opened in 1984. It was one
of the first developments in
what has become a booming
business region around the
Montage exit of Interstate 81.
A call seeking comment
from Sno Mountain was not
returned Thursday. The re-
sorts website gives the ap-
pearance of business as usual,
listing job openings, offering
a season pass sale, and ad-
vertising a Nov. 5 job fair.
- MARK GUYDISH / THE
TIMES LEADER
Lackawanna
commissioners cancel last
meeting before election
SCRANTON The Lacka-
wanna County Commission-
ers meeting scheduled for
Wednesday, Oct. 26 at 10 a.m.
was cancelled due to a then-
pending court decision on the
meetings lone agenda item
the borrowing of $20.5 mil-
lion, which was approved just
hours later.
The judge hasnt ruled on
that yet, so the chief of staff
(Maria Elkins) recommended
that we cancel the meeting,
County Communications
Director Lynne Shedlock said
at about 12:30 p.m. on
Wednesday.
Visiting Senior Judge Peter
J. OBrien approved the bor-
rowing in a decision released
at 1:21 p.m. on Wednesday,
ruling that curtail of public
services would be dangerous
to the public health, safety
and education.
The Lackawanna County
Stadium Authority meeting
was also cancelled on
Wednesday due to a lack of a
quorum.
The next commissioners
meeting is set for Wednesda,
Nov. 9.
GO LACKAWANNA
STAFF
NEWS BRIEFS
FOUR HUNDRED RED BALLONS GO BY
S
CRANTON Nearly 400 students at John G. Whittier Elementary School in South
Scranton released red balloons Monday morning to celebrate the beginning of Red
Ribbon Week, which encourages young people to lead drug-free lives.
Mondays balloon launch also marked 10 years in the collaborative, innovative way to
share the drug-free message with students between Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty and
Whittier Principal Ann McDonough, former principal of the now closed Lincoln-Jackson
Elementary School.
Small tags were attached to the balloons seeking responses from people who find them
across the country. Last years balloons garnered letters back from New York, Vermont,
New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, according to Whittier PTA President Melissa Ecken-
rode.
Local leaders including Doherty, Superintendent William King, Pennsylvania State Police
Trooper Frank Orlando, and Scranton Police Lt. Len Namiotka encouraged students to
not only stay away from drugs but also to be lifelong learners.
- CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
Riverside tudents recognized for
Electric Art
Riverside High School seniors
Rainy Pritchett, Jessica Davis and
Sean Ritter recently participated in
the Electric Art project for their
senior projects. The students trans-
formed utility boxes into perma-
nent art installations throughout
downtown Scranton.
TCMC sets Turkey Trot
On Saturday, November 19, The
Commonwealth Medical Colleges
MD Class of 2014 will host the
second annual Turkey Trot: 5K
Walk/Run in downtown Scranton.
The event will also feature a Tot
Trot for children age 13 and under.
Proceeds of the students commu-
nity fundraiser will benefit Friends
of the Poor annual Thanksgiving
community dinner.
Check in begins at 7:30 a.m. in the
main lobby of the Medical Sciences
Building, 525 Pine St., Scranton.
The Tot Trot steps off at 8:30 a.m.
and the 5K Walk/Run begins at 9
a.m.. T-shirts will be provided to
the first 100 pre-registered partici-
pants.
Race day registration fee is $20
for ages 14 and above, or partici-
pants can pre-register online for
$15. Registration for the Tot Trot is
$5 or two canned goods to be
donated to the food drive.
Scranton among top producers
of Fulbright students
The University of Scranton has
placed second among Masters
Institutions in the nation for
producing Fulbright scholarships
for students in 2011-12, according
to a ranking published by The
Chronicle of Higher Education
online on Oct. 23.
Scranton is one of just six Jesuit
universities to be cited. Universi-
ties listed are broken into four
categories based on their school
type as designated by the Carne-
gie Classification of Institutions of
Higher Education. The University
of Scranton is second among 20
masters level institutions rec-
ognized.
Scrantons 2011-12 Fulbright schol-
ars are Rebecca Bartley, James-
burg, N.J., Fulbright English
Teaching Assistantship to Malay-
sia; Melissa C. Beltz, Eagleville,
Fulbright/Pdagogischer Aus-
tauschdienst English Teaching
Assistantship to Germany; Kaitlyn
L. Doremus, Tobyhanna, Ful-
bright/Pdagogischer Austausch-
dienst English Teaching Assist-
antship to Germany; Philip J.
Kachmar, Kingston, Fulbright
Scholarship to the University of
British Columbia in Vancouver,
Canada; and Aileen M. Monks,
Bellmore, N.Y., Fulbright-Nehru
English Teaching Assistantship to
India; and Gian Peter Vergnetti,
Brooklyn, N.Y., a Fulbright to the
Masdar Institute of Science and
Technology, Masdar City, Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
A total of 134 University of Scran-
ton students have received grants
in the competitions administered
by the Institute of International
Education since 1972.
SCHOOL NOTES
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SCRANTON A visiting senior judge
ruled Wednesday that Lackawanna Coun-
ty can borrowup to $21million to cover its
unfunded debt through the end of 2011.
In his findings of fact filed Oct. 26, vis-
iting Senior Judge Peter J. OBrien wrote
that in government, as in life, hindsight is
always 20/20 but reality provides surpris-
es toone andall. The County of Lackawan-
na has plenty of company in government
bodies surprised by the current economic
climate in the country.
The plan to borrow up to $21 million
was suggested in September by a financial
advisoryboard, andanevidentiaryhearing
was held Oct. 19.
Duringthat hearing, Lackawanna Coun-
ty Chief Financial Officer Tom Durkin
warned that the countys inability to bor-
rowthe moneywouldresult inpayless pay-
days and that defaults on tax anticipation
note payments would negatively impact
the countys finances.
Curtail of public services wouldbe dan-
gerous tothe public health, safety andedu-
cation, and it is not feasible nor in the
public interest to levy additional taxes in
the current fiscal year, OBrien wrote.
Durkin said shortfalls were caused by
losses including but not limited to the loss
of federal inmates in the Lackawanna
County Prison for which the federal gov-
ernment was expectedtopaymorethan$3
million and a SWAP termination intended
to fix a variable interest rate on a bond is-
sue that cost the county another $10 mil-
lion.
County borrowing plan approved
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
JOBS GROUP: BARLETTA LIAR, PINOCCHIO
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO
S
CRANTON Taking issue with a town hall meeting held in Hazleton on Oct. 17,
members of the NEPA Needs Jobs Coalition picketed against U.S. Rep. Lou
Barletta, R-Hazleton, on Oct. 25 on Courthouse Square in Scranton.
We were quite shocked with the amount of lies Lou told at that meeting, Wilkes-
Barre resident and jobs coalition member AJ Marin said Tuesday, standing next to a
cardboard cutout of the representative.
The forum in Hazleton started out orderly and remained that way until about 30
minutes into the event, when some audience members began shouting out as Bar-
letta was responding to questions from constituents, according to reports from The
Times Leader.
According to Marin, Barletta made false claims about the loss of $500 million from
Medicare caused by the Healthcare Reform Act. He also said that the Ryan budget
would not cut funding to Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security.
Marin questioned Barlettas support of certain free trade agreements, claiming they
would cost more than 150,000 American jobs.
We have to ask, who is Lou Barletta representing? Is he representing the corpora-
tions, or is he representing people in Scranton faced with economic hardships? he
said.
We want the people of Scranton and the people throughout the 11th Congressional
District to know that Lou Barletta is a liar, and its time to call him out for being Pi-
nocchio, Marin added, before adding a prosthetic nose to the cutout of the con-
gressman.
- CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES / GO LACKAWANNA
Dunmores Elmhurst Boule-
vard will receive emergency
patching this week in an at-
tempt to protect residents un-
til more extensive work can be
done, borough officials an-
nounced at this past Mondays
council meeting.
Civil Design Partners of
Moscow recently inspected
the boulevard and found that
there were significant pot-
holes, some larger than six
inches deep. They also ob-
served motorists veering into
the oncoming lane to avoid
the potholes, potentially put-
ting residents and pedestri-
ans at risk, according to bor-
ough solicitor Thomas Cum-
mings.
The roads major problem is
the storm water on its south-
erly side and, until this is ad-
dressed, the road will contin-
ue to deteriorate.
The long-term resolution
for the problem is quite ex-
pensive and will take a certain
amount of time, but at least
this will help the people into
the winter months, Cum-
mings said.
Redoing the road and storm
water system on Elmhurst
Boulevard could be a multi-
million dollar project, some-
thing that the borough cannot
finance without help from the
county, state, and federal gov-
ernments.
We need to do something
up there to protect the people
as much as we can, said coun-
cil president Sal Verrastro.
In other news:
Joseph Germano was ap-
pointed school crossing guard
for the Dunmore School Dis-
trict by a unanimous vote.
The boroughs Cable
Franchise Agreement was ap-
proved for an additional 10
years with no additional im-
pact on the public.
Officials voted unani-
mously to declare November
as National Pancreatic Cancer
Awareness Month in Dun-
more.
Emergency
patching set
in Dunmore
By STEPHANIE LONGO
For Go Lackawanna
issues, andbuildconsensus.
Lee Morgan, the lone Re-
publican candidate, said he is
running for council because he
has been attending council
meetings for over 20 years and
feels that eachelectedbody has
been ineffective in solving the
citys debt issues and have not
been listening to the needs of
thepeople. Hebelievesthat pol-
itics haveplayedtoolargearole
in city government and that he
haslearnedfromthemistakesof
past councils hehas observed.
Issues involving the citys fi-
nancial situation were the sub-
ject of manyquestions.
Toprevent future budget def-
icits, Morgan said that council
must go through budgets line
item by line item and find out
where the money is going and
makecutsacrosstheboardcuts.
He is against borrowing more
money.
Loscombe feels that too
much has been cut from basic
cityservicesandthefederal gov-
ernment cannot be relied on
anymore for bailouts. Both he
and McGoff support new reve-
nuesources, suchascommuter,
amusement, andpayrolltaxes; a
better parking meter system;
and a stronger rental registra-
tionprogram.
Morgan feels a lack of em-
ploymentandbusinessdevelop-
ment in the city, as well as high
taxes, has driven citizens away
andsuggestedthe implementa-
tion of a comprehensive plan
suchastheScranton-Abingtons
Planning Association Compre-
hensive Plan, a plan which
McGoff alsosupports.
DEBATE
Continued from page 4
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9
10 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
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S
CRANTON Mi-
chael Simonson
worked the day be-
fore his brief escape from
the Lackawanna County
Prison last month to get
things in order, according
to testimony from a pre-
liminary hearing on Mon-
day, Oct. 24.
Lackawanna County Prison
Intelligence Capt. Robert Ma-
guire said they learned in an
interview after the escape
that Simonson had used a
four-inch steel shank that he
smuggled into the prison ear-
lier that month to cut open a
section of chain link fence
over the top of a personal rec-
reation yard, or dog pen, on
Sept. 27.
The next day, Lackawanna
County Detective Chris Kol-
charno said, he smuggled a
tightly braided brown bed
sheet that he prepared the
night before into the pen in-
side his pants, climbed one
chain link fence, covered a
portion of razor wire above a
second fence with the sheet,
and stepped onto a steel pole
to leap over the prison wall
and onto the roof of the neigh-
boring Medical Mall on
Wyoming Avenue.
Simonson later encoun-
tered Pennsylvania American
Water employee Dave
Hughes, who testified that
the escapee knocked on the
window of his work vehicle
asking for directions to River
Street.
As the utility worker looked
up directions on his iPhone,
Simonson told him to hurry
up and explained that he just
escaped from the prison.
I thought he was joking
around, Hughes said.
When Simonson asked for
his van, Hughes told him no
and was
punched in
the face.
Simonson
held the
shank up to
his own face
and ordered
Hughes out
again.
I figured my life was more
important than the van,
Hughes said, explaining that
he surrendered the vehicle.
Among the patrolmen re-
sponding to both emergency
calls was Scranton Ptlm. Ke-
vin Davis, who testified that
he made a U-turn on Wyom-
ing Avenue at Mulberry
Street when he spotted the
van with a shirtless Simonson
behind the wheel.
Davis followed the van until
Simonson ditched it along
North Washington Avenue as
it was still moving.
He cornered Simonson be-
hind the Wells Fargo bank
branch in the 100 block of For-
est Court off of Spruce Street
after a foot pursuit.
Simonson, who is serving a
life sentence for a murder
committed in April 2009 in
Luzerne County, was looking
for River Street as a means to
reach the interstate and hide
for the rest of his days south
of the border, Kolcharno said.
He stated that once he got
to (Interstate) 81, he would
ditch the van, live in the
woods for a few days to go
Rambo as he defined it, and
he wanted to make his way to
Mexico, Kolcharno said.
Charges of robbery of a mo-
tor vehicle, aggravated as-
sault of a protected person,
assault by a life prisoner,
reckless endangerment, es-
cape, an inmate procuring
himself with a weapon, and
fleeing or attempting to elude
a police officer were bound
over for county court by Ma-
gisterial District Judge Alice
Hailstone Farrell after Mon-
days hearing.
Prisoners plan: Go
Rambo, flee to Mexico
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
Simonson
Michael Simonson allegedly cut top of rec
yard fence day before his Sept. 28 escape.
SCRANTON The Lacka-
wanna County Prison Board
held an hour-long executive
session on Wednesday after-
noon to discuss the details of
District Attorney Andy Jarbo-
las ongoing investigation into
the Sept. 28 escape of convict-
ed murderer Michael Simon-
son, but few details were made
public.
Despite Simonsons elabo-
rate escape plan, Jarbola said
there was no evidence found
that suggested he had help
from inside the prison during
planning or execution.
I can say definitively no. He
hadno help, no aidwhatsoever.
Someone didnt say, Hey, do
this, or someone didnt give
him the knife. He didnt have
any proactive assistance, he
stated.
Simonson, who is serving a
life sentence for the April 2009
murder of Donald Skiff in Lu-
zerne County, was able to es-
cape after allegedly being left
unsupervised.
During a preliminary hear-
ing on those charges held Mon-
day, it was alleged that Simon-
sonuseda four-inchsteel shank
to cut open a section of chain
link fence over the top of a per-
sonal recreation yard the day
before his escape.
He then used a tightly braid-
ed bed sheet to climb the fence
and cover a section of razor
wire above a second fence with
the sheet, allowing him to step
on a metal pole and leap over
the prison wall and onto the
roof of the neighboring Medi-
cal Mall on Wyoming Avenue.
After carjacking a nearby
Pennsylvania American Water
vehicle, he crashed into a
parked car in the 200 block of
North Washington Avenue and
was captured after a pursuit on
foot.
The escape, which only last-
ed about 10 minutes before he
was apprehended in the 100
block of Forest Court by Scran-
ton Police, occurred just one
hour after the previous board
meeting.
Now, one month later, Jarbo-
la said he expects his investiga-
tion to wrap-up in about a
week to two weeks after com-
ing across other unspecified in-
formation involving prison em-
ployees, the warden, and other
matters.
I dont want to get into spe-
cifics, but I know as a result of
this incident, the Simonson es-
cape, we came across some oth-
er information that we had to
followup with, Jarbola said af-
ter the meeting.
Four prison guards - Sgt.
Brian Cwalinski and correc-
tions officers Richard Pitoniak,
Kevin Dolphin, and Michael
Zemantauski - were immedi-
ately suspended after the es-
cape andthenfiredonOct. 7 by
Warden Robert McMillan.
McMillan declined com-
ment on revelations made
Monday, citing the continued
investigation.
No inside help for Simonson, DA says
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
as a result of this
incident, the Simonson
escape, we came
across some other in-
formation that we had
to follow up with.
District Attorney Andy Jarbola
On the continuing investigation
into Michael Simonsons escape
Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 11
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The following criminal charges were filed
in Lackawanna County Court between Sept. 18
and Oct. 22. All accounts are derivative of
affidavits prepared by lawenforcement
officials, and all charges are pending follow-
ing the respective hearings of the suspects
unless noted otherwise.
OLYPHANT
ASSAULT CHARGES were filed Sept. 18
against PatrickCoombes, 22, of Valley
Avenue, Olyphant, for allegedly punching two
sleeping men in the head, face, and neck
while he was held in the Lackawanna County
Processing Center for public drunkenness.
Coombes had to be tased to stop the attack
and was placed in a restraint chair before
being moved to his own holding cell. Cpl.
John Tigue of the Lackawanna County
Sheriffs Office was the arresting officer.
Coombes was charged by summons on
Oct. 5 with two counts each of simple assault
and harassment and one count of disorderly
conduct. A preliminary hearing is set for Oct.
31.
SCRANTON
BURGLARY CHARGES were filed Oct. 21
against Arthur Decker, 34, of Ferdinand
Street, Scranton, after he allegedly stole
copper pipe froma home for sale in the 500
block of Wales Street on Oct. 18. Decker
allegedly admitted to the theft when ques-
tioned by police at his home on Oct. 20. Ptlm.
Rocco Cipriano was the arresting officer.
Decker was arraigned Oct. 21 on charges of
burglary, theft, and receiving stolen property
and was released on $20,000 unsecured bail.
A preliminary hearing is set for Oct. 31.
DISORDERLY CONDUCT CHARGES were
filed Oct. 21 against MartinDunayIII, 42,
of Pond Run, Clarks Summit, for allegedly
making death threats against his ex-wifes
newfianc on Oct. 21. The fianc, Steve Hanis,
said he was nervous about the threats
because Martin has several firearms. Ptlm.
Mark Kosko was the arresting officer.
Dunay was arraigned Oct. 22 on charges of
terroristic threats and disorderly conduct,
and he was held for $5,000 bail. A preliminary
hearing is set for Oct. 31.
BURGLARY CHARGES were filed Oct. 21
against RoyHawkins, 46, of Capouse
Avenue, Scranton, and Robert Edward
Smith, 39, homeless, for an alleged bur-
glary in the1000 block of Capouse Avenue on
Oct. 20. Hawkins and Smith allegedly removed
almost all of the copper pipe and wiring
fromthe home, and their backpack contained
pipe cutters, according to police. Ptlm. Donald
Hofsommer was the arresting officer.
Hawkins and Smith were arraigned Oct. 21
on identical charges: two counts each of
burglary and criminal trespassing, and one
count of possessing an instrument of crime.
Each was held for 10 percent of $5,000 bail,
and preliminary hearings are set for Oct. 31.
ASSAULT CHARGES were filed Oct. 22
against ShaneLoughney, 24, of Stafford
Avenue, Scranton, after he allegedly stabbed
Michael Kulick with a steak knife for failing to
burn copies of DVDs for himearly that
morning. Loughney also allegedly placed
Kulick in a chokehold until he passed out.
Ptlm. James Weaver was the arresting officer.
Loughney was arraigned Oct. 22 on two
counts each of aggravated and simple assault
and one count each of reckless endanger-
ment and harassment, and he was held for
$25,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for
Oct. 31.
THEFT CHARGES were filed Oct. 20
against JustinNeff, 31, last known address
on Lincoln Avenue, Scranton, and Matthew
PatrickWhite, 23, of Main Street, Old
Forge, for the alleged theft of a donation jar
at Peppers Pizza to a 2-year-old girls family
pay for her leukemia treatment. The jar
contained approximately $150 and was stolen
fromthe business on Oct. 9, according to
business owner Gene Fitzpatrick. A store
employee positively identified both men after
viewing photos provided by Scranton police.
Detective Timothy Mayo was the arresting
officer.
Neff and White were arraigned Oct. 21 on
two counts each of theft and one count of
receiving stolen property. White faces a
second count of receiving stolen property.
Neff was held for $10,000 bail, and Whites bail
was set at $5,000. Preliminary hearings are
set for Oct. 31.
DRUG PARAPHERNALIA CHARGES were
filed Oct. 7 against MarkOprisko, 45, of
Pittston Avenue, Scranton, after police
allegedly discovered11 syringes inside his
pants pocket as he sat on the steps of the
Gary A. DiBileo Agency, Inc., at 302 S. Main
Ave., Scranton, on Aug. 15. Ptlm. William
Golden was the arresting officer.
Oprisko was charged by summons on Oct.
7 for possession of drug paraphernalia. A
preliminary hearing is set for Nov. 2.
INDECENT ASSAULT CHARGES were filed
Oct. 21 against StevenPsolka, 36, of
Tennant Street, Pittston, after he allegedly
attempted to force a woman to performoral
sex on himin the back stairwell of the
ColosseumNightclub & Lounge. When Psolka,
a former security guard at the club, would not
put his foot inside a patrol vehicle after his
arrest, he was warned he would be tased and
allegedly replied, You do what you gotta do!
Ptlm. Robert Olecki was the arresting officer.
Psolka was arraigned Oct. 21 on charges of
indecent assault, indecent exposure, dis-
orderly conduct, and resisting arrest, and he
was released on $5,000 unsecured bail. A
preliminary hearing is set for Oct. 31.
RETAIL THEFT CHARGES were filed Oct.
20 against MarcySingleton, 35, of
Broadway Street, Scranton, after she alleged-
ly stole $560.44 in clothing fromGymboree at
the Mall at Steamtown. Singleton was wanted
on a warrant for a Nov. 30, 2010 incident for
the alleged theft of $217.84 in merchandise
fromthe Christmas Tree Shops in Moosic and
another incident that day for an attempted
theft at the Redners market in Scranton. Ptlm
Steven Lavin was the arresting officer in the
most recent incident.
Singleton was arraigned Oct. 20 on one
count of retail theft and released on $2,500
unsecured bail. A preliminary hearing is set
for Oct. 31.
POLICE BLOTTER
Rogan emphasized that he
wouldnot support a taxincrease
to raise these funds.
We cant afford to lose more
cops. We cant afford to have
more firehouses closing in the
city. We absolutelycannot afford
toincreasetaxes. Thepeopleare
broke. There is no more money
to squeeze out of residents of
this city, Rogan said.
.
Councilman Bob McGoff was
the only council member to ex-
press outright disagreement
with the courts ruling, saying
that because arbitrators favor
unions, this discourages the ne-
gotiation of contracts altogeth-
er.
We nowhave arbitrators that
are determining howmunicipal-
ities are going to operate. I think
this diminishes the authority of
all elected officialsIt takes the
power away from the elected of-
ficials and puts it in the hands of
somebody who is never elect-
ed, McGoff said.
I think this turns democracy
aroundIt sets a bad precedent,
and that concerns me.
He did agree, however, that
themayor shouldnegotiatewith
the unions and said he would
meet withhimtoencourage him
to do so.
Evans said that council would
alsobe willingtoworkout a pay-
ment plan with the unions on
their own and present it to the
mayor for his approval. While
placing much of the blame on
Dohertys shoulders, she also
felt that the state DCED and
PEL actively urged and en-
abled the city to continue de-
laying the decision, selecting
Scranton from among other dis-
tressed municipalities to use as
their guinea pig to prove the
supremacy of Act 47.
Evans asked City Clerk Nancy
Krake to send a letter on behalf
of council requesting state fund-
ing fromDCEDto help with the
citys costs and another letter to
Governor Tom Corbett and
DCED requesting the replace-
ment of PEL and a local DCEP
representative as Act 47 coordi-
nators due to their failed lead-
ership. McGoff opposed both
letters, but was outvoted 4-1.
Additional letters weresent to
Senator John Blake and state
representatives Kevin Murphy
and Ken Smith requesting their
assistance in obtaining state
funds to further mitigate costs.
Doherty did not return a re-
quest for comment on Friday. In
a phone interviewlast week, the
mayor told Go Lackawanna that
employment cuts would be
across the board, but public
safety workers would be hit the
hardest.
COUNCIL
Continued from page 3
RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Scranton Fire Lt. Dave Gervasi, fire union president, alleged
Tuesday that city taxes could increase 100 percent under the
mayors supposed plan.
NO TASTE LIKE HOME
S
ean Wolfe knows the con-
notations that may come
along with forming two
groups dedicated to beer, but the
Waldorf Park Beer Club and
Scranton Brewers Guild seek to
shatter those ideas.
Theres more to do with beer
thanjust drinkit andfall downon
a Saturday night, Wolfe, 29, of
Clarks Green, said. Theres this
underlying beer subculture in
Scranton that is vastly un-
tapped.
Wolfe and Lee Burke, 60, of
Newton Township, formed
the beer club more than two
years ago with the intent to
share beer culture and educa-
tion with others who appre-
ciated it.
We started by doing differ-
ent styles of beer. We did Ok-
toberfests and fall beers,
pumpkin beers. Then we were
able to attract local brewers to
come up, Burke said. We tell
you what you are tasting, why
it tastes like that, where it
comes from its pretty neat.
The growth of the club soon
brought the addition of home-
brewers, which created the
secondary brewers guild that
formedinJune tofurther facil-
itate the hobby, Wolfe said.
Its more than just drink-
ing, he added with a hearty
laugh.
Wolfe, Burke and 16 other
members of the guild, includ-
ing Wolfes wife, Christina, 30,
gathered Wednesday, Oct. 26,
at Jacks Draft House, 802
Prescott Ave., Scranton, to
share their creations and proc-
esses behind their personal
brews. The group meets there
the final Wednesday of each
month, but dates may shift in
November and December to
accommodate the holidays.
One of the exciting parts
about the brewing industry is
that no one is anti-informa-
tion, Mr. Wolfe said.
Its more of an air of cam-
araderie than it is of competi-
tion, brewer Ron Sechler
added.
A Learn to Homebrew
Day on tap at Breaker Brew-
ing Company in Wilkes-Barre
on Nov. 5 embodies that spirit
of sharing details and devo-
tions to pale ales, IPAs, and
more. The educational day in
Luzerne County is their first
major public event.
The Scranton Brewers
Guild attends local events cel-
ebrating all things beer to con-
tinue their education and ap-
preciation of the beverage.
If youre going to brew
good beer, you need to taste a
lot of beers to know what you
Scranton Brewers Guild to conduct Nov. 5 event on homebrewed beer in Wilkes-Barre
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Scranton Brewers Guild member Sean Wolfe, right, pours a sample of Hooch for Lee Burke during the groups meeting on Oct. 26 at Jacks Draft House.
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
12 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
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See BREWERS, Page 17
The Scranton Brewers Guild will participate in Learn to Home-
brew Day on Saturday, Nov. 5, at Breaker Brewing Co., 783 E.
Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre, from10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The compa-
ny is located in the former St. Josephs Church.
For details, call Sean Wolfe at (570) 499-3423 or email scran-
tonbrewers@gmail.com.
LEARN MORE
Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 13
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This year, the Pennsylvania
Historical and Museum Com-
missions 2011 annual theme is
William Penns Legacy: Reli-
gious and Spiritual Diversity.
The annual theme provides
state museums with a focus to
examine Pennsylvanias rich
history and its influence on
many of the traditions and
values that have shaped the
American experience.
Part of the Anthracite Heri-
tage Museums plan to focus
on this years theme is an
exciting partnership with St.
Saint Lukes Episcopal
Church, 232 Wyoming Ave.,
Scranton, who will host Reli-
gion and the Rails at the
November 4 First Friday event
from 6 to 9 p.m.
Religion has always played a
significant part in the devel-
opment of the region and the
city of Scranton itself. In many
ways, the Industrial Revolu-
tion spawned an awakening in
various socio-religious move-
ments.
In 1840 the area of present
day Scranton was a sleepy
little hamlet known as Slo-
cums Hollow. With the dis-
covery of anthracite coal and
iron in the region, the settle-
ment became known as Scran-
ton and, by 1860, was home to
the Scranton Brothers Lacka-
wanna Iron and Coal Compa-
ny and its iron furnaces. The
iron furnaces, which made
T-Rails for the railroad and
coal industries, attracted a
large number of immigrants to
the region searching for jobs.
Early on, the immigrants
were predominately Welsh,
Irish, and German. Later, in
the late 19th and early 20th
centuries, Eastern and South-
ern European ethnic groups
arrived to take advantage of
the many job opportunities in
the very active coal mining
region. With this growing
population, other industries,
especially railroading thrived.
However, as industry in-
creased and communities
grew, there was also an in-
crease in crime.
In 1844, the Young Mens
Christian Association (YM-
CA) was born out of the in-
dustrial revolution in London.
By 1860, several American
cities followed suit and orga-
nized their own YMCAs.
In 1872, the nations first
YMCA designated specifically
for railroads was established
in Cleveland, Ohio. By 1877,
Scranton, too, established a
Railroad YMCA on Wyoming
Avenue. By 1903, the RR YM-
CA had constructed an official
club house at 55 Lackawanna
Ave. and became a home
away from home for thou-
sands of railroaders through
the decades. However by the
1960s, as the railroad industry
declined, so, too, did the use
of RR YMCAs across the
country.
In May, 1968, it was an-
nounced that the facility on
Lackawanna Avenue would
close its doors and railroaders
would be accommodated for
overnight stays at the Hotel
Casey.
Religion on the Rails will
relate the history of the RR
YMCA and the significant role
religion has played on the
railroads in the area and
throughout the country. Staff
and board members of the
Pennsylvania Anthracite Heri-
tage Museum planned the
display, which consists of
images from the museums
collections plus model trains
loaned by museum volunteers.
Religion and the rails
MINING HISTORY
JOHN E. FIELDING AND
ROBERT SAVAKINUS
Hometown: Zionsville, Ind.
Education: Washburn College
Profession: Jesuit Volunteer at
Saint Francis of Assisi Kitchen
This weeks Go Lackawanna Go-Get-
ter is a recent Lackawanna County
transplant whohas brought nothingbut
positiveenergyandcontributions tothe
least fortunate of our region.
He resides at the Saint Joseph Cen-
ter with four other Jesuit volunteers.
During his last year of college, Einterz
decided to take employment with the
Jesuit Volunteer Corps.
Our four values at the Jesuit Volun-
teer Corps are social justice, simplicity,
community, andspirituality. This organi-
zation gives me a chance to grow and
also allows me to be of some service to
the greater community, said Einterz.
Einterzsaidhis positionandtheover-
all mission of the Saint Francis of Assisi
Kitchen are quite simple.
We strive to be a place of comfort
and assistance to some of the most
marginalized in our community, he
said. We provide a hot meal to those in
needandwe alsoprovide a less tangible
and equally as important resource,
companionship.
Einterz enjoys running and has been
a runner since elementary school. He
said he began running as a way to keep
up with his older brother.
Uponhis first entry intothe Scranton
Marathon this fall, Einterz said it was a
fabulous experience, citing what a
great community Scranton is and the
beautiful small town feeling the mara-
thon had.
Einterz says he has also been over-
whelmed by the generosity and hospi-
tality shown to him by Lackawanna
County citizens.
To learn more about Jesuit Volun-
teers at St. Francis of Assisi Kitchen, vis-
it their Facebook page at www.face-
book.com/stfranciskitchen.
Einterz also is active in the organiza-
tion Scranton Running and encourages
residents tovisit www.scrantonrunning-
.com to learn more about community
running events.
Go-Getter: Seth Einterz
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Seth Einterz finished eighth in his first attempt at the Steam-
town Marathon earlier this month.
14 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
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Its almost
Halloween, so
if youre not
trickor treat-
ing, partyingin
full costume,
navigating
your waythrougha haunted
house, or holdingsomeone tight
ona scaryhayride, youre most
likelywatchinghorror movies.
This year, hopefully, youre doing
soat home andnot ina theater.
The onlytwohorror films that
seemtobe playingintheaters
across the countryat the mo-
ment are Paranormal Activity
3, a tiredsequel, andThe
Thing prequel/remake/re-
hashedgarbage that youalready
knowit is. Its fittingthat these
are the onlyoptions bigstudios
are offeringthis season, as they
bothrepresent what moviegoers
are forcedtochoose between
almost everyweekof the year.
This will alsobe the first year
insevenyears that there will be
noconsecutive Saw sequel, as
the producers finallylaidthat
franchise torest, at least for now,
after meticulouslycuttingout
everylast enjoyable feature those
movies offered.
The closest thinganystudio
seems tobe toutingat the mo-
ment is the Paranormal Activ-
ity series, where cheapcameras,
or nice cameras made tolooklike
cheapcameras, filmpeople
throwingthemselves across
rooms betweenpanickydialogue
writtenbythe directors10-year-
oldkid.
If there was anywayI could
type a sighloudenoughfor you
tohear, Iddoit right here.
Ive beenthinkinga lot about
horror franchises this month, as
its become anannual traditionof
mine towatchCinemassacres
Monster Madness throughout
October toget me inthe holiday
spirit.
Foundat www.cinemassacre-
.com, filmmaker andinternet
star James Rolfe, better known
online as the AngryVideoGame
Nerd, startedthe series of horror
movie reviews backin2007.
Eachdayof the 31days of the
month, James highlights a differ-
ent movie, offeringanhonest and
detailedanalysis of bothmajor
blockbusters andobscure Btitles.
The theme of his reviews this
year is sequels, discussingUni-
versal Studios Frankenstein,
Hammer Films Dracula, A
Nightmare onElmStreet, and
Halloween, alongwiththeir
subsequent follow-ups. Frommy
earlier stabs at franchises, it may
seemlike Imcompletelyagainst
the idea of sequels, but Imnot
necessarilyopposedtothe idea
that the storydoesnt always end
once the credits roll.
It has become a staple of the
genre toventure forthandcontin-
ue where theyleft off. Its easyto
bashtodays hackneyedploys for
quickmoney, but anytrue horror
fanknows that Hollywoodhas
beenplayingthis game for much
longer thanmost of our lifetimes.
Witheachsequel comes a
different filmmakers take ona
familiar story, withsome picking
upthe ball andscoringwhile
others. Some become just as
memorable as their precursors,
while most enduponlate-night
cable.
The rationale behindany
series is simple we all want to
knowwhat happens next. If we
enjoyedthe original story, then
we gladlypaythat ticket price
againfor the safe bet or assump-
tionthat this one will be as good
as the last. What interests me
almost as muchas where the
storywill gois howthe writers
ultimatelydecide that storytell-
ingpath.
What possessedsomeone to
turnthe faceless serial killer
Michael Myers intoa mindless
pawnfor a Satanic cult? Whoin
their right mindthought Exor-
cist II: The Heretic needed
physic powered-girls andbrain-
wave devices?
The onlythingscarier than
these ideas were probablythe
substance abuse problems the
writers assuminglysuffered
from.
Fans, for some reason, forgive
these indiscretions, buyingbox
sets tocomplete their collections
tolet most discs collect dust.
Eventually, as the movies goon,
the entertainment value changes
fromjumps tolaughs, soyoucan
oftentake pleasure injust how
badit endedup.
This toobecame a pillar of the
genre. Whodoesnt enjoya good
night of MysteryScience Thea-
ter 3000-like commentarywith
friends?
Sowhile I continue tolament
the present offerings Hollywood
has produced, or rather thrown
uplike pea souponanunsuspect-
ingpriest, I see the needfor the
badas muchas the good. Maybe
ina fewyears, Ill forgive Jigsaw
for leavingus witha whimper
rather thana trap-inducedbang.
For now, Ill enjoymyHallo-
weenwitha DVDmarathonthat
will at least be memorable 40
percent of the time. It seems
thats about all we couldever
hope for.
A stab at awful horror franchises
INFINITE
IMPROBABILITY
R I C H H O W E L L S
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Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 15
Its beginning to look a lot
like Christmas in department
stores, and the deals are start-
ing to explode online as well.
Some of my secret go-to on-
line stores are sites that offer
flash sales usually lasting 72
hours or until items are sold
out. Shopping early on these
sites can score you up to 70
percent off brand name items.
Flash sales are like the TJ
Maxx and Marshals of online
shopping. The stores feature
items like adult and childrens
apparel, toys, gadgets, and
more.
There are a number of
childrens flash sale sites that
offer free membership. Mem-
bership includes daily emails
filled with special promos.
Zulily.com is one of my favor-
ite flash sale sites since it
offers discounts on top-qual-
ity apparel, gear, housewares,
toys and even half price
vouchers.
Members enjoy up to 90
percent off retail prices of
brand names like Manhattan
Toy, So La Vita, Laura Ashley,
Timberland, and Mud Pie.
The best part about Zulily is
that you can earn $15 by
inviting friends to join
through email, Facebook and
Twitter. Right now, take $5
off a $50 purchase with the
code GA4756.
Other similar sites to Zulily
are Totsy.com and TheMini-
Social.com.
Some sites like RueLaLa-
.com and Gilt.com are start-
ing to crossover to childrens
deals, which gives shoppers
more choices.
RueLaLa.com and Gilt.com
often offer top brand name
deals on Gucci, Fendi, 7 for
All Mankind, and Ed Hardy.
Hautelook.com, BeyondtheR-
ack.com, Modnique.com, and
Swirl.com are other sites that
offer similar sales. These
private shopping clubs for
women and men usually last
48 hours or until items sell
out. These items often sell
out due to the limited quanti-
ties.
The best way to take ad-
vantage of these flash sales is
by signing up for daily emails.
Modnique.com offers $5
credits when you sign up for
daily emails and free ship-
ping. There are some items
that you can get shipped to
your house for under $10
after credit.
There are even flash sales
with discounts on home
items from accessories to
cookware. OneKingsLane-
.com and HomeSav.com are
two of my favorite sites. Right
now at One Kings Lane, shop-
pers can grab a $15 credit at
signup that is good off any
purchase of $30 or more.
Subscribing to these daily
emails may seem a little over-
whelming at first. However,
as the holidays are quickly
approaching and budgets are
getting smaller, shopping
flash sales will help you buy
high quality items at a huge
discount.
Check out
flash sale sites
DEAL
DETECTIVE
J E N N A U R B A N
CVS
Cover Girl cosmetics, buy one,
get one 50 percent off. Use $8
off two Cover Girl coupon from
Procter & Gamble from Oct. 2.
Speedstick or Lady Speed-
stick, two for $5.50. Get $4 in
Extra Care Bucks when you buy
two.
Walgreens
Crest Pro Health toothpaste,
two for $7. Buy two, get $5 in
Register Rewards, and use $1 off
one Crest toothpaste or gel
coupon from P&G from Oct. 16.
Rite Aid
UP2U gum, $1. Use $1 off one
UP2U pack coupon from Smart
Source on Oct. 9.
Dawn dish soap, $.99. Use $.50
off one coupon from P&G from
Oct. 30.
TOP DEALS
M
embers of the Ac-
tors Circle will re-
turn their unique
murder mystery to the
Scranton Cultural Center,
420 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton, on Sunday, Oct.
30, beginning at 7 p.m.
Actors Circle President
Nan ODonnell Wandalow-
ski, of South Abington
Township, said this years
production takes on a new
theme as the plot is cen-
tered around the Titanic
and a murder on the ill-fat-
ed vessel in recognition of
the 100th anniversary of its
sinking next April.
The great thing about both
years productions is that we get
to see the Cultural Center,
Wandalowski said. In this par-
ticular scenario, the people are
on a cruise ship, the Titanic, and
we have a library, bar, and stor-
age room to stage the event.
We had thought about it for
our productionat the Actors Cir-
cle, but it does entail a lot of cos-
tuming and a lot of different
rooms. When the Cultural Cen-
ter contacted us, we thought
that it was a win-win.
Audience members will tour
the Cultural Center in the
unique presentation as theyre
providedwithclues onwho may
have committed the murder on
the White Star Line ship des-
tined for New York City.
The murder mystery presents
a great opportunity for new ac-
tors testing out their comfort on
stage among the nearly 25 in the
cast.
The whodunit show pre-
sented at the Masonic Temple
this weekend continues a com-
mon theme for Actors Circle as
they often include an Agatha
Christie mystery intheir regular
season.
Wandalowski said shes espe-
cially excited to portray a ma-
tron on the ship working securi-
ty.
In 1912, to have a woman as
one of the top personnel there
was quite unusual, Wandalow-
ski said. I really like that part of
it.
Sundays event will begin
with appetizers and cocktails.
Tickets are $40 and can be
purchased at the Scranton Cul-
tural Center Box Office by call-
ing (570) 344-1111.
Masonic mystery set on ill-fated Titanic
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Mystery at the Masonic cast members include, from left, Jeannine McGowan, J.P. McGowan,
Laura McGowan, John McInerney, Mary Graff, Lou Bisignani, Nan Wandalowski, Andrew Gruden
and Kelly Walsh.
Chills & thrills
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
Actors Circle also opened its
current production of Hay Fe-
ver this weekend. Shows contin-
ue Nov. 4-6 with performances
Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and
Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12,
$10 for senior citizens, and $8 for
students. Shows take place at
Providence Playhouse, 1256
Providence Rd., Scranton. For
more information, call (570)
342-9707.
ALSO OPENING
PAGE 16 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 17
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like and what youre aiming for
when youre brewing, Mrs. Wolfe
said of their taste-testing trips.
The brewers are each part engi-
neer, chemist, plumber, and chef.
For example, Kurt Dean of Tunk-
hannock built his own heat ex-
changer recirculation mashing sys-
tems to customize his process and
offset the sometimes expensive
costs of beginning the hobby.
Some of the locally-createdbeers
have already won competitions.
Fellow brewers were quick to raise
a toast for Dupont resident Steve
White on Wednesday for a recent
third place prize in the 2011 Monk
Melee homebrewing competition
for his Belgian golden strong ale
called Excuses.
Other creative blends have re-
called processes predating the Iron
Age, Mr. Wolfe said.
An original pumpkin steinbier
called St. Jacks Graveyard was
brewed using discarded tomb-
stones heated over a fire and low-
ered into mashing tubs to achieve
the required temperature.
Now, theres about six of us that
are hooked, and thats how were
trying to brew most of our beers,
Mr. Wolfe said.
But theres not groups of people
in Scranton throwing hot rocks in
their beer, Mrs. Wolfe quipped.
Members each have their prefer-
ences on what they brew. Sechler is
dedicatedtoimperial stouts includ-
ing his own Black As Midnight,
Dean prefers German- and Belgian-
style beers, Mr. Wolfe enjoys Irish
reds and hoppy beers, and Mrs.
Wolfe is the mad scientist of the
group crafting chocolate mint por-
ters and the like.
Against the thought of a male
dominated beer culture, the group
welcomes the input of some very
vocal brewing girls, Mr. Wolfe
said.
Theyre not ashamed to say,
No, I like beer, andI canmake good
beer, he said.
The only membership require-
ment is an appreciation for the bev-
erage, and beer lovers are asked to
chip in at tasting events. Home-
brewers are also asked to share
their creations, if any are available.
Those interested in learning
more about the group and the proc-
ess of homebrewing can join the
Scranton Brewers Guild group on
Facebook or email scrantonbrew-
ers@gmail.com.
BREWERS
Continued from page 12
T
he 11th annual OMalley Halloween
Party presented by Scranton School
Board member Patrick OMalley
was held Oct. 23 at McDade Park in Scran-
ton. More than 900 children and their fam-
ilies attendedthe event, accordingtoOMal-
ley, and were treated to pictures with the
Wicked Witch of the West, coupons for local
restaurants, pizza from Goodfellas, and
more.
Entertainment was provided by DJ Jason
Miller from Extreme Entertainment.
Johnathan Houck of Scranton. Party host Pat OMalley snaps a
photo.
Avengers Angelo Morales, left, and
Vincent Quiles of Scranton.
Happy haunting
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Gianna Pilosi, Skyy Peperno, and Elizabeth Majewski of Old Forge.
Cory Tansits of Scranton.
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18 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 19
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20 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
An unbeaten season
is a true measure of
excellence.
Obviously, only qual-
ity, championship
teams finish with per-
fect records.
Upsets as the Scranton Prep football
teamreminded Valley Viewlast weekend
happen.
Some of the quality teams with the
potential to go unbeaten fall and some
other teams, though not on the cham-
pionship level overall, have what it takes
to come up with a special effort at just
the right time.
Getting through an entire season with-
out a single slip takes on differing de-
grees of difficulty depending on the
sport.
In sports where one athletes perform-
ance is measured against another, with
no defense involved, upsets are unlikely.
The 11-second, 100-meter sprinter
might occasionally lose to someone who
runs an11.1, but seldomloses to some-
one who runs a 12-second100.
Thus, when one track, cross country or
swimming teamis consistently stronger
than another across the board, the likeli-
hood of a true upset is relatively minis-
cule.
Although it is not as much of a given,
some of the same holds true in sports
that are a series of dual competitions.
The teamwhich sends out the stronger
lineup in sports like wrestling, tennis and
golf is going to win a significant majority
of the time because it has to have a series
of upsets in separate competitions add up
to an upset in the teamscore.
When a first-place teamfalls in those
sports, it is often to the second-place
team. Years can pass between .500 teams
knocking off championship-level teams.
We have learned through the years that
there are not as many sure things in
other sports.
Some of us may be able to predict
close to 80 percent of the winning teams
in sports like football and basketball, but
the rest of the games fall into those
where it is hard to really knowwho is
best and those where the teamthat is
best over the course of an entire season is
not best on that given night in that par-
ticular matchup.
Strategy, match-ups, emotions, the
KEEPING SCORE
T O M R O B I N S O N
Perfection comes
with varying
degrees of difficulty
See ROBINSON, Page 21
DIMOCK When the Class AAA
boys race was over, Sean Burke of
Abington Heights described his plan for
the District 2 Cross Country Champion-
ships.
That description sounded remarkably
similar to the actual race he hadjust run.
The first mile I just wantedtosit back
a little bit in fifth or sixth place and kind
of see what happened, Burke said after
covering a wet 3.1.-mile course at Elk
Lake High School in a winning time of
16:35. The next mile, I wanted to pick
people off.
About a half-mile from the finish, I
wanted to put it all on the line.
Burke moved up from fifth place be-
fore the midway point in the race. He
worked his way to the front of the pack,
then over that final half-mile, opened
what wound up being a 10-second mar-
gin over Valley Views Aaron Wilkinson.
Very early in the race, Burke felt com-
fortable that he would be able to run the
race he planned.
Right around a half mile in, there
were 14 or 15 ahead of me, he said.
They all started dropping off and I was
passing them without having to change
my pace.
Burke was the only champion indi-
vidual or team from Lackawanna
CLASS AAA BOYS
Team Standings: 1. Dallas 44; 2. North Pocono 71;
3. Tunkhannock 73; 4. Scranton Prep 107; 5.
Wallenpaupack 161; 6. Abington Heights 170; 7.
Hazleton Area 228; 8. Honesdale 230; 9. Wyoming
Valley West 252; 10. Crestwood 277; 11. Coughlin
289; 12. Valley View 295; 13. West Scranton 364; 14.
Delaware Valley 364. 15. Scranton 373; 16. Pittston
Area 421; 17. Berwick 433.
Top 10: 1. Sean Burke (AH) 16:35; 2. Aaron Wilkinson
(VV) 16:45; 3. Dominic Deluca (D) 16:53; 4. Jake
Siegel (T) 17:02; 5. Chris Ehret (D) 17:14; 6. Mike
Brier (SP) 17:21; 7. Alex Zubko (D) 17:22; 8. Jacob
Fetterman (Haz) 17:23; 9. Jess Adams (D) 17:25; 10.
Ben Robinson (T) 17:41.
State Qualifiers: Dallas team, Burke (AH), Wilkin-
son (VV), Siegel (T), Brier (SP), Fetterman (Haz).
Lackawanna County Top 25: Burke (AH), Wilkin-
son (VV), Brier (SP); 11. Dave Rubino (NP) 17:43; 13.
Brody Dial (NP) 17:47; 14. Matt Warner (NP) 17:49; 15.
Mike Brenkosh (NP) 18:01; 18. Alex Gentile (NP)
18:14; 21. Sam Hager (SP) 18:19; 22. Corey Loman
(SP) 18:22; 23. Robert Ward (Scr) 18:24; 25. Paul
Labelle (SP) 18:29.
CLASS AA BOYS
Team Standings: 1. Holy Redeemer 31; 2. Blue
Ridge 85; 3. Holy Cross 96; 4. Mid Valley 157; 5.
Lackawanna Trail 167; 6. Lakeland 169; 7. Elk Lake
172; 8. Dunmore 180; 9. Northwest 262; 10. Lake-
Lehman 266; 11. Montrose 291; 12. Hanover Area
324; 13. Susquehanna 382; 14. Wyoming Seminary
401; 15. MMI Prep 415; 16. Riverside 430; 17. Western
Wayne 448; 18. Meyers 504.
Top 10: 1. Luke Jones (EL) 16:45; 2. Rico Galassi
(HC) 17:05; 3. Mitchell Ford (HR) 17:25; 4. Vinay
Murthy (HR) 17:37; 5. Frazee Sutphen (HR) 17:55; 6.
Jake Hinkley (BR); 7. Jacob Bevan (L-L) 18:01; 8.
Brandon Murray (D) 18:07; 9. Mike Ambrulavage
(HR) 18:09; 10. Patrick Condo (HR) 18:11.
State Qualifiers: Holy Redeemer team; Blue Ridge
team; Jones (EL); Galassi, Antonio Hastie (HC);
Bevan, Kieran Sutton (L-L); Murray, Todd Daven-
port (D); Mike Petcavage, Jason Sansky (MV); Mark
Arzie (L).
Lackawanna County Top 25s: Murray (D); 11.
Hastie (HC) 18:12; 12. Davenport (D 18:12; 13. Petcav-
age (MV) 18;14; 15. Arzie (L) 18:21; 17. Sansky (MV)
18:22; 19. Paul Szustakowski (L) 18:34; 23. Mike
Pastore (HC) 18:38.
CLASS AAA GIRLS
Team Standings: 1. Dallas 66; 2. North Pocono 107;
3. Wallenpaupack 127; 4. Hazleton Area 129; 5.
Abington Heights 149; 6. Honesdale 150; 7. Pittston
Area 172; 8. Scranton Prep 178; 9. Western Wayne
250; 10. Wyoming Valley West 253; 11. Crestwood
286; 12. Berwick 302; 13. Tunkhannock 318; 14.
Delaware Valley 318; 15. Valley View 424; 16.
Wyoming Area 451; 17. Coughlin 469.
Top 10: 1. Regan Rome (Dal) 19:18; 2. Taylor Ross
(AH) 19:38; 3. Kate Lewis (NP) 19:46; 4. Tessa
Barrett (SP) 19:49; 5. Nicole Buehrle (Haz) 19:50; 6.
Summer Hill (Hon) 19:50; 7. Erin Jaeger (AH) 20:14;
8. Catherine Lombardo (PA) 20:18; 9. Molly Kane
(NP) 2:28; 10. Bryanna Dissinger (D) 20:32.
State Qualifiers: Dallas team, Ross (AH), Lewis
(NP), Barrett (SP), Buehrle (Haz); Hill (Hon).
Lackawanna County Top 25s: Ross (AH); Lewis
(NP); Barrett (SP); Jaeger (AH); Kane (NP); 17.
Melissa Becker (SP) 21:06; 22. Shannon Vairo (Scr)
21:22; 23. Hannah Whitney (NP) 21:26; 25. Jenn
Burke (AH) 21:36.
CLASS AA GIRLS
Team Standings: 1. Holy Redeemer 40; 2. Elk Lake
58; 3. Lake-Lehman 105; 4. Montrose 130; 5.
Hanover Area 151; 6. Holy Cross 165; 7. Wyoming
Seminary 193; 8. Mountain View 258; 9. Mid Valley
258; 10. Susquehanna 293; 11. MMI Prep 299; 12.
Dunmore 315; 13.Northwest 340; 14. Riverside 342;
15. Meyers 363; 16. Lackawanna Trail 370.
Top 10: 1. Marissa Durako (HR) 19:06; 2. Rachel
Sowinski (HR) 19:43; 3. Jenny Vanetten (EL) 20:26;
4. Amy Viti (Han) 21:00; 5. Kaylee Hillard (L-L)
21:04; 6. Brianne Ligotski (HR) 21:08; 7. Samantha
Bennici (M) 21:09; 8. Emily Sutton (L-L) 21:11; 9.
Nicole Kobylanski (MV) 21:12; 10. Lainey Bedell (EL)
21:19.
State Qualifiers: Holy Redeemer team; Elk Lake
team; Viti, Paige Antall (Han); Hillard, Sutton (L-L);
Bennici, Allison Lewis (M); Kobylanski (MV);
Allanah Trombetta (WSem);Casey Pardum (BR); Ivy
Christensen (Sus).
Lackawanna County Top 25s: Kobylanski (MV); 19.
Alex Miller (L) 21:48; 24. Melissa Kearns (HC) 22:26.
RESULTS DISTRICT 2 CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Preps Tessa Barrett finished fourth among AAA girls in Wednesdays cham-
pionship.
PERFECT PLAN
By TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
See CROSS, Page 23
Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 21
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difference of an inch or two
either way on some plays, and
even the misfortune of a bad
bounce or a bad call can swing a
game or two over the course of
the season.
Go undefeated in football, as
only Dunmore had a chance to
do in District 2 entering this
weekend, and you have really
accomplished something spe-
cial. And, thats just referencing
the regular season. Valley Views
15-0 state championship teamof
1992 was the last football squad
fromLackawanna County to
make it through the regular
season and playoffs perfect.
But as difficult as going un-
beaten in football and basketball
can be, a perfect season in a
sport that features a pitcher or
goalie is the toughest of them
all.
One strong pitching perform-
ance can negate just about ev-
erything else happening in a
baseball and softball game.
Sports where scoring is at a
premiumand teams shoot at a
protected goal, such as soccer,
field hockey and ice hockey, are
the most prone to upset. Piling
up the shot totals or getting the
most true quality shots usually
translates into victory, but not
as often as having control in
other sports.
To go unbeaten in the goalie
sports generally means produc-
ing a higher level of consistency
because winning every game
not only means being the better
teamin each outing, but being
better by enough of a margin
that a hot goalie cannot take a
win away.
The Holy Cross boys and
Abington Heights girls made it
through the Lackawanna
League soccer regular season
with just such an accomplish-
ment.
Adominant offense, which
outscored the next two most
productive teams in the division
combined, allowed Holy Cross
to beat 12 Division 2 boys oppo-
nents by a combined 65-21mar-
gin.
Arecord-setting defense
paved the way for Abington
Heights to outscore 14 Division
1girls opponents, 63-4.
Both teams made finishing
perfect look easier than it really
is.
ROBINSON
Continued from page 20
The Grunza family tradition
lived on with the Mansfield
field hockey team.
Junior Kristyn had another
standout season while fresh-
man Kayla played in every
game for the Mountaineers.
Kristyn, who earned All-
America honors as a sopho-
more, and Kayla have followed
in the footsteps of graduate
Courtney, who was also an
All-American at Mansfield. All
are former Lackawanna Trail
standouts.
The Grunzas are, well, the
Grunzas, veteran coach Diane
Monkiewicz said. A great
hockey family, and that talent
continues on through the
family tree.
Kristyn finished with nine
goals and two assists for 20
points in 14 games as the
Mountaineers finished 5-12
overall and 3-6 in the PSAC
West. She had 30 points as a
sophomore (12 and six) and
26 points as a freshman (nine
and eight).
Kristyn had a great year
statistically, even though she
wasnt able to make all of the
games because of her academ-
ic schedule, Monkiewicz said.
She was a dominant player
and very well respected.
Kayla finished with two
goals and an assist.
Having Kayla here has been
like a flashback to Courtney,
but different, Monkiewicz
said. Shes her own player,
who blends the stick skills of
Kristyn, almost, and the cun-
ningness and timing of Court-
ney. Kristyn and Kayla play
well together.
Freshman Lacey Croasdale,
also from Lackawanna Trail,
played in 17 games with one
start and scored a goal.
Lacey was a very hard
worker who started getting
the hang of our system and
the college game, Monkiew-
icz said. She has raw talent
and the desire to improve and
theres tons more to come
from her in the future.
OGOLSKY SEEING ACTION
Freshman Brittany Ogolsky
(Carbondale) is competing
both as a starter and off the
bench for the Cedar Crest
soccer team. She picked up
her first collegiate point with
an assist in a 3-3 tie with Penn
Tech.
Brittany is one of the most
motivated players on the
team, coach Nicole Pietrobon
said. This motivation makes
her extremely hard-working
and very coachable. She had a
breakout game against Penn
Tech.
The coach feels that Ogol-
sky has adapted to the college
game.
Brittany plays in our for-
ward position, Pietrobon
said. She is an unselfish play-
er, looking to assist the other
forwards in goal scoring. Shes
a fighter and looks to high
pressure the defenders to get
them to turn over the ball,
which she is very successful at
doing. Shes been a great addi-
tion to our team.
GOOD MOVE FOR QUINN
Shane Quinn filled in as
goalkeeper for the Marywood
mens soccer team last season
and played well enough to
earn second team honors in
the Colonial States Athletic
Conference.
This season, the regular
goalkeeper has returned and
the versatile Quinn (Abington
Heights) has moved to outside
back without missing a beat.
The Pacers gave up just nine
goals with nine shutouts in the
first 14 games of the season.
Our two outside backs
were injured leaving us
strapped in the terms of de-
fenders, coach Dawson Dris-
coll said. Shane has done a
good job at making the transi-
tion.
KLINGMAN FITTING IN
Sophomore Derek Klingman
(Abington Heights) is seeing
action with the Scranton
mens soccer team. He had his
first collegiate points when he
scored two goals in a 4-1 victo-
ry over Mt. St. Mary College.
Derek has been improving
each day and we are starting
to see a more consistent over-
all game from him, coach
Matt Pivirotto said. This is
evident in his increased play-
ing time and the fact that he
has been starting some
games.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Lackawanna Trail graduates and sisters Kayla, left, and Kristyn Grunza continue to lead their field hockey team at Mansfield.
Tradition of excellence
ON CAMPUS
B I L L A R S E N A U L T
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22 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
GL ONLINE
For daily roundups of local college
sports, including Saturdays
Colonial States Athletic Confer-
ence Cross Country Champion-
ships, see www.golackawan-
na.com/sports.
TOP STORY
Olivia Habicht had three goals and
an assist while Siobhan Blanca-
flor added two goals and an
assist as Marywood University
continued its surge in Colonial
States Athletic Conference
womens soccer play with
Thursdays 7-1 rout of visiting
Keystone College.
The Pacers improved to 8-1-1 in the
CSAC.
Blancaflor made it 3-1 on a goal
with 36 seconds left in the half.
Habicht then scored 37 seconds
in for the first of four goals in
the first 6:21 of the second half.
In its previous outing, Marywood
downed Cabrini College, 3-1,
when Lacey Habicht scored the
third goal after assisting on the
first two.
SEASON AWARDS
Carly Leitzel of Marywood was
named CSAC Rookie of the
Year in womens tennis.
Melissa Hudock was named first-
team, all-star in singles and
honorable mention in doubles
while representing the Pacers
on the CSAC All-Sportsmanship
Team.
Leitzel went 11-1 in singles, in-
cluding 9-1 in the CSAC, while
playing number-two and num-
ber-three doubles. She was
Hudocks doubles partner while
going 9-2.
Kara Hoff and Megan Nastelli
were first-team choices in
doubles where they went 9-0.
Lindsay Burke and Beth Schneider
were second-team, all-stars in
doubles. Nastelli, Leitzel, Burke
and Schneider were second-
team singles all-stars.
WEEKLY AWARDS
University of Scranton senior
goalkeeper Alexandria Marandi-
no is the Landmark Conference
Defensive Player of the Week
after tying a career-high with 17
saves in a 2-0 loss to Catholic
University, the 12th-ranked field
hockey team in the country.
Scrantons Jessica Sciscione is the
Landmark womens soccer
Defensive Player of the Week
for the third time this season
after scoring twice and helping
the Lady Royals to two shut-
outs.
Three Marywood athletes re-
ceived Colonial States Athletic
Conference weekly awards.
Womens volleyball player Alyssa
Hartranft and mens soccer
player Christian Lawlor were
named Player of the Week in
their sports. Lacey Habicht was
named to the womens soccer
Honor Roll.
Hartranft set season and career
school records for assists while
helping Marywood improve to
15-9.
Lawlor had three of Marywoods
four goals in a 2-0 week.
Baptist Bible Colleges Erin Law
also made the CSAC womens
soccer Honor Roll after scoring
four of the five goals while the
Lady Defenders went 2-1.
Scranton named Sarah Gibbons, a
junior midfielder on the wom-
ens soccer team, as its Athlete
of the Week.
Gibbons scored the goal in a 1-0
victory over Catholic Oct. 22 to
help the Lady Royals clinch the
top seed in the upcoming Land-
mark Conference playoffs.
Keystone named womens soccer
player Samantha Littleford and
field hockey player Kelsey
Drozda as its Athletes of the
Week.
Littleford had three goals, in-
cluding an overtime game-
winner, to help the team go 2-0.
Drozda scored the first two goals
of a 3-0 victory over Notre
Dame of Maryland.
PLAYOFFS
Erika Symons had a hat trick in
the quarterfinals and scored
the only goal in the semifinals
as Lackawanna College put
together a strong showing in
the National Junior College
Athletic Association Region 19
Division I playoffs.
Symons broke a tie and scored
twice in the last 13 minutes for a
3-1 victory over Harcum College
in the Oct. 22 quarterfinals.
Essex County College eliminated
the Lady Falcons, 2-1, in a sud-
den-death penalty kick shoo-
tout during Tuesdays semi-
finals.
The teams were tied through two
overtimes and the first five
shots of a shootout. They lost
when the shootout proceeded
to sudden death.
I am very proud of my team,
coach Danny Berg said, accord-
ing to a story on the schools
website. We entered the tour-
nament as the last seed and we
came within a successful penal-
ty kick and stop from moving
on to the Region final.
TOP EVENTS
Lawlor scored with 53 seconds
remaining Tuesday to lift Mary-
wood to its sixth straight mens
soccer victory, 3-2 over Baptist
Bible.
Alicia Tamboias second straight
two-goal game lifted Scranton
to a 4-2 field hockey victory
over Keystone Thursday.
Marywood finished its first golf
season Monday by placing 10th
out of 13 teams in the Immac-
ulata Fall Invitational.
Davonta Farrell ran for two touch-
downs and threw for another in
the first half Sunday to send
Lackawanna College on its way
to a 55-10 football victory over
the Tiffin University junior
varsity.
Marywood swept Hood College,
176.5-85.5, in the mens meet
and, 157-102, in the womens
meet Oct. 23 to even its swim-
ming records at 1-1.
Scranton opened the swimming
season Oct. 22 by sweeping
mens and womens tri-meets.
Keystone College finished 1-12-1 in
womens tennis when it lost to
Kings College, 5-4, Oct. 22.
- Compiled by Tom Robinson
COLLEGE SPORTS RECAP
Habicht gets
hat trick for
Lady Pacers
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Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 23
SCRANTON Abington
Heights peppered West Scran-
ton with 24 shots in the first 28
minutes, but only one, taken by
freshman Michaelina Holmes,
got through.
The constant pressure finally
paidoff for the LadyComets late
in the first half.
Unbeaten Abington Heights
scored on three out of four shots
during a span of 3:19 to break
away for a 7-0 rout of West
Scranton in a District 2-4 Re-
gional Class AAA girls soccer
semifinal at Memorial Stadium.
Abington Heights gradually
increased the pressure after be-
ing well contained by the West
Scranton defense over the first
11 minutes.
Holmes converted an Emily
Sullivan pass to score from 12
yards out with 21:09 left in the
half.
Alex Chapman then dribbled
downthe middle, past four Lady
Invaders, on the way to the first
of her twostraight goals for a 2-0
lead with 11:40 left.
Chapman pivoted and got off
a quick shot to score again on
the next Abington attempt less
than two minutes later.
Ahandball in the penalty area
as West Scranton tried to con-
trol a rebound after a dangerous
shot by Katrina Helcoski ledto a
penalty shot that Lauren Hoyt
converted, making it 4-0 with
8:21 left in the half.
The Abington Heights de-
fense did the rest, not allowing a
shot or corner kickonthe wayto
its school record13th shutout of
the season.
Abington will return to Me-
morial Stadium Wednesday to
face Pottsville, a 3-2 winner over
Wallenpaupack in the opener of
Thursdays doubleheader.
Scranton Prep is already in
the District 2 Class AA final,
scheduled for Tuesday at 8 p.m.
at Memorial Stadium.
The Classics face Western
Wayne, a 1-0 overtime winner
over Valley View Friday.
Forest City defeated Mon-
trose, 4-1, Fridaytoearnaspot in
the District 2 Class A final
against Mountain View.
Mountain View needed over-
timeon its home field to get past
Lakeland, 2-1, in Thursdays
semifinal.
Lakeland defeated Holy
Cross, 4-1, and Montrose shut
out Carbondale, 6-0, in the quar-
terfinals.
BOYS SOCCER
Abington Heights has ad-
vanced to this weeks District
2-4 Class AAAsemifinals, Scran-
tonPrepis inthe District 2Class
AA semifinals and both Holy
Cross and Forest City are in the
District 2 Class A semifinals.
Top-seeded Abington
Heights, the Lackawanna
League Division1champion, de-
feated Tunkhannock, 6-2,
Wednesday night at Dunmore in
the quarterfinals.
The Comets will play Dela-
wareValleyMondaynight at 8in
one semifinal while Wallenpau-
pack plays Williamsport in the
other semifinal at Wilkes Uni-
versity.
Ahat trickbyBrianODonnell
lifted Scranton Prep over Ha-
nover Area, 4-2.
Ray Hassay scored the other
goal to give the Cavaliers a 3-1
lead with 12:17 left in the half.
DISTRICT 2 PLAYOFF ROUNDUP
Abington girls in D2 final
By TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
See ROUNDUP, Page 27
County in four races.
Elk Lakes Luke Jones, who
repeated as Class AA cham-
pion, was theonlyother winner
from the Lackawanna League.
Dallas swept the Class AAA
teamtitles while Holy Redeem-
er swept in Class AA.
Both individual girls win-
ners came fromthe teamcham-
pions.
Reagan Rome from Dallas
and Marissa Durako each re-
peated as champions.
North Pocono turned in the
countys top team perform-
ance, finishing second in Class
AAA boys and girls.
The Trojans followed up an
unbeaten boys season in the
Lackawanna League witha sec-
ond-place finish behind Dallas,
44-71.
Dallas ran a tremendous
race, North Pocono coach
Marc Gaughan said. We ran as
well as we could.
I was so proud of the kids.
They gave every bit of effort
that they had.
Sophomore Dave Rubino led
a pack of five runners between
11th and 18th place for North
Pocono.
Freshmen Brody Dial (13th)
and Mike Brenkosh (15th)
joined sophomore Alex Gentile
(18th) and sophomore Matt
Warner (14th) in that pack.
Theyre a very young
group, Gaughan said.
They dont quite know how
good they can be yet.
The season ended for the
North Pocono boys.
Kate Lewis from the girls
team is among the individual
qualifiers for the state meet.
Taylor Ross of Abington
Heights, Lewis and Tessa Bar-
rett of Abington Heights came
in second through fourth, be-
hind Rome, to earn three of the
five individual state spots avail-
able in Class AAA.
The top team and five indi-
viduals in each AAA race and
the top two teams and 10 indi-
viduals in each Class AA race
advance tothe Pennsylvania In-
terscholastic Athletic Associ-
ation Championships Saturday
at the Hershey Parkview
Course.
Burke, Wilkinson and Scran-
ton Preps Mike Brier, who was
sixth, qualified in Class AAA
boys.
The Blue Ridge boys and Elk
Lake girls qualified for the sec-
ond team berths in Class AA.
Rico Galassi of Holy Cross
was second in Class AA boys.
Brandy Murray of Dunmore
was eighth, Antonio Hastie of
Holy Cross, 11th; Todd Daven-
port of Dunmore, 12th; Mike
Petcavage of Mid Valley, 13th;
Mark Arzie of Lakeland, 15th,
and Jason Sansky of Mid Valley
17th to also advance.
The only county girl to ad-
vance inClass AAgirls was Mid
Valleys Nicole Kobylanski with
a ninth-place finish.
CROSS
Continued from page 20
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO
Holy Crosss Rico Galassi was
the top finisher among AA
boys fromLackawanna County.
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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 25
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26 GOLackawanna Sunday, October 30, 2011
D
ominant efforts that
caused their Friday
night Lackawanna
Football Conference games
to end under the Mercy
Rule left Valley View and
Scranton as co-leaders of
Division 1 while allowing
Dunmore toclinchat least a
tie for the Division 2 title.
The Cougars and Knights
went on the road for their wins
that cut the tie at the top of the
division from three-way to two-
way.
Valley View smashed West
Scranton, 40-0, and Scranton
handled Wallenpaupack, which
had been part of the leadership
tie, 35-6.
The teams are likely to share
the divisionchampionship since
they finish up next week at
home against the bottom two
teams in the division. Valley
View faces winless North Poco-
no while Scranton meets Abing-
ton Heights.
Dunmore, which had already
locked up a District 2 Class A
playoff spot, clinchedits tie with
a 56-0 rout of visiting Carbon-
dale.
The Bucks canfinishwithDis-
trict 2s only perfect regular-sea-
son record and take the title out-
right with a win at Riverside Fri-
day. TheVikings remainedinpo-
sition to share first place with
Dunmore, if they win, when
they came up with a 35-13 victo-
ry at Lakeland.
DIVISION1
Valley View overwhelmed
West Scranton in its first outing
since suffering its first defeat,
7-6, last week against Scranton
Prep.
The Cougars, who have
clinched a District 2 Class AAA
playoff spot, rushed for more
than400 yards. They put togeth-
er first-half scoring drives of 75,
80 and 99 yards. The 99-yarder
featured 10 straight running
plays.
Tyler Phillips carried11times
for163yards. He ran28yards for
a touchdown on the first posses-
sion, 10 yards for another in the
second quarter and 50 yards for
a third, midway through the
third quarter.
Tyler Kapinus added 100
yards and a touchdown on 10
carries while Pat Jeffers picked
up 60 yards and two touch-
downs on 17 carries.
Scranton posted its fifth
straight victory since a 1-3 start.
The Knights led, 27-0, at half-
time and, 35-0, after three quar-
ters.
Marlinn Waiters passed for
three touchdowns and Joe
McCarthy scored three, includ-
ing one of the pass receptions.
Karlon Quiller caught a 79-
yard touchdown pass and made
an interception.
In another game, Abington
Heights defeatedNorthPocono,
18-15.
The Comets (3-6 overall) end-
edafive-gamelosingstreakwith
their first victory in division
play.
Quinn Karam rushed for 162
yards, two touchdowns and the
go-ahead, two-point conversion
after the Comets trailed, 7-0, at
halftime.
Karam ran 1 yard and added
the two-pointer early in the
third quarter. His second touch-
down made it 18-7 with1:36 left,
but the Trojans rallied for a
touchdown and two-pointer be-
fore coming up short on an on-
side kick attempt.
John Gething, who rushed for
147 yards, and Jack Williams ran
for North Poconos touchdowns.
DIVISION 2
Tom Lapinski scored two of
Dunmores three first-quarter
touchdowns and Daiqwon
Buckley turned two of his three
carries into scores to help the
Bucks to their rout.
Dunmore led, 34-0, at half-
time and reached the Mercy
Rule onBuckleys 62-yardrun39
seconds into the second half.
Buckley also had a 73-yard
touchdown run in the first quar-
ter.
Tom Lapinski, who suffered a
serious leginjuryonthefirst car-
ry of the 2010 season, continued
his comeback by running 6
yards for the first touchdown.
HakeemLincolnandNicholas
Dranchak combined to help Riv-
erside avenge the only loss of its
2010 regular season.
Lincoln carried 29 times for
138 yards and three touchdowns
while catching two passes for 34
yards.
Dranchak went 13-for-21 pass-
ing for 174 yards and two touch-
downs while also carrying six
times for 80 yards. He hit Mike
Thomas five times for 80 yards
and two touchdowns and Dave
Sweetman six times for 60
yards.
The Vikings opened a 28-0
lead in the third quarter before
Lakelandscoredthe games next
two touchdowns on Kyle Kie-
hart passes of 8 yards to J.J. Ro-
jenches and 5 yards to Alex Fil-
arsky.
Honesdale, which had been
winless in division play since
2007, is nowon a two-game win-
ningstreakafter holdingonfor a
35-34 victory over Western
Wayne.
The Hornets took a 35-20 lead
into the fourth quarter and sur-
vivedwhenWesternWayne mis-
sed a field goal with a second
left.
DIVISION 3
Eric Laytos ran for two touch-
downs, went over the1,000-yard
rushing mark on the season and
forced a fumble, all in the first
half of Lackawanna Trails 42-6
rout of visiting Montrose.
The Lions (2-2, 7-2) opened a
35-0 lead to assure that the en-
tire second half was played un-
der the Mercy Rule.
Jonathan Zedar ran back the
second-half kickoff to complete
Lackawanna Trails scoring.
FRIDAY FOOTBALL ROUNDUP
Mercy Rule wins dominate Friday football
JASON RIEDMILLER/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Valley Views Patrick Jeffers grabs a reception for a first down under pursuit by Wests Dylan Lindberg (7) and Cullen Fanning (23).
Staff reports
All three of Saturdays Lackawan-
na Football Conference games
were postponed as snow started
to fall throughout the area early
in the day.
Two games were rescheduled for
today with another shifted to
Monday.
Old Forge at Holy Cross is sched-
uled for today at 1 p.m. at St.
Anthonys Playground in Dun-
more.
Delaware Valley at Scranton Prep
is set for today at 1:30 p.m. at
Memorial Stadium in Scranton.
Mid Valley will be at Susquehan-
na Monday at 3 p.m.
See www.golackawanna.com/
sports for coverage of the games.
SATURDAY SNOW
Sunday, October 30, 2011 GOLackawanna 27
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Scranton swim captains
named
University of Scranton mens and
womens swimming coach Paul DeAnge-
lo has named this seasons captains.
Seniors Joseph Clifford, Marc Dezii,
Andrew Kelly and Paul Vignati are the
mens captains.
Seniors Carolyn Gillespie, Christine
Gorge and Jillian McGowan are the
womens captains.
Full calendar at Riverfront
Riverfront Sports in Scranton is
planning several indoor activities for the
winter.
Micro Soccer Academy for children
2-6 has several options, U8 Devel-
opmental League begins Nov. 12, Soccer
Academy for players 7-12 begins Nov. 4,
and high school soccer training for
players in Grades 7-11 begins Nov. 8.
Youth soccer league play will begin
the week of Nov. 6. Adult soccer leagues
will start Dec. 7.
Adult flag football begins Nov. 30.
For more information, call (570)
347-0797 or visit www.riverfrontsports-
.com.
Chargers get first playoff
win
The Electric City Chargers posted the
first playoff victory in team history
when they improved to 11-0 with a 42-6
Regional American Football League
romp over the Philadelphia Braves Oct.
23 at Honesdale High School.
Malcolm Singleton pushed his career
sack total to 99 in the victory.
Local junior football teams
advance
Taylor, Olyphant and North Pocono
each advanced one team to the All
County Conference Junior Football
League finals.
Taylor defeated North Pocono, 29-13,
and Olyphant downed West Scranton,
20-6, to reach the A final.
North Pocono edged Wallenpaupack,
7-6, and Pocono Mountain got past
Valley View, 14-13, in C semifinals.
Wallenpaupack defeated North
Pocono, 12-6, and Pocono Mountain shut
out Valley View, 14-0, in the B Division.
The league will have its Super Bowl
championships Sunday with A at noon, B
at 1:45 p.m. and C at 3:30.
SPORTS BRIEFS
District 2 champions Scran-
ton Prep and Abington Heights
were eliminated from the PIAA
girls tennis tournament with
first-round losses Tuesday.
Wyomissing eliminated
Scranton Prep with a 4-1 Class
AA victory at the Hershey Rac-
quet Club.
Unionville shut out Abington
Heights, 5-0, in Class AAA
match at Birchwood Racquet
Club.
Scranton Prep took a strong
runat the2009statechampions,
who also reached the state final
last year.
Emily Walshwonthe number-
two singles match from Greta
Koch, 7-6 (7-3), 6-2, and the
Classics took both doubles
matches to the third set. Eliza-
beth Hyers-Emilia Jakubek won
the second set in an extended
tiebreaker at first doubles. Mara
Silvon-Annie Tressler took the
third set to a tiebreaker before
falling short at second doubles.
GOLF
North Pocono finished third
among boys teams and Scran-
ton Preps Danielle Dalessandro
earned a medal by finishing
eighth among girls during the
Pennsylvania Interscholastic
Athletic AssociationGolf Cham-
pionships, which were held
MondayandTuesdayat theHer-
itage Hills Golf Resort in York.
The Trojans shot 319 Monday
and 321 Tuesday, finishing third
of four teams each day.
Manheim Township, which
North Pocono beat for the PIAA
East Regional title a week earli-
er, came from behind in the sec-
ondroundtowinwitha 622. Up-
per St. Clair was second with
625 and Erie Cathedral Prep
fourth with 653.
Dalessandro was tied for sev-
enth after a first-day 82 and fol-
lowed it up with an 83.
Council Rock Norths Erica
Hess won the state title with a
150.
North Poconos Amanda Re-
ach tied for 19th with a 175.
Eric Montella of Abington
Heights was 44th in the boys
tournament. He bounced back
from an opening 87 to shoot 79
and finish with a 166.
Ken Sames led the Trojans
Monday with a 77. Mark Paradi-
se led the team Tuesday with a
75.
Paradise shot a two-day total
of 153. Sames shot 155, Richie
Antonio 163 and Kevin Nardella
169.
STATE TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Courtney Ostrowski returns a volley during the first round of PIAA play on Tuesday at Birchwood.
TEAMS FALL IN STATES
Staff reports
In another quarterfinal,
Lake-Lehman shut out North
Pocono, 2-0.
The Trojans reached the
tournament with back-to-back,
play-in game victories, includ-
ing a 2-1 sudden-death shoo-
tout victoryover ValleyViewin
what coach Hosiah Dave Da-
vis describedas the most excit-
ing game hes ever been associ-
ated with.
Onthe13thpenaltyshot af-
ter tworounds of fiveshots and
two rounds of sudden-death
Michael Quinn made a save for
North Pocono and freshman
Tucker Loescher followedit up
with the winning shot.
Holy Cross and Forest City
meet in a battle of division
champions Monday at 6 in the
semifinals after winning Class
A quarterfinals Wednesday.
Division 2 champion Holy
Cross downed Lakeland, 4-1.
Division 3 champion Forest
City shut out Meyers, 3-0, with
the help of 15 saves by Zach
Sosnowski.
Meyers had eliminated Car-
bondale, 3-0, in a Monday play-
off game with the help of two
goals by Cal Lisman.
GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
The District 2 tournament is
set tobeginMonday withquar-
terfinal matches in Class AA
and semifinals in Class AAA
and A.
Class AAwill continue Tues-
day and Thursday.
The Class AAA and A cham-
pionships will be determined
in a Wednesday doubleheader.
Unbeaten Lackawanna
League Division 1 champion
Dunmore is the second seed in
Class AA.
Lackawanna Trail is the top
seed in Class A.
North Pocono, which com-
petes in the Wyoming Valley
Conference, is the second seed
in Class AAA where Abington
Heights is fourth.
Dunmore and Lackawanna
Trail each earned Monday
home matches to complete
doubleheaders. Dunmore will
face Meyers, and Trail will
meet MMI Prep. Abington
Heights and North Pocono are
in separate matches of a dou-
bleheader at Delaware Valley.
FIELD HOCKEY
Gabrielle Ators secondgoal,
with no time left on the clock,
brought an end to a wild Dis-
trict 2 Class AAA quarterfinal
by lifting Hazleton Area to a
5-4 victory over Lackawanna
Trail Monday.
The Lady Lions had leads of
1-0 in the first half and 3-2 in
the second half before needing
an Eliza Furneaux goal with
2:03 left to force a 4-4 tie.
Nicole Rosa had a goal and
an assist for Lackawanna Trail,
which led in shots, 27-21, and
penalty corners, 9-6.
Alexa Rzucidlo and Court-
ney Wood had the other goals
for the Lady Lions.
Selena Garzio had two goals
and two assists, including one
on the game-winner, for Hazle-
ton Area.
ROUNDUP
Continued from page 23
THE ARGYLE SWEATER
FAMILY CIRCUS
STONE SOUP
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
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CLASSIC PEANUTS
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 29
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@golackawanna.com
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Attorney Ron Wilson
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PAGE 30 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
Open House Directory
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96 43rd St., Fell Twp.
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Dir: From Chinchilla, up Layton Road 1 mile, left on Stanton, right on
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104 Amity Avenue, Old Forge
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
Dir: North on 6&11, right onto S. Abington Road, right onto Edella,
right onto Griffn Pond Road. MLS#11-4946
Dir: Route 6 & 11 North, make a left at Agway onto Old Trail Road.
Left onto Northup Hill Road. Property is on the left just past Hum-
phrey Road. MLS#11-57
Dir: N. Abington Rd. to a left at the Waverly Comm, bear left onto
Waverly Rd. MLS#11-3565
Dir: Main Street Old Forge to right on Vinet St. (Vine is just past
Powell) turn right on Church St. Take 3rd left on Winter St. Take 3rd
right on Amity Ave in Old Forge Estates. MLS#11-3154
1-3PM 1-3PM 2-3:30PM 1-2:30PM $284,900 $429,900 $782,000 $215,000
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 31
To place your
ad call...829-7130
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,1
owner, garage kept,
camel leather interi-
or, 3.2L / 6 cylinder,
5-speed automatic,
front/rear & side
airbags, ABS
Navigation System,
8-speaker surround
system DVD/CD/AM
/FM/cassette,XM
Satellite Radio,
power & heated
front seats,power-
door locks & win-
dows, power moon-
roof, 4 snow tires
included!....and
much, much
more! Car runs and
looks beautiful
$17,500 Firm
See it at
Orloskis Car Wash
& Lube
295 Mundy Street
(behind Wyoming
Valley Mall)
or Call 239-8461
AUDI `05 A6
3.2 Quattro AT6.
Auto tiptronic 6
speed. Black with
black leather. Garage
kept. Fully loaded,
gps, cold weather
package. 78K miles.
Asking $17,400. Call
570-814-6714
LINE UP
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on an automobile?
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BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $13,000
OBO. 570-466-2630
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
BUICK `05 LESABRE
Garage kept. 1
owner. Local driv-
ing, very good
condition.
53,500 miles.
Asking $9,700
(570) 457-6414
leave message
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CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$3,900
(570) 760-0511
To place your
ad call...829-7130
DODGE `97
CARAVAN
139,000 miles, new
brakes, runs well,
body is fair. $1,275.
570-603-0252
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,400
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HYUNDAI `02
ELANTRA
129,995 miles,
manual, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors, CD
player, leather inte-
rior, sun roof, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
GREAT ON GAS.
REDUCED $3,000.
570-654-8469
412 Autos for Sale
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,750
Call (570) 288-6009
JAGUAR 94
XJS CONVERTIBLE
Mint Condition
Magnolia red,
with palomino
beige leather
interior. A
cream puff
inside & out.
4 new tires and
services. Florida
car. $14,900.
570-885-1512
JEEP `04
WRANGLER
4 lift, 33 BFG
base KM2, 5
speed, excellent
condition, 46,200
miles. $12,500.
OBO.
Call 570-592-1829
412 Autos for Sale
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition,
No Accidents.
Classy Car.
New Price!
$5,000
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
412 Autos for Sale
SAAB `06 93
A E R O s p o r t .
Leather interior.
Heated seats. Sun-
roof. Good condi-
tion. $8,000. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-760-8264
SUBURU 06 LEGACY
GT LIMITED SEDAN
4 door, black,
approximately
76,000 miles. 2.5
liter engine, auto.
asking $12,000.
570-510-3077
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on an automobile?
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Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
TOYOTA `05
COROLLA-S
68,700 miles. Auto-
matic, power win-
dows, locks, mir-
rors, air, cruise, key-
less entry. Ground
effects.
$8,900 Negotiable
570-388-2829 or
570-905-4352
412 Autos for Sale
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
VOLKSWAGEN 00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES 76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
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that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
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to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LLE LE LE LE E LLE LE EE DER.
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PAGE 32 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
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on an automobile?
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Classifieds got
the directions!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
DESOTO CUSTOM
49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In its
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
shes beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
FORD SALEEN 04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
documented #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
interior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$2,300 or
best offer
570-693-3263
Ask for Paul
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
LINE UP
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the directions!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
All original
45,000 miles
350 Rocket
engine
Fender skirts
Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
GMC SIERRA 98 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
BMW 07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
KAWASAKI 05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
CHEROKEE 10
Travel trailer. 39 ft.,
4 slide outs, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, microwave,
awning, tinted win-
dows, Brand new.
Have no pets or
smokers. Much
more!!!!!
$33,000
(cell) 682-888-2880
442 RVs & Campers
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20 long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,595
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
442 RVs & Campers
PACE 99 ARROW VISION
Ford V10. Excellent
condition. 8,700
miles. 1 slide out. 2
awnings. 2 colored
TVs, generator,
back up camera, 2
air conditioners,
microwave/convec-
tion oven, side by
side refrigerator
with ice maker,
washer/dryer,
queen size bed.
$37,900 negotiable
(570) 288-4826
(570) 690-1464
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25 travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
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SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,200.
(570) 540-0975
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451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE 07 RAM
4 W.D. HEMI
engine. Full bed.
1500. Extended
cab. Excellent con-
dition. 49,6128
miles. $19,000
570-954-3650
To place your
ad call...829-7130
FORD `90 TRUCK
17 box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 99 F150
Shortbox. 1 owner.
New truck trade!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 04
EXPLORER XLT
4x4. Absolutely
like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
Trade ins accepted.
570-466-2771
JEEP `04
CHEROKEE
135,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, $6,500.
(570) 237-6979
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the directions!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Auto. V6.
Black Beauty!
$6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 03 MPV VAN
V6. CD Player.
1 owner vehicle!!
$3,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
To place your
ad call...829-7130
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. Luxury
4x4. garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion, fully loaded,
every option
34,000 miles.
GREAT DEAL
$14,500
(570)825-5847
To place your
ad call...829-7130
RANGE ROVER
07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
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451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
To place your
ad call...829-7130
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 33
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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Find
that
new
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The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
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to place an
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ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
7
1
9
7
6
0
SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS WANTED
FREE CDL LICENSING
ALL CLEARANCES
PD. BY ROHRER BUS
BONUS PROGRAMS
LIMITED HEALTH BENEFITS
CONTACT SHAWN @
ROHRER BUS SERVICE
PHONE: 570-586-0175
Email: ahsup@epix.net
QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN
Entry Level -
Will assist QC Supervisor, establish, examine
and maintain quality on production floor.
Position will be on hands in production
dept., on floor testing and sampling. $
13/hour to start. Hours: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m Mon.
Fri. Must have prior experience in QC and
with Microsoft Word & Excel. Will operate
forklift and some heavy lifting may be
required. Must be detailed oriented and have
ability to multi-task. Competitive benefit
pckage. Candidates meeting qualifications
should forward resume with wage require-
ments to:
AEP Industries, Inc.,
Attn: Human Resources,
20 Elmwood Ave., Mountain Top, Pa. 18707
Fax 570-474-9257
We are a Drug Free Workplace. EOE
AUTOMOTIVE SALES
CONSULTANTS
Valley Chevrolet is seeking
individuals who are self-starters,
team-oriented and driven.
(No experience necessary)
We Offer:
Salary & Commission Benefts
401k Plan 5 Day Work Week
Huge New & Used Inventory
Apply in person to:
Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager
Rick Merrick, Sales Manager
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CONSTRUCTION/
PAINTERS
Painters with
spackling experi-
ence. Carpenters
with roof experi-
ence. Must be pro-
fessional and expe-
rienced. Amateurs
need not apply.
Call 570-654-4348
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
PROJECT MANAGERS &
CARPENTERS
General Contractor
seeking Project
Managers with esti-
mating experience
& Carpenters for
commercial con-
struction company.
Attention to detail,
desire to work as
part of a team, abili-
ty to keep projects
on schedule and
valid drivers license
are a must.
Please forward
resume to:
CHAMPION BUILDERS, INC.
239 Pringle St.
Kingston, PA 18704
To place your
ad call...829-7130
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
DEVELOPMENT
DIRECTOR
The SPCA of
Luzerne Co. is seek-
ing a full time Devel-
opment Director to
promote its pro-
grams and services,
develop funding
opportunities in the
community through
effective corpo-
rate/community
relations, events
planning, new grant
research and writ-
ing. This position is
responsible for
overall fund raising
including the plan-
ning and coordina-
tion of fund raising
events, and the
research and devel-
opment of new
funding opportuni-
ties.
In addition to out-
standing interper-
sonal, communica-
tion, and organiza-
tional skills,
qualified candidates
will possess a bach-
elors degree, and
have extensive pub-
lic relations, events
planning, and fund
raising experience
with a proven track
record of results.
SPCA offers an
excellent compen-
sation and benefits
package along with
a rewarding career
experience. Please
forward your
resume with salary
history to:
SPCA of
Luzerne Co.
c/o Search
Committee
524 East Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
TELEPHONE
TROUBLESHOOTER/
CSR
Do you have
digital, telephone,
or modem
experience?
RFM is looking for
someone with the
ability to prioritize
and organize
requests. Self-
motivated individual
with a dedicated
sense of follow
through. Call center
or help desk experi-
ence is necessary.
Must have comput-
er knowledge &
possess good peo-
ple skills. Competi-
tive starting rate.
Pleasant office
environment. Must
be dependable.
Company offers a
voluntary health
benefits package
and 401k plan. Call
1-888-514-8883
for details,
ask for Theresa.
Fax resume to:
570-517-5003
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLL NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
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Findthe
perfect
friend.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LLLE LE LEE LLE LE LLEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
PAGE 34 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
524 Engineering
NETWORK SYSTEMS
ENGINEER
Local I.T. solution
provider has an
opening for a Net-
work Systems Engi-
neer. The individual
will provide techni-
cal expertise to our
customer base in
the design, installa-
tion, implementation,
operation and main-
tenance of Windows
based Servers and
Clients. Expertise in
Networking Basics
i.e.: Topologies,
Cabling, Gateways
& Networking Com-
munications. Server
experience w/Win-
dows 20xx + SBS a
must.
Send Resume with
wage requirements
to: Northeast Micro
1021 N. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18705
Or e-mail bkovach@
northeastmicro.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
SIGN ON BONUS
Due to our contin-
ued growth, Bolus
Freight Systems
is expanding its fleet
of company drivers.
Company drivers
will enjoy dedicated
runs or regional
runs. You can be
home every night or
every weekend, the
choice is yours.
You can earn in
excess of $1200 per
week, and you will
be driving a new or
late model truck.
Part time and week-
end work also avail-
able. This is a
career opportunity
for dependable driv-
ers to work for an
industry leader and
one of the highest
paying companies in
the business. We
offer a performance
bonus, paid vaca-
tions and holidays,
medical and life
insurance as well as
401K. For more
information call:
1-800-444-1497
ext 721
548 Medical/Health
NURSING
PrimeCare Medical
is seeking
PRN LPNS
to work in the
medical
department in the
Luzerne County
Juvenile Detention
Center. Contact HR
at 1-800-245-7277
or fax resumes to:
717-651-1865
EOE REF #642
548 Medical/Health
HELPMATES, INC.
Leading home care
provider in PA
since 1987.
Now hiring part-time
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES for Luzerne/
Wyoming Counties.
The successful can-
didates will be
responsible for trav-
eling home to home
providing personal
care. Are you willing
to assist with
bathing, light house-
keeping and meal
preparation? We
provide travel time
and a voluntary ben-
efit package. We
are also seeking an
RN Consultant. You
will be responsible
for patient initial
assessments, quar-
terly visits, as well
as aide verification
of competencies
and aide superviso-
ry visits. RN certifi-
cation and liability
insurance is
required. Interested
candidates should
call 1-855-444-2037
to set up an inter-
view. EOE.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
RNS/LPNS
wanted for
Pediatric Home
Care in the Clarks
Summit and
Thornhurst areas.
Competitive pay
rates and sign on
bonus available.
Contact Kristen @
610-310-8409.
551 Other
ARCHER DANIELS
MIDLAND COMPANY
is one of the worlds
largest agricultural
processing compa-
nies. ADM is hiring
for Production Per-
sonnel, Mainte-
nance Technicians,
Laboratory Techni-
cians, and Produc-
tion Supervisory
positions at its
newest Cocoa Pro-
cessing facility in
Humboldt industrial
park in Hazle Town-
ship. Apply online at
www.adm.jobs. All
positions are full
time, offer a com-
plete benefits pack-
age, and competi-
tive wages. ADM is
an equal opportunity
employer.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
554 Production/
Operations
MAIL PROCESSOR
ZODIAC PRINTING
Seeking an experi-
enced mail depart-
ment processor.
Must understand
postal regulations
and procedures and
have experience
operating ink jet
addressing and
inserting equipment.
Part time to full time
available. Forward
resume to Tomz@
zodiacprinting.com
or call 570-474-9220
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
MACHINE OPERATORS /
PRODUCTION
$9/HR.TO START
60-90 day evalua-
tion with $ increase
$ based on YOUR
performance, atten-
dance etc. Benefit
Package includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Vacation, Hol-
iday pay PLUS.
Full-time 12 hour
shifts on alternating
3 & 4 day work
weeks. Every other
weekend a must.
Previous manufac-
turing experience
preferred. Some
heavy lifting.
Accepting
applications at
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood
Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA
18707
EOE
We are a drug free
workplace.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
EAST MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
A luxury apartment
community, is
looking for a per-
sonable, customer
service and sales
oriented person to
be part of our Pro-
fessional Apartment
Management team.
Applicant must be
detail oriented,
computer literate &
able to multi task.
Excellent salary.
Apply in person to:
Charlene Poulos,
680 Wildflower Dr,
Plains Township or
by email: Cpoulos@
themanorgroup.com
No phone calls
please.
569 Security/
Protective Services
SECURITY OFFICERS
Join Vector Security
Patrol and become
a name on a winning
team. We have
career opportunities
for Security Officers
and those wishing
to begin a career in
the security field
with openings for
Part Time hours in
Wilkes-Barre and
Noxen. Previous
security experience
a plus. 800-682-
4722. EOE
To place your
ad call...829-7130
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BAR/TAVERN
FOR SALE
Turn key business.
Liquor license &
patio license. Air
conditioned. Lower
level 1 bedroom
apt. Reduced to
$159,000 Owner
Retiring.
570-929-3214
JAN-PRO
Commercial Cleaning
Of Northeastern PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or Part
time. Accounts
available NOW
throughout Luzerne
& Lackawanna
counties. We guar-
antee $5,000 to
$200,000 in annual
billing. Investment
Required. Were
ready are you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
610 Business
Opportunities
POPCORN/
CANDY/ICE
CREAM SHOP
Tunkhannock. Mak-
ing over 25 flavors
of popcorn. Ideal
family business.
Selling equipment
supplies and inven-
tory Turnkey oper-
ation. Full training.
Unlimited potential
$44,900.
570-650-2451
To place your
ad call...829-7130
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
R-12 FRIGC refriger-
ant 30lb unopened
automotive, refrig-
erant, and A/C use
$350. 262-1279
WASHER & DRYER
Kenmore apartment
style stackable
washer/ electric
dryer $175.
570-239-6586
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
HESS TRUCKS new
from 1990 to 2008
$450. plus 11 extras
@20. 570-825-3688
HESS TRUCKS new
in boxes 2000-2008
$60.-$100.
570-675-4383
710 Appliances
APPLIANCES (4)
washer, dryer,
stove, dishwasher,
Kenmore, 3 years
old $300. each Four
for $1,000.
570-235-7170
KITCHEN UNIT ideal
for cabin, cottage or
camper. Unit a king
unit consists of 2
burner electric
stove top, stainless
steel sink, under
counter refrigerator
with freezer, meas-
ures 4wx23 deep
X41h, covered with
formica lid. $100.
firm. 570-735-2694
710 Appliances
REFRIGERATOR
almost new
Frigidaire, white 29
1/2 W, freezer on
top, pickup in
Exeter, $275.
570-362-2766
REFRIGERATOR:
small cube, very
good condition,
$35. 570-675-4383
WASHER $15 Dryer
$10. $20 for
both, must haul
away. 406-5857
712 Baby Items
CAR SEAT Graco
childrens, like new
condition $45.
570-693-0811
To place your
ad call...829-7130
CRIB MATTRESS
Kolcraft, like new.
Well protected by
mattress cover.
$35. 570-333-0470
HIGH CHAIR: Fisher
Price Space Saver
$25. 570-288-7905
716 Building
Materials
KITCHEN CABINETS
flat doors, approxi-
mately 10 linear ft.
Top & bottom with
formica counter top
bathroom sink with
faucet. $600. Call
570-301-8200
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
726 Clothing
COAT long, black
leather, size large,
never worn, tags
still on $50.
570-606-1136
COATS 3 cashmere
size 6 $40 each.
Toddler bed & bed-
ding, toybox, rug,
complete $50.
Phaltzgraph dishes
over 100 pieces
sacrifice $150. or
best offer. 6 wood-
en folding chairs
$40. Rocking chair
$30. Wood mirror
full length $25.
Antique victorian
floor lamp $200.
570-592-8414
GIRLS CLOTHING
3T winter $5. 4 win-
ter $10. 5 winter
with boots $10.
570-868-0481
732 Exercise
Equipment
BICYCLE: Miami Sun
3-wheel, great con-
dition $225.
570-239-6586
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER Dyno Glo
kerosene heater
23,000 BTU, like
new includes
kerosene container
& fuel. $50.
570-868-6655
VENT FREE
propane & natural
gas heaters brand
new in unopened
box, can be mount-
ed on wall or floor.
has thermostat &
blower Full manu-
facturer warranty
20,000 btu -
$190.00, 30,000 btu
- $220.00
(570)675-0005
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUES: book-
case desk $2,100.
Victorian wicker
$100. Oak dining
table $375. Pine 3
drawer chest $90.
Bamboo book shelf
$85. Step end table
$65. Limoges china
bowl $100. Other
items, oak 5 shelf
wardrobe $175.
Small pine table
$75. Fabric 5 panel
screen $155.
570-675-0586
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, gray, full size
bed new $150.
beige sofa bed
$100. Living room
end tables $25,.
Metal desk $50.
570-417-3940
COMPUTER DESK:
$40. or best offer.
570-332-4536
To place your
ad call...829-7130
DINING ROOM SET
solid oak table with 1
leaf, 6 chairs, light-
ed hutch. $500.
Recliner sofa & love
seat blue velour,
$275. End tables 2
light color wood,
$100. 570-954-1440
744 Furniture &
Accessories
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE SALE
Virginia House Oak
Dining Room Set:
Includes 1 hutch, 1
buffet, table with 2
leaves, 2 arm chairs,
6 side chairs. Excel-
lent condition,
$1,750. Call
570-262-5028
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
bedroom set,
French Provincial
set includes 2 twin
beds, dresser with
mirror & chest $125.
Loveseat, sea foam
green, very good
condition $75.
570-826-1407
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ROCKER/RECLINER
black vinyl, like new
$135. 793-4000
ROCKING CHAIR,
antique outdoor
$15. 570-287-1644
or 655-1959
TV STAND black
with 3 shelves bare-
ly used $100.
570-592-7723
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW THROWER,
Craftsman 26 4
cycle Tecumseh
Snow King engine,
rarely used. $475.
570-288-4340
756 Medical
Equipment
BRUNO STAIR LIFT
For a bi-level home.
Like new. Paid
$12,000. Selling for
$4,500, negotiable.
Call 570-752-4869
COMPASS POWER
WHEELCHAIR
By Golden. Red.
Like new. With
Ramp. $2,000
negotiable. Call
570-752-4869
DYNEX II Neurostim-
ulator (TENS unit) all
necessary equip-
ment included.
$150. 570-829-1611
HOSPITAL BED.
All electricaly con-
troled, in good con-
dition. Delivered.
$295.00
(610)589-9902
To place your
ad call...829-7130
758 Miscellaneous
BABY GIRL clothes
size 0-24 months,
large crate $100.
Graco high chair
$30. Mizuno golf
cart bag $25.Bo-
flex XTL, lat bar, leg
machine all acces-
sories included
$200. Strollers
Graco $30. Safety
1st $30. Pink
umbrella stroller $5.
Black leather rock-
ing chair with rock-
ing footrest $75.
Klipsch home the-
ater system in-
cludes 2 front, cen-
ter & sub $250.
Sony 19 flat screen
computer monitor
with speakers $100.
AB shaper & sit up
bench $25. Evenflo
booster car seat
$35. 570-212-2347.
BARREL, cider or
wine, 53 gallon,
$175. 570-876-3830
CANOPY covered
metal swing set 3
wide seat with
cushions $25.
570-824-0591
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 35
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 11pm
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Sturdy 42 oak table
$15. Twin bed frame
with bookcase
headboard, $15.
Wooden carrom
board $15. Big
Bertha leather clas-
sic golf bag $10.
570-678-5488
GROOMING table,
small $60. Twin
Aero bed $30.
Byers choice
Thanksgiving car-
oliers $140.
570-829-1007
GUITAR acoustic
guitar & hardcase.
$295. 823-3835
MOVIE LOT kids vhs
movie lot reduced
to $2. each or all 22
vhs for $35. All
have their covers &
most are the plastic
ones. VHS stand-
black, holds many
movies for $5. COS-
TUMES Old Navy
pumpkin hat &
shoes, black jump-
suit underneath,
$15. Plus size but-
terfly $25. Pirate
queen 12-14 girls.
$10. SKUNK 1 piece,
medium $15. Skele-
ton bride, girls 12-14
lace up bodice, tulle
trim cuffs, head-
band, veil $15. 12-14
Vampire dracula
gothic costume 12-
14, $15. 50s Girl
sock hop 1 piece
dress $15. 735-2661
PANS cast iron, 6.5
fry pan $6. 11 grid-
dle $16. 12 broiler
pan $17. 570-287-
1644 or 655-1959
PIANO Story &
Clark $700 or best
offer! 822-4593
PORTAPOTTI new
for trailer or boat,
$20. Beech wood
firewood in 2
lengths, about a
cord, $25. 328-5611
TIRES: 2 General
Grabber 275x40
x20, excellent con-
dition $300.
570-823-3425
WARMER Creators
brand, inside slide
doors front & back,
2 racks, $750.
570-636-3151
762 Musical
Instruments
DRUM SET: WJM
Percussion 5-piece
complete with cym-
bals, throne, metal-
lic blue, slightly used
$200. firm. Radio
Shack MD-1121 Syn-
thesizer/Piano w/
stand, like new,
$100. firm
570-574-4781
768 Personal
Electronics
PHONES, extremely
rare, rotary dial
desk phones, (1)
bright red (1) bright
orange, like new..
$125.each or best
offer. 570-696-2008
770 Photo
Equipment
CANON EOS DIGI-
TAL 300D 18-55 mm
lens, 75mm-300mm
zoom lens, 2 batter-
ies, 1 charger, 1-1gb
card, 1-512 mb card,
1 128mb card, 1-lens
filter, manual & soft-
ware $500.
570-819-2174
776 Sporting Goods
BACK PACK BAG-
GAGE, (2) large with
compartments $30
eaCh. 280-24782
BACK PACK
Lightweight, navy,
like new $50.
570-675-4383
BIKE: Next slumber
party brand girls 20
bike. $40.
570-735-2661
BIKE: Peugeot 12
speed english rac-
ing bike $50.
570-696-4912
To place your
ad call...829-7130
BOOTS Burton snow
board, size 9. Excel-
lent condition $50.
at 570-301-3484 or
570-631-6635.
BOWFLEX XTREME
2, like new. $800.
Weslo treadmill
$125.570-542-5823
CAMPING COTS (2)
metal frame $25.
each. Metal ham-
mock frame $15.
Murray 20 18
speed bike/Her-
culite micro-alloy
$50. Hillary camping
tent, sleeps 6 $50.
570-824-0591
HOME GYM Schwin
Bowflex, bench,
incline, latpull down,
leg extensions, slid-
ing seat for aerobic
rowing $250.
484-219-3346
MAILBOX Lake
Lehman airbrushed
mailbox. $60. Harry
Potter airbrushed
table $300. Golfers
toilet seat, unique
handpainted $75
570-477-1269
RECUMBENT BIKE
Edge 288R magnet-
ic $100. 570-901-
1095 or 594-0057
WEIGHT BENCH &
weights, stationary
bike, powerhouse
fitness gym, ab
lounger, will sell all
for $250. or sepa-
rately. 654-1820
784 Tools
COMPOUND MITER
SAW, Chicago Elec-
tric Power Co. 10
blade, 15 amp, 5300
RPM includes dust
bag, extension
wings, 60 tooth car-
bide blade, spring
load blade guard,
table tilts 45
degrees. New,
never used $50.
Delta bench saw 10
blade, 120v, 13mps,
Type 2, angle cut
bracket $50.
570-735-2694
TOOLS/ASSORTED
nails, iron pipes,
take all $22. 570-
287-1644/655-1959
To place your
ad call...829-7130
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
NEED CASH?
We Buy:
Gold & Gold coins,
Silver, Platinum,
old bills, Watches,
Costume Jewelry,
Diamonds, Gold
Filled, Sterling Sil-
ver Flatware,
Scrap Jewelry,
Military items, old
Tin & Iron Toys,
Canadian coins &
paper money,
most foreign
money (paper/coin).
Visit our new loca-
tion @ 134 Rt. 11,
Larksville
next to WOODYS
FIRE PLACE
& PRO FIX.
We make house calls!
Buyer & seller of
antiques! We also
do upholstering.
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS FREE 12
weeks old, liter box
trained. 594-2975
KITTENS Free to
good home. 2
orange male tabbys
left. Litter trained. 8
weeks old.
570-771-6347
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
AKC Registered
Black Great Dane
Puppies. Vet
checked, shots,
wormings, micro-
chipped. Tempera-
ment tested. Ear
cropping available.
$500.
570-384-0593
CHOW CHOW
Loving,caring,
gentle, adorable
puppies available
11/12/11. Papers and
first shots included.
570-655-3189
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES - AKC
Great Pedigrees.
Multiple V ratings.
Titled from
Schutzhund to ther-
apy dog. Father
imported from Ger-
man. Call for more
info. 570-474-5409
GERMAN SHORT-
HAIRED POINTER
pups, excellent pets
and hunters, par-
ents are health test-
ed, sire is AKC
titled. $350 to $550.
570-926-0873
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $350
Pomeranians - $500
607-217-8303
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
attic for storage,
washer, dryer & 2
air conditioners
included. New
Roof & Furnace
Furnished or unfur-
nished.
Low Taxes! New
price $118,500
570-885-1512
WANAMIE
Newport Twp
East Main Street
Handyman Special
Double Block
Two 2 story, 3-bed-
room units each
with attic, cellar,
bath and pantry.
Large 4 car garage.
Upper and lower
floors. As is for
$25,000. Call
570-379-2645
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WHITE HAVEN
LARGE SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
Buffalo Street
Two story, 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath-
room, eat-in
kitchen, office/
study, family room,
living room, bonus
room, utility room,
Large back yard,
Three large walk-in
closets $52,500.
after 5:00 p.m.
570-582-5907 or
email
paulmichelle@
pa.metrocast.net.
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
915 Manufactured
Homes
LAUREL RUN ESTATES
We have mobile
home sites for new
and used single &
double wides.
LARGE WOODED LOTS
overlooking
Wilkes-Barre
Call 570-823-8499
CELL 570-241-1854
SPRINGBROOK
2 bedroom. Clean.
Needs no work.
Remodeled
throughout. Owner
financing. $14,000.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
Large 3 bedroom
2nd floor.
Off street parking.
Call Joe570-881-2517
To place your
ad call...829-7130
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
ALL UNITS
MANAGED
VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Call for
availability
1-2 bedrooms,
all modern.
Employment/
Application
Required
No Pets/
Smoking
Leases
Very Clean
Standards
288-1422
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Great location, 1
bedroom apartment
in residential area,
all utilities included.
$600/month
+ security.
908-482-0335
KINGSTON
2nd Floor. Available
Nov-1. 2 bedrooms,
renovated bath-
room, balcony off
newly renovated
kitchen with refrig-
erator & stove, cen-
tral air, newly paint-
ed, off-street park-
ing, no pets. $600
per month plus utili-
ties, & 1 month
security deposit.
570-239-1010
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
42 Third Avenue
2nd floor, newly
remodeled 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, fridge
& stove included.
Washer/dryer
hookup. $550 +
security. Water &
sewer included. No
pets. 570-417-2919
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple
Ave. Large Two
story, 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
Central Heat &
Air, washer/dryer
in unit, parking.
$830 + utilities &
1 month security
570-262-6947
KINGSTON
Page Avenue
2 bedroom, living
room, dining room,
off street parking.
$450 + utilities. Call
570-752-6399
KINGSTON
Remodeled 2 bed-
room, dining & living
room, off street
parking. All new
appliances. $600/
month + utilities,
security & refer-
ences. Water &
sewer included.
Absolutely No Pets.
Call 570-239-7770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, 1st floor
3 Bedroom with
modern bath and
kitchen. New floor-
ing, large closets.
Off Street Parking,
fenced yard. Water
& garbage included.
Tenant pays electric
& gas service.
$575/month. No
pets. One year
lease.
570-301-7723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible. Equal
Housing Opportuni-
ty. 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
Immediate Opennings!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
347 Hanover St.
1 bedroom, 1st
floor, wall to wall
carpet, eat-in
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup,
porch & shared
yard. $400/mo +
utilities and
security. New
energy efficient
gas furnace.
Call 570-814-1356
NANTICOKE
603 Hanover St
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room. No pets.
$500 + security, util-
ities & lease. Photos
available. Call
570-542-5330
PITTSTON
2 apartments avail-
able. 2 bedrooms.
All appliances
included. All utilities
paid; electricity by
tenant. Everything
brand new. Off
street parking.
$675-$750 + securi-
ty & references. Call
570-969-9268
PITTSTON
5 room apartment
includes 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator, stove
and washer/dryer.
Water & garbage
included. Cats OK.
$500 per month,
+ security deposit.
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
Call Ben at
570-715-7739
PAGE 36 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
Jenkins Township
Newly renovated, 4
bedrooms, 2 full
baths, living room,
kitchen, stove, &
fridge included
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking. Heat &
water included.
$875. per month +
security deposit.
Credit check and
references.
Cell 917-753-8192
PLAINS
15 & 17 E. Carey St
Clean 2nd floor,
modern 1 bedroom
apartments. Stove,
fridge, heat & hot
water included. No
pets. Off street
parking. $490-$495
+ security, 1 yr lease
Call 570-822-6362
570-822-1862
Leave Message
PLYMOUTH
Large 2 bedroom 1
bath, ground floor.
$525/ month +
security. Includes
heat, water &
sewer. Pets accept-
ed at an additional
fee. 310-431-6851
WEST PITTSTON
East Packer Avenue
2 bedroom Town-
house with full
basement, 1 bath,
off street parking.
$625/mo + utilities.
No Pets. 570-283-
1800 M-F, 570-388-
6422 all other times
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WEST PITTSTON
HIGH AND DRY
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment, 2nd floor.
Recently renovated,
sewer & appliances
included. Off street
parking. Security.
No pets.
$500/month +
utilities & gas heat.
570-586-0417
WEST WYOMING
AVAILABLE NOW!!
2nd floor 1 bed-
room, nice kitchen
with appliances,
$450 month plus
utilities No animals.
No smoking. Call
570-693-1000
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom. Heat &
hot water included,
$550 month +
Security required
973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
22 Terrace Street
2 bedroom, 3rd
floor. Hardwood
flooring. Appliances,
heat, water, sewer
& trash included.
Pet friendly. $700 +
electric & natural
gas. 570-969-9268
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
WE HA WE HAVE SP VE SPACE!! ACE!!
Come see us
now- youll be
surprised! Afford-
able modern
office space avail-
able at the
Luzerne Bank
Building on Public
Square. Rents
include heat, cen-
tral air, utilities,
trash removal and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Super fast
internet available.
Access parking at
the new inter-
modal garage via
our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
for details.
OFFICE OR RETAIL
LUZERNE
Out of flood plain.
2,200 SF. Near
Cross Valley High-
way. Loading dock.
Newly painted.
570-288-6526
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
OFFICE SPACE
Bennett St.
Luzerne
1100 to 1600 sq ft,
1st floor, off street
parking.
570-283-3184
PROFESSIONAL
COMMERCIAL SPACE
West Pittston
Village Shop
918 Exeter Ave
Route 92
1500 sq. ft. &
2,000 sq. ft.
OUT OF FLOOD ZONE
570-693-1354 ext 1
315 PLAZA
900 & 2400 SF
Dental Office -
direct visibility to
Route 315 between
Leggios & Pic-A-
Deli. 750 & 1750 SF
also available. Near
81 & Cross Valley.
570-829-1206
947 Garages
WEST PITTSTON
5 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9x18 &
11x18. $90/month.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, no pets, no
smoking, not in
flood zone. Hard-
wood floors living
room, dining room,
large kitchen. Refer-
ences, security,
$650/per month,
plus utilities.
Call 570-881-8267
or email
cw95150@aol.com.
KINGSTON
Two bedrooms,
newly remodeled,
hardwood floors,1
ceramic bath and
kitchen,oak cabi-
nets, refrigerator,
stove and dish-
washer, off-street
parking, no pets, no
smoking. $750/per
month, security &
references.
Call (570) 417-4821
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom. Washer
dryer hookup. $600
+ utilities. Call
570-954-7919
WILKES-BARRE
1/2 double. 3 bed-
rooms. Wall to wall
carpeting, washer /
dryer hookup.
Fenced in yard.
$475 plus security.
570-472-2392
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE HEIGHTS
293 S. Hancock St.
Two bedrooms, with
wall-to-wall carpet-
ing, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, off-
street parking, no
pets, $595. per
month, plus utilities
& security deposit.
(570) 814-1356
953Houses for Rent
EDWARDSVILLE
Off street parking,
garage. All appli-
ances provided.
Section 8 Approved.
Section 8 Welcome.
$700/month + utili-
ties. Full months
security required at
lease signing.
Call (570) 592-5764
ask for Steve
953Houses for Rent
FORTY FORT
ONE OF A KIND
3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, all
appliances provid-
ed, washer/dryer
on premises, off-
street parking, no
pets, Completely
renovated, $1200./
per month, water
and sewer paid,
$1200./security
deposit. Call
(570) 847-8138
after 9:00 a.m. to
set an appoint-
ment or email
Chad.schleig@
att.com.
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
PLYMOUTH
Quiet & Cozy 2 bed-
room. Large kitchen
& bath. Washer
dryer hookup. Small
hedged & fenced
yard. All situated
high & dry on a 1-
way street. No pets.
$575 + first, last &
security. Call
570-829-3902 or
570-235-4981
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms with
lots of storage.
Hardwood floors. 5
minute walk to Gen-
eral Hospital. $670.
+ utilities.
570-814-3838
To place your
ad call...829-7130
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
***
AFFORDABLE
***
General Masonry
& Concrete
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR TOO SMALL!
Masonry /Concrete
Work. Licensed &
insured. Free est.
John 570-573-0018
Joe 570-579-8109
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
*2008 Pulse Research
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NL NNLLL NNNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLLE LE LE LE EE LLLLE EEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
House in Shambles?
We can fix it!
Cover All Painting & Cover All Painting &
General Contracting General Contracting
PA068287. Serving
Northeast PA &
North Jersey since
1989. All phases of
interior & exterior
repair & rebuilding.
Call 570-226-1944 Call 570-226-1944
or 570-470-5716 or 570-470-5716
Free Estimates
And yes, I am a
lead paint removal
certified contractor
CALL 970.7201 OR VISIT IMPRESSIONSMEDIADIGTIAL.COM
PERSONALITY. FUNCTIONALITY. PROFESSIONALISM.
Move your business forward with the online marketing
solutions from Impressions Media Digital. Get Started today.
Marketing Landing Pages
Website Design and Management
Mobile Marketing
POWER YOUR
PROFILE AND
YOUR PROFITS.
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 37
PAGE 38 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
V A L L E Y
CHE V ROL E T
K E N W A L L A CE S
*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Low APR to well qualified buyers. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A
1.9
%
APR
O n Select
C ertified
Preow ned Til
10/31
V ISIT U S 24/7 w w w .valleychevrolet.com
#12045B,1.8LEC O TEC VVT
D O H C 4 C yl.,6 Speed M anualTrans.,
A /C ,PW ,PD L,FrontBucketSeats,
16SteelW heels,XM Satellite Radio,
O nStar w /A uto C rash
Response & Turn-By-Turn
N avigation,A M /FM /C D /M P3
$
13 , 9 47
$
13 , 9 47
* $
1 3 , 9 4 7
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y C R U Z E L S 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y C R U Z E L S
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
#Z2560,2.2LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,
D eluxe FrontBuckets,Running Boards,
Traction C ontrol,XM Satellite Radio,
O nStar w /Turn-By-Turn N avigation,
Luggage RoofRails,Pow er D rivers Seat
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y H H R L S 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y H H R L S
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
#Z2550,3.5LV6,A uto.,A /C ,
PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors,Pow er
Seats,Rem ote Start,A M /FM C D ,
H eated FrontBucketSeats
$
15 , 48 0
$
15 , 48 0
* $
1 5 , 4 8 0
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y IM P A L A L T 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y IM P A L A L T
SALE PRICE starting at
10
AVA IL.
#Z2556,2.4LD O H C A utom atic,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er
M irrors,A M /FM C D ,FrontBucketSeats,
Body Side M oldings
$
15 , 9 8 5
$
15 , 9 8 5
* $
1 5 , 9 8 5
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y M A L IB U L T 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y M A L IB U L T
SALE PRICE starting at
4
AVA IL.
#Z2519,2.4LD O H C
A utom atic,A /C ,
D eep Tinted G lass,C ruise,
Steering W heelRadio
C ontrols,A M /FM C D ,
Pow er H eated M irrors,
Rem ote Keyless Entry
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y E Q U IN O X L T A W D 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y E Q U IN O X L T A W D
SALE PRICE starting at
2
AVA IL.
#Z2538,3.6LV6 A uto.,
Traction C ontrol,A /C ,8 Passenger,2nd
& 3rd Row SplitBench,Pow er O ptions,
Pow er D river Seat,Rear Spoiler,18
A lum .W heels,U ltra Sonic Rear Parking
A ssist
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y T R A V E R S E A W D 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y T R A V E R S E A W D
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
from
S
p ecial
P
urchase
S
p ecial
P
urchase
W hatisGM Certified?Itisan additional...
12 m os. 12,000 M ile Bum per-to-Bum perW arranty
up to48 M os48,000 M ILES
plus5 year100,000 m ilePow ertrain LTD W arranty
$
26 , 9 21
$
26 , 9 21
* $
2 6 , 9 2 1
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
35,790
$
24, 5 0 0
$
24, 5 0 0
* $
2 4 , 5 0 0
$
14, 9 7 5
$
14, 9 7 5
* $
1 4 , 9 7 5
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
17,895 O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
21,299
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
26,210 O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
23,941
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 39
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs .
All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au g 2 0 11.

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
THE NUM BER 1NISSAN DEAL ER IN
THE NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**
S C AN HERE FO R
S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S
We Will Sell
We Will Sell
39 Altimas
39 Altimas
and
and
34 Rogues
34 Rogues
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DUELING
DUELING N ISSAN S DUELING
*$159 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,435; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 NM AC Ca p tive Ca s h.
30
AVAIL AB L E
AT TH IS
P R ICE!
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
2 0 12 N ISSAN ALTIM A 2 0 11 N ISSAN R OG UE
STK#N20528 M O DEL# 13112
M SRP $23,820
L EAS E FO R :
$
159
*
P ER
M O.
P lu s Ta x.
B U Y FO R
$
19,495
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
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*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,148; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2150 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h.
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $750 Nis s a n Reb a te.
L EAS E FO R :
$
199
*
P ER
M O.
P lu s Ta x.
B U Y FO R
$
20 ,995
*
W / $750 N IS S AN R EB ATE
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4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
M SRP $23,905
STK#N20680 M O DEL# 22211
VS.
VS. VS.
2 .5 S SED AN S AW D
30
AVAIL AB L E
AT TH IS
P R ICE!
**
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4
STK#N20967
M O DEL# 25211
M SRP $34,930
V6, Au to , A/ C, AM / F M / CD, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts !
S A V E OV E R
$5000ON
A L L 2011
P A THFIN DE RS IN
S TOCK !
**
2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
STK#N20706
M O DEL# 23211
M SRP $32,130
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S COUPE 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S COUPE
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts
7COUP E S
A V A IL A BL E !
4CYL & V 6TOO!
STK#N20905
M O DEL# 15112
M SRP $25,040
B U Y FO R
$
21,495
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
229
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,523; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier
1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5S SEDAN 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5S SEDAN
V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Po w erS ea t, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
STK#N20827
M O DEL# 16111
M SRP $32,885
B U Y FO R
$
26,995
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
259
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$259 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,757; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h
d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
12
M A XIM A S
A V A IL A BL E !
S & S V TOO!
B U Y FO R
$
29,8 95
*
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
329
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$329 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,718; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h
d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $2345 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
B U Y FO R
$
26,8 95
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,743; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h
d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $750 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
20 2011
M URA N OS
A V A IL A BL E !
19
14
14 10
H U R R Y
S AL E EN D S
10 /31/11
PAGE 40 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011