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July 2004

3.3

GIS / TRANSPORTATION MODELLING

3.3.1 Geographical Information System (GIS) As part of the ITP process, an extensive data collection exercise has been undertaken, much of this information being spatial in nature. In order to more usefully understand the linkages and relationships between various aspects of this data, the information has been captured on a Geographical Information System (GIS). For the purposes of the ITP the ESRI ARCview platform and WGS84 geo-reference systems were utilised. This platform is fully compatible with existing City of Johannesburg and Provincial GIS systems. The following base GIS information is contained within the ITP GIS system: The Gautrans Road Network; The Gauteng Transport Study Zones (Household Surveys); The 1999 CPTR information; The Johannesburg Road Referencing System (RRS); The 1996 South African Census GIS dataset; The South African Road Network dataset; The PTIS GIS dataset; Spatial Planning Information; Enumerator Areas; and The Johannesburg Municipal Planning Unit (MPU) dataset.

3.3.2 GIS Maps and Datasets The following information is available on the GIS and is used on the base maps: Road Network indicating the road center lines; City of Johannesburg Municipal Boundary; The boundaries of the 11 regions within the CoJ.

The following information is available on the road network: Road Classification; Road Name;
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Functional Class; Length and Width of links; Street Names; Suburb and Region in which the link is located; Responsible Road Authority.

The following Spatial Planning information is available: The Spatial Development Framework; The Citys Boundaries; Previous MLCs Boundaries; Voting Wards; Place names; Schools.

It should be noted that the results of the 2002 Gauteng Household Interview Survey (GHIS) is available on the GIS on a region, as well as a ward, basis. The following GIS datasets for public transport are also available: Bus Routes per Bus Operator; Bus Start and End points; Putco Bus Sleeping and Breaking Points; Metrobus Termini; Railway Lines; Railway Stations; Long Distance Taxi Ranks; Local Taxi Ranks. Bus Routes Minibus Taxi Routes

The following road network datasets are also included within the GIS: Pavement condition of the road network; The link counts where available;
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Walking distance buffers for Taxi Ranks, Rail Stations & Bus Nodes; Buffer Zones for Schools; SDF and JRA Capital Projects;

3.3.3 GIS Manipulation and Reporting It should be noted that the Transportation Model which has been developed as part of the ITP (as discussed in section 3.3.4 below) shares the road network definition and public transport routeing with the GIS system. Given this high level of compatibility between the two systems, as the development of the EMME/2 model proceeds, the outputs of the model may be converted to the GIS database for ease of display and interpretation. From the GIS information available as part of the ITP, the scope for the display of map-based information is vast. With the GIS it is possible to display any of the datasets with another to compare various attributes. The GIS system has been utilised to create many of the graphics contained within the ITP, and as more information becomes available and is added to the system over time, it is believed that the GIS will become an invaluable tool to assist in the future planning of the City. 3.3.4 Transportation Modelling Because of the age and unsuitability of the existing CoJ transportation model, a completely new strategic model was developed in 2002/03, and was being refined and extended during 2003/04. It was designed to completely replace the existing EMME/2 model which was developed in the late 1970s and periodically maintained up to the early 1990s, but which was subsequently not updated or improved. The new model was developed in EMME/2 using all available network and public transport routes data captured in the GIS database for the CoJ, and also updated for the current CoJ municipal region. The essential model elements are as follows: Road and rail network covering the entire CoJ study area as well as additional regions to the east and south-east as shown in Figure 3-4. Latest available classified, tube, and occupancy counts from the CoJs traffic count database supplemented by counts carried out in November 2002;

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Key:

Freeways Railways Other Roads

Figure 3-4

City of Johannesburg EMME/2 Modelled Area

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All national, provincial, and metropolitan roads and also most Class 4 roads considered significant; 1677 public transport routes including 3-hour peak period frequencies; route lengths, route definitions, and passenger counts where available. These routes comprise: 903 minibus-taxi routes as of 2002 with routes categorised by the 27 operators; 670 bus routes categorised by the 7 operators; 104 rail routes.

The travel demand matrices were derived primarily from the 2002 Gauteng Household Interview Surveys (GHIS), using the 2002 morning peak period as a base. The matrices reflect four trip purposes, namely, compulsory trips to both work and education destinations, non-compulsory trips starting or ending at home, and also non-compulsory trips that neither start nor end at home. The major drawback in the modelling process, however, was the lack of up to date land use data to calculate more stable trip generation rates and hence more reliable travel demand that could further be projected. Moreover, the zoning system used was not based on reliable land use data. There were also drawbacks in terms of the limitations of the EMME/2 software in that the software license size that the City had, had major restrictions on the capacity of public transport and therefore needed to be upgraded. During 2003/04, therefore, the model was extended and refined as follows: The EMME/2 License was increased from B/4 to B/6. The number of traffic zones was increased from 468 to 667 and coded accordingly. Land use and employment opportunities data was obtained per new traffic zone. Trip generation was based primarily on Category Analysis and used the previous matrices as prior matrices. The categories were chosen on the basis of their statistically significant contribution to travel demand. Modal split was modeled more explicitly.

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The next step in the modelling process will be to investigate different development planning scenarios, ensure the integrity of the road network and obtain traffic counts for the wider study area. It is further proposed that tactical models be developed for a number of high-growth precincts that will eventually inform development policy in the respective precincts. The process will demand more investment in software packages that will enable analyses at different levels. Finally, a strategy should be developed on the continuous update of land use information, which would incorporate input from various stakeholders within the City.

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