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Juris Doctor (J.D.

) Program

University of Toronto Faculty of Law 2011 2012

With each copy of the J.D. Guide, the Faculty of Law renews a commitment to protect the environment by using natural resources responsibly. We are dedicated to implementing policies to facilitate the global conservation of ancient and endangered forests. Part of this initiative involves printing the J.D. Guide on paper meeting the strict guidelines set out by Markets Initiativefree of ancient or endangered forest fibre and chlorine. Using 3,000 lb. of Rolland Enviro100 Print, instead of virgin-fibre paper, significantly reduces our ecological footprint by:

26 trees 1,620 pounds of solid waste 15,294 gallons of water 10.3 pounds of suspended particles in the water 3,558 pounds of air emissions 3,708 cubic feet of natural gas
This reduction is the equivalent of:

0.5 an American football field of trees and a shower lasting 3.2 days

The Ancient Forest Friendly logo represents the highest ecological qualities in the paper industry. To be Ancient Forest Friendly, a paper must be manufactured with a high percentage of recycled fibre or agricultural residue. Any virgin fibre used in the paper must be Forest Stewardship Council certified and assessed as not originating from endangered forests. Bleaching must be chlorine free. Ancient Forest Friendly papers conserve intact forest ecosystems and their functions, such as climate stabilization, water regulation and species habitat.

From the dean

At the University of Toronto, we offer one of the worlds outstanding legal educations. To be a student at our law school is to join a wonderful community of the finest law teachers and scholars, and the most promising law students in Canada. Our students have a wide range of interests, and each September our school benefits from a flow of new energy and ideas. Co-curricular and extra-curricular programs give students the opportunity to put their studies into practice and connect with like-minded colleagues. Some of our most popular programs include the International Human Rights Program, Downtown Legal Services and the newly created David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights, which provides students with hands-on experiences working on prominent cases under the supervision of lawyers. Our law school is also renowned for its excellent combined degree programs, which allow you to take advantage of some of the other outstanding departments and faculties at the University of Toronto, and for a wide range of exchange programs with the worlds finest law schools.

As Dean, I believe our law school has an important public mandate. Our faculty members are regularly called upon to litigate at the Supreme Court of Canada, draft important new legislation, head commissions of inquiry, advise countries around the world on the rule of law and constitutional issues, and work with our governments to produce policy papers with national and international reach and scope. A legal education at U of T reflects our belief that law is a powerful tool for social change, and that lawyers canand shouldmake a positive difference in the world. Y are about to embark on a fantastic journey. I wish you all the ou best and hope to see you at the law school next year.

Photo: Jeff Kirk

Mayo Moran (99), Dean University of Toronto Faculty of Law


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University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Welcome to Canadas top law school


The University of Toronto Faculty of Law is a vibrant, intellectual community of extraordinarily talented faculty members and academically gifted students. Established in 1887, the Faculty of Law is a vital Canadian academic institution and one of the worlds finest law schools. Small class sizes, public interest and clinical programs, researchintensive courses, international opportunities, and an enormous range of volunteer placements in the community are all important parts of the legal education we offer, and all contribute to a unique and intellectually stimulating environment in which to study the law. Our leadership position within Canada has enabled us to serve as a national forum for rigorous debate on domestic policy in a range of different contexts. Each year the Faculty is host to a plethora of conferences, workshops and public lectures that bring together scholars, policy-makers, jurists and students from around the globe to examine and comment on complex social issues including: the future of our health-care system; the accreditation of internationally trained professionals; constitutional rights issues; gender and diversity in the legal profession; multiculturalism; anti-terrorism legislation; and the environment. U of T law scholars are also actively engaged in high-profile public interest litigation and important policy development for the country. They have appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada, engaged in a variety of domestic and international human rights litigation, led international and national cases on land claims and indigenous rights, and advised senior government officials on immigration and refugee issues. Our law school is uniquely well-positioned to play a key role in the emerging world of transnational engagement that will define the future academy. Faculty members are carefully selected from an international pool of outstanding academics. Our student body, particularly at the graduate level, is increasingly international. Similarly, our J.D. graduates are highly sought after and go on to work and study all over the world.

Photo: Jeff Kirk

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

Ideally located in North Americas most multicultural and diverse city


Our physical location provides an exceptional opportunity for studying the law in Canadas largest urban centre, an exciting multicultural city of more than 2.5 million people with a richness and cultural diversity no other city can match. Nestled in the heart of old Toronto, surrounded by the tranquil tree-lined pathways of Philosophers Walk, the Faculty of Law is just steps away from the provincial legislature, the Ontario Court of Appeal and Superior Courts, and the countrys largest legal and financial districts. The uniqueness of the U of T experience extends to the charming heritage buildings and classrooms where you will be studying. T wo architecturally beautiful buildings, Flavelle House and Falconer Hall, house the many classrooms that make up our law school. The Bora Laskin Law Library, named after one of the facultys finest scholars and the former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada (19731984), is a more recent addition to Flavelle House. It is an outstanding resource for the Facultys students and professors, with a team of five dedicated librarians and more than 270,000 volumes and primary legal materials from the major common law countries such as Canada, the U.S., and the U.K. Study space occupies three floors and includes a computer lab and wireless Internet connectivity.

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Photo: (Top left) Toronto Tourism, (Bottom right) Toronto Tourism

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

Left: Professors Sujit Choudhry, Yasmin Dawood, Jutta Brunne and Douglas Sanderson.

Learn the law from world-renowned faculty


We are committed to recruiting and retaining the best academics in the world and delivering the finest legal education possible, one that meets international standards of excellence. Professors at the Faculty of Law are leading experts in their fields who regularly shape the most important policy issues and debates in our society. More than 50 full-time faculty members and 20 visiting scholars from across the globe create an intellectually robust and exciting academic environment for the study of law. Internationally renowned for their research excellence, our faculty members have published many groundbreaking books with major academic publishing houses. They also regularly publish leading articles in prestigious national and international journals. Their academic textbooks are some of the most widely used texts at law schools across Canada
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and worldwide. Our faculty members have earned a number of prestigious prizes, fellowships and other honours, including several Killam and Connaught awards, two Molson Prizes, and countless book prizes. U of T law professors are engaged in traditional legal scholarship and theoretical and inter-disciplinary study. They draw on a range of different intellectual perspectives and more than one-third are cross-appointed to other faculties, departments and centres at the University. Our inter-disciplinary strength and diversity is reflected in many ways: in vibrant academic workshops and lectures sponsored at the law school each year; in the breadth and innovation of our curriculum; and in the range of our collaborative and combined programs.

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Photo: Jeff Kirk

Experience the camaraderie of an academically gifted and engaged student body


As a Faculty of Law student, you will quickly become part of our very special community. Y ou will learn alongside an exceptional group of the countrys top students who bring a broad and interesting set of life experiences to the study of law. Our students are highly educated, extremely diverse and deeply committed to justice at home and around the world. Academically, they are the strongest student body in the country and they rank among the top in North America. Students come to our law school with a unique and varied mix of racial, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds and experiences, intellectual interests and political commitments. For a number of years, women have made up more than 50% of the student body. In the academic year 20102011, we have 22 Aboriginal students enrolled and 32% of the first-year class identify with a visible minority group. The relatively small size of our student body, combined with its diversity of backgrounds, ages, experiences and ambitions, creates many opportunities for the exchange of ideas, not only among students, but also between students and faculty. Ours is a community institutionally committed to intellectual openness and collegiality, where students are constantly challenged by new ideas and experiences.

Profile of 20102011 First-Year Class


Photos: Diana Balogh-Tyszko

194 48% 32% 19% 7% 60% 29.8% 10%

Students Women Visible minority students, including Aboriginal students With advanced degrees Mature students (five or more years of non-academic experience) From Ontario universities From universities in other provinces From universities outside of Canada

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

Choose from an outstanding selection of courses


U of Ts Juris Doctor (J.D.) program of study offers a curriculum of extraordinary breadth, with a core set of courses that have made our first-year and upper-year programs distinctive in Canada. The academic program, primarily taught by the Facultys 50-plus full-time professors, is enhanced by visiting teachers who come from the broader legal community of accomplished lawyers, judges and international academics.

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Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

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First-year program
The first-year program offers a high degree of contact between students and faculty members. All courses are taught by full-time faculty members who do not use teaching assistants. Our first-year curriculum includes seven core courses: Legal Process, Professionalism and Ethics; Administrative Law; Canadian Constitutional Law; Contracts Law; Criminal Law; Property Law and Torts. Through these courses, students are introduced to a wide range of views and a diversity of perspectives on law and legal reasoning. Three additional elements enrich the student experience and make our first-year program distinctive: the Introduction to Law Academic Orientation, the Legal Research and Writing Program, and the Professionalism and Ethics Intensive Program. The Facultys small-group program allows students to take one of their first-year courses in a small (18 to 20 students), seminar-style environment. The intimate nature of the small group format gives students an excellent opportunity to complete and obtain feedback on written work, as well as gain exposure to the basics of legal research. The small group also presents a distinct classroom experience which ensures each student has the advantage of close personal interaction with a law professor and a small group of students in an intense learning atmosphere. First-year students also take another of their core courses in a midsized section of approximately 45 to 50 students. In this setting, legal research and writing skills are developed further through extended writing assignments.

Introduction to Law Academic Orientation


During the first week of law school and through lunchtime sessions during the fall, students are exposed to the fundamental building blocks of legal education through our Introduction to Law program. Students receive instruction on common law reasoning, the parliamentary system, the structure of the courts, stages of the legal process, and how different perspectives on law shape legal analysis and understanding.

The Professionalism and Ethics Intensive Program


In the fall, all regular courses are put on hold for one week to facilitate intensive instruction in Legal Ethics and Professionalism. The intensive format exposes students to various ethical issues as esteemed members of the profession come together at the Faculty to discuss the importance of professionalism. Such an intensive program is unique to the Faculty and a response to the increased emphasis on professionalism within the bar and by the public at large. The creation of a new Centre for the Legal Profession at the Faculty of Law also engages students in the discussion of issues of professionalism and ethics throughout the year.

The Legal Research and Writing Program


Analytical writing requires students to grapple with and synthesize legal concepts contained in an established set of materials. At the Faculty of Law, students learn and start to improve their analytical writing skills in their first-year courses, specifically in their small groups and mid-sized sections.

Peer Mentoring Program


Finally, our Peer Mentoring Program is designed to facilitate a friendly, welcoming first-year experience. The program matches first-year students with upper-year mentors who can answer questions, provide support and help new students feel more connected to the broad range of academic and co-curricular activities available.

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University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Upper-year program
The upper-year program at the Faculty of Law is rich and varied, with more than 180 courses offered each year. The breadth and depth of the curriculum allows the law school to tailor programs of study to the individual needs and ambitions of students. Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests and to undertake advanced work, including independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. University, the University of Fribourg, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Kings College London, the University of Melbourne and the National University of Singapore. Each academic year the Centre hosts up to 10 University of Toronto J.D. students and two faculty members.

Writing and Directed Research


In the upper years, students legal research and writing skills evolve further through ambitious writing projects under the close supervision of faculty members, either in seminars or directed research. For example, the Supervised Upper-Year Research Paper provides an excellent opportunity to conduct rigorous legal research and writing in consultation with a supervising professor in an area of mutual interest.

The Capstone Program


A highlight of the final year of law school is the capstone course, in which students engage in an intensive, academically rigorous and meaningful faculty-supervised study opportunity, with participation by leading external experts. Notable capstone courses have included a focus on equity and diversity in the legal profession, Ontarios electoral system, the use of forced labour in Burma, the future of law reform in Ontario, and access to and enhancement of civil justice.

Perspectives Courses
Students are required to take at least one Critical Perspectives course concerned with the nature, sources, and purposes of legal regulation in general rather than with the study of legal doctrine in a particular area. Students must also complete an International, Comparative or Transnational Law Perspectives course to enhance and deepen their understanding of the changing global legal order.

The Academic Stream Intensive


In their final year of study, third-year students interested in pursuing an academic career are also able to undertake original research and writing in an advanced workshop setting. This includes a pedagogical skills-training component to support and encourage students in their goal of becoming law faculty members.

The Distinguished Visiting Faculty Program


A defining feature of the Facultys upper-year program is the Distinguished Visiting Faculty Program. Each year the Distinguished Visiting Faculty Program brings approximately 20 world-renowned academics to the Faculty to teach two-week intensive courses in their area of specialty. This program allows students to learn from some of the best legal scholars, jurists and policy-makers in the world. In past years, Distinguished Visiting faculty have included justices from the Canadian Supreme Court and Courts of Appeal, and from the supreme courts of numerous other countries; leading legal scholars from Canada and from around the world, including from Europe, Asia, Australasia, Africa and the Middle East; and Canadian and international scholars in a wide range of other disciplines.

Combined Degree Programs


The Faculty of Law partners with other U of T faculties and departments to offer a number of special combined degree programs. Each of these inter-disciplinary programs enables students to combine their J.D. degree with a second, graduate-level degree in another discipline which complements their legal education. These programs reflect the culture of intellectual pluralism that is one of the Faculty of Laws most important ideals, one reflected in the fact that almost one-third of our faculty are cross-appointed to other departments. Students interested in combined programs must apply to and be admitted separately by both the Faculty of Law and the corresponding department or faculty within the University, meeting all admission requirements for each. Detailed information can be found on our website. k J.D./M.B.A k J.D./Master of Social Work k J.D./Certificate in Environmental Studies k J.D./Master of Global Affairs k J.D./M.A. in Criminology k J.D./M.A. or Ph.D. Economics k J.D./M.A. European, Russian and Eurasian Studies k J.D./Master of Information Studies k J.D./M.A. English k J.D./Ph.D. Philosophy k J.D./Ph.D. Political Science

Co-Curricular Opportunities
Students continue to learn outside the four walls of the Facultys classrooms through a co-curricular education program that includes four legal clinics, four student-run law journals, a client-counseling competition and a mooting program that is one of the best in the country. Through various exchange programs and internships, upper-year students can study and/or work across Canada and around the world, in countries such as Hungary, Singapore, France, Netherlands, New Zealand, UK, Scotland, China, Australia and Japan. A recent new offering is the Centre for Transnational Legal Studies, a global education centre based in London, England where highly qualified students can pursue legal studies together under outstanding faculty from participating schools such as the University of Toronto, Georgetown

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Upper-year program
Focus Areas
Students may choose to focus their studies on a number of specific legal areas including those listed here.

Health Law and Policy


Students may choose to research different areas relevant to health law and policy, including bioethics, constitutional law, drug regulation, end-of-life issues, genetics and the law, and human rights law. Faculty members have expertise in a wide variety of related areas and are cross-appointed to many University of Toronto faculties and departments. These scholars are also associated with relevant academic organizations such as the Joint Centre for Bioethics, and collaborate on research projects with national and international colleagues and policy-makers from federal and provincial governments. Students benefit from the multidisciplinary environment, fortified by the programs conferences, roundtables and workshop series, which bring local, national and international scholars and policy-makers to the Faculty to address key health law and policy issues.

Students interested in the study of constitutional law may participate in the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights. The Centre is devoted to advocacy, research and education in the areas of constitutional rights in Canada. The cornerstone of the Centre is a legal clinic that brings together students, faculty and members of the bar to work on significant constitutional cases.

The John and Mary A. Yaremko Program in Multiculturalism and Human Rights
The John and Mary A. Y aremko Program in Multiculturalism and Human Rights sponsors a wide range of activities at the Faculty of Law each year relating to the study of human rights and multiculturalism, including conferences, student activities and visiting professorships. It has also supported law students participating in summer fellowships focusing on domestic human rights, and has provided funding for visiting professors offering specialized courses in human rights and multiculturalism.

Aboriginal Law
The Faculty of Law has long been dedicated to initiatives which allow our Aboriginal and other students to gain an enhanced understanding of Aboriginal rights and how they can be incorporated into law, government and public policy. Under the leadership of Professor Douglas Sanderson, Aboriginal Student Advisor, courses offered address race, culture and Aboriginal issues, including Aboriginal Peoples and Canadian Law, and advanced seminars on Aboriginal issues. Students can also complete an Aboriginal Rights Moot with other law schools across the country, and work on the Facultys Indigenous Law Journal. Through a gift to the law school establishing the June Callwood Program in Aboriginal Law, the Faculty offers community internships and fellowships for Aboriginal students. The Facultys library acquisitions now represent the premier collection of Aboriginal legal texts and materials in the country, and last year, our Aboriginal speakers program brought distinguished scholars in this field to the law school for workshops on a variety of current issues.

Law and Economics


Students may choose to study with professors from the Faculty of Law, the Department of Economics and the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management. In addition, the Faculty hosts leading law and economics scholars through the Law and Economics Workshop and the Distinguished Visiting Professorship in Law and Economics.

Getting into the Faculty of Law here at U of T is just further proof that a dream can be achieved.
Ayan Hersi (11)
Ayan arrived in Canada as a child with her mother and four siblings, all refugees from war-torn Somalia. She excelled in her undergraduate program in Equity Studies at U of T. Ayan came to law school with a long history of volunteerism in the areas of HIV/AIDS, womens rights, international human rights and urban youth. She is the founder of Y outh in Touch, a non-profit youth-led organization that provides young people with access to education and employment. In 2008, Ayan was awarded flare Magazines Volunteer Award and the Canadian Urban Institutes City Y outh Urban Leadership Award, and was recognized as the 2008 YWCA Y oung Woman of Distinction.

Constitutional Law
The Faculty is proud of its longtime strength in Canadian constitutional law, and the constitutional law of other countries. Students are exposed to the history of the Canadian constitution, the applicability of the Charter of Rights, and constitutional theory and practice. Students have special study and research opportunities in a variety of constitutional questions. The Faculty of Law sponsors the monthly Constitutional Roundtable and welcomes faculty members with constitutional law expertise from other law schools through the Distinguished Visiting Faculty Program.
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University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Photo: Michelle Gibson

Mayor of Toronto, 20032010

David Miller (84)

I have always had an interest in the way the world works and in social justice. These interests led me to study law, and ultimately, to a career in public service. My time at the University of Torontos law school taught me many critical skills that have helped me to govern this city: the ability to reason, to withstand criticism, to get the details right, and most important, to keep my eye on the big picture.
Our graduates include a former prime minister of Canada, former premiers of Ontario, senators, former federal cabinet ministers, and David Miller (84), pictured here, Mayor of Toronto,

Photo: Michelle Gibson

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

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Change the world: locally, nationally, globally


At the Faculty of Law, we believe an outstanding educational institution is one that demonstrates extensive public engagement with a broad cross-section of society, and a strong commitment to social responsibility in local and global communities. As such, public service is a critical component of the Facultys mission and of every law students legal education. From the first day of law school, students are expected and encouraged to demonstrate social responsibility through their involvement in the many public interest opportunities available, such as the Clinical Legal Education Programs, Pro Bono Students Canada, the International Human Rights Program, and our high-school outreach program, Law in Action Within Schools.

Clinical Legal Education


Downtown Legal Services is the Facultys flagship public-interest clinic for low-income clients. Each year, approximately 200 students from the Faculty of Law provide important legal services to low-income clients in Toronto under the supervision of the clinics four lawyers. Students have the opportunity to draft pleadings, develop case strategies, and conduct their own trials, hearings and negotiations in areas such as criminal law, housing law, refugee law, family law and university affairs. The Facultys six additional clinical programsAdvocates for Injured Workers, the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, the Asper Constitutional Advocacy Clinic, the International Human Rights Clinic, the Health Law and Equity Clinic, and the Centre for Spanish-Speaking Peoplesoffer services to members of the community and a range of non-governmental organizations, and provide an exciting array of hands-on learning opportunities for students including challenging casework, community legal education, and the opportunity to be involved in precedent-setting litigation.

Bottom left: Cara Zacks works a volunteer shift at the Faculty of Laws Downtown Legal Services, where law students help low-income Torontonians with criminal, tenant, family, refugee or academic issues, under the supervision of staff lawyers.

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Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Pro Bono Students Canada


Pro Bono Students Canada, founded in 1996 at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, is a national pro bono organization with 21 chapters across Canada. PBSCs mandate is to provide legal services without charge to organizations and individuals in need. PBSC programs have a direct impact on access to justice in Canada. Each year, about 1,500 PBSC law-student volunteersfully a quarter of all law students in Canadaprovide approximately 120,000 hours of free legal services to more than 400 public interest and other community organizations, courts and tribunals across the country. PBSC creates engaging, innovative pro bono projects wherever there is a need in the community and in all areas of the law that serve many diverse Canadian populations. U of T law students have described their experiences with PBSC as one of the best of their law school career. Here are just a handful of examples of the opportunities we provide to students: The Rights Watch Blog with the Canadian Civil Liberties Association: the CCLA trains PBSC students to monitor and blog about civil liberties abuses in their local communities. The Not-for-Profit Corporate Law Project: PBSC students receive hands-on experience in corporate law matters by providing legal assistance to not-for-profit community organizations. The Family Law Project: PBSC students provide unrepresented litigants with legal assistance at three courthouse sites in Toronto. The Wills Clinic: PBSC students draft wills and powers of attorney for low-income clients diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. The Health Professions Appeal and Review Board Advocacy Project: PBSC students advocate on behalf of unrepresented complainants before the health board. Law Help Ontario: PBSC students provide assistance to clients at this court-based, selfhelp centre for low-income, unrepresented litigants.
PBSC also administers programs that provide students with valuable, paid opportunities in public interest law. The Donner Civic Leadership Fund Fellowships enables U of T students to work during the summer for public interest organizations, such as BNai Brith Canada, the Ontario Federation of Labour and ARCH: Disability Law Centre. The June Callwood Program Fellowships provide students with an opportunity to work during the summer for First Nations organizations, including First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres and Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto. The Public Interest Articling Fellowship Program, funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario, provides students with an opportunity to article at a public interest organization that otherwise would not have the financial capacity to host an articling student. Current participating organizations include Amnesty International, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic and Ecojustice.

Pro Bono Students Canada also administers programs that provide students with valuable, paid opportunities in public interest law.

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

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International Human Rights Program


The International Human Rights Program (IHRP) is dedicated to promoting global human rights through legal education, research and advocacy. The mission of the IHRP is to mobilize law students to address international human rights issues and assist partner organizations to establish human rights norms in domestic and international contexts. The IHRP has five elements:

Internships
The summer internship program is one of the longest running pillars of the IHRP program. Designed to train and develop the capacity of students in the promotion and protection of international human rights through advocacy, activism and education, the program allows law students to spend a summer working abroad alongside international human rights practitioners at governmental, non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations. During the summer of 2010, the IHRP sent 19 students to human rights organizations around the world, including the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (the Hague), the Centre for Justice and Reconciliation (Cambodia), and the Institute for Democracy in Africa (South Africa). Interns are selected in January based on student-driven internship proposals. The process is competitive. Only about half of the applicants receive internships.

Clinical Legal Education


The IHRPs clinical legal education program provides students with an opportunity to advocate for international human rights under the supervision of lawyers and professors, and in partnership with community and international organizations. Projects include research and policy work, drafting of reports and submissions, and advocacy before courts and tribunals. Participation in the clinic is by application only, and is limited to upper-year J.D. students.

Speaker Series
The IHRP Speaker Series provides students and faculty with a forum for intellectual exchange and debate on major international human rights issues. The program invites leading human rights advocates, practitioners and academics to speak at the Faculty of Law. Past speakers have included Phillipe Sands (author of Torture Team), Christine Chinkin (Professor at the London School of Economics) and Sidney Thompson (Special Court for Sierra Leone).

Working Groups
Working groups provide students with an important opportunity outside of the formal clinical setting to learn about international human rights issues and advocacy strategies. Each year, students apply to create and lead working groups on a variety of topics related to international human rights advocacy. Student volunteers conduct legal research, and provide assistance on international issues to community and international organizations, and to practicing lawyers. Some students continue work started during the academic year in a summer internship. Working groups during the 2009-2010 academic year included: North-South Institute, which researched the intersection of international human rights, international business, and Indigenous and Tribal Peoples perspectives and protection. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, which provided research support to Toronto-area lawyers representing LGBT refugee claimants. Confront Rape in Congo, Empower Survivors, which completed research and advocacy surrounding the epidemic of sexual violence against females in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Rights Review
rights review is a bi-yearly, student-edited publication that highlights current international human rights topics of interest to our students.

Right: Lauren Rock, J.D. 2011, third from the right, chose the University of Toronto Faculty of Law because of the International Human Rights Program (IHRP). In her first year, she was a member of the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Working Group, which provided country-specific research assistance to lawyers representing LGBT refugee claimants. In her second year, she co-led a working group that partnered with Aids-Free World, an international NGO, to design legal advocacy strategies to combat impunity for widespread and systematic rape in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Clinical studies allowed her to work with the Womens Initiative for Gender Justice (WIGJ), an international legal advocacy NGO in The Hague, and to attend the Review Conference of the Rome Statute in Kampala, Uganda, with WIGJ in the summer of 2010. Lauren intends to remain heavily involved with the IHRP in her final year of law school.
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University of Toronto Faculty of Law

International Human Rights Activist Deputy Representative, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Nepal

Diane Goodman (83)

Being in the field with refugee women and children and seeing their resilience and what they can achieve in the most difficult circumstances with absolutely nothing has been incredibly inspiring.

Photo: Taffi Rosen

Protecting the rights of displaced women and children has been a lifelong calling for Diane Goodman, who has witnessed brutal human rights violations while working with the United Nations. Her career has taken her to countries around the world, including Rwanda, Sudan, Cambodia, Haiti, and Nepal to reunite families separated by war, help establish refugee camps, provide support to survivors of gender based violence, and secure the release of the wrongfully imprisoned.

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LAWS (Law in Action Within Schools)


Volunteering with LAWS gives law students a unique opportunity to work with local young people as tutors, educators and coaches. LAWS is a unique three-year academic and extracurricular high school program aimed at inner-city students who are interested in the law but face barriers to succeeding in school. Started in 2005, the program is a partnership between the Faculty of Law and the Toronto District School Board, and is implemented at three Toronto high schools with diverse populations: Central Technical School, Harbord Collegiate Institute and Monarch Park Collegiate. LAWS provides a range of interactive learning experiences that exposes students to legal issues, the legal system and the legal profession. It assists students to stay engaged in school, access postsecondary studies and become informed and engaged citizens. To deliver its unique programming, LAWS partners with lawyers, judges, justices of the peace, courts, law firms, legal aid clinics and public interest organizations. Law students volunteer as after-school tutors, workshop developers and facilitators, and coaches for debate and mock trial clubs. LAWS also hires law students to coordinate programs during the school year and summer. Working or volunteering with LAWS is an excellent way for law students to practice articulating complex legal topics, develop mentoring and facilitation skills, strengthen their advocacy abilities, gain an appreciation for complex, social issues, and have fun interacting with dynamic young people who have an interest in the law.

Below: Graduates of the LAWS Program from Central Technical High School celebrate their Convocation Day at the Faculty of Law June 4, 2010.

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University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Associate Professor, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Anver Emon

I believe the University of Toronto Faculty of Law offers students and faculty a unique opportunity to think globally and act locallyand in some cases, to act globally as well. Scholars from around the world visit the law school to exchange ideas about issues that affect all of us, and to hear what our faculty, and our students, have to say about these issues. The Faculty of Law offers a unique place to learn about, experience, and explore the circumstances that make up our world today.
Prof. Anver Emon teaches a first-year Torts class, supervises graduate students, and participates in the law schools International Human Rights Program. His research and academic interests include Islamic legal history and theory, governance and adjudication, medieval intellectual and religious history. He has been a frequent speaker on Islamic law to NATO forces and senior military personnel at the Canadian Forces College, and has addressed a group of American military lawyers, as part of their judicial education initiative.

Photo: Michelle Gibson

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

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Explore limitless career opportunities


The Faculty of Law is committed to ensuring its students and graduates receive high quality resources and guidance in pursuing distinguished, creative and fulfilling careers. The Career Development Office (CDO) is staffed by four professionals making it one of the largest law school CDOs in Canada. During the year, the CDO offers a host of workshops to assist students in obtaining summer and articling positions and to support informed career decision-making. Lively panels and workshops draw upon the expertise of lawyers, legal recruiters, and external consultants who share their knowledge in areas such as rsumwriting, interviewing skills, business etiquette and diversity in the profession. Alumni return to share their experiences of working in different areas of law, different jurisdictions, and alternatives to law. The CDO develops and updates numerous resources designed specifically for U of T law students, including guides to summer jobs, clerkships, articling and public interest employment. The CDO also hosts several on-campus recruitment programs and career fairs giving students the opportunity to meet with more than 100 employers every year from different sectors and jurisdictions. The Facultys strong academic reputation is well understood by prospective employers. U of T law graduates enjoy great success in securing positions at law firms, industry, public interest organizations and government. Graduating classes typically enjoy the highest articling placement rates of all Ontario law schools. The Faculty of Law also has a remarkable placement rate for judicial clerkships at all levels of courts.

Summer Internship Programs


There are several summer internship and fellowship programs that enable first and second-year students to pursue opportunities in public interest law, sexual health and reproductive rights, technology and innovation, and international and domestic human rights. In addition, a number of Toronto law firms partner with the CDO to offer summer internship programs which enable students to spend a portion of the summer working at a host organization or with a faculty member, sponsored by the firm.

Alumni/Student Mentorship Program


Our very popular Alumni/Student Mentorship program matches students with recent graduates. Meeting in pairs or individually, students explore areas of practice in different workplace settings with graduates who gladly share their experiences and expertise. One of the strengths of the program is its ability to match students with graduates who are using their law degrees in various ways, such as in-house corporate counsel, public interest advocacy, labour relations consultants and mediators, or graduates who are practicing in growth industries such as technology or health law. Students can choose a mentor from a number of diverse backgrounds and pre-law careers.

Career Counselling
The CDOs professional team provides individualized career counselling and planning sessions for students in all years. They assist students to access information, identify options, and make and implement decisions to get their legal careers started. The CDO also provides information about public interest career opportunities, including legal clinics, government offices, advocacy organizations and law firms that serve underrepresented clients or further a social justice cause.
Right: Laurie May, 93, is co-president and founder of Maple Pictures Corporation, a film distribution company based in Toronto. Maple Pictures distributed the award-winning film Precious, and The Cove. May spoke to Faculty of Law students in 2010 about her career trajectory and answered questions about non-traditional law careers.

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Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Photos: Jeff Kirk

Supreme Court of Canada Justice

Rosalie Abella (70)

My time at the University of Toronto law school flew by, but the wonderful memories didnt. Its the place where we learned that law was even more fascinating than we had hoped, and that working at it was even more exhilarating than we had expected, all enhanced by the incredible generosity of teachers and colleagues. And its been like that ever sincethe fascination, exhilaration and generosity have never stopped. The three years at law school were all we needed to be propelled, enthusiastically, into the profession. It was magic.
Our graduates include a former Chief Justice of Canada, a former Chief Justice of Ontario, numerous federal and provincial court judges, almost half of the Court of Appeal for Ontario and several current and former members of the Supreme Court of Canada, including Madam Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella, pictured here, the first Jewish woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court.

Photo: Taffi Rosen

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

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J.D. admission requirements and procedures


Admission Requirements Undergraduate study
To be considered for admission in 2011-2012, applicants must have completed at least three years of post-secondary study no later than the end of May 2011. Almost all of our students have completed a four-year undergraduate university degree by the time they start law school.

The LSAT must be taken no later than February 2011. For entry in September 2011, LSAT scores taken on or after the June 2007 administration of the test will be accepted. In recent years, successful applicants had a median LSAT score in the 95th percentile and a median cumulative undergraduate academic record of about 85% (this statistic is based on the best three years of an applicants undergraduate academic record). Very few applicants are admitted with cumulative undergraduate records below 80%, and LSAT scores below the 90th percentile, unless their backgrounds, other qualifications, or personal accomplishments would, in the opinion of the Admissions Committee, contribute significantly to the class.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

Admission Procedures

The following documents constitute a complete file and should be submitted directly to the Ontario Law School Application Service (OLSAS): k oLSAS application form k official and original copies of all post-secondary academic transcripts k LSAT score report k Personal statement k Rsum (for mature applicants only) The deadline for submitting applications for the 2011-2012 program is November 1, 2010. For a more detailed explanation of our admission policies, requirements and procedures, please see the Prospective Students section of the Faculty of Law website: www.law.utoronto.ca.

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Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

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Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Photos: Jeff Kirk

University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program 20112012

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University of Toronto Faculty of Law 84 Queens Park, Room 108 Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2C5 T/ 416-978-3716 F/ 416-978-0790 E/ law.admissions@utoronto.ca www.law.utoronto.ca