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JABATAN PELAJARAN PERAK

KEMENTERIAN PENDIDIKAN MALAYSIA

LEARNING TO SCORE 2005

SET 1

BAHASA INGGERIS

KERTAS 1

SKEMA PEMARKAHAN

HALAMAN 1
Mark Scheme Paper 1 Set 1

MARK SCHEME:
Content: 6 marks
Elaboration: 6 marks
Format: 3 marks
Language: 20 marks
Total: 35 marks

CONTENT POINTS:
Award 1 mark for each of the following content point. (1 X 6 = 6 marks)
Award 1 mark for the elaboration of each content point. (1 X 6 = 6 marks)

C1 - Volunteer your help


C2 - Counsel victims
C3 - Console victims
C4 - Contribute cash
C5 - Distribute foodstuff
C6 - Clear up debris

BAND SCALE FOR LANGUAGE: CRITERIA FOR MARKING LANGUAGE

Description of Criteria
Mark Range

• The language is accurate apart from occasional first draft


slips.
• Sentence structure is varied and shows that the candidate
is able to use sentence length and type to achieve an
intended effect.
• Vocabulary shows some sophistication and is used with
A
precision.
• Punctuation is accurate and helpful to the reader.
19 – 20
• Spelling is accurate across the full range of vocabulary
used.
• Paragraphs have unity and are appropriately linked.
• The style is formal, informative and concise.
• The tone is polite and courteous.

• The language is almost always accurate but there may be


more minor or first draft slips.
• Errors may also arise from more ambitious structures
which are imperfectly understood.
B • Sentences show some variation, length and type, including
the confident use of complex sentences.
16 - 18 • Punctuation is almost always accurate and generally
helpful to the reader.
• Vocabulary is wide enough to convey intended shades of
meaning with some precision.
• Spelling is nearly always accurate.

HALAMAN 2
• It is written in paragraphs and shows some unity and is
usually linked appropriately.
• The style is formal and avoids digression.
• The tone is polite enough and generally appropriate and
informative.

• The language is largely accurate to communicate meaning


clearly to the reader.
• Simple structures are used without error; mistakes may
occur when more sophisticated structures are attempted.
• Vocabulary is adequate to convey intended meaning
although it may not be sufficiently developed to achieve
precision.
• Sentences show some variety of length and structure
C although there is a tendency to repeat some sentence
types, giving it a monotonous effect.
13 - 15 • Punctuation is generally accurate although errors may
occur in more complex uses.
• It is written in paragraphs which show some unity,
although links may be absent or in appropriate.
• The style shows some understanding of the need to be
formal.
• There may be occasional lapses in the tone but an attempt
to be polite and informative is evident.

• The language is sufficiently accurate.


• There will be patches of clarity particularly when simple
structures are used.
• Mistakes will occur when more complex sentences are
attempted.
• There may be some variety of sentence length and type
but this may not be successful in enhancing meaning or
arousing interest.
• Vocabulary is adequate but lacks precision.
• Simple words are spelt correctly, but errors may occur
D
when unfamiliar words are used.
10 – 12 • Punctuation is generally correct but does not enhance or
clarify meaning.
• Sentence separation errors may occur.
• It is written in paragraphs which may show some unity in
topic.
• The style shows an attempt has been made to achieve
formality but this may not be sustained.
• The tone is not always appropriate although it is evident
that the candidate has some understanding of what is
required.

E • Meaning is never in doubt but single word errors


sufficiently frequent and serious to hamper precision and

HALAMAN 3
7–9 speed of reading.
• Some simple structures will be accurate but accuracy is
not sustained for long.
• Vocabulary is limited and either too simple to convey
precise meaning or are imperfectly understood.
• Simple words will usually be spelt accurately but mistakes
will occur when more difficult words are used.
• It will have paragraphs but these lack unity and links are
incorrectly used or it may not be paragraphed at all.
• There may be errors of sentence separation and
punctuation.
• The style may fail to achieve the requirement of this task.
• The tone may inappropriate for a formal piece of writing.

• Meaning is usually fairly clear.


• The reader feels that the correction of ‘single word’ errors
may produce a piece of fairly accurate English but the
incidence of errors is high and will definitely impede the
reading.
• A few simple structures are used accurately.
• Vocabulary may not extend beyond a simple range of
words that are inadequate to express intended shades of
U (i)
meaning.
• Punctuation will sometimes be used correctly but sentence
4–6
separation errors may occur.
• Paragraphs may not be used, or if used, show a lack of
planning.
• There may be frequent spelling errors.
• The style may not be accurate or if it is, may not show
understanding of the detailed requirements of the task.
• The tone is inappropriate.

• Some sense will usually be decipherable but some of the


errors will be multiple, requiring the reader to re-read and
re-organise before meaning becomes clear.
U (ii) • Whole sections make little or no sense.
• There are unlikely to be more than one or two accurate
2–3 sentences.
• The content is comprehensible but its tone and style are
hidden by the density of errors.

• Scripts in this category are almost entirely impossible to


recognise as pieces of English.
• Whole sections may make no sense at all or are copied
U (iii)
from the task.
• Award ‘1’ mark if some sense can be obtained.
0–1
• The mark ‘0’ should only be awarded if it makes no sense
at all from beginning to end.

HALAMAN 4
CATEGORY DESCRIPTIONS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CONTINUOUS WRITING

Apart from the very occasional first draft slips, the language is entirely
accurate. Sentence structure is varied and shows that the candidate is
able to use various types of sentences to achieve a particular effect.
A
Vocabulary is wide and is used with precision. Punctuation is accurate
and helpful to the reader. Spelling is accurate across the whole range
44-50
of vocabulary used. Paragraphs are well-planned, have unity and are
linked. Topic is addressed with consistent relevance. The interest of the
reader is aroused and sustained.
The language is accurate; occasional errors are either minor of first
draft slips. Vocabulary is wide enough to convey intended shades of
meaning with some precision. Sentences show some variation of length
and types, including some complex sentences. Punctuation is accurate
B
and generally helpful. Spelling is nearly always accurate. Paragraphs
38-43
show some evidence of planning, have unity and are usually
appropriately linked. The piece of writing is relevant to the topic and the
interest of the reader is aroused and sustained through most of the
composition.
The language is largely accurate. Simple structures are used without
error; mistakes may occur when more sophisticated structures are
attempted. Vocabulary is wide enough to convey intended meaning but
may lack precision. Sentences may show some variety of structure and
length but there is tendency to use one type of structure, giving it a
C monotonous effect. Spelling of simple vocabulary may be correct but
32-37 errors may occur when more sophisticated words are used.
Punctuation of simple structures is accurate on the whole. The
composition is written in paragraphs which may show some unity,
although links may be absent or inappropriate. The writing is relevant
but may lack originality and planning. Some interest is aroused but not
sustained.
The language is sufficiently accurate to communicate meaning clearly
to the reader. There will be patches of clear, accurate language,
particularly when simple vocabulary and structures are used. There
may be some variety of sentence type and length but the purpose is not
D clearly seen. Vocabulary is usually adequate to show intended meaning
26-31 but this is not developed to show precision. Simple words will be spelt
correctly but more spelling errors will occur. Paragraphs are used but
show lack of planning or unity. The topic is addressed with some
relevance but the reader may find compositions at this level lacking in
liveliness and interest value.
Meaning is never in doubt but errors are sufficiently frequent and
serious to hamper reading. Simple structures may be accurate, but a
E
script at this level is unlikely to sustain accuracy for long. Vocabulary is
20-25
limited, either too simple to convey precise meaning or more ambitious
but imperfectly understood. Simple words may be spelt correctly but

HALAMAN 5
frequent mistakes in spelling and punctuation make reading the script
difficult. Paragraphs lack unity or are haphazardly arranged. The
subject matter will be relevant to the topic only a partial treatment is
given. The high incidence of linguistic error is likely to distract the
reader from any merits of content that the composition may have.
Script in this category will show considerable limitations of subject
matter, usually because of the candidate’s lack of linguistic skills. There
will be many serious errors of various kinds throughout the script but
U(i) they are mainly of the one word type i.e. they could be corrected
14-19 without rewriting the whole sentence. Although communication is
established, the frequent errors may cause blurring. Sentences will be
simple and very often repetitive. Punctuation will sometimes be used
correctly. There may be no paragraph but meaning is fairly clear.
The reader is able to get some sense out of the script but errors are
multiple in nature, requiring the reader to read and re-read before
being able to understand. At this level, there may be only a few
U(ii)
accurate sentences throughout the script. The content may be
8-13
comprehensible, but the incidence of error is so high as to make the
meaning blur. This type of script may also be far short of the required
number of words.
Scripts in this category are almost entirely impossible to read. Whole
U(iii) sections may make little or no sense at all. Where occasional patches
0-7 of clarity occur, marks should be awarded. The mark of ‘0’ should only
be given if the script makes no sense at all, from beginning to end.

NB. No script will fit neatly into any one of the categories described above. The
appropriate mark for a script will be determined by deciding by which category most
neatly reflect its characteristics. Examiners should not construct any hierarchy of
characteristics when allocating a mark, but should assess the composition on its own
merits, before deciding on the mark.

HALAMAN 6