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DIGITAL EQUALIZER

Training Manual
April 2006

http://www.aifoundation.org de.helpdesk@aifoundation.org
Table of Contents

Section 1 American India Foundation – An Introduction 2

Section 2 Digital Equalizer Program – An Overview 4

Section 3.1 Teacher Training Schedule Year 1 6

Section 3.2 Teacher Training Schedule Year 2 14

Section 3.3 Teacher Training Schedule Year 3 19

Section 4 DE Presence in Punjab 20

Section 5 DE Punjab - Team Structure 21

Section 6 Interacting with Adult as learners 22

Section 7 Tips for Trainers 24

Section 8 Creating effective ‘academic’ presentations 27

Section 9 Project Based Learning 31

Annexure 1 Teacher Training Plan Index 34

Annexure 2 IT Skills Assessment Templates 35

Annexure 3 Year End School Review 42

AIF DE Program Training Manual 1


Section 1: American India Foundation – An Introduction

The Beginning

In the aftermath of the massive earthquake that struck Gujarat in January 2001, a
large number of people from across the world – chiefly of Indian origin – came
together with the immediate goal of fundraising to help rebuild Gujarat. A number of
these were high net worth Indians based in the US, who had the inclination to
contribute to the crisis as well as establish a permanent means to channel interest
and resources from the US. A group of Indians decided to form an organization that
would facilitate the collection and distribution of funds to Gujarat. This organization is
the American India Foundation.

With the support of President Bill Clinton, the Honorary Chair of AIF, the organization
managed to successfully raise and disburse over $4 million for relief, reconstruction
and rehabilitation activities in Gujarat. The success of this endeavor encouraged the
founders to expand the work of AIF beyond the earthquake-related activities to work
across India.

AIF is lead by Ms. Lata Krishnan, the founder and President and Mr. Pradeep Kashyap,
the Executive Director. A National Advisory Council, chaired by Nobel-laureate Dr.
Amartya Sen provides valuable ongoing advice to the Foundation. The AIF Board of
Trustees in the US consists of several luminaries in the fields of business, technology,
and philanthropy. Since its inception in 2001, AIF has managed to raise over $30
million. AIF has main offices in New York, Silicon Valley (California) and New Delhi.

The Work We Do

AIF’s mission is to accelerate the process of social and economic change in India. AIF
partners with grantees and directly implements programs in 3 areas - education,
livelihoods and public health - that focus on the most disadvantaged in India.
Additionally, it provides fellowships to Americans who volunteer their skills with Indian
NGOs and health institutions working on HIV/AIDS.

Education:
• Grants to community-based NGOs focusing on universalizing quality primary
education with a particular focus on the children of migrant workers. NGOs
include: Bodh Shiksha Samiti in Rajasthan, Janarth in Maharashtra, SETU and
Vikram A. Sarabhai Community Science Center in Gujarat, Vikalpa and Lok
Drishti in Orissa, and Pratham in Uttar Pradesh and Delhi

AIF DE Program Training Manual 2


• Digital Equalizer, bridging the “digital divide” by providing computers, Internet,
and training to under-resourced schools

Livelihoods:
• Grants to NGOs focusing on livelihoods improvement with a particular focus on
empowering women, utilizing micro-finance in many programs. Work in rural
areas includes natural resource management and work for landless
communities. The urban work focuses on self-employment and wage
employment. NGOs include: ANANDI and Samerth in Gujarat, PRADAN in
Chattisgarh, SKS and Dr. Reddy’s Foundation in Andhra Pradesh, Samaj
Pragati Sahayog in Madhya Pradesh, MAYA Organic in Karnataka, and
Uddyama in Orissa
• League of Artisans, creating sustainable livelihoods for underprivileged artisans

Public Health (New Initiative):


• Grants to NGOs focusing on HIV/AIDS prevention and care
• Medicorps fellowship, connecting American healthcare professionals to Indian
institutes to help build up capacity in HIV/AIDS prevention efforts

AIF also continues work on disaster relief and rehabilitation by funding organizations
working in tsunami hit areas and in the earthquake affected regions of Gujarat and
Kashmir. AIF also implements the Service Corps Fellowship Program, developing
young American leaders by placing them with Indian NGOs working across AIF’s
programmatic areas.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 3


Section 2: Digital Equalizer Program – An Overview

Vision: An India where ALL children have access


to resources and information that prepares
them for participation in the Digital Age

Mission: To advance the use of technology to


engage, educate, enrich and empower India’s
underprivileged children

The DE Approach

• Promote the proficient use of technology in under-resourced


schools to:
o Enrich and improve the quality of Education by enabling teachers to
integrate the use of technology in pedagogy
o Inspire curiosity, confidence, teamwork and the pursuit of knowledge
by actively engaging children in interactive collaborative learning using
technology and internet.

• Ensure the program’s long-term success and sustainability:


o Build capacity within the schools via extensive teacher training,
motivation and skills enhancement
o Encourage active participation of the school administration and
community and empower them to take ownership of the program.

• Universalize the DE model:


o Create a scalable, cost-effective program and extend its reach
throughout the country
o Collaborate with government and policy makers to adopt and adapt the
DE model, leading to significant multiplier effects

AIF DE Program Training Manual 4


DE Capacity Building Model

Teacher Trainer
Teachers 1 (Coordinator)

2 3 1

1
Students Student Trainer
(Facilitator)

The DE model begins with a Teacher Trainer (or Coordinator) and a Student Trainer
(or Facilitator) being attached to the teachers and students of the school respectively.
For each of these entities, there is a two-way process of learning in the initial stages,
with the exchange of knowledge and ideas taking place between the connected links.
In the next phase, teachers start using some of the tools and techniques they have
learnt in their interaction with the coordinator as part of their teaching-learning
process. Subsequently, the facilitator starts direct interaction with the teachers to
support them in the use of computer technology in classroom transactions.

The school is considered to be “Digitally Equalized” when the teachers are fully
trained and equipped to make optimal use of technology in their lessons, and
students have acquired all the essential skills required to incorporate technology in
their learning.

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Section 3: Teacher Training Schedule – Year 1, 2 and 3

The teacher training schedule is divided into 28 modules to be delivered on a week-


by-week basis as it is expected that at-least 28 working weeks will be available for
training during a year.

Week 1 Year 1

Unit – 1 – AIF-DE PROGRAM INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

Support material: Presentation, Handout

Participants – Management Committee members, Principal, Teachers and the DE


Facilitator of the participating school.

Objective - To help the Management members, Principal, Teachers and DE Facilitator


develop a clear understanding of the AIF-DE program, draw up an “Action Plan” and
also understand their roles and responsibilities.

Training Plan: The DE Coordinator/ Teacher Trainer will conduct the session in all
the participating schools.

The session will begin with an overview of American India Foundation and DE
program in detail helping the participants to develop a clear understanding of
Program’s mission / objectives. The participants will also be oriented towards the
various processes involved in gearing up the schools to work towards realizing the
goals and vision of the AIF-DE program.

The following points will be covered:

1. The vision and goals of the program


2. The program’s expectations from the Management, Principal, Teachers,
Students and Facilitator
3. The benefits of the program to:
 Management
 School
 Teachers
 Students
4. Role & responsibilities of the Management, Principal, Teachers and DE
facilitator.

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5. The three-year AIF Plan will be then presented and explained to the
participants. So, that they gain a better understanding of the objectives,
curriculum, methodology and outcomes.

The session will be continued discussing various issues such as tackling the
bottlenecks relating to effective implementation of the program, (the same will be
explained using the successful models), implementation of Computer Aided Learning
(CAL), Time management (for teachers), ways of rescheduling the school timetable to
accommodate the training plan, Internet connectivity issues, Lab management and
sustenance plan.

This will be followed by group discussions where the participants will develop the
“School Action Plan”. This plan will be worked out in such a way so as to fit in the 3
year DE plan into the school calendar. The plan will then be presented and various
issues related to successful implementation of the plan will be discussed.

Unit – 2 – ORIENTATION ON INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION


TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

SUPPORT MATERIAL: Presentation, Handout, Example Files, Multimedia


Animations

Objective: To develop an understanding of the role of ICT in today’s education


system.

Training Plan: The coordinator will organize a session in each of the participating
schools covering the following points:

1. Reinforcing the vision & goal of AIF-DE program


2. Introduction to Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
3. Role of ICT in education
4. Computer Education versus Computer Aided Learning (CAL)
5. Benefits of CAL
6. Teachers’ role in ICT in Education
7. Pedagogical issues relating to CAL
8. Judicious use of Technology
9. Effect of DE program on students’ academic performance
10. Professional enhancement of Teachers

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Week 2 Year 1

Unit – 3 – WORKSHOP ON THE SET-UP AND RUNNING OF THE DE


CENTER

Support Material: Unit Handout

Participants: DE centers facilitators and selected teachers from the schools.

Objective: To understand how each and every component in the DE Center works.

Training Plan: The workshop will be conducted in one of the DE centers or


individually in schools. The AIF coordinator and a representative of the agency
involved in supply & maintenance of the Hardware will conduct this workshop. During
this training session the DE center facilitators and selected teachers would participate.

1. The participants will be provided information on:


a. The external agencies/ vendors involved.
b. Contact persons in case of crisis like Software/ Hardware problems.
2. Participants will be given hands-on training on the operations of various
components of the DE center.
3. Basic guidelines and hands-on training for hardware troubleshooting and
software installation would be provided.
4. Internet virus, Anti-virus-its use, maintenance and advantages (AVG, NAV)
5. Maintenance of records in the lab like stock/ stationery register, daily
Internet usage logbook, creating separate directory for AIF documents,
Software/ Hardware complaint book, filing external agency documents &
maintenance of all the correspondence between AIF and school.

Week 3, 4, 5, 6 Year 1

Unit – 4 – INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER BASICS & WINDOWS

Support Material: Unit Handout, Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book, Notepad &
MS Paint software, Unit Topics Checklist, Typing Tutor (freeware), Keyboard
and Mouse Practice Games

Participants: Teachers of the participating school.

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Objective: To help participants develop a thorough understanding of computer basics
and Windows.

Training Plan:
The DE Coordinator will conduct a survey two weeks before the scheduled workshop
date, to assess the level of computer literacy of the participants. Based on the
information gathered, the coordinator will adjust the training modules according to
the needs of the participants. The training will be conducted in the respective schools.
Teachers will be given hands-on training on the basics related to Computers usage
and Windows.

During the training session the following topics will be covered:

1. Introduction to computers
a. What is a computer?
b. Hardware – Input devices, Output devices and Storage devices
c. Software – Application Software, System Software and Operating
Software.
2. Getting started with computers
a. Start and Shutdown the computer
b. Operating the keyboard
c. Operating the mouse
3. Working with Windows
a. Desktop
b. Understanding icons
c. Opening and Closing Windows
d. Maximizing and Minimizing Windows
e. Working with Multiple Windows
f. Windows Explorer
4. Understanding files and folders
a. Creating and Deleting Files and Folders using NOTEPAD
b. Organizing Files and Folders
c. Copy and moving Files and Folders
d. Finding Files and Folders
5. MS Paint
6. Understanding transporting and storage of file using:
a. Floppy Diskette
b. CD-ROM

AIF DE Program Training Manual 9


Week 7 Year 1

Unit – 5 – EVALUATION OF UNIT 4 [Computer Basics & Windows]

Support Material: IT Skills Assessment Question Bank

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

Week 8 Year 1

Unit – 6 – TRAINING ON EFFECTIVE USE OF THE CURRICULUM


SOFTWARE [subject to availability of curriculum software]

Support Material: Available Curriculum Software CDs

Participants: Subject Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To guide teachers to use curriculum software effectively.

Training Plan: The teachers will be given a brief introduction on how to use
curriculum software.
1. The teachers will be shown various examples as to how they can use
technology to teach effectively and get the best from their students.
2. Teachers will be encouraged to identify the available resources (curriculum
software) related to their syllabus and plan ways of using it in their
teaching.
3. Once the teachers are familiar with the curriculum software they will use it
to cover parts of the syllabus for classes 6th to 10th with an initial
commitment of 2 DE periods per week per class.
4. An orientation on the use of NetMeeting software for delivering curriculum
topics in the DE center.

Week 9, 10, 11, 12 Year 1

Unit – 7 – APPLICATIONS OF WORD PROCESSOR IN EDUCATION

Support Material: Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book, Unit Topics Checklist

Participants: Teachers of the participating school.

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Objective: To motivate teachers to use word-processing in their day-to-day
operations.

Training Plan: The DE coordinator will introduce the teachers to the basics of Word
processing software and understand its uses as an effective tool for:
1. Preparing question papers, notices, letters, etc.
2. Preparing lesson plans (they can store, alter & modify the same for re-
use).
3. Creating newsletters
4. Preparing reports
5. Designing posters
6. Creating timetables
7. Preparing worksheets
8. Preparing certificates and awards

In this session, the teachers will get hands-on experience and they will develop
confidence in using Word Processor applications and understand the effective use of
these applications in education. The idea of developing a question bank for all
subjects will be introduced to the participants during this session. The participants will
take on the responsibility to create subject wise questions and submitting to the DE
coordinator. The teachers will upgrade the question bank once every month. The DE
coordinator will take the responsibility of compiling the city question bank that will in
turn be submitted to the DE head office and the national DE question bank will be
available on the DE Portal.

Week 13, 14 Year 1

Unit – 8 –USING VERNACULAR SOFTWARE & FONTS

Support Material: CDAC ISMV5 Software, Regional Font, Unit Handout

Participants: Principal and Teachers

Objective: To use Vernacular Fonts for their day-to-day activities.

Training Plan: The coordinator will give the participants hands-on training on how to
use Vernacular software. The DE facilitators and the teachers are then given the
responsibility of reaching out to their colleagues and also training them to effectively
prepare documents in their respective vernacular languages. The participants are also
given various assignments, which will help them to develop confidence in using the
vernacular fonts.

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Week 15 Year 1

Unit – 9 – EVALUATION OF UNIT 7 & 8 [Word Processor & Vernacular


Software]

Support Material: IT Skills Assessment Templates

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

Week 16, 17, 18 Year 1

Unit – 10 – INTERNET APPLICATIONS

Support Material: Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book

Participants: Principal and teachers of the participating school.

Objective: The participants will be introduced to the basics of Internet and the way it
could be effectively utilized in education and as a communication tool.

Training Plan: The training will be held in the respective schools. The teachers will
be trained on the following areas:
1. Basics of Internet
2. Effective use of Search Engines
3. Introduction to educational websites and developing a resource bank.
4. Learning techniques of downloading and using various tools for offline
viewing.
5. Exploring ways of using the Internet to make the lessons interesting and
thereby enabling students to learn beyond what is in the textbooks.
6. Creating & Using E-mails
7. Using Chat conferences as a communication tool

Week 19 Year 1

Unit – 11 – EVALUATION OF UNIT 10 (Internet Applications)

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 12


Week 20, 21, 22, 23 Year 1

Unit – 12 – EFFECTIVE USE OF PRESENTATION TOOLS

Support Material: Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book, Handout, Unit Topics


Checklist, Few presentations prepared by teachers of other DE Schools

Participants: Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To help participants to understand use of any one of the popular


presentation tool / software in Computer Aided Learning

Training Plan: Teachers will be trained to use one of the popular presentation tool /
software to create:
1. Effective & Interesting presentations based on the subject topics to make
abstract concepts clear to their students using vernacular fonts.
2. Preparing teaching resources that are not available in the curriculum
software provided.
3. Using Internet resources for creative content display.

Week 24, 25, 26, 27 Year 1

Unit – 13 –EVALUATION OF UNIT 10 & 11 [Internet & Presentation


Tool]

Support Material: Teachers may decide their own topics on the basis of their
teaching subjects.

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To evaluate the comprehension of the various modules covered so far by


the teachers, and also to assess their ability to deliver the same in a practical format.

Week 28 Year 1

Unit – 14 – YEAR END REVIEW [of the school]

Support Material: Evaluation Form

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 13


Week 1 Year 2

Unit – 1 – REVIEWING THE EFFECTIVE USE OF CURRICULUM


SOFTWARE

Support material: Curriculum Software

Participants: Subject Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review the effective use of the curriculum software

Training Plan: The workshop will be held in all the schools. The AIF coordinator will
review the use of curriculum software in the different classes.
1. Teachers will also plan out areas where they need to prepare their own
resources.
2. The teachers will make Timelines for the preparation of the same ready.
3. Ideas for using the Internet and customizing the available resources in the
curriculum software will be discussed

Week 2, 3, 4, 5 Year 2

Unit – 2 – REFRESHER COURSE on YEAR 1 UNITS

SUPPORT MATERIAL: Unit Topics Checklist

Objective: To review the skills of the teachers in basic computer usage, Word
processing and presentation software applications and Internet usage

Training Plan:
1. The coordinator reviews the skills of teachers by using assessment sheets
and conducting quizzes on different topics to assess the knowledge level of
each participant.
2. The coordinator then plans different sessions according to the needs of the
teachers.
3. The refresher course will be in the form of activities and assignment, which
promote the use of different applications effectively and at the same time
help the participants to develop a clear understanding of different concepts
in which they had been trained.
4. Newly recruited teachers will also be given training at this stage.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 14


Week 6, 7, 8 Year 2

Unit – 3 – SPREADSHEETS

Support Material: Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book, Unit Topics Checklist

Participants: Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To enable participants to use spreadsheets in their day-to-day operations.

Training Plan: Teachers will be introduced to the common functions in a spreadsheet


package and understand how it may help in reducing their workload. Teachers will
learn to apply the skills learnt for
1. Making report cards (using various functions i.e. sum, subtraction, division
etc)
2. Maintaining attendance records
3. Student progress charts
4. Class performance charts
5. Class timetable
6. Monitoring the student performance
7. Create interesting charts
8. Create Timelines
9. Reinforcing Mathematical concepts
10. Preparing the format and maintaining the students Fees Record
11. Sorting and searching the records

Week 9 Year 2

Unit – 4 – EVALUATION OF UNIT 3 [Spreadsheets]

Support Material: IT Skills Assessment Templates

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

Week 10, 11, 12 Year 2

Unit – 5 – PROJECT BASED LEARNING

Support Material: Unit Handout

AIF DE Program Training Manual 15


Participants: Subject Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To promote project-based learning in schools.

Training Plan: The coordinator conducts the workshop in each school, and explains
the concept of PBL which will help make learning relevant and useful to students by
establishing connections to life outside the classroom, addressing real world concerns,
and developing real world skills.
1. The participants are briefed on the importance and usefulness of Project
Based Learning (PBL) - Training Plan, like
a. Ability to work well with others,
b. Making thoughtful decisions,
c. Taking initiative, and
d. Solving complex problems
e. Promoting Enquiry based learning
2. Discussion on various case studies/ success stories to highlight the
effectiveness of the PBL implementation
3. During the workshop
a. The teachers will list out the topics in the curriculum that can be
taught using the PBL.
b. The coordinator will provide clarifications on various
doubts/concerns raised by the teachers

At the end of the session the coordinator will ensure that each teacher has a concrete
plan for the integration of PBL in his or her timetables.

Week 13, 14 Year 2

Unit – 6 –INTRODUCTION TO TELE-COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS

Support Material: www.iearn.org | www.iearn-india.org

Participants: Teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To introduce and promote participation of teachers in collaborative


projects.

Training Plan: The coordinator conducts the workshop in each school.


1. The participants are introduced to the concept and benefits of Tele-
collaborative projects.

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2. Introduction to organizations like iEARN that promote collaborative
projects.
3. Participants explore the iEARN website and understand the way Tele-
collaborative projects work.
4. The participants then choose suitable projects and decide the plan of action
to involve their students in the projects.

There is constant follow up throughout the academic year to review the participation
of the teachers. The coordinator motivates & gives guidelines to participants and also
maintains a record of the participation of the teachers and students in the
collaborative projects.

Week 15, 16, 17, 18 Year 2

Unit – 7 – PUBLISHING SOFTWARE

Support Material: Publishing Software

Participants: Principal, Teachers & Administrative Staff

Objective: To enable teachers to effectively use any popular publishing software, for
creating news letters.

Training Plan: The coordinator plans training sessions in each school so as to enable
the participating teachers to master the skills of the publishing software. The idea is
to motivate the teachers to create their own class newsletters and also contribute to
the school newsletter.

The participants are given hands-on training to create their School Newsletters. At the
end of the training session the participants are given the task of preparing their class
newsletters. (The teachers should ideally involve their students in this activity).

Week 19, 29, 21, 22, 23 Year 2

Unit – 8 – WEBSITE DESIGNING

Support Material: Microsoft ‘Project Shiksha’ Book

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

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Objective: To enable teachers to develop website using popular word processing,
publishing and web authoring software.

Training Plan: Training will be conducted in each school.


1. At the end of the training session, the participants would be able to create
websites using popular word processing, publishing and web authoring
software.
2. The selection of software would depend on the availability in the school.
3. The participants will also be trained in hosting their school website or
students’/ teachers’/ class websites in any of the free Web Hosting sites.

Week 24, 25, 26, 27 Year 2

Unit – 9 – ANNUAL PROJECT

Support Material: Teachers may decide their own topics on the basis of their
teaching subjects.

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To evaluate the comprehension of the various modules covered so far by


the teachers, and also to assess their ability to deliver the same in a practical format.

Week 28 Year 2

Unit – 11 – YEAR END ASSESSMENT

Support Material: Evaluation Form

Participants: All the teachers of the participating school.

Objective: To review what and how much has been delivered effectively.

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Year 3

Refresher Course

Setting up of a government team to take on the DE Program

Evaluation & Workshop: Building Capacity (Sustenance) of the government


system

Evaluation & Workshop: Technology Integration and Absorption in Teaching


& Learning and Admin work

Follow-up workshop in Tele-collaborative projects

AIF DE Program Training Manual 19


Section 4: DE Presence in Punjab

District No. of Schools

Amritsar 38
Patiala 37
Jalandhar 30
Ludhiana 29
Faridkot 25
Hoshiarpur 17
Rupnagar 15
Fatehgarh Sahib 09

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Section 5 : DE Punjab - Team Structure

STATE TEAM LEADER

CLUSTER MANAGERS [3] PROJECT COORDINATORS [3]


[AIFT] [GOVT]

FIELD COORDINATORS [31]


[AIFT – 8 DISTRICTS]

TEACHER TRAINERS [200] STUDENT TRAINERS [310]

Reporting Points to be covered by the Teacher Trainers & Field


Coordinators

• How many subject teachers have attended the training program and
whether training is on track as per schedule?

• Whether teachers have converted one of their subject periods as CAL


periods and bringing the children in to the lab?

• How many projects in a month are being attempted by the teachers


and getting tracked by the FC's to be reported to you?

• Feedback from the teachers about the value of the DE methodology.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 21


Section 6 : Interacting with Adults as learners

Part of being an effective trainer involves understanding how adults learn best.
Compared to children and teens, adults have special needs and requirements as
learners. Teachers and other adults may react negatively to being in the
unaccustomed student role. In a day or a few days one cannot change the orientation
of a person but you can get people to THINK.

The first thing is to introduce yourself as a trainer in such a way, i.e creating a
comfort zone between you and the teacher. This can be only done by giving some
introduction about your self in a very simple and friendly way, and also individually
getting the teachers introduce themselves i.e., saying something about them like:

1. From how many years they are working in this school.


2. What subjects do they teach.
3. Their mode of teaching i.e., the teaching procedures which has been adopted
by them. (This can be asked separately to each teacher)

This will help them to understand you, and you to understand them. The principal can
also act as a mediator to create this comfort zone. The teachers should feel that we
have not come to teach them but to guide them to make practical use of these
applications in their projects.

 Make the adults feel at ease. The trainer’s role should be that of coach,
facilitator, or mentor rather than that of taskmaster talking.

 Adults have accumulated a foundation of life experiences and knowledge that


may include work-related activities, previous education and family
responsibilities. They need to connect learning to this knowledge/experience
base. To help them do so, trainer should draw out participants' experience and
knowledge which is relevant to the topic. It is especially important to connect
the learners’ new concepts with their existing knowledge or previous concepts.
The approach should be of FUNCTIONAL learning.

 Ask open-ended questions to start with, so that you do not come across as
‘All Knowledgeable’ testing their knowledge.

 Vary the pace and rhythm to facilitate learning and to make it engaging for the
learners. Plan a variety of activities (hands on, discussion, lecture) so that
there is variation in the rhythm.

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 Adults might need loads of practice for eye-hand co-ordination. Have them
practice playing interesting keyboard, mouse games and MS Paint. This allows
them to practice pointing, clicking, and dragging skills.

 Introduce basic concepts while avoiding jargon. Terms such as RAM, K, and
byte easily roll off the tongue of the experienced computer user but are
confusing for those who are not sure what they mean.

 Move from concrete to abstract. "Go to the text editor" is abstract and "Click to
open WordPad" is concrete. Focus on details rather than abstractions. For
instance, explain “how to check e-mail” instead of “how e-mail works”. Rather
than just saying that “Computer is a useful machine”; include examples and
applications of its “use in our daily life”.

 Adults are relevancy-oriented and goal-oriented. They must see a reason for
learning something. Learning has to be applicable to their work or other
responsibilities to be of value to them. Therefore, trainers must identify
objectives for adult participants before the course begins. This means, also,
that theories and concepts must be related to a setting familiar to participants.
This need can be fulfilled by letting participants choose projects that reflect
their own interests.

 Begin with a concept and allow for hands on application so that the learners
can get a boost by feeling that they have accomplished one skill before moving
on to a new challenge.

 Encourage questions and listen to the whole question before starting to


answer. If necessary repeat the question so that everyone else can hear.
LISTEN to all the answers and ACCEPT them as they are. Try to thank them for
their response and questions.

 Use peers as a resource to facilitate learning and to give adults the confidence
that they know it. You can form groups of the same subject teachers, so that
they all can come out with different ideas and suggestions relevant to the
same subject and make learning much more interesting.

 Make handouts friendly with simple, step-by-step instructions using clear,


concise wording, in an easy to read font and size. They should also include
abundant, labeled graphic illustrations to keep the learner’s attention focused.

Treat the interaction as a teaching


learning process and believe it to be so.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 23


Section 7: Tips for Trainers

Trainers must remember that learning occurs within each individual as a continual
process throughout life. People learn at different speeds, so it is natural for them to
be anxious or nervous when faced with a learning situation. Positive reinforcement by
the trainer can enhance learning, as can proper timing of the instruction.

Learning results from stimulation of the senses. In some people, one sense is used
more than others to learn or recall information. Trainers should present materials that
stimulate as many senses as possible in order to increase their chances of teaching
success.

There are four critical elements of learning that must be addressed to ensure that
participants learn. These elements are

1. Motivation
2. Reinforcement
3. Retention
4. Transference

Motivation:

If the participant does not recognize the need for the information (or has been
offended or intimidated), all of the trainer's effort to assist the participant to learn will
be in vain. The trainer must establish rapport with participants and prepare them for
learning; this provides motivation. Trainers can motivate via several means:

• Set a feeling or tone for the lesson. Trainers should try to establish a
friendly, open atmosphere that shows the participants they will help them
learn.
• Set an appropriate level of concern. The level of tension must be adjusted
to meet the level of importance of the objective. If the material has a high
level of importance, a higher level of tension/stress should be established in
the class. However, people learn best under low to moderate stress; if the
stress is too high, it becomes a barrier to learning.
• Set an appropriate level of difficulty. The degree of difficulty should be set
high enough to challenge participants but not so high that they become
frustrated by information overload. The instruction should predict and reward
participation, culminating in success.

In addition, participants need specific knowledge of their learning results (feedback).


Feedback must be specific, not general. Participants must also see a reward for

AIF DE Program Training Manual 24


learning. The reward does not necessarily have to be monetary; it can be simply a
demonstration of benefits to be realized from learning the material. Finally, the
participant must be interested in the subject. Interest is directly related to reward.
Adults must see the benefit of learning in order to motivate themselves to learn the
subject.

Reinforcement:

Reinforcement is a very necessary part of the teaching/learning process; through it,


trainers encourage correct modes of behavior and performance.

• Positive reinforcement is normally used by trainers who are teaching


participants new skills. As the name implies, positive reinforcement is "good"
and reinforces "good" (or positive) behavior.
• Negative reinforcement is normally used by trainers teaching a new skill or
new information. It is useful in trying to change modes of behavior. The result
of negative reinforcement is extinction -- that is, the trainer uses negative
reinforcement until the "bad" behavior disappears, or it becomes extinct.

When trainers are trying to change behaviors (old practices), they should apply both
positive and negative reinforcement.

Reinforcement should be part of the teaching-learning process to ensure correct


behavior. Trainers need to use it on a frequent and regular basis early in the process
to help the students retain what they have learned. Then, they should use
reinforcement only to maintain consistent, positive behavior.

Retention:

Students must retain information from classes in order to benefit from the learning.
The trainers' jobs are not finished until they have assisted the learner in retaining the
information. In order for participants to retain the information taught, they must see
a meaning or purpose for that information. The must also understand and be able to
interpret and apply the information. This understanding includes their ability to assign
the correct degree of importance to the material.

The amount of retention will be directly affected by the degree of original learning.
Simply stated, if the participants did not learn the material well initially, they will not
retain it well either.

Retention by the participants is directly affected by their amount of practice during


the learning. Trainers should emphasize retention and application. After the students
demonstrate correct (desired) performance, they should be urged to practice to

AIF DE Program Training Manual 25


maintain the desired performance. Distributed practice is similar in effect to
intermittent reinforcement.

Transference:

Transfer of learning is the result of training. It is the ability to use the information
taught in the course but in a new setting. As with reinforcement, there are two types
of transfer: positive and negative.

• Positive transference, like positive reinforcement, occurs when the participants


uses the behavior taught in the course.
• Negative transference, again like negative reinforcement, occurs when the
participants do not do what they are told not to do. This results in a positive
(desired) outcome.

Transference is most likely to occur in the following situations:

• Association - participants can associate the new information with something


that they already know.
• Similarity - the information is similar to material that participants already
know; that is, it revisits a logical framework or pattern.
• Degree of original learning - participant's degree of original learning was high.
• Critical attribute element - the information learned contains elements that are
extremely beneficial (critical) on the job.

Book References:

‘The Adult Learner’ by Malcom Knowles

‘How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School’ by John D. Bransford, M.
Suzanne Donovan, and James W. Pellegrino

Web References:

http://www.rit.edu/~609www/ch/faculty/learner.htm

http://www.pharmacy.ferris.edu/htmls/academics/center/Teaching_and_Learning_Tip
s/Teaching%20the%20Adult%20Learners/indexAdultLearners.htm

http://www.learnerassociates.net/workshop/

AIF DE Program Training Manual 26


Section 8: Tips for creating effective ‘academic’ presentations

Content is the most important part of your presentation

The quality of the research


The topic should be thoroughly researched, with a number of different sources. While
using visual images, make sure they are appropriate to the point(s) you wish to
make, and be certain that you know the specifics on each image (who? what? when?
where? how?).

Organization and transition


There should be a logical flow from beginning to end, like in written work. If you are
only using words, keep them brief. Use key words only, not full sentences. Avoid
jumping from one point to another, and be careful about adding information that is
not directly related to the main theme. Strongly consider drawing up an outline
before you begin assembling the actual slides.

Mind your Text


One of the most obvious mistakes in a presentation, and one that is most frequently
made, is to put too much text on a slide. This does two things: it leads your audience
into reading the slide rather than listening to you, and it leads you into reading the
slide aloud, rather than using it as a memory aid. The best presentations are the ones
where only the core of your message is on the slide, so the audience has to watch
you to get important extra information.

If you need more points to cover a topic, restructure the section into two slides, each
with a smaller number of bullets. You're aiming for simplicity in every slide, so your
audience will concentrate on what you're putting across.

Make sure that you check the spelling. This is easy to forget but it will help increase
the professionalism of the presentation.

Effective use of technology - Don’t let technology over power you

Use Colours Wisely


The effects of color choice are often subconscious, but they can have a powerful
impact on audiences. PowerPoint lets you tap into a vast palette of colors. Choose
colors with a high contrast, e.g., black text on a white background, or white text on a
black background. Not, blue on black or yellow on white.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 27


Use Fonts Wisely
It is impossible to define absolute rules for selecting fonts and font styles. Different
presentations have different requirements, ranging from the feeling they need to
create to the need to fit maximal content onto every slide.

One good principle to keep in mind is that sans serif fonts such as Arial/ Verdana
work better than serif fonts on a projected image. Serif fonts, such as Times Roman,
have thin lines that are harder to read across a distance. Words in all capital letters
are hard to read.

Font Sizes
• Titles: 44 points +/- 4
• Body: 32 points +/- 4
• 2 inches (5 cm) of character height for every 20 feet (6 m) of distance
between the visual and the audience.
• 8-foot rule: Print out your visual. Tape it to the wall. Step back 8 feet
(2.5 m). If you can read it easily, it's the right size.

Titles/ Headers
Capitalize the first letter of every word (Title Case).

Body Text
• Keep left. Capitalize only the first letter of the first word in each
sentence (Sentence case).
• Font: Bolded Arial or Arial make good body fonts.
• Font Size: 28-36
• Color: White

Bullets
• Font Size: Same as body font size (28-36)
• Color: Antique Gold, yellow or other bright color

Use Visuals Wisely


People grasp pictures more quickly than words. Whenever possible, use pictures and
graphics to support or prove a point. Ideally, visuals should provide your audience
with at-a-glance comprehension of material to support your main points. "At-a-glance
comprehension" means that the audience understands the visual quickly because it is
simple and clear.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 28


Do not cram so much material onto a slide that it becomes impossible to read. Dense
visuals confuse the message and bury the point. Save details for handouts. You can
fill in all the details in the "Notes" pages in PowerPoint or prepare one set of visuals
for presentation on the screen and another set, with more detail, for the audience to
take away at the end of the presentation.

Using “key words only” supports the message but also lets the audience focus on the
presenter instead of reading dense text. Effective visuals serve the audience's needs
and not the presenter's. This is why visuals should not be designed as a script for the
presenter. Rather, they should be designed to help the audience understand a point
or idea.

Avoid more than six lines of text on a visual and try not to dilute graphic visuals with
lots of words. If the graphic requires written words to explain it, it may not be an
effective presentation graphic. Save it for the handout. Your visuals should
complement your spoken words, not replicate them.

Charts/Graphs
Use lots of graphs and chars where ever there is data listing of comparisons.

Transition Effects/ Animation


Transitions and builds, if any, should be simplest ones. Don't over use animations and
transitions. People lose track of what is being said and focus on the effects. Only use
special effects to emphasize a particular point. Use fly-ins (of key words, for example)
sparingly. When considering fly-ins, ask yourself why you want to use them. If the
answer is because they look “good” or because they add life to your presentation, do
not use them.

Use your own personal energy to add life to the presentation. You are the most
important visual in your presentation.

Be consistent
Invest the extra time and effort required to make your presentation look
professionally done by making sure that everything is very consistent. Titles should all
be not only in the same font, color and style but also in the same position. If you
decide to utilize a visual transition between slides use always the same one.

Keep your color theme constant throughout as well as the basic layout of all of your
presentation slides.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 29


Leave ample margins
Presentation elements in every slide need sufficient margins around them to
"breathe". Do not stick your organization logo in a corner letting it touch the borders
of your slide. Do not let titles or text come too close to Clip Art elements,
photographs or other graphic elements present on the slide.

Leave always a discrete but perceptible amount of margin between any two elements
(including in this your slide margins).

The academic presentations can be broadly classified into two sub-heads:

Presenter Oriented User Oriented

In this kind of academic In this kind of academic presentation,


presentation, the teacher or the end user is the key element who uses
presenter is the key element who the presentation as information/ learning
uses the presentation as a tool to enhance his knowledge on the
resource tool or point of topic. So, while creating a presentation,
reference to provide weight & in addition to the regular tips, following
support to his lecture. points should be taken care of:
1. The content should be a balance of
text and visuals wherein text
should be adequate enough in
itself (yet not too lengthy) and
complement the visuals.
2. Adequate references should be
mentioned wherever applicable for
further reference.
3. Proper content indexing for easy
navigation

References:
PS for Business Communicators
Creating an effective PowerPoint presentation by Thomas saylor, Ph.d.
12 design commandments for professionally-looking presentations by Luigi Canali De Rossi

AIF DE Program Training Manual 30


Section 9: PROJECT BASED LEARNING

Project-based learning is a comprehensive approach for classroom activity that shifts


away from classroom practices of short, isolated, teacher-centered lessons and
instead emphasizes learning activities that are long term, interdisciplinary and
student centered. Project-based learning helps make learning relevant and is useful to
students by establishing connections to life beyond the classroom, addressing the real
world concerns and developing real world skills.

Many of the skills learnt through Project-based learning are those desired by today’s
employer which includes the ability to work well with others, make thoughtful
decisions with accountability, take initiatives, communicate effectively and solve
complex problems.

In a classroom situation, Project-based learning provides many unique opportunities


for teachers to build relationships with students. Teachers may fill the varied roles of
coach, facilitator, and co-learner. Finished products, plans, drafts, and prototypes all
make excellent "conversation pieces" around which teachers and students can discuss
the learning that is taking place.

Example
Mrs. Sharma, a std. VII teacher, teaches her students “The Solar System” in an
interactive way. After the completion of the chapter, she divided the students into
groups to prepare a project on the topic covered. Children respond with extreme
enthusiasm and excitement. She gives them the liberty to consult Books,
Encyclopedia CD’s, Internet and their elders. She also gives them the flexibility of
selecting the modes of presentation i.e. Paint, Word Processor or PowerPoint. Her
class has 40 students.

Characteristics of Project-based learning

• Students make decisions within a prescribed framework.


• There is a problem or challenge without a predetermined solution
• Students design the process of reaching a solution
• Students are responsible of assessing and managing the information they
gather
• Evaluation takes place continuously
• An environment is created that tolerates errors and change
• Leads to Interdisciplinary and integrated learning

AIF DE Program Training Manual 31


Advantages of Project-based learning

• Student centric: Puts the students at the center of the learning activity
• Propels students towards self learning
• Enhance Team work
• Allows students to work at their own pace
• Develops real world skills and concerns
• Builds student-student and student-teacher relationship
• Engages and motivates slow learners

Implementation

A teacher becomes a coach and facilitator, helping students shape the project so that
it meets content standards and allows for a variety of assessments by giving them
relevant topics and creating a platform for focused approach for the desired
outcomes.

Steps for Planning and Implementing

1) Decide on the project


2) Draft time frame
3) Plan activities
4) Plan for assessment
5) Begin project with students
6) Finish project and reflect

Assessment

• Assessment helps teachers understand the potential of the students as


there is enough scope for the teachers to interact with the students and give
constructive feedback. Similarly, students work closely with each other
exchanging and sharing ideas with their peers, mentors, parents and
community members. .

• Assessment helps students answer the questions "Am I getting it?"


and "How am I doing?" Early and frequent feedback from the teacher, peers,
and mentors will also provide students with the practice and the knowledge to
better assess themselves and find answers to these questions.

• Assessment can help make content connections clear. Prompt the


students to do research through relevant websites, encyclopedias and books.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 32


• Assessment engages students directly in the evaluation of their own
work. Student reflections should be more than just commentary on what the
students have done--they should used by students to highlight what they have
learned, explain important decisions they have made, and articulate plans for
incorporating feedback and moving forward.

Conclusion
Project-based learning allows the teacher to incorporate numerous teaching and
learning strategies into project planning and implementation.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 33


ANNEXURE 1
Teacher Training Plan Index
YEAR 1
Week Topic
1 Unit 1: AIF-DE program introductory seminar
Unit 2: Orientation on Information and Communication
Technology in Education
2 Unit 3: Workshop on the set-up and running of the DE
center
3, 4, 5, 6 Unit 4: Introduction to Computer basics & Windows
7 Unit 5: Evaluation of unit 4
8 Unit 6: Training on effective use of the curriculum
software [subject to availability of curriculum software]
9, 10, 11, 12 Unit 7: Applications of Word processor in education
13, 14 Unit 8: Training on using vernacular software
15 Unit 9: Evaluation of unit 7 & 8
16, 17, 18 Unit10: Internet Applications
19 Unit 11: Evaluation of unit 10
20, 21, 22, 23 Unit 12: Effective use of presentation tools
24, 25, 26, 27 Unit 13: Evaluation of unit 10 & 11
28 Unit 14: Year end review [of the school]

YEAR 2
Week Topic
1 Unit 1: Reviewing the effective use of curriculum software

2, 3, 4, 5 Unit 2: Refresher course on Year 1 units


6, 7, 8 Unit 3: Spreadsheets
9 Unit 4: Evaluation of unit 3
10, 11, 12 Unit 5: Project Based Learning
13, 14 Unit 6: Introduction to tele-collaborative projects
15, 16, 17, 18 Unit 7: Publishing Software
19, 20, 21, 22, 23 Unit 8: Website Designing
24, 25, 26, 27 Unit 9: Annual Project
28 Unit 10: Year end review [of the school]

AIF DE Program Training Manual 34


ANNEXURE 2

Template 1: IT Skills Assessment – MS Word

What is a rainbow?
Author Donald Ahrens in his text Meteorology Today describes a
rainbow as "one of the most spectacular light shows observed on
earth". Indeed the traditional rainbow is sunlight spread out into its
spectrum of colors and diverted to the eye of the observer by water
droplets. The "bow" part of the word describes the fact that the rainbow
is a group of nearly circular arcs of color all having a common center.
Where is the sun when you see a rainbow?
This is a good question to start thinking about the physical process that
gives rise to a rainbow. Most people have never noticed that the sun is
always behind you when you face a rainbow, and that the center of the
circular arc of the rainbow is in the direction opposite to that of the
sun. The rain, of course, is in the direction of the rainbow.
What makes the colors in the rainbow?
The traditional description of the rainbow is that it is made up of seven
colors - red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Actually,
the rainbow is a whole continuum of colors from red to violet and even
beyond the colors that the eye can see.
The colors of the rainbow arise from two basic facts:
Sunlight is made up of the whole range of colors that the eye can
detect. The range of sunlight colors, when combined, looks white to the
eye. This property of sunlight was first demonstrated by Sir Isaac
Newton in 1666.
Light of different colors is refracted by different amounts when it
passes from one medium (air, for example) into another (water or
glass, for example).

AIF DE Program Training Manual 35


What is a rainbow?
Author Donald Ahrens in his text Meteorology Today describes a rainbow as "one of the
most spectacular light shows observed on earth". Indeed the traditional rainbow is
sunlight spread out into its spectrum of colors and diverted to the eye of the observer by
water droplets. The "bow" part of the word describes the fact that the rainbow is a group
of nearly circular arcs of color all having a common center.
Where is the sun when you see a rainbow?
This is a good question to start thinking about the physical process that gives rise to a
rainbow. Most people have never noticed that the sun is always behind you when you
face a rainbow, and that the center of the circular arc of the rainbow is in the direction
opposite to that of the sun. The rain, of course, is in the direction of the rainbow.
What makes the colors in the rainbow?
The traditional description of the rainbow is that it is made up of seven colors - Violet,
Indigo, Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange and Red. Actually, the rainbow is a whole
continuum of colors from red to violet and even beyond the colors that the eye can see.

The colors of the rainbow arise from two basic facts:

• Sunlight is made up of the whole range of colors that the eye can detect. The range of
sunlight colors, when combined, looks white to the eye. This property of sunlight was
first demonstrated by Sir Isaac Newton in 1666.
• Light of different colors is refracted by different amounts when it passes from one
medium (for example - air) into another (for example - water or glass).

AIF DE Program Training Manual 36


ANNEXURE 2

Template 2: IT Skills Assessment – MS Word

The DE Approach
Promote the proficient use of technology in under-resourced schools to:
Enrich and improve the quality of Education by enabling teachers to integrate the use of
technology in pedagogy
Inspire curiosity, confidence, teamwork and the pursuit of knowledge by actively
engaging children in interactive collaborative learning using technology and internet.
Ensure the program’s long-term success and sustainability:
Build capacity within the schools via extensive teacher training, motivation and skills
enhancement
Encourage active participation of the school administration and community and empower
them to take ownership of the program.
Universalize the DE mode:
Create a scalable, cost-effective program and extend its reach throughout the country
Collaborate with government and policy makers to adopt and adapt the DE model, leading
to significant multiplier effects

AIF DE Program Training Manual 37


The DE Approach

• Promote the proficient use of technology in under-resourced


schools to:
o Enrich and improve the quality of Education by enabling teachers to
integrate the use of technology in pedagogy
o Inspire curiosity, confidence, teamwork and the pursuit of knowledge
by actively engaging children in interactive collaborative learning using
technology and internet.

• Ensure the program’s long-term success and sustainability:


o Build capacity within the schools via extensive teacher training,
motivation and skills enhancement
o Encourage active participation of the school administration and
community and empower them to take ownership of the program.

• Universalize the DE mode:


o Create a scalable, cost-effective program and extend its reach
throughout the country
o Collaborate with government and policy makers to adopt and adapt the
DE model, leading to significant multiplier effects

AIF DE Program Training Manual 38


ANNEXURE 2

Template 3: IT Skills Assessment – MS Word

MS Word Crossword Puzzle


DOWN
Set Alignment using this option to evenly align the left and right margins.
Data repeated at the top of the page – created or edited via the View menu.
Right click to bring up this menu for quick access to frequently used options.
ACROSS
Automatically detects and corrects typos, misspelled words, and incorrect capitalization.
Customize toolbars from this menu.

Don’t press the spacebar five times to start a paragraph, use this key instead.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 39


ANNEXURE 2

1J 3S 6T A B

U H

S O 2H MS Word
4A U T O C O R R E C T
Crossword
5V I E W T A

F C D
Puzzle
Y U E

T R

DOWN ACROSS
1. Set Alignment using this option 4. Automatically detects and
to evenly align the left and right corrects typos, misspelled
margins. words, and incorrect
2. Data repeated at the top of the capitalization.
page – created or edited via the 5. Customize toolbars from this
View menu. menu.
3. Right click to bring up this menu 6. Don’t press the spacebar five
for quick access to frequently times to start a paragraph, use
used options. this key instead.
TAB
VIEW
AUTOCORRECT
SHORTCUT
HEADER
JUSTIFY
answers

AIF DE Program Training Manual 40


ANNEXURE 2

Template 4: IT Skills Assessment – MS Word

DE Capacity Building Model

Teacher Trainer
Teachers (Coordinator)

Students Student Trainer


(Facilitator)

AIF DE Program Training Manual 41


ANNEXURE 3

EVALUATION OF DE IMPLEMENTATION IN SCHOOLS

School: ________________________________________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________

Email-id: ________________________________________________________

Month: ________________ Year: ________________

Conducted by:________________________________________________________

Management Support
Minimum Level
Desired Level
Outstanding
Teacher Involvement
Minimum Level
Desired Level
Outstanding
Student Learning
Minimum Level
Desired Level
Outstanding

Remarks

The evaluator should consider each factor and place a check mark in the column,
which describes its own effectiveness relative to the factor. On a 4-point scale, 0
stands for Ineffective, and 3 stands for Very Effective. Please tick the appropriate
boxes against each of the factors.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 42


Section A

MANAGEMENT SUPPORT

Factors 0 1 2 3

Minimum Level

1. The School management and head support the DE


program and demonstrate a positive attitude.
Take regular feedback, track progress, take necessary
corrective action

2. Regular attendance and active participation in


management meetings with DE team

3. Teachers in the school have been deputed for


technology training.
3 if all, 2 if >50% , 1 if >25%, 0 if lesser

4. Management ensures that Teachers have access to


Internet for research work

5. Technology resources are kept in operational order, are


allocated for maximum use and are accessible for all
students in the High school.

6. School management has a designated full time


facilitator to support technology integration.

7. Changes have been made in the timetable to allow for


DE classes.

8. Computer fees charged on students is less than Rs 120


per year.

Desired Level

9. School managements encourage students & teachers in


technology learning by giving them awards & prizes
during annual day celebrations

10. School management has allotted time for the


development of technology-aided lesson plans, teacher
open house sessions and subject meeting sessions
during regular working hours.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 43


11. The School promotes the use of technology in all areas
of administration and encourages the administrative
staff to make effective use of technology

12. School heads initiate ideas for technology use, review


ongoing applications, and encourage staff to gain new
skills in using technology resources.

13. The Management in consultation with the teachers and


coordinators has developed a plan for technology
integration.

14. Management is very resourceful and tries to generate


funds from other resources in order to provide low-cost
computer education to their students

Outstanding

15.Management works proactively with AIF to implement


alternate sustenance options rather than charging the
students.

16. School head includes the use of technology effectively


as an integral part of the staff evaluation process.

17. Parents are aware of the school’s efforts to integrate


technology into teaching and learning and support the
school’s efforts to integrate technology by taking part in
school activities.

AIF DE Program Training Manual 44


Section B

TEACHERS’ INVOLVEMENT

Factors 0 1 2 3

Minimum Level

1. Teachers develop/ use technology based lessons as


and when required and use them to implement
technology-enhanced learning experiences.

2. Teachers use technology tools for class room


management like marks card tabulation,
attendance, assessment, etc.

3. Teachers use technology to research and find


resources to address the diverse learning needs of
the students.

4. Teachers give assignments to students to encourage


them to do Research using either internet or off-line
content

Desired Level

5. Teachers encourage students to participate in online


telecollaborative projects.

Outstanding

6. Teachers are experimenting with new instructional


strategies as a result of use of technology.

7. Teachers are actively involved in acquiring newer


technology skills for their professional development

AIF DE Program Training Manual 45


Section C

STUDENTS’ INVOLVEMENT AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Factors 0 1 2 3

Minimum Level

1. All Students have knowledge of basic computer usage


like starting and shutting down a machine & usage of
CD drive, floppy, etc

2. All students can navigate thro the Operating system and


start necessary applications.

3. All students can create files & folders

4. All students can use word processor

5. All students can use spreadsheets

6. All students can use presentation tools

Desired Level

7. All students have participated in atleast 1 research


based project during their 3 years in high school.

8. All students can use atleast 1 search engine

9. All students can use mail tool and send out mails

10. All students can use chat tools

11. Most students are aware of the usage of encyclopedia,


internet and other digital resources for their learning.

12. Atleast 50% of students have participated in


telecollaborative projects

Outstanding

13. Most students have developed higher order thinking


skills as a result of technology based learning

14. Students participate in various online contests and


competitions

AIF DE Program Training Manual 46