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Lesson Plan Title: Winter Watercolor Grade Level: 1-8 Entering Competencies: The students will need to be familiar

with creating a wash using watercolors. Task Description: Students will learn about the wet-on-wet watercolor wash technique and how to create texture using a sponge and acrylic paint. They will also learn about landscape composition, atmospheric perspective, watercolor painting skills, and will paint their own simple compositions using different colors, shapes, and overlapping skills. Goals: The students will be able to paint a landscape painting using watercolors and overlapping the watercolors with acrylic paint. Student Learner Outcomes: The students will: Draw two thumbnail sketches from observation or from a winter scene visual as an aid. They will select the composition that best suits the need of the assignment and use it as a guide for their painting. Paint the background above the horizon line using wet-on-wet watercolor wash technique, and paint the midground hills maintaining the rule of atmospheric perspective. Paint the foreground trees using grey of black and add acrylic paint on top of the watercolor for a texture effect of snow. Paint any remaining details last including highlights. Show respect for classmates by sharing the masking tape and the acrylic paint. Time: The lesson should last for two 50-minute periods. The first class will discuss landscape composition and atmospheric perspective. The teacher will show the students examples of watercolor landscapes and landscape images showing winter scenes. The students will tape around the edges of their watercolor paper on all 4 sides. They will paint the sky above the horizon line using cool colors. This will be accomplished using wet-on-wet watercolor technique. The compositions will be allowed to dry. The next class, the students will continue by painting the hills/trees in the midground and the pond in the foreground. They will then paint the snow effect by sponging white acrylic paint onto the tree limbs. Allow composition to dry completely.

Materials and Tools: 20 sets of watercolor paints 20 sheets of 11 x 17 watercolor paper

20 watercolor brushes (#6 or #4) 10 rolls of masking tape (1 per each pair of students) 10 Small round coin or circular paint bottle wrapped in tissue paper (1 per each pair of students) 20 globs of white acrylic paint on wax paper. Teacher will prep this before the class begins. 20 small sponge pieces

Visuals and Resources: * All of these resources can be checked out from Kimbel Library at Coastal Carolina University. Blockley, John. Country landscapes in watercolor. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1982. Jamison, Phillip. Capturing nature in watercolor. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1980. Szabo, Zoltan. Landscape painting in watercolor. New York, Watson-Guptill Publications, 1971. Landscape watercolor posters Vocabulary: Atmospheric perspective Landscape composition Foreground, Midground, Background Acrylic Paint Wet-on-wet Watercolor Watercolor wash Presentation: Review: The focus of the lesson is to teach students how to effectively create a mixed media landscape painting using watercolor and acrylic paint. The lesson contains science connections because it discusses the landscape composition. Motivation: The students will be motivated by the idea that they can create whatever winter landscape they want and in the cool colors of their choice. The teacher will explain to them that there is no right or wrong landscape composition. The students have complete creative freedom with this project and can express themselves however they want to. The students will be aware of the possibilities for creating the landscape composition due to the prior exposure of watercolor landscapes from the visual aids.

Demonstration or Directions: The students will be guided through visual aids and stepby-step teacher demonstration of how to paint the landscape. The teacher will also write on the board the main criteria for successful completion of the assignment.

Procedure: Part I: Overview of Lesson 1) Teacher will discuss atmospheric perspective as it pertains to landscape composition. During the lesson students will learn about the 3 zones of space and the characteristics of foreground, midground, and background. 2) To prepare for the lesson the teacher will check visual aids from the library such as books and posters. The teacher will hang the posters around the classroom and display the books on the students tables for them to look through. All tape, watercolors, acrylic paint, water containers, and brushes will be out on a supply table so that when the time comes, they can be easily distributed to the workstations. 3) Teacher will demonstrate the painting of the background above the horizon line and the stamping of the coin (to create the moon) so that the students fully understand the goal to be accomplished. On day two of the class the teacher will demonstrate the painting of the hills and the overlapping of the white acrylic paint. 4) The students will be motivated by the idea that they can create whatever winter landscape they want and in the cool colors of their choice. The teacher will explain to them that there is no right or wrong landscape composition. The students have complete creative freedom with this project and can express themselves however they want to. The students will be aware of the possibilities for creating the landscape composition due to the prior exposure of watercolor landscapes from the visual aids. 5) The student will be graded using graduate checklist. Part II: Criteria for Grading 1. First, paint your background above the horizon line using two or more cool colors. 2. Paint the hills and trees in the midground making sure the trees overlap the hills. 3. Add snow texture by sponging white acrylic paint onto the tree branches. 4. Paint the remaining details neatly. 5. Show respect for your classmates by sharing the tape and the coin stamp.

Part III: Sequential Description of Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Discuss briefly atmospheric perspective and landscape compositions Discuss the 3 zones of space (foreground, midground, background). Talk in detail about wet-on-wet watercolor technique. Give students and overview of the assignment Demonstrate how to paint wet-on-wet watercolor technique. Tape the watercolor paper on all 4 sides using tape. Use a pencil to draw a thin line 1/3 of the way up for a hilly landscape. Using the line as a guideline wet the paper above the line half way to the top. Paint horizontal lines of cool colors to create the background/skyline. 9. While the paper is still wet, dab a round coin wrapped in tissue onto a spot in the sky to make a moon. The tissue will absorb the excess water. 10. Wet the area below the horizon and paint the hills. 11. Allow watercolor to dry. 12. Demonstrate how to overlap the watercolor with acrylic by using a sponge. 13. Apply acrylic paint to create tree shapes on the hills. 14. Share and present landscapes with the class. 15. Display collages in classroom and in school hallways. Clean-Up: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Be sure all students have written their name on the back of their paintings. Have students stop working and collect materials on their group table. Have 1 student collect tape. Have 1 student collect all watercolor cases. Have each group table dispose of the dirty brush water in the sink. Have 1 student at each table take the projects to the drying rack. While materials are being collected have students wipe of desks, throw away trash, wash hands (if needed), and return to their seats to sit quietly for the remainder of the class.

Total Time for Clean-Up: 5-7 minutes

Evaluation: (See attached graduated checklist) Graduated Checklist aligned with objectives and criteria.

Criteria: First, two or more cool colors for the background painted above the horizon line. Effectively demonstrate wet-on-wet watercolor technique on the background. The composition should be colorful and interesting to the viewer. Student was able to demonstrate overlapping by using the white acrylic paint. Show respect for your classmates by sharing the tape and coin stamp. Accommodations: This lesson can be done with the majority of students. Some students with special needs may have trouble painting neatly. The teacher can arrange to have a few volunteers to help the students with the wet-on-wet watercolor technique. If volunteers are unavailable the teacher can spend a few extra minutes assisting those in need. Sources: (Lesson Plan) Kall, L. (2010, January 30). Watercolor Winter Landscapes Art Lesson. Retrieved June 1, 2010, from Bright Hun website: http://www.brighthub.com/education/k-12/articles/62117.aspx Blockley, John. Country landscapes in watercolor. New York : Watson-Guptill Publications, 1982. Jamison, Phillip. Capturing nature in watercolor. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1980. Szabo, Zoltan. Landscape painting in watercolor. New York, Watson-Guptill Publications, 1971.

Name:___________________

Graduated Checklist

0 Criteria No Attempt Two or more cool colors for the background painted above the horizon line.

1 Needs Improvement

2 Satisfactory

3 Exceeds Expectations

Comments

Effectively demonstrate weton-wet watercolor technique on the background.

The composition should be colorful and interesting to the viewer. Student was able to demonstrate overlapping by using the white acrylic paint.

Show respect for your classmates by sharing the tape and coin stamp.