Anda di halaman 1dari 24

The Lynchburg Times FREE

Vol. II, Issue 34 December, 2011


in Kroger, McDonalds & More 35,000 local readers!
FREE
The joys of
Virginias
winter
camping
Community Calendar 2
A Virginia Marines Christmas
in Afghanistan 5
Lynchburg Chamber gets rare
5-star accreditation 9
No, you didnt really win that
$500,000 sweepstakes you
never entered 10
James River Day School 11
Holiday shopping tips 15
One-time bonus for schools 19
Virtual education popular,
unfunded 20
Iage 2 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
Thursday, December 1, 2011
Holiday Open House from 4:30pm-6:30pm at
Wingate by Wyndham, 3777 Candlers Mtn. Rd. in
Lynchburg. 434-845-1700 Email:bknopp@sehotel.
com On the 1st day of December the Wingate by
Wyndham gave to me... a wonderful Holiday Open
House! The evening will be full of holiday music,
sweet treats and great prizes! In the Spirit of Giv-
ing, we encourage you to bring a canned food item
to benefit the Salvation Army, the Miller Home for
Girls, the Liberty Godparent Home and the Blue
Ridge Area Food Bank.
Friday, December 2, 2011
First Fridays from 5:00pm-8:00pm at Lynchburg
Museum System, 901 Court Street in Lynchburg.
434-455-6226 www.lynchburgmuseum.org The
Lynchburg Museum in the Old Court House is open
for First Fridays. Free admission from 5 pm to 8
pm on the first Friday of each month. The Art Trolley
will drop you off and pick you up at the front door
at 901 Court Street as it makes its way between
art galleries, studios, and other places of interest
in Downtown Lynchburg. There will be a featured
topic for each First Friday and a staff member will
be on hand to show artifacts that are not usually on
exhibit and talk with visitors. FREE
First Fridays Events from 5:30pm-8:00pm in
Downtown Lynchburg & Various Locations. 434-
847-1811 Its First Fridays time in Lynchburg. The
art galleries will be open for an evening of strolling
along the streets downtown or hopping the trolley
to a gallery not located in the downtown area. En-
joy the exhibits and various activities while partak-
ing of light refreshments. Brochures are available,
if needed. So, meet your friends for an evening in
the Arts!
Romeo & Juliet from 7:30pm-9:30pm at LU
Tower Theater, Liberty University Green Hall,
1971 University Blvd. in Lynchburg. 434-582-2085
Email:theatre@liberty.edu www.liberty.edu/Theatre
The chronicle of world literature abounds with ill-
fated lovers, be it Troilus and Cressida, Tristan and
Isolde, or Lancelot and Guinevere. It is likely that
none, on the stage, are more eminent than Romeo
and Juliet. People become acquainted with it from
such varied sources as their high school English
class, a graphic novel, a trip to the local Shake-
speare festival or Tom Stoppards colorful treat-
ment in the 1998 film Shakespeare in Love. We
invite you to once again take this darkly romantic
journey through the streets, back alleys and tombs
of Renaissance Verona, where the sins of the fa-
thers, and their children, will drive them all into the
maelstrom of romantic and reckless obsession. Ad-
ditional Performance Dates: December 3, 8, 9*, 10
7:30pm; December 3, 10 2:00pm; December 4
2:30pm. Tickets go on sale August 22. Regular
ticket prices apply. Rated PG-13
Friday Salsa Dance Night from 9:00pm-12:00am
at Dance Theatre of Lynchburg, 722 Commerce
Street in Lynchburg. 434-942-1197 Email:lynch-
burgsalsa@gmail.com A beginner salsa lesson
from 9pm-10pm and social dancing from 10pm-
12am. Cover charge is $5 which includes the les-
son. No smoking or drinking.
Saturday, December 3, 2011
Christmas Times a Coming Open House from
12:00pm-5:00pm at Peaks of Otter Winery, 2122
Sheep Creek Road in Bedford. 540-586-3707
Email:appleseed@earthlink.net www.peaksofot-
terwinery.com Warm apple cinnamon wine and
cider will be in the wine tasting room. Gift packs
of wine and canned products will make wonderful
Christmas gifts. FREE. You may bring your own
glass, purchase a souvenir glass or taste out of a
free plastic cup. Visit the Christmas lights at the
Elks National Home in The Christmas Capital of
Virginia
Home Holiday Tour from 1:00pm-5:00pm at vari-
ous locations in Appomattox County. 434-352-7373
Email:office.aca@appomattoxchristianacademy.
com www.appomattoxchristian.com Home Holiday
Tour to benefit Appomattox Christian Academy
(ACA). Four historical and unique homes will be
open for touring in Appomattox County. Homes in-
clude, Eldon, the birthplace of Congressman Hal
Flood; Maples End, the circa 1919 home of Dr. &
Mrs. Ken Powell; the original Methodist Parsonage
and current home of Mr. & Mrs. Allen Austin; and
the masterful traditional/contemporary home of Mr.
& Mrs. Bruce Boone. Tickets are $12 each.
Christmas on Ice from 2:00pm-8:30pm at La-
Haye Ice Center, Liberty University, 1971 Uni-
versity Blvd. in Lynchburg. 540-586-8979Email:
rescue163@msn.comWebsite:www.lynchburgfsc.
com The Lynchburg Figure Skating Club presents
their annual Christmas on Ice, featuring a A Story-
book Christmas on December 3, 2011 Showings
at 2:00pm & 6:00pm. Tickets $10 in advance ~
$12 at door. Tickets available at: Givens & Little
Dickens, LifeWay Christian Bookstore and online
at www.lynchburgfsc.com
Sounds of the Season from 2:00pm-4:00pm at
E.C. Glass High School Auditorium, 2111 Memorial
Avenue in Lynchburg. 434-845-6675 Lynchburg
Symphony Youth Orchestra & Junior Strings per-
form selections such as The Polar Express, Sleigh
Ride, Auld Land Syne, O Holy Night, A Christmas
Festival and much more. Special Guest: Lynch-
burg City Schools Elementary Honors Strings.
Tickets available in advance at various locations
or online at www.lynchburgtickets.com. For more
information call: 434-845-6675
Romeo & Juliet from 2:00pm-4:00pm. (See de-
scription Dec. 2.)
Christmas Concert from 7:30pm-9:30pm at
Timberlake United Methodist Church, 21649 Tim-
berlake Road in Lynchburg. 434-528-5700 Email:
info@jeffersonchoralsociety.org www.jefferson-
choralsociety.org Jefferson Choral Society and
Jefferson Youth Chorale perform Peace on Earth
- Vivaldis Gloria and other seasonal music. Ad-
ditional performance on December 4, 2011 at 4pm.
Tickets: Adults $20 ~ Students 12+ $8 ~ Children
$0
The House Band 7:30pm-11:00pm at The Ellington,
421 Rivermont Ave. in Lynchburg. 434-845-2162
Email:info@theellington.org www.theellington.org
The House Band is an 11 piece band that plays
oldies R&B music - best known for playing music
by Earth, Wind, and Fire - though the group has a
large variety of music that it covers. Members of
the groups ages are from different eras which add
to versatility of group. Some members have played
on cruise ships, while others have played with local
gospel, jazz, and R&B groups. Doors open at 7:30
with music at 8:30. Tickets price varies by show
(go to our ticketing page for more info). Cash bar
available. Ellington age policy: no children under
12, under 21 with a parent.
Romeo & Juliet 7:30pm-9:30pm (See descrip-
tion Dec. 2.)
- news@lynchburgtimes.com
BLACK
The ideal candidates will be organized and self-motivated. Great people
skills and a professional demeanor are key. This indiviual should enjoy the
freedom of setting his or her own hours and meeting new people. Previous sales
experience is a plus, but not necessary. The candidate must be dependable ,
reliable and self-starter. Applicant must be able to track customer payments, work
well with others and be customer oriented. If you want a position where you
can set your own hours and earn great commissions, please send us your recent
work experience. Start selling immediately. Only serious inquires please. This is a
commission-based position with excellent earnings potential.
Email angie@lynchburgtimes.com
Advertising Representative
Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0811
1-888-626-2356
30 Premium Channels
for 3 Months!
SAME DAY
INSTALLATION
in up to 6 rooms
CALL TODAY -
INSTALLED TODAY!
Where available.
Multi-Sport Pack featuring
Available with our Most Popular Packages through 1/4/12
Watch Every Touchdown from
Every Game, Every Sunday Afternoon.
Packages starting at:
PACKAGES
UNDER
$
50
Local Channels
Included!
FIVE
For 12 months
MO
Prices valid for rst 12 months.
Requires 24 month Agreement. with 24 month Agreement.
Call Now and Save Over $750 this year on TV!
AUTHORIZED RETAILER
With qualifying programming you will receive Multi-Sport Pack programming through 1/04/12. Qualifying programming packages include Americas Top 120 Plus, Americas Top
200, Americas Top 250, DishLATINO Dos, DishLATINO Max, DISH America Silver, and DISH America Gold. You will forfeit programming if you do not maintain a qualifying
programming package. You must call to continue subscription at the end of promotional period. 2011 NFL Enterprises LLC. NFL and the NFL Shield design are registered
trademarks of the National Football League.Oer valid for Blockbuster By Mail 1 Disc plan; requires activation of new qualifying DISH Network service between5/18/11 and
1/31/12 and an online DISH Network account. Blockbuster By Mail account will require valid email address and major credit card. You must redeem oer within 45 days of DISH
Network service order. At end of 3 months you will be charged then-current price unless you cancel Blockbuster By Mail service. You can exchange online rentals for 5 in-store
movie rentals per billing month. Exchanges are only valid at participating BLOCKBUSTER stores. Existing Blockbuster By Mail customers are not eligible. This oer is not available
in Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands. BLOCKBUSTER name, design and related marks are trademarks of Blockbuster L.L.C. 2011 Blockbuster L.L.C. Premium Movie Package
oer ends 9/30/11. Oer value is up to $126; after 3 months then-current price applies unless you downgrade. HBO, Cinemax and related channels and service marks are the
property of Home Box Oce, Inc. Starz and related channels and service marks are the property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. SHOWTIME and related marks are registered
trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. Digital Home Advantage plan requires 24-month agreement and credit qualication. Cancellation fee of $17.50/month
remaining applies if service is terminated before end of agreement. After 12 months of programming credits, then-current price will apply. $10/mo HD add-on fee waived for life
of current account; requires 24-month agreement, continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing. Free Standard Professional Installation only. All equipment is leased
and must be returned to DISH Network upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Limit 6 leased tuners per account; upfront and monthly fees may apply based on
type and number of receivers. HD programming requires HD television. Prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Oer available for new and qualied
former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer agreements. Additional restrictions may apply. Oer ends 1/31/12. All new customers
are subject to a one time non-refundable processing fee.
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 3 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
Sunday, December 4, 2011
Christmas Open House from 12:00pm-4:00pm
at Point of Honor, 112 Cabell Street in Lynchburg.
434-847-1867 Website:www.pointofhonor.org Point
of Honor, one of Lynchburgs architectural jewels,
will host its 29th Annual Open House. Decorated
for Christmas ca. 1815 with native greens, yule log,
and other customs of the period. Enjoy period music,
refreshments, and special items on sale in the Gift
Shop. FREE
Christmas Open House from 2:00pm-4:00pm at
Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation, 1250 Red Hill
Road in Brookneal. 434-376-2044 Come join the holi-
day celebration as Patrick Henry did in 1796. Red Hill
will again welcome neighbors and friends to Henrys
home this Christmas Season...Docent-guided tours
of the historic buildings, Complimentary hot mulled
cider and cookies as well as Brunswick stew. The
gift shop will offer a 10% discount. Enjoy festive live
music. Quilt raffle tickets available as well as the pur-
chase of locally grown boxwood wreaths and Kissing
balls. Call to reserve your wreath or kissing ball as
supplies are limited.
Romeo & Juliet 2:30pm-4:30pm (See description
Dec. 2.)
Christmas Concert from 4:00pm-6:30pm (See de-
scription Dec. 3.)
Lynchburg Christmas Parade from 5:00pm-7:00pm
at Main & Church Streets in Downtown Lynchburg.
434-455-6369 Website:www.lynchburgva.org A
Lynchburg Tradition. Central Virginians of all ages
love the annual Lynchburg Christmas Parade. Ev-
ery December they turn out along the streets of his-
toric downtown Lynchburg for two hours of marching
bands, colorful floats, antique cars and motorcycle
clubs, equestrian and military units, beauty queens,
emergency vehicles, and much more. The Lynch-
burg Christmas Parade is the only annual parade in
Lynchburg and its even more exciting when its held
under the lights as dusk falls across Lynchburg. The
theme for this years parade is Christmas Stories.
Wednesday, December 7, 2011
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 7:00pm-
9:00pm at Thomas Road Baptist Church, 1 Mountain
View Road in Lynchburg. 888-244-2178 Website:
www.virginiachristmasspectacular.com For the 41st
year, the historic Thomas Road Baptist Church pres-
ents the Virginia Christmas Spectacular. This annual
event, located in the heart of Virginia, attracts more
than 40,000 people each December. This years
musical is titled: Let There Be Light! Experience
the story of the Light like never before with dazzling
Christmas lights, powerful choir, full orchestra, a cast
of 350, live animals, creative video and special ef-
fects. For more information on ticket purchase, loca-
tion and seating options, please visit www.virginia-
christmasspectacular.com Additional Performances:
Dec. 7-10 at 7:00pm; Dec. 11 at 2pm; Dec. 11 at
6:30pm.
Thursday, December 8, 2011
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 7:00pm-
9:00pm (See description Dec. 7.)
See How They Run from 7:00pm-9:30pm at Heri-
tage High School Pioneer Theatre, 3020 Wards Ferry
Road in Lynchburg. 434-582-1147 ext. 206 www.
lynchburgtickets.com See How They Run is a classic
English comedy in three acts by Philip King. Its title
is a line from the nursery rhyme Three Blind Mice. It
is considered a farce for its tense comic situations
and headlong humour, heavily playing on mistaken
identity, doors, and vicars. Performance Dates: De-
cember 8, 9, 10 at 7pm; December 11 at 2pm. All
Tickets: $5
Romeo & Juliet from 7:30pm-9:30pm (See de-
scription Dec. 2.)
Friday, December 9, 2011
Ellington Fridays from 5:30pm-9:00pm at The El-
lington, 421 Rivermont Ave. in Lynchburg. 434-845-
2162 www.theellington.org Do you want to hear
some of the best local bands and grab a bite to eat
for only 10 bucks? Join your friends to hear Work
Release. Doors open at 5:30pm with music from
6:00pm-9:00pm. Tickets are $10 and available at the
door only. Cash bar available.
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 7:00pm-
9:00pm. (See description Dec. 7.)
See How They Run from 7:00pm-9:30pm. (See
description Dec. 8.)
Romeo & Juliet from 7:30pm-9:30pm. (See de-
scription Dec. 2.)
Friday Salsa Dance Night from 9:00pm-12:00am at
Dance Theatre of Lynchburg, 722 Commerce Street
in Lynchburg. 434-942-1197 Email:lynchburgsalsa@
gmail.com Friday Salsa Dance Night in Downtown
Lynchburg at the Dance Theatre of Lynchburg. A
beginner salsa lesson from 9pm-10pm and social
dancing from 10pm-12am. Cover charge is $5 which
includes the lesson. No smoking or drinking.
- news@lynchburgtimes.com
BLACK
The Lynchburg Times
www.lynchburgtimes.com
Publisher & Editor:
Dan McDermott
dan@lynchburgtimes.com
Advertising Sales Manager:
Angie Buterakos
angie@LynchburgTimes.com
540-683-9197
Senior Political Writer:
Emily Williams
emily@lynchburgtimes.com
Features Writer:
Benjamin Shelton
ben@lynchburgtimes.com
Two Locations:
20584 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg
4744 S. Amherst Hwy., Madison Heights
countrycookin.com
G
i
f
t
We Host & Cater
Holiday Parties!
Buy
$
50
$
10
FREE
Bonus Card
Get a
C
a
r
d
s
Richard E. Turner, MBA
Accounting
and
Tax Preparation
434-420-2683
or
returner1964@gmail.com
Iage 4 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
Saturday, December 10, 2011
Lunch with Santa from 11:00am-1:00pm at
Wingate By Wyndham, 3777 Candlers Mtn. Rd.
in Lynchburg. www.wingatehotels.com For the
second year in a row, the Wingate by Wyndham
is hosting Lunch with Santa. Children who bring
a new, unwrapped gift for Toys for Tots will enjoy
crafts with Santas Elves, arts & crafts, a special
lunch including our famous fresh baked cookies
and a personal visit with Santa. Professional pho-
tos by The Portrait Place will also be available for
$12.95 (Photos are optional).
Christmas Times a Coming Open House from
12:00pm-5:00pm at Peaks of Otter Winery, 2122
Sheep Creek Road in Bedford. 540-586-3707
Email:appleseed@earthlink.net Website:www.
peaksofotterwinery.com Warm apple cinnamon
wine and cider will be in the wine tasting room.
Gift packs of wine and canned products will make
wonderful Christmas gifts. FREE. You may bring
your own glass, purchase a souvenir glass or
taste out of a free plastic cup. Visit the Christmas
lights at the Elks National Home in The Christ-
mas Capital of Virginia.
Wreaths Across America from 12:00pm-2:00pm
at Old City Cemetery, 401 Taylor Street in Lynch-
burg. 434-847-1465 Email:occ@gravegarden.
org www.gravegarden.org This special ceremony
honors all veterans who have served in times of
war and peace. After a brief service, attendees
lay evergreen wreaths on hundreds of veterans
graves in the Cemetery.
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 2:00pm-
4:00pm. (See description Dec. 7.)
Romeo & Juliet from 2:00pm-4:00pm. (See
description Dec. 2.)
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 7:00pm-
9:00pm. (See description Dec. 7.)
See How They Run from 7:00pm-9:30pm.
(See description Dec. 8.)
A FACination Christmas from 7:30pm-10:00pm
at Academy of Fine Arts, 600 Main Street in
Lynchburg. 434-846-8499 Email:info@Academy-
FineArts.com www.academyfinearts.com Songs
of the Holiday, Cocoa with peppermint sticks,
Christmas Cheer, and a Surprise Guest abound
in this chorus frolic through this magic season.
Romeo & Juliet from 7:30pm-9:30pm. (See
description Dec. 2.)
Sunday, December 11, 2011
Christmas at Historic Sandusky from 1:00am-
6:00pm at Historic Sandusky, 757 Sandusky Dr.
in Lynchburg. 434-832-0162 www.HistoricSan-
dusky.org Enjoy Christmas at Historic Sandusky
with Book signings, house tours, Victorian deco-
rations, and Santa Claus! Great Christmas Gifts!
Book Signings: Jim Elson: Lynchburg, Virginia:
the first 200 years from 1pm-2pm. Dr. James I.
Robertson, Jr.: The Untold Civil War from 4pm-
6pm. Get your copy of Hunters Raid!
Holiday Tours from 10:00am-4:00pm at Thomas
Jeffersons Poplar Forest, 1542 Bateman Bridge
Road in Forest. 434-525-1806 Email:events@
poplarforest.org www.poplarforest.org Tours will
focus on holiday traditions and dining in the early
19th-century. Museum Shop open for holiday
shopping.
A FACination Christmas from 2:00pm-4:30pm.
(See description Dec. 10.)
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 2:00pm-
4:00pm. (See description Dec. 7.)
See How They Run from 2:00pm-4:30pm.
(See description Dec. 8.)
VA Christmas Spectacular 2011 from 6:30pm-
8:30pm. (See description Dec. 7.)
Saturday, December 17, 2011
Holiday Open House from 1:00am-4:00pm at
Old City Cemetery, 401 Taylor Street in Lynch-
burg. 434-847-1465 Email:occ@gravegarden.
org www.gravegarden.org The Cemeterys his-
toric museums will be open to the public and
decorated for the holidays with greenery from the
grounds. Enjoy mulled cider and cookies in the
Cemetery Center.
Christmas Times a Coming Open House from
12:00pm-5:00pm at Peaks of Otter Winery, 2122
Sheep Creek Road in Bedford. 540-586-3707
Email:appleseed@earthlink.net www.peaksofot-
terwinery.com Warm apple cinnamon wine and
cider will be in the wine tasting room. Gift packs
of wine and canned products will make wonderful
Christmas gifts. FREE. You may bring your own
glass, purchase a souvenir glass or taste out of a
free plastic cup. Visit the Christmas lights at the
Elks National HOme in The Christmas Capital
of Virginia
Dancing with Strings and Christmas Things
from 7:30pm-10:00pm at Academy of Fine Arts,
600 Main Street in Lynchburg. 434-846-8499
Email:info@AcademyFineArts.com www.acade-
myfinearts.com Exquisite dancers, fine musicians
and angelic voices in this Holiday sensation.
Sunday, December 18, 2011
Dancing with Strings and Christmas Things
from 2:00pm-4:00pm. (See description Dec. 17.)
- news@lynchburgtimes.com
BLACK
Ever Consider a Reverse Mort-
gage? At least 62 years old? Stay
in your home & Increase cash
flow! Safe & Effective! Call Now
for your FREE DVD! Call Now
888-830-3993
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed Ca-
nadian mail order pharmacy will
provide you with savings of up to
90 percent on all your medication
needs. Call Today 888-604-5084
for $25.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
MIGHTY BITE. The ONLY Proven
5-Sense` Fishing Lure System!
Great for Fresh & Saltwater Fish-
ing. Kit Includes over 100 Pieces!
Only $19.95 (plus S&H.) Call 1-
888-656-7759 Today!
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA
SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get
FREE CPAP Replacement Sup-
plies at NO COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores and bacterial infec-
tion! Call 888-841-1376
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY
BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us
Nothing. Contact Disability Group,
Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call
For Your FREE Book & Consulta-
tion. 888-841-6647
FAST IRS TAX RELIEF. Do You
Owe $10,000 or MORE to the
IRS? We Help You Settle Your
Overdue Taxes for LESS! FREE
Consultation! 888-842-2175
Attention Joint & Muscle Pain Suf-
ferers: Clinically proven all-natural
supplement helps reduce pain
and enhance mobility. Call 888-
657-2704 to try Hydraflexin RISK-
FREE for 90 days.
DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/
month PLUS 30 Premium Movie
Channels FREE for 3 Months!
SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL - 888-626-2356
ATTENTION Diabetics with Medi-
care! Join America`s Diabetic
Savings Club and receive a FREE
diabetic bracelet. Membership
is FREE. Qualify for meter up-
grades, prescription delivery and
free giveaways. Call 1-888-847-
7064
READERS & MUSIC LOVERS.
100 Greatest Novels (audio
books) ONLY $99.00 (plus s h.)
Includes MP3 Player & Accesso-
ries. BONUS: 50 Classical Music
Works & Money Back Guarantee.
Call Today! 1-888-657-2542
VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS
20mg!! 40 Pills 4 FREE for only
$99. #1 Male Enhancement, Dis-
creet Shipping. Only $2.70/pill.
Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-888-836-
1937
Diabetes/Cholesterol/Weight Loss
Natural Product for Cholesterol,
Blood Sugar and weight. Physi-
cian recommended, backed by
Human Clinical Studies with fast
acting results within 30 days. Call
to hear about our special offer
888-846-8029
VONAGE Unlimited Calls in
U.S. & 60 Countries! NO AN-
NUAL CONTRACT! $14.99 For 3
Months! Then ONLY $25.99/mo.
Plus FREE Activation. Call 888-
840-5345
INTRODUCING 100% guaran-
teed, delivered-to-the-door, World
Port Seafood, an Omaha Steaks
company ONLY $49.99 - The
Seafood Lover`s Catch, filled with
premium quality, wild caught cus-
tomer favorites. 1-888-703-6721
mention code 2325TMC or www.
WorldPortSeafood.com/wp22
100% Guaranteed Omaha Steaks
- SAVE 64% on the Family Value
Collection. NOW ONLY $49.99
Plus 3 FREE GIFTS & right-to-the-
door delivery in a reusable cooler,
ORDER Today. 1-888-729-4210
and mention code 45069SQY or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/fvc78
RED ENVELOPE - Unique & Per-
sonalized Gifts for All Your Friends
& Family! Starting at $19.95. Visit
www.redenvel ope.com/Great-
value for an extra 20% off or Call
1-888-707-5566
Mouthwatering gourmet straw-
berry gifts fresh for all occasions!
100% satisfaction guaranteed.
Delivered nationwide. SAVE 20%
on Dipped Berries! Visit www.ber-
ries.com/heart or Call 1-888-722-
7085
PROFLOWERS. Send Flowers
for Every Occasion! Anniversary,
Birthday, Just Because. Starting
at just $19.99. Go to www.proflow-
ers.com/Cheer to receive an extra
20% off your order or Call 1-888-
712-0053
Ads: angie@lynchburgtimes.com
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 5 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
Handcrafted Sterling Silver
& Gold filled Jewelry
Designer/Owner Margi Murphy
(434)386-7706
(Website)http://glamandglitz.artfire.com
DESIGNS
LITZ
AND
LAM
G
G
Professional Disc Jockey Service
for Weddings, Reunions, Birthdays,
Anniversaries and Special Events.
Solid Gold Time Machine
434 528-3553 richard@sgtm.biz
On the web: www.sgtm.biz
Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0811
1-888-626-2356
30 Premium Channels
for 3 Months!
SAME DAY
INSTALLATION
in up to 6 rooms
CALL TODAY -
INSTALLED TODAY!
Where available.
Multi-Sport Pack featuring
Available with our Most Popular Packages through 1/4/12
Watch Every Touchdown from
Every Game, Every Sunday Afternoon.
Packages starting at:
PACKAGES
UNDER
$
50
Local Channels
Included!
FIVE
For 12 months
MO
Prices valid for rst 12 months.
Requires 24 month Agreement. with 24 month Agreement.
Call Now and Save Over $750 this year on TV!
AUTHORIZED RETAILER
With qualifying programming you will receive Multi-Sport Pack programming through 1/04/12. Qualifying programming packages include Americas Top 120 Plus, Americas Top
200, Americas Top 250, DishLATINO Dos, DishLATINO Max, DISH America Silver, and DISH America Gold. You will forfeit programming if you do not maintain a qualifying
programming package. You must call to continue subscription at the end of promotional period. 2011 NFL Enterprises LLC. NFL and the NFL Shield design are registered
trademarks of the National Football League.Oer valid for Blockbuster By Mail 1 Disc plan; requires activation of new qualifying DISH Network service between5/18/11 and
1/31/12 and an online DISH Network account. Blockbuster By Mail account will require valid email address and major credit card. You must redeem oer within 45 days of DISH
Network service order. At end of 3 months you will be charged then-current price unless you cancel Blockbuster By Mail service. You can exchange online rentals for 5 in-store
movie rentals per billing month. Exchanges are only valid at participating BLOCKBUSTER stores. Existing Blockbuster By Mail customers are not eligible. This oer is not available
in Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands. BLOCKBUSTER name, design and related marks are trademarks of Blockbuster L.L.C. 2011 Blockbuster L.L.C. Premium Movie Package
oer ends 9/30/11. Oer value is up to $126; after 3 months then-current price applies unless you downgrade. HBO, Cinemax and related channels and service marks are the
property of Home Box Oce, Inc. Starz and related channels and service marks are the property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. SHOWTIME and related marks are registered
trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. Digital Home Advantage plan requires 24-month agreement and credit qualication. Cancellation fee of $17.50/month
remaining applies if service is terminated before end of agreement. After 12 months of programming credits, then-current price will apply. $10/mo HD add-on fee waived for life
of current account; requires 24-month agreement, continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing. Free Standard Professional Installation only. All equipment is leased
and must be returned to DISH Network upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Limit 6 leased tuners per account; upfront and monthly fees may apply based on
type and number of receivers. HD programming requires HD television. Prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Oer available for new and qualied
former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer agreements. Additional restrictions may apply. Oer ends 1/31/12. All new customers
are subject to a one time non-refundable processing fee.
Meet one Virginia Marine about to spend Christmas in Afghanistan
By Dan McDermott
Te Lynchburg Times
As we enjoy Tanksgiving and Christmas
with our families here in the United States, we
thought it would be a good idea to remember
the young men and women who serve in our
armed forces and cant be with their families
this holiday season.
2007 James Wood High School graduate
Matthew Miller, of Winchester, will turn 23
years old on January 4. Hell be celebrating it at
Camp Bastion, Afghanistan where he is a U.S.
Marine Corporal currently serving as a Mobile
Facility Repairman with Marine Aviation Lo-
gistics Squadron 40.
I spoke with Cpl. Miller via the technical
operations center of the Defense Video & Im-
agery Distribution System just days before the
news broke of increasingly strained relations
between the United States and Afghanistans
neighbor Pakistan.
Te Lynchburg Times: What prompted you to
enlist in the Marine Corps?
Cpl. Matthew Miller: Well my moms side of
the family had a collective 97 years of service
in the Navy and they really wanted me to go
that route and complete the 100 years but from
all the challenges I had heard about the Marine
Corps I was drawn in that direction.
LT: I know you are a mechanic. What exactly
do you do there?
MM: Right now we work on generators to sup-
ply power. We assist all the other squadrons
with aircraft to keep them fying. We also work
on air conditioning units in the shelters the
other marines work out of . Tey have to keep
certain equipment within certain temperature
ranges.
LT: When did you join and when did you get
overseas?
MM: I took the summer after high school to
have some fun before I went to boot camp. I
was in the delayed entry program. From boot
camp I went to school down in Pensacola, FL
for about 7 months then I was in Cherry Point,
NC for about two months and fnally to my sta-
tion which is Marine Corps Air Station New
River in Jacksonville, NC. Late last year I went
to Pakistan for three months on a humanitar-
ian mission and now I am in Afghanistan.
LT: How do you celebrate Tanksgiving and
Christmas when you are on a base in Afghani-
stan?
MM: Well they have some nice Tanksgiving
dinners at the chow halls. My unit actually has
a competition where they try to make the best
looking and best tasting meal out of MREs. It
is us and nine others. We call it Iron Chef Af-
ghanistan.
LT: How is the food on the base? Is it good?
MM: Its edible. (laughter)
LT: How does it feel having to spend the holi-
days away from your family?
MM: Well you get kind of lonely around the
holidays but I know what my job is out here.
I know what Im supposed to be doing and I
know when I get back Ill be able to have great
moments like I would having Tanksgiving
Dinner with the family.
LT: What do you feel you are accomplishing
in Afghanistan? What diference are you mak-
ing?
MM: I would say our main mission over here
is to win the hearts and minds of the locals and
what I have read in the newspapers and such I
believe we are doing a good job.
LT: Do you think most of the locals you en-
counter are glad we are there or do they want
us to leave tomorrow?
MM: Te ones I have come into contact with,
they support what we are doing over here. Te
majority are really friendly, really talkative.
LT: How much interaction with the locals do
you have in your job? Are you stuck on a base
or do you get to go into town?
MM: Im stuck on base right now. Te only
time we get interaction with Afghans is when
we get on the bus or go to chow hall.
LT: Tell me something about living in Paki-
stan and Afghanistan that most Americans
wouldnt know.
MM: Well, I knew it was hot but personally
I dont think people know just how hot it is
during the summer. When I frst got here it
was 120-130 degrees and the sun was beating
down on me pretty hard.
LT: What is the humidity?
See MARINE, 7
This could be your ad
for just $38
Advertise in The Lynchburg Times
and reach 35,000 readers!
Were in every McDonalds, Kroger &
lots of other places
angie@lynchburgtimes.com
540-683-9197
Iage 6 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
COLOR
Think. Feel. Ride.
^
Dec. 3 December DeMoss Rail Jam
Feb. 18 February DeMoss Rail Jam
Have a birthday or event coming up?
Book our facility!
JOIN US THIS WINTER
FOR FUN ON LIBERTY MOUNTAIN!

(434) 582-3539
>D^
>D^
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 7 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
COLOR
MENS HOME SCHEDULE
Dec. 6 UNC Wilmington 7PM
Dec. 10 Virginia Intermont 7PM
Dec. 17 Hampton 7PM
Dec. 20 Montreat 7PM
Dec. 31 Charleston Southern
X
2PM
Jan. 2 Presbyterian College 7PM
Jan. 12 Radford 7PM
Jan. 14 Winthrop 7PM
X
Game will be played at Randolph College/
game ticket required
For tickets call 434-582-SEAT (7328)
MM: Pretty much zero. It is really dry heat. It
is about 45 degrees now. Te coldest it gets is
around 30.
LT: Do you feel relatively safe where you are?
MM: Well it wasnt exactly too dangerous but
we had indirect fre a few weeks ago. It was a
mortar round that landed on our compound.
It was about 20-30 yards from where I was. I
didnt explode but it went through some metal
material the marines use for runways. It land-
ed right beside the compound and everyone
was shook up but then we went back to doing
what we do.
LT: What goes through your head when some-
thing like that happens?
MM: Luckily for me I was of shift when it
happened. I was already back in my room but
when I came and saw exactly what it did it
made me realize that I know that Im here in a
dangerous area but Im here to do my job and
make sure it gets done.
LT: Early in the war there were news reports of
families buying all sorts of things for the sol-
diers, even armor. How well equipped are you.
Are there things you need?
MM: Te gear I have been issued is all top-of-
the-line stuf. Its what everyone else is issued.
I dont know why they were saying there were
armor issues. We do get care packages. I know
one marine who talked to his father back home
in Washington and all he wanted for Christ-
mas was Christmas lights. So we got all these
boxes of Christmas lights and were going to
decorate it up and take pictures and send them
back to the newspapers back home and show
them exactly how we are doing.
LT: If some folks would like to send you some-
thing, what would it be and where should they
send it?
MM: Well we have a mailing address for care
packages. It is Corporal Matthew R. Miller,
MALS 40, DET A, Work Center 990, Unit
78369, FPO AE 09510.
LT: What would be good send. Obviously
chocolate wouldnt work if it gets that hot but
what do you not have that would be a good
idea?
MM: Well I know were all big fans of jerky.
Tere are a lot of hunters in my family so
theyre going to be sending me deer jerky here
soon. We get some creative packages that come
in. We get letters from the elementary school
kids and the little pictures that they draw. We
try to respond back but we get so many in that
it is hard to keep up with them and still get our
work done.
LT: How long does it take for a package to ar-
rive?
MM: It is about a week or two depending on
the mail.
LT: How do you communicate with your fam-
ily? I know we are speaking through a military
communications network. Do you have inter-
net access?
MM: Yes, I contact my wife through email and
I usually call my immediate family once or
twice a week depending on how busy we are.
LT: Any fnal thoughts to share?
MM: I wish everyone a great holiday. Tey
should spend it wisely with their family and
enjoy the moments. Tere are a lot of people
who are over here and cant get home and
would gladly trade places in a second to be
back with their families.
dan@lynchburgtimes.com
MARINE, from 5
250 Old Town Connector Madison Heights, VA
Car and Van Rental and Sales
434-528-4111
www.amcar-rental.com
sales@amcar-rental.com
Locally owned and operated by Bert & Bonnie Limbrick
Our vehicles need new owners
why not call and
2001 Ford Taurus
2009 Kia Rio LX
Iage 8 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
V
o
t
e
d
Top Ten N
atural
Pain Reliever, Consum
er
Health D
igest
Introducing Hydrafexin:
Thousands report end of pain and
infammation, new fexibility and
no side-efects.

Back Pain
Gone!
*

Knee & Leg
Pain Gone!
*
Finger
& Wrist Pain
Gone!
*
Hips
Shoulder
& Elbow Pain
Gone!
*
Say Good Bye Forever To Joint
& Muscle Pain
I no longer wake up stif!
Hydrafexin means I no longer wake
up stif or with pain in my knee.
~ Lolita R., Palos Heights, IL
Call today to fnd out how you can get a
FREE bottle of Hydrafexin.
You have nothing to lose but your pain.
Not available in stores.
888-657-2704
24 hours 7 days a week
* This product has not been reviewed or evaluated by the U.S. Food &
Drug Adminstration. This product is not intended to treat, diagnose
or cure any disease or illness.
** A testimonial represents the experience of just one person. Your
experience or result may be diferent. We look forward to hearing
fromyou.
*** This ofer is limited to one bottle per US household
2 Capsules Daily
Is All That It Takes
To Get The Relief
You Deserve!
Biocentric Health, 2009. All rights reserved.
Five Colleges of study.
One clear focus:
Your career success.
*DeVry University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association, www.ncahlc.org. In NewYork, DeVry University operates as DeVry College of NewYork.
DeVry University operates as DeVry Institute of Technology in Calgary, Alberta. DeVry is certifed to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. AC0060. DeVry University is
authorized for operation by the THEC. www.state.tn.us/thec. Nashville Campus - 3343 Perimeter Hill Dr., Nashville, TN 37211 Programavailability varies by location. Viewour privacy policy at
http://www.devry.edu/devry_privacy_policy.jsp. 2010 DeVry Educational Development Corp. All rights reserved.
DeVry University is an accredited* university offering you the fexibility of
90+ locations, online courses and a wide variety of associate, bachelors
and masters degree programs. Whether you earn your degree on campus,
online, or through a combination of both, youll fnd small classes and
personal attention from experienced and respected professors focused
on one thing your educational and career success. Discover education
working at DeVry University.
Take the frst step toward a university education:
CALL TODAY TO APPLY NOW!
888-831-6217
LEARN MORE. IT ONLY TAKES A PHONE CALL
888-831-6217
McDonnells reform measures have little budget impact
By Bill McMorris
Virginia Statehouse News
Gov. Bob McDonnell released a furry of re-
form proposals aimed at streamlining govern-
ment, but his plan would do little to reduce a
state budget gap of $1.5 billion.
Te governor endorsed several proposals
Nov. 29 put forward by his hand-picked Com-
mission on Government Reform and Restruc-
turing.
Te governors ofce claimed the plan to
eliminate or merge more than 50 state boards
and agencies would save around $2 million. Te
details behind how it arrived at the number,
however, proved murky.
We are fne-tuning the individual numbers,
but we are confdent the total will be greater
than $2 million, said Jef Palmore, McDonnells
deputy policy adviser who served as executive
director to the commission.
Commission members said cost cutting was a
secondary factor behind their proposals.
We were more concerned about making the
services more accessible, commission member
Jack Rust said.
Rust pointed to the merger of the Department
of Aging, Department of Rehabilitative Services
and adult protection programs operating under
the Department of Social Services as an exam-
ple of increased accessibility. A senior citizen in
need of home care could register with the post-
merger Department for the Aging and Rehabili-
tative Services rather than separately approach
the departments of Aging and Social Services.
McDonnells plan would eliminate the Vir-
ginia National Defense Industrial Authority, or
VNDIA, and Board of Towing and Recovery
Operators, or BTRO, as well as 19 boards.
Te agency eliminations and mergers will
produce the most savings, Palmore said. Some
will be realized in this coming budget because
if theres a duplication of function, they will
streamline quickly.
Te governor warned that some reforms
could produce layofs, but his plan would af-
fect a handful of state workers. VNDIA employs
three people and BTRO, four.
VNDIA Executive Director Stan Scott said
the future of the program will not be known.
Te reform commission made the same rec-
ommendation last year, but the General Assem-
bly did not act on it, he said. If they do pass it,
our role would likely be taken over by the Sec-
retary of Veterans Afairs and Homeland Secu-
rity.
Te 19 boards the governor has proposed
eliminating would not afect employment since
board members are not paid and have other em-
ployment in the public or private sector.
Commission members told Virginia State-
house News that the commission did not know
exact cost-savings details or layof estimates for
all of its proposals. Commission Chairman Fred
Malek said the fgure sounded like a ballpark es-
timate.
I think $2 million was the minimum the gov-
ernors people could put their arms around, said
Malek, who was at McDonnells side in Orlando
for a Republican Governors Association confer-
ence.
Tere could be short-term costs associated
with the reforms, including the acquisition of
ofce space, new letterhead and moving of per-
sonnel. Te governors ofce has yet to make
these estimates.
Tere will certainly be transactional costs
with mergers, but we think there will be net sav-
ings in the end, Palmore said. We dont have
the details fnalized.
In addition to the Reform Commissions pro-
posals, the governor has asked state agencies
to draw up plans for spending cuts of 2, 4 and
6 percent. Te proposed agency mergers and
eliminations will not afect the budgeting in
place.
Until we get this done, the individual agen-
cies will have to prepare their own cuts, but if a
merger happens, I expect they would do so un-
der a unifed department, Rust said.
Department of Rehabilitative Services Com-
missioner Jim Rothrock said the proposed
merger may end up increasing the budget share
of elderly services, rather than lead to cost cut-
ting. Adult services under the Department of
Social Services attracted about $7 million in
state and federal spending in 2011.
Rothrock said that once these services are
lumped together with the $43 million budgets
of rehabilitative services and aging, lawmakers
will be more inclined to increase spending on
the program.
Te consolidated forces will ensure there will
be more of a magnet for (budget) attention, he
said.
Te governor created the 32-member reform
commission after taking ofce in January. Te
committees primary task is creating efcien-
cies in state government, including streamlin-
ing, consolidating, or eliminating redundant
and unnecessary agency services, according to
its report.
Te American Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees, which represents
several thousand state employees but carries no
collective bargaining rights, did not return calls
for comment.
Te General Assembly will consider McDon-
nells reform measures when it reconvenes on
Jan. 11. Te governor is working on his frst two-
year budget.
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 9 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
The ideal candidates will be organized and self-motivated. Great people
skills and a professional demeanor are key. This indiviual should enjoy the
freedom of setting his or her own hours and meeting new people. Previous sales
experience is a plus, but not necessary. The candidate must be dependable ,
reliable and self-starter. Applicant must be able to track customer payments, work
well with others and be customer oriented. If you want a position where you
can set your own hours and earn great commissions, please send us your recent
work experience. Start selling immediately. Only serious inquires please. This is a
commission-based position with excellent earnings potential.
Email angie@lynchburgtimes.com
Advertising Representative
Not a high-priced consolidation loan or one of those
consumer credit counseling programs
Credit Card relief
for your free consultation Call 888-644-3437
Not available in all states
buried
debt?
credit in
card
Over $10,000 in credit card bills?
Cant make the minimum payments?
We can get you out of debt quickly
We can save you thousands of dollars
We can help you avoid bankruptcy

By Benjamin Shelton
Te Lynchburg Times
On November 2, the Lynchburg Regional
Chamber of Commerce received 5-star ac-
creditation from the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce for the second time.
It frst received the distinction in 2006,
placing it in the top 1% of approximately
7,000 Chambers nationwide and the top .5%
which have managed to do it twice. 18 oth-
ers also received accreditation, including 9
that also earned fve stars.
Accreditation validates a chamber as
having programs that beneft their local
economy and for positively infuencing their
community, said Raymond P. Towle, IOM,
CAE, U.S. Chamber Executive Director of
Political Afairs and Federation Relations.
We call it the Good Housekeeping seal
of approval, said Rex Hammond, president
and CEO of the Lynchburg Chamber of
Commerce.
Despite the prestige, only 234 Chambers
are currently accredited.
Most chambers have elected not to go
through it. I think thats unfortunate. I would
assure any one of those chambers that they
would be better for the experience, said
Hammond.
Te Danville, Pittsylvania and Halifax
County Chambers are the only other 5-star
accredited Chambers in Virginia.
Hammond described the application as
a lengthy, introspective process which in-
volves both objective measurements and es-
says.
Te application can take six months to a
year to complete and accreditation must be
renewed every fve years.
Our goal in the accreditation process is to
be the best we can possibly be. Te Chamber
needs to attempt to be as good as our com-
munity and members are, said Hammond.
Hammond stressed that he tries to meet
the needs of the 900 business members of
the Chamber and claimed the Lynchburg
Chamber has a good reputation nationwide
for its public policy initiatives.
I would be proud to work with any other
Chamber in Virginia to get that accredita-
tion. We dont compete against other com-
munities, said Hammond and claims the
Lynchburg Chamber has already started
working on the next application.
ben@lynchburgtimes.com
Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce earns 5-star accreditation
Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce earned 5-star accreditation for the sec-
ond time.
A celebration of Kwanzaa
Te Legacy Museum of African Ameri-
can History ofers two opportunities for the
public to learn about and plan for Kwanzaa,
a craft workshop from 10:30-1:30 Saturday,
December 10 and an Open House from 2:00
to 4:00 Sunday December 11. Both events
will be held at the Legacy Activity Center,
415 Monroe ST..
Kwanzaa is an African American celebra-
tion of family, community, and culture that
traces its origins to the frst harvest festivals
held throughout Africa. Its name is derived
from the Swahili phrase for frst fruits, ma-
tunda ya kwanzaa. It is celebrated through-
out the African diaspora from December 26
through January 1.
Legacy celebrates Kwanzaa as part of its
mission to stimulate an appreciation of the
diversity of the African American experi-
ence.
At the craft workshop for children and
families participants will learn about the
seven principles of Kwanzaa while they de-
sign and make Kwanzaa gifts using stamps
of Ghanaian adinkra symbols. Te Open
House on Sunday December 11 will fea-
ture information, displays of home decora-
tions, and refreshments. Special Kwanzaa
wreaths will be sold to beneft the Museum.
Te Museum featuring the retrospective ex-
hibit, Celebrating Commuity! Te Legacy
Museums First Ten Years will also be open
at those times.
Both programs will be held at the Legacy
Activity Center, 415 Monroe ST. Tey are
free and open to all. For information and
reservations for the workshop, call the Mu-
seum at 434-845-3455.
Iage 1O The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
HelpProtectYourHomeandFamily HelpProtectYourHomeandFamily
Ahomeisburglarizedevery9.1seconds,dontletyoursbethenext!
FREE
At no cost to you for parts and activation with only a $99 installation fee
and the purchase of alarm monitoring services. Terms & Conditions below.
Mon-Fri 8am - 11pm - Sat 9am- 8pm - Sun 10am - 6pm EST
Home Security System! Home Security System!
$99.00 Customer Installation Charge. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $35.99 per month ($1,295.64). Form of payment must be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or
savings account. Offer applies to homeowners only. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. Certain restrictions may apply. Offer valid for newADTAuthorized Dealer
customers only and not on purchases fromADT Security Services, Inc. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Licenses: AL-10-1104, AZ-ROC217517, CA-ACO6320,
CT-ELC.0193944-L5, DE-07-212, FL-EC13003427, EC13003401, GA-LVA205395, IA-AC-0036, ID-39131, IL-127.001042, IN-City of Indianapolis: 93294, KY-City of Louisville: 483, LA-F1082,
MA-1355C, MD-107-1375, Baltimore County: 1375, Calvert County: ABL00625, Caroline County: 1157, Cecil County: 541-L, Charles County: 804, Dorchester County: 764, Frederick County: F0424,
Harford County: 3541, Montgomery County: 1276, Prince Georges County: 685, Queen Annes County: L156, St. Marys County: LV2039R, Talbot County: L674, Wicomico County: 2017, Worcester
County: L1013, MI-3601205773, MN-TS01807, MO-City of St. Louis: CC354, St. Louis County: 47738, MS-15007958, MT-247, NC-25310-SP-LV, 1622-CSA, NE-14451, NJ-34BF00021800,
NM-353366, NV-68518, City of Las Vegas: B14-00075-6-121756, C11-11262-L-121756, NY-Licensed by the N.Y.S. Department of State UID#12000286451, OH-53891446, City of Cincinnati: AC86,
OK-1048, OR-170997, Pennsylvania Home Improvement Contractor Registration Number: PA22999, RI-3428, SC-BAC5630, TN-C1164, C1520, TX-B13734, UT-6422596-6501, VA-115120,
VT-ES-2382, WA-602588694/PROTEYH934RS, WI-City of Milwaukee: 0001697, WV-042433, WY-LV-G-21499. For full list of licenses visit our website www.protectyourhome.com. Protect Your Home
3750 Priority Way South Dr., Ste 200, Indianapolis, IN 46240. "Crime data taken from http://ovc.ncjrs.gove/ncvrw2008/pdf/crime_clock_eng.pdf"
Call Now and Help Protect Your Family!
850 Value!
$
24/7 PROTECTION only
$35.99/mo.
Get up to a 20% DISCOUNT
on home owners insurance!
FREE wireless remote
control with PANIC BUTTON!
1-888-629-9692
Available two-way voice that allows
you to instantly communicate with
an ADT Security Specialist.
Train fatality
Te Amherst County Sherifs Ofce investigated
a fatal pedestrian / train crash on River Road in
Madison Heights.
At 10:45 p.m. Nov. 17, fve Liberty University
students were caught out on the river road rail-
road trestle by a train headed north into Amherst
County from Lynchburg. Te fve freshman college
students had apparently walked onto the trestle to
watch the stars.
As a result of injuries received when struck by the
train, 18 year old Hannah Emmaline Williams, of
Sanford North Carolina was killed. Additionally, 18
year old Juianne Ashbaugh, of Temple Georgia was
treated by Lynchburg General for critical injuries
she received when falling from the trestle.
Treated for minor injuries were; Patrick Marshall,
an 18 year old male of Yorktown Virginia: Javier Da-
vid Duque, a 19 year old male of Arlington Texas
and Kaitlyn Hermening, an 18 year old female of
Mosinee Wisconsin
Two of the surviving victims were able to jump
to a nearby piling and avoid the train while another
hung down below the track by his arms.
No, you didnt really win that $500,000 sweep-
stakes you never entered
Te Lynchburg Police Department is warning
citizens to beware of recent telephone scams in-
forming potential victims they have won a publish-
ers sweepstakes or other contest with prizes over
$500,000.
One purported scam involved a sweepstakes
publisher, based in Shawnee Mission, Kansas. Te
potential victim was instructed to meet a courier at
her bank to sign a form authorizing them to pay the
taxes out of her winnings. Tis particular fraud
tends to focus on senior citizens.
If a person wins a legitimate contest or sweep-
stakes, they are not required to pay anything up-
front to receive their prize. It is important to note
that you should never give out your banking infor-
mation to anyone over the phone, or sign any legal
documents without frst verifying the contents and
the legitimacy of the business.
Another potential victim was notifed that she had
won $2.5 million and a new Mercedes. Te potential
victim was advised that all she had to do claim her
prize was to go buy a specifc type of money order
for $150 and then call the initiating party back when
she had purchased it. Clearly, this is a fraud and if
the money order had been purchased, the victim
would have been out of the money once it was sent
to the fraudulent prize company.
As a reminder, never give out personal informa-
tion over the phone to anyone who calls you. You
should not agree to allow a courier to come to your
home to deliver a prize or pick up a check or money
order from you. If you have any questions about
frauds, please contact the Lynchburg Police Depart-
ments Crime Prevention Unit at 455-6070.
Additionally, the Federal Trade Commissions web
site has valuable information to help avoid being the
victim of a scam. Te FTC works to prevent fraud-
ulent, deceptive and unfair business practices and
provides information to help consumers to avoid
them. For more information on consumer issues,
or additional scams, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free,
1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-
653-4261.
Middle School All-District Band Honors

Fifteen Lynchburg City Middle School students
made the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors
Association All-District Band. Auditions were held
at Linkhorne Middle School on November 12. More
than 400 middle school band students traveled from
all over Central Virginia to audition for one of 180
spots in this elite ensemble. Congratulations go out
to the following LCS student musicians:
Anna Beck, Clarinet - LMS, Morgan Bush, Alto
Sax - LMS, Sung min Cho, Clarinet - SMS, Jackson
Cobb, Oboe - DMS, Rhyan Cooper, Alto Sax - LMS,
Isaac Howard, Trombone - SMS, Brandon Johnson,
Baritone - SMS, Allison Johnston, Oboe - LMS,
Daniel Kim, Clarinet - SMS, Sam Lefew, Percussion
- LMS, Riley Millward, Trumpet - LMS, Liam Shee-
han, French Horn - LMS, Jake W. Smith, Percussion
- LMS, Leon Strange, Tuba - LMS, Sarah Wilkins,
Oboe - SMS
Nine die on Va. roads during Tanksgiving
- more than half not wearing seatbelts
Preliminary reports indicate nine individuals lost
their lives in nine trafc crashes during the 2011
Tanksgiving holiday weekend. State Police in-
creased its visibility and trafc enforcement eforts
during the heavily-traveled holiday which began
at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday (Nov. 23) and continued
through midnight, Sunday (Nov. 27). During the
2010 holiday weekend, 10 motorists died in trafc
crashes on Virginias highways.
Of the nine individuals killed during the 2011
Tanksgiving holiday, fve were not wearing seat-
belts.
What makes this so troubling is that law en-
forcement just participated in a statewide Click-It-
or-Ticket project the previous week which is an
educational and enforcement campaign aimed at
increasing seatbelt usage in Virginia, says Colonel
W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superin-
tendent. Sadly, half of the trafc crashes involved
victims who werent buckled up. As we begin this
holiday season, public safety responders are strong-
ly encouraging driver and passenger to take two
seconds and fasten your seatbelt it costs nothing
and could save your life.
Te Tanksgiving holiday crashes occurred in
the counties of Appomattox, Chesterfeld, Hanover,
Henry, Loudoun, Rappahannock and Washington.
Two of the nine fatalities occurred in the cities of
Norfolk and Virginia Beach. One fatality involved
a pedestrian and another involved a motorcyclist.
Alcohol was a factor in two of the crashes. Tose
killed ranged in ages from 17 to 54.
As part of the 2011 Tanksgiving Operation
C.A.R.E. initiative, 75 percent of state polices uni-
formed workforce was on patrol during the fve-day
statistical counting period. Operation C.A.R.E. is
the acronym for Combined Accident Reduction Ef-
fort and is a nationwide, state-sponsored campaign
intended to reduce crashes, fatalities and injuries
caused by speeding, impaired driving and failure to
wear seatbelts by drivers and passengers.
In addition, state police arrested 103 drunk driv-
ers during the Tanksgiving weekend. Troopers
cited 8,526 speeders and 2,898 reckless drivers on
Virginias highways statewide. Another 687 sum-
monses were issued to individuals who failed to
buckle up and 250 child safety-restraints were is-
sued. Troopers also investigated 884 trafc crashes.
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
I feel safe. I am protected. I have Life Alert

.
When
ALONE
I am home
One touch of a button sends help quickly in the event of a medical
emergency, fall, home invasion, re or carbon monoxide poisoning.
For a FREE brochure call:
1-888-622-8144
Now we have two systems available:
Life Alert Classic for seniors
Life Alert 50+ for people 50+
New!
Your choice of help buttons
I've faIIen and I can't get up!

Mouthwatering Gifts
100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Save 20
%
Offer only available at:
www.berries.com/heart
or call 1.888.722.7085
*20% discount will appear upon checkout. Discounts may not be used in conjunction
with other special offers, coupons or discounts. Discount applies to item cost only
and does not include discounts on shipping and handling or taxes. Discount only
applies to items over $29. Valid now through 12/31/2011.
Over 20 Million
Berries,
Hand-Dipped.
James River Day School supports local farmers and healthy eating
By Ben Shelton
Te Lynchburg Times
James River Day School realizes the im-
portance of childrens nutrition. Earlier this
month, it participated in the week-long Farm
to School initiative, which seeks to connect
schools with local and regional farmers to
promote good nutrition, organic foods and
supporting the local farmers.
Every day, students were taught about nu-
trition while being served locally grown items
such as eggs, sausage, apples, pumpkins, whole
grains and sweet potatoes in the cafeteria and
participated in games and activities related to
nutrition.
Its not just delicious and healthy for them
but also fun and educational, said Natalie
Trost, who helped coordinate Farm to School
week.
Tis culminated in a lunch and farmers
market that was open to parents on Friday in
which all the food served was grown or raised
locally.
Several farmers and groups supporting local
farming, including Auburnlea Farms, Lynch-
burg Grows, and Horse & Buggy Produce,
comprised the farmers market where locally
grown foods could be purchased.
I think its very smart to be teaching kids
these habits early, said Bill Varner, a parent of
two JRDS students. Teyre mindful of whats
served in the cafeteria. Te meals here are
very healthy.
Te students seemed to respond positively
to healthy eating.
Tey are into it because its not their par-
ents teaching them said Tifany Tatom, the
JRDS health and wellness nutrionist. Te
whole idea is keeping it fun.
Tatom is working for JRDS to get its own
chef within the next two years and for more
schools in the community to focus on their
students nutrition.
Children and parents enjoy a lunch with ingredients provided entirely by
local farmers.
Mayor Joan Foster drops by the
Farm to School lunch and farmers
market.
Iage 12 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
COLOR
Financial Crutches
Can be Addicting
Three addicting financial habits can cost you ex-
tra money in the long run, according to The National
Foundation for Credit Counseling. Here are the cul-
prits:
Pawn shops will loan money in exchange for an
item you own, such as a television or stereo. Its
considered an easy way to get money, and it can be
addicting because of the immediacy. At the end of
the agreed upon period, you can buy your item back
-- by paying the original amount plus interest. If you
cant pay at that time, you can extend the loan pe-
riod, with additional interest tacked on to the original
amount. The interest rates are more than youd ever
pay at a bank. To break the pawn-shop habit, set
aside money until you accumulate an emergency
fund.
Payday loans can be addictive because of the im-
mediate payoff (you get the cash right now) and the
delayed payback (you write a post-dated check). At
the end of the agreed upon period, the lender will
cash your check -- which is for the amount you bor-
rowed plus interest. As with pawn shops, the inter-
est rates can be astronomical. To break the habit of
using payday lenders, open a savings account at a
credit union. When you need a loan, ask there first.
Rent-to-Own is considered an easy way to get
furniture, televisions, appliances and even com-
puters for your home by making small weekly pay-
ments. As with anything that sounds too good to be
true, once you add up the fees and interest, along
with the payments, you could end up paying five or
six times what you would have paid in a store. To
break the rent-to-own habit, save your money and
buy one item at a time. If you use a credit card,
dont charge more than you can realistically pay off
in three months.
While NFCC doesnt mention it, buying a new ve-
hicle every year can be an addictive habit as well. A
shiny car or truck, without a scratch, with that new-
car smell and brand-new tires -- its easy to want
one in the driveway. The problem is that vehicles
depreciate quickly. The longer you keep a vehicle,
however, the less it depreciates each year. Invest
in a complete vehicle detailing service twice a year,
and keep the vehicle at least three years.
David Uffngton regrets that he cannot personally
answer reader questions, but will incorporate them
into his column whenever possible. Write to him in
care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
!MY(OLMES
*OHN-C#ASLIN
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
WBRG 'IInewest.pdf I/II/?0II 4.04.?0 PM
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 13 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
COLOR
Face Painting
By Shelley
434-609-6161
FOR ANY OCCASION
CHILDRENS BIRTHDAY
PARTIES
AND SPECIAL EVENTS
TWITTER.COM/CENTRA
FACEBOOK.COM/CENTRAFAN
CentraHealth.com
Be Tobacco Free!
Six-week Program
Begins January 5
Thursdays
9 to 10 a.m.
Centras Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program offers this Be
Tobacco Free clinic for people seriously considering a tobacco-
free life. Be Tobacco Free captures both smoking and chewing
tobacco.
Smokeless tobacco users are nine times more likely to
experience receding gums and have about 2.4 times
as many cavities as nonusers.
Using smokeless tobacco is linked to cancers of the
esophagus, larynx and stomach.
Secondhand smoke is responsible for an estimated
3,000 lung cancer deaths among U.S. nonsmokers
each year.
Board Room
The Cardiovascular Group
2410 Atherholt Road
Lynchburg
To register,
call 434.200.3812
and leave a message.
The cost for the six-week program
is $40 per person. Preregistration
is required.
By Peter Smith
Virginia Statehouse News
Virginia will pay nearly $600 million to credi-
tors in 2012 after borrowing record amounts
during the past few years, diverting money from
services and programs facing budget cuts.
Paying down Virginias debt ate up $1.19 bil-
lion over the past two years 3.7 percent of the
$32 billion allocated for the general fund oper-
ating budget over that period.
Legislative analysts for the state Senate Fi-
nance Committee said that number will rise
even more next year.
Bill Echelberger, a Senate fscal analyst, told
lawmakers gathered at the committees fall
retreat that Virginia had seen the four larg-
est tax-supported debt acquisitions in history
during the past four years, including Gov. Bob
McDonnells $600 million transportation pack-
age.
Te large scale borrowing is expected to in-
crease debt payments by $50 million in fscal
2012, which comes as the state prepares for
budget cuts.
McDonnell has asked state agencies for 2 per-
cent to 6 percent across-the-board budget cuts,
exempting Medicaid, kindergarten through
grade 12 education, and higher education from
the austerity measures.
Debt payments bind the hands of budget
writers, because they operate on a fxed sched-
ule, which can detract from government ser-
vices and programs.
A fat debt level could have nearly the state
Department of Corrections from the $60.7 mil-
lion that could be cut from its budget, if 6 per-
cent cuts are enforced. A 6 percent cut across
the board would save $220 million for the up-
coming biennial budget.
Debt has more than doubled in the past six
years, increasing from $5.8 billion in fscal 2005
to $11.9 billion in fscal 2011. Annual interest
payments have increased at an even faster rate
from $236 million in 2005 to a projected $593
million in 2012.
Virginias debt total is among the lowest in
the country, a big reason for its AAA credit
rating. Some budget hawks, however, said the
states fscal picture ignores an issue that could
further strain its ability to pay for services and
programs.
Whats not included in that analysis is $54
billion in unfunded pension obligations, for-
mer Government Accountability auditor Bob
Williams said. Its government accounting
gimmicks that allow them to get away with it
a private company in Virginia would not have
that luxury.
Williams, a former Republican politicians, is
president of State Budget Solutions, a nonparti-
san budget policy group with conservative lean-
ings.
State estimates put the pension debt at about
$20 billion. Williams said his estimate is based
upon the stricter accounting standards required
for the private sector.
Te committees report is based on fscal pro-
jections on recent tax revenue and spending.
Te Debt Capacity Advisory Committee, a
state body that makes recommendations to the
governor on how to issue debt responsibly, will
release its own long-term estimates on Dec. 19.
Virginia debt service begins slow toll on budget
Crime Stoppers
Te Amherst County Sherifs Ofce is
investigating a larceny from the highway /
bridge construction area of Rt. 29 in north-
ern Amherst County.
Over the weekend of Saturday / Sunday
November 19th and 20th, a 500 gallon fuel
tank, with diesel fuel and a pump were tak-
en from the construction area of the Tye
River Bridge in northern Amherst County.
A smaller 100 gallon tank and pump were
also taken during the larceny.
Anyone with any information regarding
this crime or the identity of the suspects
is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-888-
798-5900, visit the Central Virginia Crime
Stoppers website at www.cvcrimestoppers.
org to enter a web tip, or text CVCS plus
your message to 274637. Crime Stoppers
will pay up to $1,000 for information re-
garding this crime. All information is to-
tally confdential.
Iage 14 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
By Peter Smith
Virginia Statehouse News
Virginia lawmakers could call the day before
Tanksgiving Black Wednesday as a fed-
eral debt committees failure means the state
must face a $500 billion cut in federal defense
spending that could hurt jobs, revenue and its
AAA credit rating.
Te General Assembly and Gov. Bob Mc-
Donnell already face a potential $1 billion to
$1.5 billion budget shortfall for the 2012-2014
budget, according to Senate and House Finance
Committee estimates. Te super committees
failure could further strain the tight budget.
Nobody really knows what to expect, Sen-
ate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Col-
gan, D-Manassas, said. Tis is going to make
our job harder, because the cuts are not going
to happen tomorrow its going to happen by
early 2013 and thats when well know how
this all afects Virginia.
Analysts for the Senate Finance Commit-
tee told lawmakers at the committees recent
retreat in Fairfax that Virginia stands to lose
than 70,000 jobs, reducing sales and income
tax levels needed to fund the 2012-2014 bud-
get. Federal grants and contracts also make up
26.1 percent, or $10.8 billion, of Virginias $41
billion in revenue for fscal 2011. And no one
knows which, if any, of these programs will be
spared from the federal budget ax.
Virginia has weathered the Great Reces-
sion better than most states and the nation as
a whole. Te state has the 10th lowest unem-
ployment rate at 6.5 percent, compared with 9
percent for the United States in October, ac-
cording to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
McDonnell, a Republican, said Tuesday that
the United States cannot support a $15 trillion
debt, but he opposed the steep defense cuts.
Te day of reckoning is here, the bills are
due, and we have got to fnd ways to reduce
spending, McDonnell said. But we certainly
cannot sacrifce the security of the United
States in the process.
Te congressional super committee of six
Republicans and six Democrats failed to fnd
$1.2 trillion in cuts over the next 10 years by
Wednesdays deadline as required by the Bud-
get Control Act of 2011, or BCA. Now the
BCA will trigger those cuts automatically, with
50 percent from defense spending and 50 per-
cent from domestic spending. Te BCA was
created as a compromise to raise the federal
debt ceiling in August.
Congresss fght over the debt ceiling spooked
markets in July and August, and wiped out $3
billion from Virginias $50 billion pension sys-
tem, which is $19.9 billion underfunded, ac-
cording to some estimates.
However, Matt Mitchell, an economist with
the states Joint Advisory Board of Economists
and senior fellow at George Mason Universi-
tys Mercatus Center, said Virginias pain from
federal cuts could be good in the long run.
No economy can be really healthy, if its
dependent on one source, he said. Arizona,
Florida and Nevada depended heavily on the
housing sector, and looked great until the
bubble burst. Virginia has a federal bubble, be-
cause it is just not sustainable.
Te credit rating agency Moodys assigned
Virginia a negative outlook on its AAA debt
rating in August, when the United States
seemed headed for a frst-time national default
on its $15 trillion debt. Moodys cited Virgin-
ias connection to the federal economy as the
reason.
A credit downgrade could make debt service
even costlier than the $593 million price tag
that state legislative analysts project for fscal
2012. Debt service ate up $1.19 billion, or 3.7
percent, of the $32 billion in the 2010-2012
general fund operating budget.
Colgan said lawmakers, despite the challeng-
es, will make ends meet, when they reconvene
Jan. 11, but the diference will come from state
agencies and programs, since Republicans op-
pose tax increases.
We can balance the budget, but its going to
be awfully tight, he said.
McDonnell has ordered all state agencies
with the exception of education and Medicaid
to prepare for 2 percent to 6 percent budget
cuts.
Supercommittee failure puts Va. jobs, debt, credit on the line
Headstones vandalized
Te Bedford County Sherif s Ofce is
investigating the vandalism to seven head-
stones located in the First Baptist Church
of Goode cemetery. Five had been pushed
over and the other two were broken. Tere
was also a stone cross pushed over and
broken. Te damage is believed to have oc-
curred Saturday night, Nov. 19, or Sunday
morning, Nov. 20, 2011. Te church is lo-
cated at 1285 Cannery Road, Goode, Va.
Anyone with information on this crime
can call the Bedford County Sherif s Of-
fce at 586-7827 or Central Virginia Crime
Stoppers at 1-888-798-5900. Crime Stop-
per callers remain anonymous and may re-
ceive a reward up to $1,000.00 for informa-
tion leading in the arrest of the person(s)
who committed the crime.
news@lynchburgtimes.com
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 15 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Nature or Nuture?
Scouts say you can pick them out when theyre little
kids.
The rest of the good playing kids in little league are
hitting a respectable .300, and then theres that one kid
hitting .700 with a dinger each game, one such scout
told me. We can see the kids already gonna be a pro,
and hes not even in high school yet.
Maybe hes got a hitch in his swing. Perhaps hes
unsuited for the position hes currently playing. Doesnt
matter.
Everybody is coachable, a coach once told me.
But the player has to respond to the coach, or you can
forget it.
Larry Bird couldnt stand Bobby Knight so he bailed
on Indiana. Former Atlanta Falcons head coach Jerry
Glanville once proclaimed that Brett Favre would never
play a down in the NFL. Martina Navratilova was too
chubby to ever become a real contender on the wom-
ens tennis circuit. Heck, Reggie Jackson couldnt get a
guaranteed spot in the Yankee lineup underneath Billy
Martin.
There was a theory making the rounds a few years
ago that posited anybody can attain expert level in just
about anything if they spend 10,000 hours or more
practicing that particular craft. If you spent every wak-
ing hour practicing, every day, that would come to about
two to three years. For a more reasonable timeframe,
lets just say its five to six years. One of the examples
they used was The Beatles. They went off to Hamburg
before they became famous, honed their craft by play-
ing jet-fueled all-night sets and returned to Liverpool as
stars.
Sounds easy, right? Of course, the notion is pretty
much absurd. If that were the case, every minor league
baseball player would be in the show and everyone
down at the country club would be competing in the
Ryder Cup.
With the exception of tennis players, quarterbacks,
switch-hitting baseball players and, for whatever rea-
son, Chinese violinists -- players who had parents
who really take the time to drill them (which is why the
coachs kid is usually one of the best players on the
team) -- most people practice what it is theyre truly
talented at.
There can be late bloomers, sure ... for instance, I
recently had an epiphany that led me to begin playing
the guitar. A friend of mine said something that clicked,
taught me the A chord, and I was off and running. Now,
I can confidently say that I am at the expert level at
guitar, so long as you only want to hear Wild Thing,
by The Troggs.
My kid is 2. He wants to be a drummer. So I bought
him some maracas and told him the ottoman was a
drum, have at it. Ill let you know in another 9,000 hours
how thats working out.
Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter who lives in Kan-
sas City.
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Answers
1. Pete Schourek (18) and John Smiley (12) in 1995; Bron-
son Arroyo (17) and Johnny Cueto (12) in 2010.
2. Kansas Citys David Cone was 16-5 when he won the A.L.
Cy Young Award in the shortened 1994 season.
3. The Colts Marvin Harrison accomplished it in 102
games.
4. It was 1998 (George Washington, Massachusetts, Rhode
Island, Temple and Xavier).
5. Bud Poile.
6. Argentina.
7. Thomas Hitman Hearns and Sugar Ray Leonard.
1. The past two times the Cincinnati Reds made the playoffs
(1995, 2010), they did so despite having only two pitchers
win 10-plus games each time. Name two of the four pitch-
ers.
2. When was the last time a pitcher captured the A.L. Cy
Young Award with 16 or fewer wins in a season before Zack
Greinke in 2009?
3. In 2010, Baltimores Anquan Boldin became the fastest
NFL receiver to 600 career receptions (98 games). Who had
been the fastest?
4. When was the last time the Atlantic 10 Conference had
five teams make the NCAA Tournament in mens basket-
ball?
5. Name the person who was the first general manager of
both the Philadelphia Flyers (1967) and the Vancouver Ca-
nucks (1970).
6. In 2011, Uruguay won the mens soccer COPA America
for a record 15th time. What country had been tied with Uru-
guay at 14?
7. In 1988, two boxers, within three days of one another,
became the first two to win five world titles in five different
weight divisions. Name them.
This could be your ad
for just $38
Advertise in The Lynchburg Times
and reach 35,000 readers!
Were in every McDonalds, Kroger &
lots of other places
angie@lynchburgtimes.com
540-683-9197
* or less
In advance of the holiday season, the FBI re-
minds shoppers to beware of cyber criminals
and their aggressive and creative ways to steal
money and personal information. Scammers
use many techniques to fool potential victims
including fraudulent auction sales, reshipping
merchandise purchased with a stolen credit
card, sale of fraudulent or stolen gift cards
through auction sites at discounted prices,
and phishing e-mails advertising brand name
merchandise for bargain prices or e-mails
promoting the sale of merchandise that ends
up being a counterfeit product.
Fraudulent Classifed Ads or Auction Sales
Internet criminals post classifed ads or auc-
tions for products they do not have. If you
receive an auction product from a merchant
or retail store, rather than directly from the
auction seller, the item may have been pur-
chased with someone elses stolen credit card
number. Contact the merchant to verify the
account used to pay for the item actually be-
longs to you.
Shoppers should be cautious and not pro-
vide credit card numbers, bank account num-
bers, or other fnancial information directly to
the seller. Fraudulent sellers will use this in-
formation to purchase items for their scheme
from the provided fnancial account. Always
use a legitimate payment service to protect
purchases.
Diligently check each sellers rating and
feedback along with their number of sales and
the dates on which feedback was posted. Be
wary of a seller with 100% positive feedback,
if they have a low total number of feedback
postings and all feedback was posted around
the same date and time.
Gift Card Scam
Te safest way to purchase gift cards is di-
rectly from the merchant or authorized retail
merchant. If the merchant discovers the card
you received from another source or auction
was initially obtained fraudulently, the mer-
chant will deactivate the gift card number, and
it will not be honored to make purchases.
Phishing and Social Networking
Be leery of e-mails or text messages you re-
ceive indicating a problem or question regard-
ing your fnancial accounts. In this scam, you
are directed to follow a link or call the number
provided in the message to update your ac-
count or correct the problem. Te link actually
directs the individual to a fraudulent Web site
or message that appears legitimate; however,
any personal information you provide, such as
account number and personal identifcation
number (PIN), will be stolen.
Another scam involves victims receiving
an e-mail message directing the recipient to
a spoofed Web site. A spoofed Web site is a
fake site or copy of a real Web site that is de-
signed to mislead the recipient into providing
personal information.
Consumers are encouraged to beware of
bargain e-mails advertising one day only pro-
motions for recognized brands or Web sites.
Fraudsters often use the hot items of the sea-
son to lure bargain hunters into providing
credit card information. Te old adage if it
seems too good to be true is a good barom-
eter to use to legitimize e-mails.
Black Friday has traditionally been the big-
gest shopping day of the year. Te Monday
following Tanksgiving has more recently
(2005) been labeled Cyber Monday, meaning
the e-commerce industry endorses this spe-
cial day to ofer sales and promotions without
interfering with the traditional way to shop.
Scammers try to prey on Black Friday or Cy-
ber Monday bargain hunters by advertising
one day only promotions from recognized
brands. Consumers should be on the watch
for too good to be true e-mails from unrecog-
nized Web sites.
Along with on-line shopping comes the
growth of consumers utilizing social network-
ing sites and mobile phones to satisfy their
shopping needs more easily. Again, consum-
ers are encouraged to beware of e-mails, text
Holiday shopping tips from the Lynchburg Police Dept.
Iage 16 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
This could be your ad
for just $38
Advertise in The Lynchburg Times
and reach 35,000 readers!
Were in every McDonalds, Kroger &
lots of other places
angie@lynchburgtimes.com
540-683-9197
messages, or postings that may lead to fraud-
ulent sites ofering bargains on brand name
products.
Tips
Here are some tips you can use to avoid be-
coming a victim of cyber fraud:
Do not respond to unsolicited (spam) e-
mail.
Do not click on links contained within an
unsolicited e-mail.
Be cautious of e-mail claiming to contain
pictures in attached fles, as the fles may
contain viruses. Only open attachments from
known senders. Always run a virus scan on at-
tachment before opening.
Avoid flling out forms contained in e-mail
messages that ask for personal information.
Always compare the link in the e-mail to the
web address link you are directed to and de-
termine if they match.
Log on directly to the ofcial Web site for
the business identifed in the e-mail, instead
of linking to it from an unsolicited e-mail.
If the e-mail appears to be from your bank,
credit card issuer, or other company you deal
with frequently, your statements or ofcial
correspondence from the business will pro-
vide the proper contact information.
Contact the actual business that suppos-
edly sent the e-mail to verify that the e-mail is
genuine.
If you are requested to act quickly or there
is an emergency, it may be a scam. Fraudsters
create a sense of urgency to get you to act im-
pulsively.
If you receive a request for personal informa-
tion from a business or fnancial institution,
always look up the main contact information
for the requesting company on an indepen-
dent source (phone book, trusted internet
directory, legitimate billing statement, etc.)
and use that contact information to verify the
legitimacy of the request.
Remember if it looks too good to be true, it
probably is.
To receive the latest information about cy-
ber scams, please go to the FBI Web site and
sign up for e-mail alerts by clicking on one
of the red envelopes. If you have received a
scam e-mail, please notify the IC3 by fling a
complaint at www.ic3.gov. For more informa-
tion on e-scams, please visit the FBIs New E-
Scams and Warnings webpage at http://www.
fbi.gov/cyberinvest/escams.htm.
McDonnell to head GOP Governors Assoc.
ORLANDO- Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell was elected Chair-
man of the Republican Governors Association Nov. 30 at the groups
quarterly meetings in Orlando, Florida. With the vote the Governor
will continue his service as head of the organization. Governor Chris
Christie of New Jersey was elected to continue serving as RGA Vice-
Chairman.
Del. Clay Athey (R-Front Royal) said Governor McDonnell has
been an innovative and efective Governor. He will also continue to be
an outstanding and efective Chairman. Bob is obviously a rising star
in the Republican Party and I predict that his name will appear sooner
rather than later on a Republican national ticket.
Speaking about the election, Governor McDonnell remarked, I am
honored to be elected by my peers to chair the Republican Governors
Association in 2012. Our country is facing unprecedented economic
and fscal challenges that require bold leadership and innovative solu-
tions. Unemployment is unacceptably high, too many of our citizens
lack access to a good paying job and the American Dream, and for too
long our leaders in Washington have over-promised, over-spent, and
under-delivered. Republican governors across the country have been
showing the way forward by balancing budgets by cutting spending,
not raising taxes; reforming state governments to make them more
efcient, efective and user-friendly to taxpayers; and focusing on pri-
vate sector job creation to get our fellow citizens back to work and
reignite the economic engine of America. Across the country these
eforts are producing positive results, and I look forward to working
with my colleagues over the next year to continue implementing good,
fscally responsible policy, and to working hard to build on the RGAs
successes of 2009-2011 to add to the ranks of our 29 outstanding Re-
publican governors.
news@lynchburgtimes.com
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 17 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Make your holiday
preparations one step at a time in order to avoid
being overwhelmed and leaving things undone.
That confusing family situation continues to work
itself out.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Ease this years
holiday money pressures by letting your thrifty
side guide you as you look for those perfect gifts
that typically reflect your good taste and love of
beauty.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Youll have a good
handle on potential holiday problems if you del-
egate tasks to family members, friends or co-work-
ers -- most of whom will be more than happy to
help out.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Right now you are
especially vulnerable to holiday scams that seek
to take advantage of your generosity. Best advice:
Check them out before you send out your checks.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) The upcoming holiday
season gives the Big Cat much to purr about. Re-
lationships grow stronger, and new opportunities
loom on the horizon, just waiting to be pounced
on.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A changing
situation brings conflicting advice about how to
go forward with your holiday plans. Your best bet:
Make the decision you feel most comfortable with.
LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Holiday
plans get back on track after some confusion about
the direction you expected to take. A potentially
troublesome money matter needs your immediate
attention.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your
holiday preparations are on track. But you need
to confront a personal situation while you can still
keep it from overwhelming everything else.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December
21) Tight financial matters ease a bit during this
holiday season. But the sagacious Sagittarian is
well-advised to keep a tight hold on the reins while
shopping for gifts.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Dont
put off making decisions about this years holi-
day celebrations, despite the negative comments
youve been getting from several quarters. Do it
NOW!
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) The holi-
days will bring new friends and new opportunities.
Meanwhile, be careful to use your energy wisely as
you go about making holiday preparations.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Theres good
news coming from a most unlikely source. And it
could turn out to be one of the best holiday gifts
you have had in years. Remember to stay posi-
tive.
BORN THIS WEEK: You are respected for your
honesty and loyalty. You make friends slowly -- but
with rare exceptions, theyre in your life forever.
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Chocolate Chip Jumbos
These cookies are super-large and chock-
full of everything -- butter, sugar, chips and
nuts. You actually spoon out the batter with
an ice-cream scoop! Just remember that one
of these jumbos is equivalent to six regular-
size cookies.
3 large eggs
1 pounds (4 sticks) butter or margarine, soft-
ened
1 package (16-ounce) brown sugar
1 1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 packages (12-ounce) semisweet chocolate
chips
1 bag (16-ounce) chopped walnuts
1. Preheat oven to 350 F. In very large bowl,
with mixer on medium speed, beat eggs 4
minutes or until light and fluffy. Reduce speed
to low; beat in butter, sugars, vanilla, baking
soda and salt. Stir in flour, chocolate chips
and walnuts (mixture will be very stiff).
2. Line 2 large cookie sheets with parchment
paper. Drop dough by level 1/3 cups (or use
2 1/2-inch ice-cream scoop), 2 inches apart,
onto prepared cookie sheets.
3. Bake cookies 23-26 minutes or until golden
around the edges, rotating cookie sheets be-
tween upper and lower racks halfway through
baking. Transfer cookies to wire racks to
cool.
4. Repeat with remaining dough, reusing the
same parchment. Store your cookies in a
tightly covered container at room tempera-
ture for up to 1 week or in the freezer up to 3
months. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.
Each cookie: About 425 calories, 25g total
fat (11g saturated), 45mg cholesterol, 265mg
sodium, 50g carbohydrate, 3g dietary fiber, 6g
protein.
For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit
our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/
recipefnder/
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
It was English biologist Thomas Henry Hux-
ley who made the following sage observation:
Irrationally held truths may be more harmful
than reasoned errors.
If you put your rubber bands in the refrigera-
tor, theyll last longer.
Its not just the tigers fur that has stripes; its
skin is striped, too.
You probably know that the iconic film
Rocky starred Sylvester Stallone in the lead-
ing role, but you might not be aware of the fact
that he wrote the script, as well. The sale of
the rights to the script came just in time; he
had a total of $106 in his bank account and
was trying to sell his dog for lack of the means
to feed it.
In the winter of 1932, Niagara Falls froze
solid.
Madame Tussaud started creating her fa-
mous wax figures in 1777 and created many
models during the French Revolution. She
traveled around Europe displaying wax figures
(both the ones she created and ones she in-
herited from her mentor), and she opened her
first museum in London in 1831. Today there
are branches located in the United Kingdom,
Amsterdam, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Vienna,
Moscow, Bangkok, Dubai, Berlin and Ham-
burg, plus five U.S. locations. Its appropriate
that there are more locations in American than
in any other country, since so many Hollywood
celebrities are recreated in the museums. In
fact, in 2006, Shiloh, Brad Pitt and Angelina
Jolies baby, became the first infant to be me-
morialized in wax for Madame Tussauds.
Those who study such things say that apples
are more effective than caffeine at waking you
up in the morning.
Its not clear why, but a ducks quack doesnt
create echoes.
Thought for the Day: The trouble with being
punctual is that nobodys there to appreciate
it. -- Franklin P. Jones
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Mighty Bite Fishing Lure System
Works for All Predatory Fish
Incredible Spasmic Action
Unique Bite-Mark Design
CALL TODAY!
1-888-656-7759
THE FIRST AND ONLY
PROVEN, 5-SENSE
FISHING LURE SYSTEM!
Only
$
19
95
+P&H
NEW WORLDWIDE FISHING
SENSATION! MILLIONS SOLD!
GREAT FOR
FRESH OR
SALT WATER
Iage 18 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
COLOR
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
On Dec. 18, 1620, the Mayflower docks at
what today is Plymouth, Mass., and its passen-
gers disembarked to begin their new settlement,
Plymouth Colony. The winter of 1620-1621 was
brutal, and by spring, only 52 of the original 102
Mayflower passengers were still alive.
On Dec. 16, 1773, in Boston Harbor, a group
of Massachusetts colonists disguised as Mo-
hawk Indians board three British tea ships and
dump 342 chests of tea into the harbor in pro-
test of the British Parliaments Tea Act of 1773.
The value of the tea was more than $700,000
in todays currency.
On Dec. 14, 1909, workers place the last of
the 3.2 million 10-pound bricks that pave the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana. Since
then, all but a 1-yard-wide strip at the start-fin-
ish line has been buried under asphalt. Kissing
those bricks after a successful race remains a
tradition among Indy drivers.
On Dec. 13, 1916, a powerful avalanche kills
hundreds of Austrian soldiers in barracks near
Italys Mount Marmolada. Over a period of
several weeks, avalanches killed an estimated
10,000 Austrian and Italian soldiers.
On Dec. 17, 1961, a fire at a filled-to-capac-
ity circus in Brazil kills more than 300 people
and severely burns 500 more. The cause of the
fire was never conclusively determined, but it
may have been the result of sparks from a train
passing nearby.
On Dec. 15, 1973, Jean Paul Getty III, the
grandson of American billionaire J. Paul Getty,
is found alive near Naples, five months after his
kidnapping by an Italian gang. Getty had initially
refused to pay his 16-year-old grandsons $17
million ransom, but finally agreed after the boys
severed right ear was sent to a newspaper in
Rome.
On Dec. 12, 1980, American oil tycoon Ar-
mand Hammer pays $5,126,000 at auction for
a notebook containing writings by the legend-
ary artist Leonardo da Vinci. The manuscript,
written around 1508, contained 72 loose pages
featuring some 300 notes and detailed draw-
ings, all relating to the common theme of water
and how it moved.
WLNI FM
L Y N C H B U R G
Voted BEST MORNING SHOW in the state by
the Virginia Association of Broadcasters
Join Brian and Mari Weekdays from 6am - 10am on The Morningline.
Keep up with whats going on around the Greater Lynchburg area. If its
happening locally, were talking about it on the Morningline. Join the
conversation by calling the studio line at 846-8255 or 866-338-1059.
Glenn Beck
10am - Noon
6pm - 7pm
Rush
Limbaugh
Noon - 3pm
Sean
Hannity
3pm - 6pm
Neal
Boortz
7pm - 9pm
Andy
Dean
9pm - Midnight
The Morningline
with Brian & Mari
6am - 10am
NewsTalk
105. 9
WLNI FM
105.9 FM 6am - 10am
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 19 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
Council approves one-time bonus for schools
By Emily Williams
Te Lynchburg Times
Te Lynchburg City Council voted Novem-
ber 22 to approve a one-time bonus for City
School employees, a group that has not seen
wage increases since 2008. Te 2 percent bo-
nus will be funded by LCS rollover funds from
fscal year 2011.
Te one-time bonus, totaling just over $1
million overall, will appear in LCS pay checks
before the end of the year. Both full-time and
part-time employees will be eligible with the
exception of retired employees that continue
to work part time.
Un-used LCS funds revert back to the city
each year, at which point the School Board
is able to request their use for what have tra-
ditionally been capital gains projects. At the
close of the 2011 fscal year, there was an ex-
cess of almost $3.4 million dollars available for
re-appropriation. Tis amount, said city Man-
ager Kimball Payne, was verifed by the audi-
tors in the frst clean audit report the schools
have seen in several years.
Councilmember Randy Nelson drew at-
tention to the fact that much of money came
from a decrease in instruction expenditures.
Tis amount, confrmed Interim Superin-
tendent Dr. Larry Massie, was a result of not
hiring for vacant positions. Nelson pointed to
this as proof that teachers were being asked
to cover more and more responsibilities and
deserved an incentive to reward their eforts.
Councilmember Jef Helgeson, who was the
only dissenting vote on the request, worried
that because everyone in the LCS will receive
the same bonus, that undeserving incompe-
tent employees would also beneft. He argued
that money should only be awarded to spec-
tacular teachers that proved themselves wor-
thy of reward.
I would be more inclined to vote for this if
we were not giving an across the board per-
cent, said Helgeson.
Councilmember Michael Gillette disagreed
with Helgesons assertion, arguing that he
trusted that the city schools were able to iden-
tify good employees and remove the bad.
I dont want to start this conversation by
assuming that there are a lot of incompetent
people and that somehow tons of them will be
getting bonuses, said Gillette.
Councilmember Helgeson later went on to
express concerns that with declining incomes
in the city, giving a raise to teachers was inap-
propriate and that the funds might be better
spent on the future of Heritage High School.
Helgeson suggested that the schools coming
in under budget was not so much a result of
the schools cutting back but instead because
the city council had allocated too much mon-
ey for education in the budget.
Councilmember Hunsdon H Cary was in
favor of the request in light of improvements
that had been made to the LCS administra-
tion.
Any beef Ive had with LCS was with the
previous school administration and what I be-
lieved was extremely poor fnancial manage-
ment, said Cary.
During the recent Teacher for a Day event,
said Cary, he was able to see LCS staf in ac-
tion up-close and was impressed at their abil-
ity to manage a classroom.
My admiration for teachers was only en-
hanced by that experience, said Cary of the
teacher for a day program.
Mayor Joan Foster, who also attended
Teacher for a Day, told the story of a teacher
who wandered the lunch room with scissors,
swooping in to help students open various
items in their bag lunches. She also drew at-
tention to the one-time bonus given to city
employees this year.
Interim Lynchburg City Schools Super-
intendent Dr. Larry Massie said part
of $3.4 million dollars left over at the
close of the 2011 fscal year was a re-
sult of not hiring for vacant positions in
the school system.
COLOR
WOMENS HOME SCHEDULE
Dec. 1 James Madison

7PM
Dec. 10 Glenville State 4PM
Dec. 15 Virginia Union 7PM
Jan. 7 High Point 7PM
Jan. 9 Campbell 7PM
Jan. 21 Presbyterian College 2PM
Jan. 23 Winthrop 7PM
(434) 239-8446
19950 LEESVILLE RD.
LYNCHBURG, VA 24502
GUTTERING
VINYL SIDING
CUSTOM TRIM
HARDIE PLANK
ROCK VENEER
CUSTOM COPPER
WINDOWS
ROOFING
CUSTOM SIDING
& WINDOWS
REMPFER
CONSTRUCTION, INC.
See SCHOOLS, 20
Iage 2O The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
By Bill McMorris
Virginia Statehouse News
Nearly 19 months have passed since law-
makers approved the states virtual education
program, but Virginia has yet to establish a
permanent funding system.
Lawmakers established the program with
strong bipartisan support from Gov. Bob Mc-
Donnell, Senate Democrats and Virginia Edu-
cation Association, the state teachers group.
School districts around Virginia have used
the Internet and other tools to teach students
from afar for more than 10 years, but the law
opened the door to full-time state-subsidized
classrooms. Te program attracted more than
400 full-time students. Tousands more use
online programs to take advanced placement
classes and remedial schooling.
Te legislation asked the state Board of
Education to design a system to compensate
school districts for admitting out-of-town
students to virtual classrooms. But the board
declined.
After several failed overtures to design a
permanent funding system, lawmakers and
education professionals hope to correct the
funding issue when the 2012 legislative ses-
sion begins Jan. 11.
When we passed it, it was all about educa-
tion opportunities as far as I was concerned,
but we should have addressed the funding,
said the laws author, Delegate Richard Bell, R-
Staunton.
State school board member Chris Braunlich
laid out a proposal to address the funding gap
in a study for the Tomas Jeferson Institute, a
nonpartisan, free market, public policy group
based in Springfeld. Braunlich is vice presi-
dent.
Funding for virtual education in Virginia is
based on the states share of school spending,
he told reporters on a Wednesday conference
call. Ultimately, the state will have to pay
more and, in the long haul, state funds would
be inadequate.
Te state reimburses virtual classrooms on
a per-pupil basis based upon the hub of the
virtual school. As a result, online learning cen-
ters, which operate as publicly funded charter
schools, have been established in some of the
poorest areas of the state to maximize the
states portion of funding.
One of the largest online learning pro-
grams is in Carroll County where the state
pays $5,697 per pupil, more than double the
states share in wealthier regions, such as
Fairfax where schools receive $2,228 per pu-
pil from the state. Under the existing funding
structure, the state pays virtual schools Car-
roll County rates even if the student is from
Fairfax.
State Sen. George Barker, D-Alexandria,
said the system is ripe for abuse.
What we have right now makes no sense
were cutting funding to traditional schools
and, at the same time, spending exorbitant
amounts of money to virtual schools, said
Barker, who serves on the Senate Education
and Health Committee. It was proftable for
the companies and school districts, but were
actually penalizing systems operated by dis-
tricts getting less state dollars.
Braunlich said the state needs to take a
step back from traditional education funding
structure to account for the cross-county line
appeal of virtual learning.
We need to treat kids as students without
borders and fund them with the average state
share of education funds, he said.
BLACK
DISABILITY LAW
Social Security Disability
FREE Condential Consultation Today!
You WIN your benets or you
PAY NOTHING.
We guarantee compassionate and
prompt client service.
1-888-841-6647
Disability Group, Inc. is a private law rm. Its principal o ce is in Los Angeles, California, 6033 Century Blvd. Managing partner, Ronald Miller, Esq. is admitted only in California and Michigan. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely upon advertisements. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. Prior results do not guarantee a similar
outcome. Additional fees may apply.
Se Habla
Espaol
Call
for your
FREE copy
today!
We Wrote The Book on Social Security Disability
Members of
Whats so special about this book?
TEN YEARS AGO I told Americans to read ONE book to
understand the BIGGEST fnancial story of the new
millennium: Rediscovering GOLD in the 21st Century
by Swiss America Chairman Craig R. Smith.
Rediscovering GOLD explained in layman terms why a new,
generational bull market in precious metals hadjust begun.
Those who followed Mr . Smiths advice protected their life
savings during the recent devastating economic downturns.
TODAY, I am telling you to read ANOTHER book: Crashing the Dollar:
How to Survive a Global Currency Collapse, to understand why our paper money is about to turn into ashes.
Mr. Smith provides innovative strategies to renew Americas economy and, if we prepare wisely, to save ourselves
and our families from the economic death spiral of extreme debt and unpopular government policies we now
face.
To help prepare Americans for the dollars demise right now, I have a very special offer: Mr. Smith and I
want to get a FREE copy of Crashing the Dollar into the hands of every American with assets to protect.
Call 1-888-848-9337 and tell them you want the Special Pat Boone Book Offer.
Assets to Protect?
Read this!
Crashing the
Dollar: Special
Offer by Pat Boone
Pat Boone
SwissAmerica11_4x4_b_Layout 1 8/2/11 3:05 PM Page 1
For me there is a parallel here and for me
its the right thing to do, said Foster.
Councilmember Turner Perrow applauded
the schools for a clean and on-time audit and
the fact that they were well on the road to
consolidating health care program with the
city.
If the school board believes that this is the
right thing to do for their teachers, and with
the progress that you all have made as a sys-
tem, I am willing to vote in favor of this, said
Perrow.
Councilmember Gillette argued that with-
out good schools and an educated youth,
Lynchburg would never rise from the hard
economic times. He pointed to schools as
a large factor in whether technology frms
would decide to locate ofces in the city.
Without good workforce development,
we will never get our way out of economic
distress, said Gillette.
After the request passed in a vote of 5-1,
School Board Chair Charles White thanked
the council for recognizing improvements to
LCS fnancial management.
I just want to thank you all for your sup-
portive commentswe continue to do our
best to improve every day, said White.
emily@lynchburgtimes.com
SCHOOLS, from 19
See EDUCATION, 22
One year into virtual education, no funding plan in place
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 21 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
Medicare Health Checks Can Catch
Problems Early
Medicare has added another preventive ser-
vice to our benefits: a yearly consultation with
our health-care provider to look at ways to pre-
vent cardiovascular disease, such as coronary
heart disease and stroke. This additional con-
sultation can include exploring changes to diet,
screening for hypertension and more. Until now,
the covered service was a blood test every five
years.
The list of Medicare preventive services is
long, and its to our benefit to use as many of
these as our doctors think we need. Here is a
sample of what is available:
Colon cancer screenings: Can include a colo-
noscopy every 24 to 120 months, depending on
your level of risk for colon cancer. A blood test
can be ordered every 12 months.
-Bone-mass measurement: Tests for the risk
of osteoporosis, and can be done every 24
months, or more often if indicated.
Pneumococcal shots: Vaccine covers pneu-
mococcal pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis
and otitis media, and generally only needs to be
given once, although some at risk might need a
booster shot.
Glaucoma test: For those with a risk due to
diabetes, a family history or other indications,
this test can be a sight saver.
Mammograms: Free yearly breast cancer
screening if the doctor accepts the assignment.
Prostate cancer screenings: Both the exam
and a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test is
suggested once a year for men age 50 and
older.
To see the rest of the preventive services, go
to the Medicare website (ww.medicare.gov),
click Manage Your Health, then Preventive Ser-
vices. Theres even a printable chart you can
take to your doctor to ask whether the assess-
ments and screenings are right for you.
Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot per-
sonally answer reader questions, but will incor-
porate them into her column whenever possible.
Write to her in care of King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.
com
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Antibiotics Usually End
Kidney Infection
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am recuperating from a
kidney infection (pyelitis). The doctor did a cul-
ture of my urine, which showed a gram negative
rod. What kind of infection is that? -- S.B.
ANSWER: The more common urinary tract infection
is infection of the bladder -- cystitis. Pyelitis (PIE-
uh-LITE-iss), now usually called pyelonephritis, is
an infection of the kidney itself. It is a much more
serious infection, and one that usually makes people
take to their bed.
Pyelitis causes high fever often alternating with
chills. People have intense flank pain, the side area
between the lowest rib and the upper part of the
pelvis. The infection also might make people urinate
more frequently and with pain. These two signs,
however, are more apt to indicate bladder infection.
The most frequent cause of pyelitis is the bacte-
rium E. coli. Bacteria are classified into two large
groups based on how they react to a stain used to
visualize them with a microscope. The stain is the
Gram stain, named after the doctor who devised it.
Bacteria are either gram positive or gram negative.
A gram positive bacterium turns blue with the stain;
a gram negative turns red.
Bacteria also are classified by their shape. Some
are elongated sticks -- rods. Others are oval-shaped.
E. coli is a gram negative rod.
Pyelitis is a situation that calls for immediate and
usually intravenous antibiotic treatment. It responds
promptly to such treatment. The temperature often
returns to normal within two days.
The booklet on urinary tract infections describes
both upper urinary tract infections (kidney -- pyelitis)
and lower urinary tract infections (bladder -- cystitis).
Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue -
- No. 1204W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Canada. with the recipients printed name
and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have seborrheic kerato-
ses and have had them for many years. Doctors
say nothing can be done. I had them cut off and
frozen off, but they come right back. Can you
help?
ANSWER: Seborrheic (SEB-uh-REE-ik) keratoses
are brown, warty-looking spots on the back, chest,
arms, legs and sometimes the face. They are not
cancers and dont become cancers. There may be
only a few, but there can be hundreds of them. Their
cause is a mystery, but they appear at older ages,
so aging is somehow involved. A doctor can scrape
them off or freeze them. They might come back, but
they can be retreated if they do. The tendency to
develop them is inherited.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Years ago, after the birth
of my son, the doctor said I had milk leg. It was
very painful. What would this be called today?
-- A.R.
ANSWER: Ive never heard the term milk leg used
by a doctor, but I have seen it in print. Today the
condition is called thrombophlebitis (THROM-boh-
flea-BITE-iss) -- a clot (thrombo) in an inflamed vein
(phlebitis). In milk leg, the vein is the femoral vein,
the large leg vein. It can be a complication of preg-
nancy even today.
Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but he will incorporate them in his
column whenever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available health newslet-
ters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Incentive Bonuses Sometimes
Go Awry
The Department of Veterans Affairs uses bo-
nuses to retain employees, and they spend a lot
of money doing that. Specifically, last year they
spent $111 million to retain 16,487 employees.
However, the VAs Office of Inspector General
found that of the incentives it studied, 80 percent
were either questionable or werent justified,
bringing the unsubstantiated amount to $1.06
million of the total spent.
To be fair, the VA does use financial incentives
to keep people in positions that are hard to fill or
that require employees who have special qualifi-
cations. According to the criteria for awarding in-
centives, there must be a scarcity of candidates
who can fill the position, efforts to recruit new
employees must have been unsuccessful and
the job must require special abilities.
The problem with this $1 million in incentives
is that there wasnt adequate documentation,
information was missing from case files (annual
reviews, for example, to determine if a bonus was
deserved), incorrect salary surveys were used to
determine amounts of incentives, documents
were signed off without question, financial limits
were exceeded and there was a lack of training
and oversight.
According to the OIGs report, the VA was
often lax about it: Extra salary increased didnt
always stop when they were supposed to, with
extra payments continuing until it was brought
to someones attention. In one case, a senior
executive received a hefty retention bonus and
shortly after received a second one. There was
no documented justification.
Based on the OIGs sample of selected facili-
ties that uncovered the 80 percent problem rate,
its recommended that in the next 12 months, 100
percent of incentive payments be reviewed and
unnecessary payments stopped.
If you want to report wrongdoing in VA Pro-
grams and Operations, call 1-800-488-8244, or
send email to vaoighotline@va.gov.
Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Fea-
tures Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@
gmail.com. Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
2011 North America Syndicate, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Iage 22 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
4 Wepaytherepairshopforyou
4 Allplansbackedbyhighestrated
insurersintheindustry
4 Areputationofintegrityandreliability
4 Peaceofmindforyouandyourfamily
4 Afordablefullcoverageplanspayfor
everythingexceptroutinemaintenance
4 A+RatedwiththeBetterBusinessBureau
Cost for a New eNgiNe $4000
Cost to rebuild traNsmissioN $3000
Cost for air CoNditioNiNg system $2000
ARE YOU COVERED?
Call today for your free Quote

888-833-7140
*Extended Service plans available for vehicles under ten years old with less than 100,000 miles
Bottle B
Compare Our Prices! Call us toll-free at 1-888-604-5084.
Call toll-free: 1-888-604-5084
Are You Still Paying Too Much For Your Medications?
You can save up to 90% when you fill your prescriptions
at our Canadian Pharmacy.
Bottle A
Typical US brand price
for 20mg x 100
Manufactured by
Pfizer
TM
Lipitor
TM
$460.00
Generic equivalent
of Lipitor
TM
generic price
for 20mg x 100
Manufactured by
Generics Manufacturers
Atorvastatin*
$99.00
Their Price
Our Price
Prescription price comparison above is valid as of January 1, 2011. All trade-mark (TM) rights associated with the brand name products in this ad belong
to their respective owners. *Generic drugs are carefully regulated medications that have the same medical ingredients as the original brand name drug,
but are generally cheaper in price. Generic equivalents are equal to their "brand" counterparts in Active Ingredients, Dosage, Safety, Strength, Quality,
Performance and Intended use. It may vary in colour, shape, size, cost and appearance.
Order Now! Toll-free: 1-888-604-5084
$25
OFF
Get An Extra
And FREE SHIPPING
Get an extra $25 o your rst order today!
Call the number below and save an additional $25 plus get free
shipping on your rst prescription order with Canada Drug Center.
Expires Dec 31, 2011. Oer is valid for prescription orders only and can
not be use in conjunction with any other oers.
Please note that we do not carry controlled substances and a valid
prescription is required for all prescription medication orders.
The ideal candidates will be organized and self-motivated. Great people
skills and a professional demeanor are key. This indiviual should enjoy the
freedom of setting his or her own hours and meeting new people. Previous sales
experience is a plus, but not necessary. The candidate must be dependable ,
reliable and self-starter. Applicant must be able to track customer payments, work
well with others and be customer oriented. If you want a position where you
can set your own hours and earn great commissions, please send us your recent
work experience. Start selling immediately. Only serious inquires please. This is a
commission-based position with excellent earnings potential.
Email angie@lynchburgtimes.com
Advertising Representative
His proposal would prevent charter schools
from taking advantage of the states reim-
bursement system by providing average allot-
ments of state and local dollars.
Te program would cost the state $4,083 per
student, and local districts would have to sub-
mit $2,559 per pupil, bringing the total cost
to $6,642 per student about $3,000 cheaper
than the average state and local money spent
on each student.
Braunlich presented his fndings to a bi-
partisan group of lawmakers and educators
following the November election. Bell, who
was at the meeting, said it received a mixed
response.
Te proposal has merit, but we need to get
more creative, Bell said. I favor creating a
separate virtual school district that will cover
the entire state, so we have consistency and
accessibility.
Braunlich said the state should focus its
creativity on holding schools accountable. His
proposal would link local payout to perfor-
mance. School districts would not have to pay
a virtual school unless the student passes.
If the student doesnt pass, the local gov-
ernment doesnt have to pay, he said. We
need to create a new form of accountability,
so taxpayers can ensure that funds spent for
education are spent well.
Some education groups said that does not
go far enough.
Tat approach assumes that the cost of
providing a virtual education is the same as a
brick-and-mortar school, but you dont have
a cafeteria, library, athletic felds or bus, said
Robley Jones, director of government rela-
tions for the Virginia Education Association,
which represents more than 60,000 educators.
We need a more analytic approach to fund-
ing, to study the issue rather than base a fgure
of of brick-and-mortar systems.
Jones worked with McDonnell and lawmak-
ers to establish virtual school systems in Vir-
ginia in 2010, but he said he wants to return
the focus of state budgeting to local school
districts, while using virtual schools to reach
out to rural areas and under-performing dis-
tricts.
Barker said Braunlichs proposal is a step in
the right direction, but he prefers a system in
which state and local money follows individu-
al students traveling from district to district,
rather than a blanket system.
EDUCATION, from 20
Sheetz larceny Te Bedford County Sherifs Ofce is seeking
information on the identity of a subject who was
seen taking a wallet from Sheets located at 12259
East Lynchburg Salem Turnpike in Forest.
On October 25, 2011 Sherifs Ofce deputy
responded to the Sheetz on Route 460 in Forest
in reference to a larceny of a wallet. Te deputy
spoke to the complainant who advised that he
had made a purchase at the business and had ac-
cidentally left his wallet on the counter when he
left, but when he returned to get his wallet it was
gone. Upon review of the store security surveil-
lance, it shows where a subject enters the business
and picks up the wallet. He then takes the wallet
and leaves the store without turning it in to the
employee.
Anyone with information on the identity of the
subject seen in video surveillance is asked to con-
tact the Bedford County Sherifs Ofce at 540-
586-7827 or Crime Stoppers at 1-888-798-5900.
Decenlei, 2O11 The Lynchluig Tines Iage 23 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
BLACK
Iage 24 The Lynchluig Tines Decenlei, 2O11 Read eveiy issue onIine al vvv.Iynchluiglines.con
ACROSS
1 Meat cut
5 - You Babe
(65 song)
9 Skimmer material
14 Chauvinist
19 Othellos ensign
20 - contendere
21 What the nose knows
22 Greene or Michaels
23 Be a blacksmith
24 Start of a remark by
James Dent
27 Appropriates
29 Dutch artist Jan
30 Let up
31 Rep.
32 Speakeasy patron
33 Hoover, for one
35 Part 2 of remark
40 Beginning on
42 72 Michael Jackson
smash
44 Impact sound
47 Downey of Touched
by an Angel
48 Woodworking tool
50 New York university
52 Butterfield 8 author
54 Rouse
56 Singer Payne
58 Plant disease
59 Pontis partner
60 Become a prune
61 Islands instrument
62 Baby -
64 Like Hercules
65 Malcolm X director
66 - Mahal
68 Widespread
69 Shed
70 Part 3 of remark
75 Ambush man
80 Ripped
81 Periodontists org.
83 Bud
86 Tweety Pie, e.g.
87 Highlands tongue
88 Nobelist Octavio
90 Man from Malmo
92 Hersey setting
93 They may be personal
94 Ornamental mat
96 Salome character
97 Like some paper
98 Covenant
100 Opies aunt
101 Unit of area
102 Archaic preposition
103 Conductor Queler
105 Snake sound
107 Part 4 of remark
111 Slalom curve
113 Ruby of A Raisin in the
Sun
114 Limit
115 Sink
119 Dust busters
121 - squash
126 End of remark
129 Peace of mind
130 Soviet cooperative
131 Hes making - . . .
132 Buffalo waterfront
133 Jocular Johnson
134 Director Sergio
135 Beau - (39 film)
136 Equipment
137 Actor Wallace
DOWN
1 Speech problem
2 Neighbor of Molokai
3 Violinist Oistrakh
4 Playwright Coward
5 Spectrum shade
6 Discuss
7 Auto pioneer
8 Petite pooch
9 Prepares onions
10 . . . baby on the -
11 Emulate Sinbad
12 Improve
13 Violent card game?
14 Hunk of gunk
15 Pindaric character
16 Pluck
17 Fairy-tale start
18 Golfers gadget
25 Disney rabbit
26 Tom, Dick, or Harry
28 No Einstein
34 Encourage a culprit
35 Go fishing
36 Long of football
37 Stun
38 Daily receipts
39 TVs - Shadows
41 Remote
43 Nick of I Love Trouble
44 Strauss aristocrat
45 Common contraction
46 Chutney ingredient
49 Minuscule
51 Reindeer name
53 Israeli dance
55 Tolkien creation
56 Japanese volcano
57 Rubbed the wrong way
63 Garage supply
64 Runners carry it
67 Crooked
71 Bara of the silents
72 Judd of George &
Leo
73 - a Rebel (62 hit)
74 Unclear
75 Itll give you a weigh
76 Lowest point
77 Absurd
78 Sheet of stamps
79 Carve a canyon
82 Furniture wood
83 Thanks, Robespierre!
84 Idolize
85 Surrenders
88 In-your-face item
89 Guinness or Baldwin
91 Sport
93 Does Little work
95 Preoccupy
99 Most methodical
104 Jacket feature
106 Hardly hyper
108 Small shrub
109 Foam
110 Choose, with for
112 Face lift?
115 Wet blanket
116 Concerning
117 WWII gun
118 Tropical spot
120 Handels - and
Galatea
121 Spotless
122 - of the Cat (77 hit)
123 Reduce, with down
124 - Spumante
125 Poverty
126 Baseballs Ripken
127 Witty one
128 Foster or Tilly
The Lynchburg Times Crossword: WAIST OF MONEY


C
o
p
y
r
ig
h
t

2
0
1
1

K
in
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

S
y
n
d
ic
a
t
e
,

I
n
c
.
,
A
ll
r
ig
h
t
s

r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
P
u
z
z
l
i
n
g Answers
The Lynchburg Times
Sudoku!
by Linda Thistle
How to play: Place a number in the empty boxes
in such a way that each row across, each column
down and each small 9-box square contains all of
the numbers from one to nine.
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Diffculty this week: Moderate
Copyright 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
The Lynchburg Times
Hocus-Focus
by Henry Boltinoff
Question: Mr. Glenn, Can we be sure that God exists?
The short answer to this one is, yes. I know that proponents of atheism, agnosticism and
rampant immorality all attack the idea of God. These folks would like to say that all the ap-
plicable scientifc fact disproves God and all scientists have considered God debunked and
irrelevant. But, actually, science supports God and the Bible and many scientists are still
believers in God. The fact is there are six irrefutable arguments for the existence of God that
have never been successfully contradicted even though disbelievers continuously ignore
them. They are simple arguments that anyone can understand. If you would like to talk
about them, you may feel free to contact me. More on this subject next month. For more
information or to ask a question, contact me at mglenn1023@yahoo.com.
toward the unity of all believers:
5even iIIs church of 0hrist 810 0Id 6raves MiII 8d., Lynchhurg 237-3666