Anda di halaman 1dari 889

Catalogue of Greek Coins in

The Hunterian Colle6tion

This

Catalogue of the

Greek

Coins in

the

Hunterian Collection University of Glasgow has been presented to the University by

James Stevenson of Hailie

CATALOGUE OF GREEK COINS

IN THE

HUNTERIAN COLLECTION

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW

VOLUME III. FURTHER ASIA, NORTHERN AFRICA, WESTERN EUROPE

BY

GEORGE MACDONALD, M.A., LL.D.

HONORARY CURATOR OF THE HUNTERIAN COIN CABINET

GLASGOW JAMES MACLEHOSE AND SONS

^awbiishn-s to the anibersitg

1905

PREFACE

In the Prefatory Note to Volume I. it was explained that this

its existence to a suggestion ma,de by Mr. James Stevenson, that suggestion being

Catalogue owes

accompanied by a munificent offer to bear the whole expense of printing and

publication.

of the enterprise thus initiated.

Unfortunately Mr. Stevenson was not destined to see the conclusion

But the friendly welcome accorded to the first

two volumes gave him real gratification, and it was characteristic of him that he

took special pleasure in that portion of the scheme under which copies of the work

were presented to nearly three hundred libraries at home and abroad. Those who

knew him will, I trust, feel that the completed Catalogue provides an appropriate

memorial of his genuine interest in learning, his enlightened public spirit, and his

deep attachment to the city of his birth.

The loss of Mr. Stevenson is not the only serious blow that the undertaking has encountered since the appearance of the second volume. In December, 1902,

Professor Young's long tenure of office as Keeper of the Hunterian Museum was

One of his cherished wishes had been to secure from a wider

circle a proper appreciation of the treasures under his care, and the zeal he showed

closed by death.

in promoting Mr. Stevenson's project was but the natural outcome of the spirit in

Dr. Young's place as a Trustee was filled

which he regarded his whole duty.

by Mr. Robert Gourlay, LL.D., who, along with Mr. James J. MacLehose, has earned

the cordial

Avas one of the original Trustees, and on him has devolved

chief responsibility for the business management of the Fund.

as in other matters his help has been invaluable.

thanks of all to whom the book in any way appeals.

Mr. MacLehose

from the outset the

In this as well

It will be found that the present volume is considerably larger than either

of its predecessors.

At the same time,

the ground which it traverses has been

much less fully explored. In some series, such as the currencies of the Arsacidae

and the Ptolemies and the native coinages of Spain and Gaul, the new material available was too scanty to admit of any attempt at an independent contribution

towards the settlement of far-reaching difficulties of classification. In other cases,

b

ii

PREFACE

however, I

have ventured to depart more or less widely from the traditional

arrangement,

in

the hope

that

the innovations introduced may be generally

accepted as improvements. In dealing with the money of the Seleucid Kings, for

instance, (and, indeed, wherever suitable opportunity offered) I have endeavoured to

gather the bronze coins into homogeneous groups by combining the evidence

of Aveights, monograms, and types.

The Alexandrian issues, again, are catalogued

upon a principle which is not, perhaps, strictly scientific, but which may be left

to justify itself by the fresh light

rate importance.

it throws on

the history

of a mint

of first-

In preparing the volume for the press, I have incidentally been led to enter

on the consideration of some interesting questions.

of the money of Tigranes I., the portrait of Antiochus Tlieos,

Certain of thesethe chronology

the coinage

of Hierax,

the issues of Antioch under the

early empire,

the era

of Rhosus,

and the significance of the numeral letters on imperial pieces of Syriahave

already been discussed elsewhere.

Others are now touched on more briefly in

Among the latter it may be convenient to indicate specifically

the footnotes.

the dates on the coins of Apamea, the supposed use of the Actian Era at Tripolis,

the legends that occur at Gaza, the well-known crux connected with the money

of Agrippa II., and the employment of a ' die-test ' as an aid in classifying the coins

of Gyrene and of Carthage.

I am exceedingly sorry that the exigencies of space

have compelled me to reduce to the narrowest possible limits the Appendix showing

the corresjDondence with Combe's Bescrlptio, and also to refrain from supplementing

the Introduction to Volume I. by the reproduction of additional letters and papers dealing with Hunter's unlucky purchase of the Peralta Collection.

Acknowledgment has once again to be made of many obligations. The references

in the footnotes will show the published works that have proved most useful.

But

it ouirht to be recorded that M. Th. Reinach allowed me to consult the new edition

of his Jewish Coins while it was still in manuscript, and that Dr. J. N. Svoronos

generously put the proof-sheets of his Ptolemaic Corpus at my disposal.

On several

special points I had the advantage of Dr. Imhoof-Blumer's most valuable advice.

At The Hague, at the Fitzwilliam Museum, and also (on three several occasions) at the

Bodleian Library, every facility was granted me for making a personal examination

of particular series, while casts came from the public museums at Berlin, Paris,

Vienna, Athens, St. Petersburg, Copenhagen, Gotha, Turin, and elsewhere, as well as

from the private cabinets of several collectors at home and abroad.

ever, it is to the

British Museum that my chief debt is due.

After all, how-

With unwearied

patience Mr. Head and his colleagues allowed me to scrutinize the contents of the

PREFACE

iii

trays for nearly every district included in Volume III. Casts for close comparison

were ungrudgingly supplied, and neither counsel nor suggestion was ever asked in

vain.

Even the laborious task of reading the proofs was willingly performed by

Mr. Wroth and Mr. Hill.

blemishes must remain.

In spite of their vigilance, and of my own efforts, many

Still, the work is finished and, with all its imperfections, it

represents twelve years of strenuous leisure.

If these years have brought difficulties

to be surmounted, they have also brought kindness in abundant measure. My deepest

regret is that some of those to whom I owe most have already passed where no Avord

Of Mr. Stevenson and Dr. Young I have

of thanks from me

can reach them.

spoken in the Prefaces to earlier volumes. And they are not alone.

In particular,

I shall always preserve a grateful recollection of the stimulating encouragement constantly received from the late Professor Robert Adamson.

August, 1905.

GEORGE MACDONALD.

CONTENTS

PAGE

Preface

Corrections

.

,.,.,

i

iv

. . viii 1- 1 5 119 132 • .140 141 . 218 222 223
.
.
viii
1-
1
5
119
132
.140
141
.
218
222
223
225
.
275
275
280
297
.299
301
.
.

- .321

••

353

354

355

•••

•••

•• •••

356

356

^^''^

562

567

^79

579

^83

Signs and Abbreviations

Further Asia Kings of Armenia

Kings of Syria

Commagene

Cyrrhestica . . . Chalcidice . . . Seleucis and Pieria . . Coele-Syria .
Cyrrhestica .
.
.
Chalcidice
.
.
.
Seleucis and Pieria
.
.
Coele-Syria
.
.
Trachonitis
Uncertain of Syria
Phoenicia
.
.
.
.
Gralilaea
Samaria
Jndaea
Kings
of Nabathaea
Arabia Petraea
.
.
.
Mesopotamia
.
.
Kings of Parthia
.
Characene
Persia
India
Northern Africa
Kings of Egypt
,
.
Alexandria
Nomes of Egypt
.
Cyrenaica
.

Libya

Syrtica

Byzacene

CONTENTS

Zeugitana Islands between Africa and Sicily

Nnmidia

Mauretania .

Western Europe

Sjjain

Ganl

Britain

Supplement

Uncertain Coins

Addenda

Corrigenda to Vols. I.

Indexes

I.

Geographical

,

and II.

.

.

II. Kings, Qaeens and Dynasts

III. Roman Emperors and Imperial Personages

IV. Types

•••• •••

V.

Symbols

VI. Countermarks

 

.

.

.

VII.

Magistrates'

.

.

Names on Autonomous Coins

 

VIII.

Magistrates' Names on Imperial Coins

.

.

.

IX.

X.

XI.

Roman Magistrates' Names

(a)

Latin

(/3) Greek

Eras

Remarkable Inscriptions, Titles of Cities, Magistrates, etc.

(a)

Greek

(/3) Latin

(y) Phoenician and Neo-Punic

(8) Hebrew

(e) Iberian

{0 Other Scripts

.

Appendix, showing Differences from Combe's Descriptio

Table of the Relative Weights of English Grains and French Grammes

.

Table for converting English Inches into Millimetres and into the Measures of Mionnet's Scale

PAGE

584

603

608

613

"19

619

676

714

'^-'-

'^'^-'

741

'^7

'^"

'51

754

755

758

774

.777

778

.779

780

780

781

782

783

783

786

788

789

790

791

793

798

799

CATALOGUE

SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS

In printing the inscriptions the following conventions have been observed :

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

Square brackets indicate that the place of the letters they enclose is oiF the coin.

E.g. AGHNAICriN]

Short strokes on the level of the line indicate an uncertain number of illegible

letters.

E.g.

Fl

E

Dots on the level of the line indicate a dejinlte number of illegible letters, each

letter being represented by one dot.

E.g. TAPAN

A dot placed beneath a letter indicates

that, while

the

N

letter

is certain, it is

impossible to decide between two or more forms of it. E.g. AAEiANAPOZ

In references for illustrations 'B.M.G.' means in each case the appropriate volume of the

British Museum Series of Coin Catalogues.

CORRECTIONS

Page 49, No. 55, Page 96, No. 54, and Page 236, No. 1, for A<JV>^

Page .58, No. 33, and Page 250, No. 12, for

Page 270, No. 58, for 0aiTv\oi read fiairvKot.

}^'\i^ read ^')>^

Page 275, No. 1 (Tiberias), for RE read

Page 866, footnote f, for ' Ptelemy ' read 'Ptolemy.'

EP

real

A'^if'

Page 423, No. 171, and Page 429, No. 218, omit ' of Osiris.'

Page 585, No. 8, for ' petnncnlus ' read ' pectunculus.'

Page 643, No. 7, for AWETTIACVS read LVETTIACVS

Page 689, headline, for South-Westebn read Westkrn.

Page 692, No. 5, for 'pentagon' read 'pentagram.'

FUETHEE ASIA

N(

Weight

Metal

SlZK

Obverse

Reveese

AEMENIA

KINGS OF ARMENIA

TIGRANES 1.

Circa 97—56 B.C.

The early Itistory of the Armenian monarchy is obscure. It touched the limit of its

greatness under Tigranes I., who in 83 B.C. succeeded in making himself master

of Syria. He joined his father -in law Milhradates in Ms struggle against Rome,

and became involved in his ruin.

His coinage, which

is often included in

the

Seleucid series, appears to have begun after he made Antioch his capital. It falls

241-8

M 11

naturally into three periods.*

Circa 83—78 B.C.

No dates have been observed on the coins of this period.

represents a famous sadptured group by Eulychides of Sicyon, levown to us by

many other copies, notably a marble statue in the Vatican.-f

The liev. type of Nos. 1 S.

SiLVEB

Euboic-Attic Standard

Tetra drachms

Head of

Tigranes r.,

wearing a lofty

Armenian tiara decorated with an eight- rayed star placed between two eagles,

which face outwards, but have their

heads turned

border.

back;

bead

and reel

BAZIAEfl Z (to r., downwards) TirPANOY (to 1., downwards)

The Tj'che of Antioch, draped and wear- ing turreted crown, with veil, seated r.

on rock, holding palm-branch in her r. ;

at her feet, the river-god Orontes, swim-

ming r. ; the whole within wreath.

on rock, }^ ;

[Plate lxiii. 1.]

in field r., pellet.

*

t

See Num. Chron., 1902, pp. 193 S.

A. S. Murray,

Hist, of Greek Sculpture,

ii. 354.

For list of references,

see Frazer,

Pausanias, Yol. iv., 'pp. 6 f., and Wroth, B.M.O. Galatia, p. Ixi.

No.

Weight

238-5

232-2

248-3

Metal

Size

.R 1-05

.R 1-16

.R 115

ARMENIA

Obverse

on rock, M ;

Reverse

in field r.,

J^

on rock, ± ([BA]ZIAEn[Z])

(Xo. 3 is pierced.)

in field r., T (TITPANOY)

I

Beonzb

Tico ilenoini nations of the contemporary hronze issues are represented here.

65-5

45-0

/E

M

-G

Similar type; dtcoration of tiara more obscure ; border of dots.

B AZ I A ED.T. (to r. , downwards)

TirPANoY (to 1., down-ivards)

Nike advancing 1., holding wreatli and

palm.

Similar ; bnt behind head, A

beneath, }£>)(?) AP(?)

[Plate lxiii. 2.]

1

Similar ; border of dots.

nothing visible beneath.

[i3.il/. C,

Pl. xxvii. 9.]

('ircn 77 73 B.C.

Bnring this period the Idwj uses the title fSaai\(h<; /SaaiX^wv, while the silcer pieces

are dated according to an era Iwijinnhuj in 111 B.C., the year of the return

if Aiitiochus nil. (Gri/pus) from Aspendus*

The letter in the

feld r. o/Ao. 7 pnibably indicates the month of issue.

SiLVEK

Euboic-Attic Standard

Drachm

Draped bust of Tigranes r., wearing tiara , BAZIAE HZ (to r., downwards)

7

():!-2

-R

-8

decorated as on Nu.s.

reel border.

1 fE. ; bead and ' BAZIAEHN

TITPANOY

(*^o !•' (^own-n'ards)

The Tyche of Antioch seated r., as on Nos. 1 fE., with the river-god Orontes at

her feet ; in field above, g" A [= 75 B.C.]

in field

border visible.

r.,

H

[ = 8]

;

in ex., ZC ;

no

[Plate lxiii. 3.]

Bronze

Here again there is a higher and a lower denomination, the types heing in each case the same.

ir,:

.E

-96

Similar to No. 7 ; border of dots.

Similar to No. 7 ; no letters : no border.

[Cf. B.M.G., Pl. xxvii. 10.]

* Sec Num. Chron., 1902, pp. 197 f.

TIGEANES I.—UNCERTAIN KING

Weight

.E -S

Similar.

Obverse

Similar.

!

 

BASIAEI2Z off coin.

 

!

("'/',

71—69 B.C.

The rare silrer (etradrachns of this period hear dates of ihe Selencld Era. The 'worhmanship of silver and bronze coins alilce is marlcedli/ degraded. It seems improhaUe that Aniioch was the place of issue. Two denominations of bronze

are again represented here.

10 99

n 94

12

13

93

62-5

M -85

M -85

M

M

-9

-8

Bbonze

Head of Tigranes r., wearing Ai'menian tiai'a, decorated "witli star behind and simple volute in front ; drapery about

neck ; boi'der of dots.

BASIAEI2Z (to r., downwards)

Tir PANOY (to 1., downwards)

Figure of Tyche seated 1. on rock, wear-

ing turreted crown and slight drapery;

she stretches out her r. hand, and holds

beneath her feet,

cornucopiae

in

1.

;

river-god swimming to front ; border

of dots.

Sir

(Part of No. 11 has been cut off.)

I

[Plate lxiii. 4.]

Similar.

(No. 13 is restruck.)

UNCERTAIN KING

Circa 30

B.C.,

or

later.

Tigranes

succeeded bi/ his son Artavasdes J., one or two of whose coins hare survived.

appears to hare issued no money after his defeat ly Lucnlhis.^

He

lie loas

The

history of the dynasty after his death is obscure and confused.

The style and the

Eev. type of the folloioing piece suggest that it shotdd be assigned to this period.

66-5

JE -7

Bronze

Draped bust of king r., wearing lofty

Armenian tiara decorated with crescent behind, y^ ; border of dots.

BAZIAEnCZ] (above)

M I PA A O [Y]

J.NNAAOY

(sic, to r., downwards)

(beneath)

Galloping biga, r. ; beneath horses' fore-

legs, M CO

[Plate lxiii. 5.]

No.

Weight

107-3

Metal

Size

M

-9

ARMENIA

Obverse

Reverse

TIGRANES III. AND ERATO

Cirr.a

12 6

B.C.

and 3—1 B.C.

Our of the few facts lenoion about this king or Ms rei</n is

that, after lie had

h'niisetf been slain in battle, his sister Erato held the reins

of ijoreniineitt for some time alone.

BACIA€YC M€rAC N€oC TITPA

NHC Draped bust of Tigranes III. r.,

weai'ins- Armenian tiara.

inscr. reads downwards from r.

ePATW BACIA€COCTirPANoY

AAA<t>H

Drajjed bust of Erato 1.

inscr. reads downwards from 1.

[Plate l.xiii. G.]

No.

Weight

Mktal

Size

Obverse

SYRIA

SYRIA

KINGS OF SYRIA

Reverse

SELEUCUS I. (NICATOR)

Circa 312—280 B.C.

Selciiciis, ivho liud been appointed satrap of Babylon by the regent Antipater in

321 B.C., loas driven ont

by Antigonus five years later.

With the aid of Ptolemy

he regained his authority by the victory of Gaza in 312 B.C., at which date the

' Selciicid Era' loas aficrwardu rechoned as beginning. As satrap he had struck

money in the names of Alexander and of Philip III.

In 305 B.C. he assumed the

title /Sao-iAcu's, and hcijim to place his oimi jiame on his coins.

The battle of Ipsus

gave him control of Syria (301 B.C.), and subsequent campaigns added considerably

While he introduced types of his own in all metals

to the extent of his dominions.

{e.g. Nos. 1 S. and Nos. 29 H.), he continued to employ contemporaneously the types

of Alexander the Great.* His earlier money was issued at Babylon, but before the

close of his reign there must have been various mints in operation.

268-7

.R 105

Silver

Eiiboic-Attic Standard

Tetradracliin

Head of Zeus r., vveariiig wreath of laurel; border of dots.

BAZIAEnZ (to 1., upwards) ZEAEYKOY (in ex.)

Athena, lielmeted, with shield on 1. ami

and thunderbolt in raised r. band, stand- ing in chariot drawn r. by four homed

elephants, the nearest of which wears a bell round his neck ; in field above, to

r. anchor, and to 1. /% aad O ; border

of dots.

[Plate lxiii. 7.]

Similar.

Drachms

Same inscr.

Similar type, without bell

on elephant's neck ; in field r., above,

anchor ; border of dots.

61-9

.R -7

beneath shield, IaP and

 

i

64-

Al -05

beneath r. arm, A ; beneath shield, O

 

i

* Sou Imhoof-Blnmor, Die Miiiustdtte Bahylon ziw Zeit der Makedonischen Satrapen, in Nmn.

Zeitschr., xxvii., pp. 1 ff.

No.

10

Weight

Metal

Size

263-6

/R 1-1

2.577

^R 1

2631

.R 1-1

240-3

M

1-1

260-6

30 6

264-3

M 1-2

/R -65

M 1-2

KINGS OF STRIA

Obverse

Reverse

Tetradraclims

Head of young Herakles r., -R'eariiig lion's

skin ; border of dots.

BAZIAEX2Z (in ex.)

Z EA EY KOY

(to r. , down-wards)

Zeus, naked to -waist, seated I. on throne

with back, his feet resting on a footstool,

and his r. leg drawn back behind his 1.;

be holds in extended r. eagle r., and

leans with 1. on sceptre ; in field 1., [Stp

border of dots.

;

beneath throne, K

beneath throne, K; (monogram in -wreath.

beneath throne, ^

[Plate lxiii. 8.]

beneath throne, ^

(Xo. 7 is double-struck, and has been pierced.)

Similar.

Similar ;

barous.

execution

rude,

Similar ; but in field 1-, /$^ , above -which, dolphin 1.

beneath throne, AB

H emidrachm

but not bar-

ZEAEYKOY (to r. doivnwards)

Zeus

seated 1. on throne, as above, holding

eagle ; his r. leg visible in fi-ont of his

1. ; execution rude, but not barbai-ons ;

in field 1., Z ; border of dots.

(Xo. 9 is pierced.)

[Pl,ATE LXIII. 12.]

T e tradracliins

Head of young Herakles r., wearing lion's

skin ; border of dots.

BAZIAEnZ (in ex.)

ZEAEYKOY (to r., downwards)

Zeus seated 1., as on Nos. 4 ff. ;

but, in

place of eagle, -wreath-bearing Nike r. ;

in field 1., vai-ying monogram ; border

of dots.

[Plate lxiii. 9.]

No.

11

13

14

15

16

Weight

264-3

263-1

259-8

256-3

261-9

:

263-2

Metal

Size

.R 1-1

M 1-1

.R

1-1

.R 1-1

.R 1-1

.R 1-15

SELEUCUS I.

Obverse

it

Reverse

'^ ; beneath throne, "P

[Plate lxik. 10.]

P on shield ; beneath throne, AZ

£

; beneath throne, ^

[Platk Lxni. 11.]

Beonze

j4.s one might expect fro)ii the length of Ids reign and the number of possihie mints,

the bronze coinage of Scleitcus exhibits great variety of types.

The material here

available is not sufficient to justify any attempt at a scientific classification.

the

earlier Seleucid Icings it is not uncommon to find series consisting of

Under

three

denominations, each of the tioo higher being, roughly, double the weight of the (ue

17

18

106-5

129

M

7E

-75

-7

belo'W, and idl having the same types.'^

With a few exceptions, the whole of the

following belong to one denomination.

Bust of Athena r

thian helmet

visible.

, , wearing crested Corin-

and

aegis ;

no border

BAZIAEHS (to r., downwards)

ZEAEYKOY (to 1., downvrai-ds)

Nike standing ]., holding in 1. a palm,

and in r. a wreath, which she is placing

on the king's name ; beneath r. arm, A

(nothing visible beneath r. arm.)

* No doubt, as is sho-wn by the monograms on later pieces, the x"'^"-"'"*. SixaXitov, and Terpa-

Xa\Koi' : see Imhoof-Blumer, Monn. grecq., p. 429. But, where series are incomplete, and there

are no marks of value, it is impossible to distinguish the diifereut denominations with certainty.

In such cases (and they constitute the great majority) no attempt has been made in this Cata- logue to distinguish the bronze coins by the names of the denominations they may have belonged to" The variation among those with marks of value proves clearly that weight is a very un-

reliable guide.

No.

19

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

Weight

Metal

Size

KINGS OF SYRIA

Obverse

Eeveese

No.

Weight

30

129

31

91

140

33

102-5

Metal

Size

.E -8

.E

M

JE

-9

-sr,

!

SELEOCUS I.

Obverse

liEVEESE

Elephant standing r., with lowered trunk;

bui'der of dots.

BASIAEfl[Z] (to r., downwards)

ZEAEYKoY

(to 1., downwards)

Head of

anchor 1.

bridled

horse

1.

;

beneath,

[PiATn LXin. 15.]

Apollo, naked to waist, holdhig arrow

extended r., and

leaning with 1.

rock on which he is seated 1.

BAZIA Ens (above) ZEAEYKOY (beneath)

Head of horned elephant r., with trunk

uplifted.

[Plate lxiii. 16.]

Head of Apollo r., laur. ; border of dots.

Similar.

[Plate

BA ZlAEnZ (to r., downwards)

(to 1., downwards)

ZEAEYKOY

Athena Alkis standing r. in usual atti-

tude, with

shield

on

1.

arm,

and

thunderbolt in raised r. hand ; border

of dots.

:ill. 17.]

BAZIAEilZ (to r., downwards) [Z] EAEYKOY (to 1., downwards)

Similar type ; in front of Athena, in-

verted anchor ; border of dots,

(no chlamys visible.)

(Nos. 32 and 33 are distinguished frnm the otlier bronze pieces here catalogued by their

fabric. On the Obv. the edge