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If

is borrowed for

years at

interest, compounded annually, and then paid in full at the end of that period, how much must be paid back at that time? Use the calculator provided and round your answer to the nearest dollar. After the first year, the amount due will be ; after the second year, the amount due will be ; and so on. In general, after years the amount due will be amount due will be . In this example, . So we have . Rounding to the nearest dollar , we get that the amount due will be The answer is . after years. times the original amount. Thus, the

A laptop computer is purchased for

After each year, its resale value is of its value the previous year. What will be the resale value of the computer after years?

Use the calculator provided and round your answer to the nearest dollar. After the first year, the computer will have a resale value of ; after the second year, the computer will have a resale value of ; and so on. In general, after years the resale value will be have a resale value of . In this example, . So we have . Rounding to the nearest dollar , we get that the computer will have a resale value of years. The answer is . after of the original value. Thus, the computer will

When a ball is thrown, its height in feet , where

after seconds is given by the equation

is the initial upwards velocity in feet per second. If

feet per second, find all

values of for which decimal places.

feet. Do not round any intermediate steps. Round your answer to

(If there is more than one answer, enter additional answers with the button that says "or".)

The relationship between

and is a quadratic equation in

. We must find the solutions of this

quadratic equation, that is, the values of for which the equation is true. First, we substitute the numbers given for . Next, we rewrite the equation in the standard form, . Comparing this to the standard form, we see , solutions to this equation are given by the quadratic formula: , and . The : and into the equation, :

. Substituting the values of , , and found above into this equation yields

So,

or

. or seconds or . seconds. feet. The

Writing these two values as decimals yields Rounding these values to Therefore, at approximately decimal places yields seconds and

seconds, the height of the ball is

first time ( ) occurs when the ball is on the way up, while the second time ( the ball is on the way down. The answer is:

) occurs when

seconds or

seconds.

Dividing the polynomial a quotient , find

by and

yields . If .

and a remainder of

The division algorithm guarantees that if the division of and a remainder of , then . We can use this fact to find . Namely,

by

yields a quotient of

. So Note that then . is the remainder when is divided by . The generalization of this result is by , and , so by the remainder

called the remainder theorem: if theorem we must have To find

is the remainder after dividing the polynomial , which is exactly the result obtained above.

. In the current problem, we have

, we use the division algorithm along with the given information that

. Thus, the answer is:

Consider a triangle the one on the right. If , and , and , find ,

like

. In other words, solve the

triangle. Put answers in the degree measure to the nearest hundredth.

When three sides of an oblique triangle are given, and we are asked to find the angles, we are said to be in the SSS case (referring to side-side-side). The procedure to solve such a triangle is as follows.

We first solve for the largest angle by using the law of cosines. This will always be the angle opposite the longest side. Since is the longest side, we find the measure of , and so by using the law of cosines:

Therefore,

(We will use the exact value of , in order to minimize rounding error.)

below rather than the approximation,

Second, we find the remaining sides using the law of sines. Since

, we have

. Hence,

. Finally, since , we have

The answer, rounded to the nearest hundredth, is .

, and

Consider a triangle the one on the right. If , and , and , find

like , ,

. In other words, solve the

triangle. Round all answers to the nearest hundredth with angles in degree measure.

When two sides and the included angle of an oblique triangle are given, and we are asked to find the remaining parts, we are said to be in the SAS case (referring to side-angle-side). The procedure to solve such a triangle is as follows.

We first solve for the unknown side by using the law of cosines. Namely,

so that

(We will use the exact value of approximation, , in order to minimize rounding error.)

below rather than the

Second, we find the measure of the angle opposite the shorter of the two given sides. Since , we solve for . Using the law of sines, we have

and hence

, so that

. Finally, since , we have

The answer, rounded to the nearest hundredth, is .

, and

Consider a triangle below. Given measure of angle ,

like the one shown , and the , solve the triangle

by finding , , and . If no such triangle exists, enter "No solution." If there is more than one such triangle, use the "or" button to enter additional solutions. Round all answers to the nearest tenth with angle measure in degrees.

When two sides and an angle not included between them are given, we are in the SSA case (Side-Side-Angle).

In the SSA case, we always know a side and its opposite angle. In this problem, we know opposite angle the law of sines: . We can then use the other given side to solve for its opposite angle

and its using

. We get the following:

(We will use the exact value of , in order to minimize rounding error.)

below rather than the approximation,

Since

is an angle in a triangle, we have that are the angles and

. shown on the unit circle in Figure 1:


Figure 1

The only two possibilities for

and

. (These values for and are approximations found using a calculator.)

Note that both

and

are solutions for

because neither is "too large" for the triangle: and .

For

, we have

. Using the law of sines, we have

. For , we have

. Using the law of sines, we have

. Note that, in calculating than the values of and , we used the values of and (given in the question) rather

(an approximation) in order to minimize rounding error.

Here are the solutions, with values rounded to the nearest tenth.

, , or , ,

Compute the value of the discriminant and give the number of real solutions to the quadratic equation .

Background: The solutions of the quadratic equation are given by the quadratic formula:

. The expression under the square root, , is called the discriminant of the

quadratic equation. The value of the discriminant determines the number of real solutions to :

y y y

If If

, there are , there is

real solutions to real solution to .

If , there are no real solutions to root of a negative number is not a real number).

(as the square

The current problem: For the quadratic equation , we have that , , and

. Thus, the value of the discriminant is . Since the value of the discriminant is equal to zero , the quadratic equation has real solution .

The answer is:

Discriminant: Number of real solutions: .

Find all the values of equation

such that the quadratic

has two real solutions . Write your answer as an equality or inequality in terms of .

Background: The solutions of the quadratic equation are given by the quadratic formula:

. The expression under the square root, , is called the discriminant of the

quadratic equation. It turns out that the value of the discriminant determines the number of real solutions to :

y y y

If If

, there are , there is

real solutions to real solution to .

If , there are no real solutions to root of a negative number is not a real number).

(as the square

The current problem: In order for . Plugging solving for , we have to have two real solutions , we must have the discriminant , , and into this inequality and

. The answer is

Rewrite as a logarithmic equation.

For any numbers

, and

, with

and positive ( .

) , we have the equivalence

if and only if

The first is a logarithmic equation, and the second is an exponential equation.

Note that

is of the form

, with

, and

We write it as a logarithmic equation as follows.

The midpoint formula states that the midpoint of the line segment joining the points is the point ((x1+x2)/2 , (y1+y2)/2)

and

So the midpoint of the line segment joining = . See Figure 1. and = is

The answer is .

Solve

for . Simplify your answer as much as possible.

For any numbers

, and

, with

and positive ( .

), we have the equivalence

if and only if Applying this to our problem gives

if and only if . From the equation on the right, we have that . Thus, .

Solve

for . Simplify your answer as much as possible.

For any numbers

, and

, with

and positive (

), we have the equivalence

if and only if . Applying this equivalence to our problem gives

if and only if

Raising both sides of the equation on the right to the power

, we get

. The answer is .

Find the magnitude of the vector given below. Also find the measure (in degrees) of the acute angle formed by the vector and the -axis. Do not round any intermediate computations, and round your responses to decimal places.

Consider the right triangle with its base along the

Figure 1. Imagine a right triangle

-axis and the vector as the hypotenuse (Figure 1). The length , and the length of the other leg equals .

of one of the legs of this

right triangle equals

The magnitude of a vector is the length of that vector. Therefore, we can use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the magnitude of the given vector. Specifically, using of the given vector, we have to represent the magnitude

. Using a calculator, we can compute the value of represents a length): (which must be nonnegative as it

. To find , we use the definition of tangent. Specifically, we have

. Therefore, we can use arctangent to find : . The answer is: magnitude of the vector: .

A vector with initial point

and terminal

point is translated so that its initial point is at the origin. Find its new terminal point.

In translating a vector, we maintain its magnitude and direction. If we move the initial point of a vector to the origin, we must simultaneously move its terminal point in the same way. In other words, to move the initial point , we must subtract add to the -coordinate: . from the to -coordinate and
Figure 1

We must also do this to the terminal point be: . The answer is .

. Therefore, the new terminal point will

For a given arithmetic sequence, the , is equal to , is equal to Find the value of the
th

th th

term,

, and the . term,

term,

A sequence

is an arithmetic sequence if and only if the differences between (called the common difference of the sequence):

consecutive terms are equal to some number . Showing this another way, we have .

So, for example, we have that arithmetic sequence, we must have

. More generally, for any terms

and

of an

. Note that if we know the value of any two terms in an arithmetic sequence, we can use this formula to find the value of . For the current problem, we are given that . So, we have the following. and

We can now find the value of sequence. Using

by using this value of with

and the value of any other term in the

, we have the following.

The answer is

Compute decimal places.

. Round your answer to

Most calculators compute logarithms only with base ). To compute a logarithm with a base different from formula for logarithms. Change of base formula for logarithms: For any positive numbers , , and ,

(denoted by or

) or base

(denoted by

, we use the change of base

. For base , the formula becomes


A proof of this formula

In the current problem, we get the following.

The answer is

Consider the equation

. Find the value of answer to decimal places. . Round your

Using the property of logarithm of a power, we can rewrite

as . Solving this equation for , we have

. We then use the change of base formula for logarithms,


proof of this formula

The answer is .