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WILKES-BARRE, PA TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 50
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Story, 5B
DALLAS TWP. A senior at Dallas
High School with a career goal of be-
coming a cavalry scout in the U.S. Ar-
my died after his pickup truck struck a
tree along Kunkle-Alderson Road near
Lake Street on Mon-
day morning.
The Luzerne
County Coroners
Office identified the
man as Thomas E.
Lynch, 18, of Har-
veys Lake. He was
alone in the vehicle.
Police Chief Rob-
ert Jolley said Lynch, operating a
Chevrolet S10, was traveling east on
Kunkle-Alderson Road when the vehi-
cle left the roadway and struck a large
tree at about 7:50 a.m.
Jolley said it was likely Lynch was
headed to school at the time of the
crash. It remained unknown if Lynch
was wearing a seat belt.
The roadway was generally dry but
wet in spots and may have been ice
covered earlier in the morning, Jol-
Thomas E. Lynch, 18, who planned to be an Army
cavalry scout, died after his pickup ran off a road
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Classmates of Thomas E. Lynch, 18, put flowers and candles at the site of his crash after school
on Monday.
Crash kills Dallas senior
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Kristen Jones and Gary Anderson hug one another at
the site of the crash that claimed the life one of their
classmates. See CRASH, Page 8A
Lynch
WILKES-BARRE All but
a handful of workers employ-
ed as Luzerne County proba-
tion officers and domestic
relations support officers
will earn more than $60,000
in base salary this year, rank-
ing them among the top paid
employees in the county.
Under the union contract,
62 of the 72 people employ-
ed as juvenile or adult proba-
tion officers will earn the top
rate of $60,577.
In Domestic Relations,
which handles child support
cases, 24 of 28 support or
B A L A N C I N G T H E B U D G E T
Some county
workers high
salaries eyed
Probation and domestic
relations officers among
top-paid county workers.
EDITORS NOTE: This is the
last of a three-day series exam-
ining the largest expenditure in
the Luzerne County budget
salaries and benefits paid to
employees.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Luzerne County Council
members purposely kept si-
lent and listened to more
than an hour of mostly criti-
cal feedback on the proposed
2012 budget amendment
Monday night.
The countys new home
rule charter requires special
public budget hearings.
Council members agreed to
keep the focus of the meeting
on comment from others,
thoughthey may defendtheir
positions for or against the
budget before they vote to-
night.
Several property owners
voiced displeasure because
the proposed spending plan
raises taxes 2 percent. The
tax increase amounts to
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Kingston resident Ed Gustitus references news articles
about Luzerne County government employee salaries.
Council gets feedback
on budget amendment
Council expected to adopt
the 2012 amended budget
at a meeting tonight.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See BUDGET, Page 10A
Adult probation officers
in Luzerne County had
one of the lowest caseload
averages of all third-class
counties in Pennsylvania
in 2010, yet they were
among the highest paid in
the entire state, according
to a state report.
Probation officers in the
adult division earned an
average of $53,544 the
second highest average
salary out of the 11 third-
class counties, and the
fourth highest out of all 65
counties in the state that
have county-run probation
offices, according a report
compiled by the state
Board of Probation and
Caseloads,
pays dont
match up
By TERRIE
MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See CASELOADS, Page 10A See SALARIES, Page 10A
HARRISBURG A judge
ruled Monday that former
Penn State assistant football
coach Jerry Sandusky can
have supervised contact with
most of his grandchildren, say-
ing there was no evidence that
the childrens parents
wouldnt be
able to keep
them safe.
Judge
John Cleland
also rejected
requests by
prosecutors
that jurors be
brought in
fromoutside the State College
area to hear the case and that
Sandusky remain indoors
while on home confinement
before trial.
Prosecutors made the bail
modification request after
hearing concerns by neigh-
bors about the safety of chil-
dren, particularly at an ele-
mentary school behind Sand-
uskys house.
The commonwealth failed
to present any evidence what-
soever that the defendant pre-
sents a clearly defined threat
to any student at the adjoining
elementary school simply by
being on his deck, Cleland
wrote.
Sandusky faces 52 criminal
counts for what prosecutors
say was the sexual abuse of 10
boys over a 15-year period. He
has denied the allegations.
Sanduskys lawyer issued a
statement saying Sandusky,
his wife and their family were
relieved by and pleased with
the visitation ruling, which
pertains to all but three of his
Sandusky
grandkids
can visit
with him
Former PSU assistant coach
charged with child sexual
abuse can have a local jury.
By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
Sandusky
See SANDUSKY, Page 8A
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama unveiled a $3.8
trillion spending plan on Mon-
day for 2013 that seeks to
achieve $4 trillion in deficit re-
duction over the next decade
but does little torestraingrowth
in the governments huge health
benefit programs, a major cause
of future deficits.
Obamas new budget was im-
mediately attacked by Republi-
cans as a retread of previously
rejected ideas. The budget bat-
tle is likely to be a major compo-
nent of the fall election cam-
paign.
The president would achieve
$1.5 trillion of the deficit reduc-
tions in tax increases on the
wealthy and by removing cer-
tain corporate tax breaks. Oba-
ma rejected GOP charges of
class warfare. In his budget
message, he said, This is not
about class warfare. This is
about the nations welfare.
In a message that repeated
populist themes Obama also
sounded in his State of the
Unionaddress, the president de-
fended his proposed tax increas-
es on the wealthy, saying it was
important that the burden of
getting deficits under control be
a shared responsibility.
This is about making fair
choices that benefit not just the
F E D E R A L B U D G E T Republicans say that president is presenting same old ideas rejected before
Obama plan avoids big health care cuts
By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
AP PHOTO
Labeling it Debt on Arrival, GOP senators Jeff Sessions, left,
and John Barrasso react to President Obamas FY2013 budget. See OBAMA, Page 7A
K
PAGE 2A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Antosh, John
Brodi, Bernadine
Carey, Tillie
Casey, Patrick
Connor, Marguerite
Dalton, John
Eddy, Claybert
Ernst, Alice
Fletcher, Jeanne
Flock, William
Gilsky, Eleanor
Hometchko, Joseph
Jones, Rev. Gary
Kolessar, Mary Jo
Lennon, Delbert
McIntyre, John
Muchler, Robert
Nossavage, Grace
Oliver, Esther
Ostrosky, Bernard
Reese, Harry
Savakinas, Dorothy
Schuetz, Sophia
Williams, Barbara
OBITUARIES
Page 6A, 8A
A PAGE1A GRAPHIC in
Sundays Times Leader listing
Luzerne County department
payrolls and average salaries
should have included an aste-
risk noting that EMS 911, like
several other departments so
marked, does not get all its
revenue from the Luzerne
County general fund.
BUILDING
TRUST
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correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG Tuesdays
Pennsylvania Cash 5 jack-
pot will be worth at least
$225,000 because no player
matched the five winning
numbers drawn in Mondays
game.
Lottery officials said 91
players matched four num-
bers and won $143 each;
2,909 players matched
three numbers and won
$7.50 each; and 29,316 play-
ers matched two numbers
and won $1 each.
One player holds a ticket
with a row that matches all
six winning numbers drawn
in Mondays Pennsylvania
Match 6 Lotto game, and
will receive $800,000.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 1-0-0
BIG 4 6-6-8-0
QUINTO - 8-6-0-0-7
TREASURE HUNT
01-04-16-20-21
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 2-9-9
BIG 4 - 6-4-4-3
QUINTO - 6-4-5-4-1
CASH 5
01-05-14-19-23
MATCH 6 LOTTO
03-10-19-21-38-39
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Issue No. 2012-045
LEHMAN TWP. To hold
steady is what Lake-Lehman
School District can anticipate in
the wake of the news of Gov. Tom
Corbetts proposed budget.
Monday night, school board
Business Manager Thomas Mel-
one of Albert B. Melone Co., Pitt-
ston, told the board members
that if the numbers hold out, and
nothing changes with the states
proposed budget, the district
could break even.
But with the states budget ap-
proval deadline of June 30 still
months away, hestressedthepro-
posed the numbers are just tenta-
tive.
Comparing school funding
from Corbetts 2012-2013 budget
proposal to funding from the
2011-2012 state budget, Melone
said the district may expect to re-
ceive the same for basic educa-
tion funding of $6,479,800, an in-
crease of $44,380 in Social Secu-
rity reimbursement to $511,955,
an increase of $21,787 in pupil
transportation to $1,452,829 and
tokeepspecial educationfunding
at $1,113,910.
One area of funding loss is the
Accountability Block Grant from
the state Department of Educa-
tion that will not be available to
the district for the 2012-2013
school year. The district received
$114,580 from ABG for the cur-
rent school year.
With all the components fig-
ured in, Melone said, the district
couldseea loss of $48,413instate
funding from 2011-2012 school
year to 2012-2013.
He said that because the pro-
posed state budget could still
change, he will keep the board
updated on the situation.
Last years significant cut of
state funding caused a hole in the
budget that the school board
strived to fill, cutting back on
supplies andnot replacingretired
teachers. Just last month the dis-
trict approved a preliminary bud-
get of $27.4 million with a 4.4 in-
crease inthe property tax millage
rates.
Amill is $1tax for every $1,000
in assessed property value
Lake-Lehman may hold steady with governors budget
School District may expect to
receive the same for basic
education funding.
By EILEEN GODIN
Times Leader Correspondent
The next regular school board
meeting will be at 7 p.m. March 19
in the library of the Junior Senior
High.
W H AT S N E X T
ST. HEDWIGS RECTORY IS RAZED
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A
piece of heavy equipment sits on top of rubble that was once the rectory of St.
Hedwigs Church, Kingston. The church closed in 2008. Parishioners now attend St.
Ignatius of Loyola Church in Kingston along with those from St. Marys Annunciation
Church.
DALLAS TWP. -- Students and
parents addressed the Dallas
School Board on Monday about
the recent usage of metal detec-
tors at the senior high school.
Before the meeting began, the
board held a moment of silence
in honor of 18-year-old Dallas
High School student Thomas
Lynch, of Harveys Lake, who
died in a vehicle crash Monday
morning.
Board President Catherine
Wega said Lynch was an Eagle
Scout who had already enlisted
in the U.S. military, and planned
to attend basic training in Fort
Benning, Ga.
During the meeting, parents
andstudents discussedthe metal
detectors at the high school that
have been in use since Feb. 1.
Principal Jeffrey Shaffer said
the system is randomized -- all
students walk through the detec-
tion system when entering the
new building, but only some are
scanned.
Paul Paci, of Dallas, whose
daughter attends the school, said
he disagrees with the notion that
all students should have to pass
through the metal detector be-
cause of the poor choices of
others.
He said students who wish to
do harmto others will find a way
to get a weapon into the school
regardless of whether there are
metal detectors.
Paci said he felt the detectors
were a violation of students con-
stitutional rights.
Board member Colleen Slo-
cum said that because of inci-
dents such as the Columbine
High School shooting, in which
two students killed 12 students
andone teacher andinjurednear-
lytwodozenothers inApril 1999,
schools need to be prepared to
keep students and faculty safe.
This is our new normal, she
said.
Pacis daughter, Amanda, said
the detectors are time-consum-
ing, which causes her to not have
enough time before class to fin-
ish her homework.
She said shes unable to com-
plete it at home due to a part-
time job.
Senior Gavin Carolan, of Dal-
las, created T-shirts in protest of
the detectors, but said the ad-
ministration had banned them
on Monday.
He saidthe shirts are bright or-
ange and read PA Department
of Corrections, Dallas High
School, Inmate Number 570.
Carolan said he researched
court cases andthe detectors and
banning students protests were
both unconstitutional.
Shaffer said he saw the shirts
as a disruptiontothe learningen-
vironment.
Amanda Paci also said she
didnt feel safe at the school be-
cause faculty, staff and visitors
were not scanned for weapons.
According to the school, Im
the only threat, she said.
Shaffer said there are seven or
eight staff members who can op-
erate the detectors, andscanning
every visitor would be impossi-
ble right now.
Parent Chris Oremus, of Fran-
klin Township, expressed con-
cerns about traffic going in and
out of the campus from Hilde-
brandt Road. He said a visibility
problem and reckless drivers are
reasons why he sees near-acci-
dents almost every single day.
Board member Bruce Goerin-
ger agreed and said there should
be a police officer in the area to
deter drivers from speeding.
In other business, the board
appointed high school assistant
football coaches Bob Roper and
Craig Haywood with stipends of
$3,976 each. There is also anoth-
er assistant position that is to be
announced.
The board also appointed mid-
dle school assistant-in-charge of
football Bill Perkarovsky with a
stipend of $3,295, middle school
assistant Chris Plaviak and vol-
unteer high school football as-
sistants Stephen Salavantis and
John Perkarovsky.
Metal detectors at Dallas H.S. criticized
Moment of silence held in
honor of student Thomas
Lynch, who died Monday.
By SARAH HITE
shite@timesleader.com
The next Dallas School Board
meeting will be at 7 p.m. March 5
in the administration building.
W H AT S N E X T
THORNHURST TWP. A
state consumer advocate on
Monday advised dozens of citi-
zens onthe legal process they can
use to oppose the proposed route
of a high-voltage power line
through their communities.
Dianne Dusman, senior assist-
ant consumer advocate for the
Pennsylvania Office of Consumer
Advocate, was guest speaker at a
meeting of a grass-roots group
concerned about the 57.2-mile
path that PPL Electric Utilities
has planned for a 230-kilovolt
power line through Wayne, Lack-
awanna and Luzerne counties.
The Office of Consumer Advo-
cate represents the interests of
state utilityconsumers before the
Public Utility Commission, fed-
eral regulatory agencies, and
state and federal courts.
Dusman led the residents
through the process PPL must
take to get state permission to
construct the power line. It could
include public hearings after PPL
submits an application to the
PUC, which is expected to hap-
pen in the second half of 2012.
If there is substantial public in-
terest in the project, Dusman
said her office will ask the admin-
istrative law judge assigned to
the case to hold public hearings.
She led the residents through the
hearing process.
Dusman said its difficult to
change a route after the hearing
process starts, soits best totry to
convince the utility why an alter-
nate route would be better before
the utility applies to the PUC.
PPL says the new power line
and three new substations one
in Buck Township, the others in
Lackawanna and Wayne counties
are needed to strengthen the
electric delivery system and im-
prove reliability.
The utility had open houses
last fall to informthe public of its
plan and solicit opinion, but
some residents dont think PPL
properly considered their com-
ments or adequately answered
their questions.
Frances CrokePage, spokeswo-
man for the grass-roots group,
said Thornhurst area residents
have hosted several meetings
since the fall to discuss the issue
and create both a town-level and
areawide plan suggesting alter-
nate routes that wouldbetter pro-
tect property values and reduce
environmental impacts and pos-
sible threats to residents health.
Residents get legal
tips on power line
State consumer advocate
details process of opposing
PPL path in Thornhurst Twp.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
The citizens group meets next at
7:30 p.m. March 19 at Thornhurst
Fire Hall, 125 River Road. Leaders
hope to have more a more defin-
itive alternate power line route
ready by that meeting. Find links
to earn more about the project
and see a map of the proposed
route at timesleader.com.
W H AT S N E X T
HAZLE TWP. -- A township
resident expressed concerns
Monday night about the cost of
snow removal in the township
when compared to Hazleton.
As an example, said Ri-
chard Wienches of Forest Hills
Acres, in 2007, when a state of
emergency was declared be-
cause of heavy snowfall, Hazle
Township spent 300 percent
more than Hazleton city.
Township Solicitor Charles
Pedri said that during that
weather event and subsequent
winter storms the township
did an excellent job in ensuring
that roadways were passable,
and did so in a timely way.
Chairman WilliamGallagher
said that open roads within the
township made plowing chal-
lenging.
I believe that funds directed
toward snow removal in the
township are well spent, said
Pedri.
In another matter, David Be-
ttine, Stockton, asked for help
from the township for lighting
for the Stockton Veterans Me-
morial.
Bettine said although he was
not a veteran, many members
of his family were and veterans
of the area deserved to be hon-
ored. He said monetary dona-
tions were being accepted.
He said he looked forward to
an upcoming fundraiser at
Community Park that would
raise money for maintenance
and improvement. The board
indicated that it would offer a
pavilion for the event at a re-
duced cost.
John Synoski, township en-
gineer, said work had been
completed on Club 40 Road
and he would be inspecting it
prior to payment of contrac-
tors.
Joe Braski, Front Street, said
he was concerned about a
Dumpster in Humboldt placed
approximately 30 yards from
Route 924 that had been there
for more than two months. He
said it created a hazard in re-
gard to visibility.
Braski also said the Bognet
building needed more lighting
because of a day care facility
housed there that was open un-
til late at night. Supervisor
Francis Boyarski said the board
would look into both matters.
Snow removal costs questioned
Hazle Twp. resident asks
board about funds spent
compared to Hazleton.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
The next meeting of the Board of
Supervisors will be March 13 at
6:30 p.m.
W H AT S N E X T
ANCHORAGE, Alaska A
federal judge has deferred sen-
tencing for a father and son from
McAdoo who pleaded guilty to
telephone harassment of Sarah
Palins Alaska lawyers.
U.S. District Judge Timothy
Burgess onMondayorderedafull
psychological evaluation for
Shawn Christy.
Burgess deferred sentencing
for Shawn Christys father, Craig
Christy, until his lawyer can con-
tact the mental health expert
who conducted an earlier evalua-
tion of that defendant.
Burgess has rejected binding
plea deals that would have al-
lowed the men to avoid jail.
Sentencing of 2 in Palin case deferred
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Machete attack probed
P
olice continue the investigation of
a brutal assault involving a 14-
year-old boy whose hand was nearly
severed by a machete outside Wilkes-
Barre Areas GAR High School.
No charges have been filed.
Police said the boy, a ninth-grader,
was assaulted during a large fight at
South Grant and Lehigh streets,
across the street from the high
school, after school was dismissed on
Thursday.
GAR students said the machete
attack occurred during a planned
fight between students of African-
American and Dominican heritage.
WILKES-BARRE
Crime Watch meetings set
The Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch
will hold meetings throughout this
week, volunteer crime watch chief
Charlotte Raup said.
On Wednesday,
Central City Crime
Watch meets at 6:30
p.m. at Provincial
Tower, 34 S. Main
St.
On Thursday, the
South View High
Rise meets at 2 p.m.
at South View Ma-
nor, 60 Monroe St. and the Parsons
group meets at 7 p.m. at the Prim-
itive Methodist Church, 193 Austin
Ave.
WILKES-BARRE
SA luncheon is set
The Salvation Armys annual Vol-
unteer Appreciation luncheon will be
held Wednesday at noon. The lun-
cheon is for volunteers who helped
during the Christmas holiday.
In 2011, volunteers gave more than
7,000 hours during the holiday sea-
son.
For more information, contact the
Salvation Army of Wilkes-Barre at
824-8741.
WILKES-BARRE
Check trial in March
The trial of a Shickshinny woman
charged with altering a check used to
pay a sewer bill will begin on March
19.
Senior Judge Kenneth Brown said
the trial of Diane Noss, 52, will begin
at 9 a.m. with jury selection. The trial
had previously been continued at the
request of prosecutors because a
witness was not available this week.
Noss is the wife of Shickshinny
Councilman Barry Noss Sr., who is
also a board member on the Shick-
shinny Sewer Authority. Prosecutors
say Diane Noss altered a $60 check
to pay her sewer bill in September
2009, according to court records.
BLOOMSBURG
University getting $2M
Bloomsburg University officials
have announced a $2 million commit-
ment to the Blooms-
burg University
Foundation by phi-
lanthropist Susan
McDowell of Selins-
grove. The gift, the
largest in the histo-
ry of the BU Foun-
dation, was given in
support of the Col-
lege of Education to establish the
McDowell Institute for Teacher Ex-
cellence in Positive Behavior Sup-
port.
The McDowell gift is the second
multimillion-dollar one to the foun-
dation. Last year alumni Terry and
JoAnn Zeigler contributed $1.67
million to establish the Zeigler In-
stitute for Professional Development
within the College of Business.
BARTONSVILLE
Wilkes center opening
Wilkes University will hold a grand
opening for its new Pocono center at
11:30 a.m. on Wednesday. The event
will kick off with a ribbon cutting.
Wilkes Universitys Pocono site, at
The Shoppes at Crossroads on Route
611 in Bartonsville, Monroe County,
allows adults to complete their de-
grees in the Poconos.
Programs include a master of busi-
ness administration and an accelerated
bachelor of business administration
program. Additional program offerings
will be added in the coming year.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Raup
McDowell
PLAINS TWP. The state Senate ma-
jority leader saidMonday the battle for re-
drawing legislative districts is not over
and, if necessary, the April 24 primary
could be moved.
DominicPileggi, R-Chester, saidRepub-
licans are scurrying to meet the Wednes-
day deadline for revision of the redistrict-
ing plan. The revised plan would be voted
on Feb. 22, he said.
Last week a federal judge ruled that for
the 2012 election, Pennsylvanias legisla-
tive districts will revert to the configura-
tion mapped out for them in 2001. If Re-
publicans appeal the latest court ruling,
the process could extend past the sched-
uled primary date.
The fact that this is a presidential elec-
tionyeardoesnotprecludemovingthepri-
mary, Pileggi said.
But it could
eliminate, or at
least minimize,
theimpactonthe
presidential race for Pennsylvania voters.
Pileggi was in the Wyoming Valley to
meet with state Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Leh-
man Township, and former state Sen.
Charles Lemmond, an old friend of Pileg-
gis.
Its not uncommon for Sen. Pileggi to
reach out to members and to come into
their specific regions to get a sense of con-
cernsinthecommunityandourlegislative
priorities, Baker said. I always welcome
an opportunity to exchange information
directly and to discuss issues that are im-
portant to this region.
One of those issues is the Marcellus
Shale industry. Pileggi voted for the im-
pactfeeoneverywell drillingforgas, retro-
activetothefirst well drilledintheMarcel-
lus formation.
It sets the framework for the foreseea-
ble future, Pileggi said. As it takes effect,
we will look at what revisions should be
madeandproposetheappropriateamend-
ments.
Pileggi said the legislature is in the
midst of negotiations regarding Gov. Tom
Corbetts proposed budget.
Thefeelingisthat thisisnot thetimeto
increasetaxes,hesaid. Westill havehigh
unemployment and we have to learn to
work within our budget constraints. We
have to learn how best to allocate these
scarce funds.
Baker said she has always had an excel-
lentworkingrelationshipwithPileggi. She
saidshewaslookingforwardtodiscussing
local issues with himat the meeting Mon-
day night.
Obviously, we will be looking at a host
of issues regarding the upcoming budget
negotiations, she said. And we will dis-
cuss the redistricting plan and the impact
it would have on my district.
Baker said she will leave for Harrisburg
early this morning for state Senate hear-
ings on the budget.
State Senate majority leader says that court ruling on redistricting causes scramble
Pileggi: Primary may be moved
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
State Sen. Dominic Pileggi speaks
with a Times Leader reporter on Mon-
day.
INSIDE: Redistricting
mess causing confusion,
4A.
WILKES-BARRETheLuzerneCoun-
ty District Attorneys Office on Monday
assignedtwodetectives toinvestigatethe
birthof twins inthe county prisononJan.
27.
First Assistant District Attorney Sa-
muel Sanguedolcesaidtwodetectivesare
reviewing prison records and interview-
ingguards andthetwins mother after the
23-year-old delivered the twins while
awaiting transfer to Schuylkill County on
a warrant.
The investigation
came at the request of
Interim Luzerne Coun-
ty Manager TomPribu-
la late Friday.
Sanguedolcesaidthe
detectives have already
met with Warden Jo-
seph Piazza, and have
begun to take state-
ments from others in-
volved.
The investigation is
not nearly completed,
Sanguedolce said, add-
ing preliminary infor-
mation indicates the
babies were delivered at the prison and
that a doctor and nurse were present.
The twins were taken to Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital, Sanguedolce said,
where one died an hour after arriving.
The babys death was due to natural
causes, he said a coroner had ruled.
Sanguedolce said the hospital did not
report any suspicious circumstances or
behavior.
No one reported (the births) to us un-
til late on Friday, Sanguedolce said of an
e-mail District Attorney Stefanie Salavan-
tis hadreceivedfromPribula. Now, were
confirmingif (theinformationwehave) is
true.
Pribula and Piazza met with county
council in closed-door executive session
Monday night to discuss the matter.
In addition to the D.A.s investigation,
Pribula said he wants to contact other
prisons and the state correctional system
to identify best practices in handling
pregnant inmates.
Pribula said he wants to ensure the
county is properly assessing pregnant in-
mates when they enter the prison to de-
termine if they are at risk and establish
whenpregnant inmates shouldbe kept in
the infirmary instead of their cells.
Piazza has said Freeland police trans-
portedthewomantothecountyprisonaf-
ter she was picked up on a bench warrant
fromSchuylkill County.
The prison nursing staff completed a
medical intake and observed the woman
was pregnant. The woman said she was
seven months pregnant.
She denied taking drugs, though a
Detectives
to probe
LCCF births
Two investigators will look into birth
of twins at county prison on Jan. 27.
One of the babies later died.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
See BABIES, Page 8A
No one
reported
(the
births) to
us until
late on
Friday.
Samuel
Sanguedolce
First assistant
DA
WILKES-BARREAwomancharged
with causing a crash that killed a 45-
year-old Ashley man pleaded guilty
Monday to related charges.
Caitlyn Hermanofski, 24, of Hunlock
Creek, entered the plea to charges of
homicide by motor vehicle while driv-
ing under the influence, accidents caus-
ing death and four counts of driving un-
der the influence relating to the June
2010 crash that killed Joseph Hauze.
Hermanofski, who will be sentenced
on May 3 by Luzerne County Judge Wil-
liam Amesbury, faces a minimum of
three years inprisononthe homicide by
motor vehicle charge.
Attorney Jonathan Blum, who repre-
sented Hermanofski on Monday in the
absence of her attorney, Ferris Webby,
said his client was nervous because she
has been unable to express her sympa-
thy to the Hauze family.
She would like to let themknowshe
is terribly sorry, Blumsaid, noting that
Hermanofski, as part of the charges
against her, was ordered to have no con-
tact with the victims family.
According to court papers, Herma-
nofski was driving under the influence
of alcohol and prescription medications
when she struck a Harley-Davidson mo-
torcycle operated by Hauze on state
Route 309 in Fairview Township.
Hauze underwent emergency surgery
and died June 21. The Luzerne County
Coroners Office ruled his death a hom-
icide after an autopsy showed he died
from pulmonary embolism, or a block-
age in the main artery of the lung.
Fairview Township police alleged
Hermanofski, who was pregnant at the
time, had a blood-alcohol level of .251
percent and had opiates and anti-anxie-
ty medications inher systemat the time
of the crash.
Since being charged, Hermanofski
has takenpart indrug-and-alcohol treat-
ment, and told Amesbury that she at-
tends the countys Day Reporting Cen-
ter program six days a week and coun-
seling sessions three days a week.
Amesbury commended Hermanofski
for doing an outstanding job with her
treatment, but warned that if she
doesnt continue her programs and
there is any deviation in her route, he
will revoke her bail and she will be
jailed.
Hermanofski was released from the
county prison on Dec. 22 after a bail
hearing. She is released on $50,000,
combined, unsecured bail for the hom-
icide by motor vehicle case, and a sep-
arate simple assault case.
Inthe case, Hermanofski was charged
in March 2011 after police said she
pushed an officer responding to a dis-
turbance at a Wilkes-Barre apartment.
Police said Hermanofski and a man
wereintoxicatedandcaringfor aninfant
in an apartment in disarray, police said.
Hermanofskis bail had been revoked
because of the new charge, leading her
to be jailed. She is awaiting trial on
charges relating to the March incident.
Blum said Monday a plea agreement
may be worked out in the assault case.
Woman pleads guilty in fatality
Caitlyn Hermanofski faces minimum
of three years in prison on the
homicide by motor vehicle charge.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Caitlyn Hermanofski leaves county court Monday after pleading guilty to
homicide by motor vehicle charges.
The state Commonwealth Court
ruled on Monday that Bear Creek
Township could not legally take posses-
sion of private land where the countys
only charter school wants to build a
new school and public recreation facil-
ities.
The ruling is the outcome of an ap-
peal to the higher court by the Harris
family that owns land adjacent to the
Bear Creek Charter School in the town-
ship.
AJune rulingby former county Judge
Joseph Van Jura allowed the taking of
48 acres that belong to the family to be
used for the estimated $12 million to
$14 million construction project, fund-
ed by the school.
In October 2009, Bear Creek Town-
ship filed a declaration of taking of the
property.
Within a month, the Harris family ob-
jected, alleging the school is a private
entity and the township has limited
power of eminent domain.
Van Jura, in an eminent domain pro-
ceeding, saidconstructionof public rec-
reationareas anda newschool wouldbe
a public benefit.
The Harris family then appealed to
the CommonwealthCourt.Aprivate en-
tity cannot take landfroma private indi-
vidual, the family maintained.
And the high court agreed.
In the ruling Monday, Judge Mary
Hannah Leavitt said it was clear from
townshipsupervisors that the township
had no plans to develop recreational fa-
cilities, and that the township would
not have takenonthe project if the char-
ter schools private foundationwasnt fi-
nancing and constructing the facilities.
A second class township may only
condemn land for those public purpos-
es specified by the Legislature, the
judge wrote.
Those purposes include deepening
and widening a watercourse, building
an airport, township buildings, landfill
for garbage or other refuse, to repair
roads, to eliminate dangerous curves in
a townshiproad, tobuildor acquire san-
itarysewers or toacquire existingwater
system and storm water management
facilities.
The declaration itself states that the
Charter school land case ruling overturned
Commonwealth Court says Bear
Creek Twp. cant take land to be
used for charter school project.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
See CHARTER, Page 8A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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TONES
WILKES-BARREWithValen-
tines Day in mind, a local author
offeredhis thoughts oncultivating
andpreservinga fulfillingrelation-
ship.
David Weinberger, Ph.D., au-
thor of Think Smart, signed co-
piesof hisbookat Barnes&Noble
on South Main Street on Monday
as he answered questions and of-
fered advice advice based on 35-
year career of working with cou-
ples and marriages and trying to
keep families together.
Thebookdoesnt tell youwhat
tothink, hesaid. It tells youhow
to think. It encourages you to ex-
amine what drives your decisions
in people and relationships.
Weinberger, 66, is a native of
Scranton. He said he has a great
marriage and he credits his wife,
Nancy, a nurse, as the reason for
hisphysical healthandoverall hap-
piness.
Weinberger has a few keys to a
successful relationships:
Spend time with someone to
truly get to knowthem.
Have mutual trust and re-
spect honesty is a given.
Make each other feel valued
andworkat making
each other feel un-
derstood.
Talk to each
other, problem-
solve and have fun.
Communicate
thekeytocommu-
nicationis listening.
Its not rocket
science, he said.
Live in the mo-
ment and appre-
ciate it.
Weinberger has
Davidisms in his
book. He shared a
few:
If you live in the present
through past history, you trade off
the future.
There is a difference between
being in a relationship and build-
ing one.
Intrapersonal issues always
supersede interpersonal ones.
Weinberger said he wrote
Think Smart to thank all the
people who had a part to play in
contributingtohis growthandun-
derstanding of hu-
man behavior and
to give back what
he took from those
encounters, in the
hope that it could
help to make a sig-
nificant difference
in the lives of oth-
ers.
The book was
mainlywrittenwith
intimate or roman-
tic relationships in
mind, butalsodeals
with relationships
with family mem-
bers, co-workers,
casual acquaintances or close
friendships.
What can people expect from
Think Smart?
Peoplewill learnthat weareall
cut out of the same fabric, Wein-
bergersaid. Whatmakesusdiffer-
ent is howwe wear our clothes.
David Weinberger, Ph.D., author of Think Smart,
has advice for maintaining successful relationships
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
David Weinberger, author of Think Smart, was signing copies of his book Monday at Barnes &
Noble in Wilkes-Barre.
Its the thought that counts
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
A licensed psychologist
with a full-time practice in
Kingston, he holds gradu-
ate degrees in Clinical and
Counseling Psychology
from Virginia Common-
wealth University and The
American University in
Washington, D.C., and an
undergraduate psychology
degree from the Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh.
Think Smart is available
at Barnes& Noble and
Amazon.com for $15.99.
D AV I D M .
W E I N B E R G E R
WYOMING A man charged
Friday with stealing more than
$5,000 froman 86-year-old wom-
an blamed his love for an ex-girl-
friend, according to charges fil-
ed.
Police allege Zachary Ryan
Yanchick, 21, of Riverview Ma-
nor, Pittston, cashed 10 checks
stolen from an elderly woman in
Harding at the M&T Bank
branch in the Midway Shopping
Center. Yanchick was arrested
Friday when he tried to cash an
11th check he forged, police said.
Yanchick told police his ex-
girlfriend, who has not been
charged, stole the checks from
her grandmother and asked him
to cash the checks, the criminal
complaint says. Yanchick agreed
to cash the stolen checks due to
still being in love with her.
He was arraigned Saturday by
District Judge James Tupper in
Kingston Township on 20 counts
of theft, 10 counts each of receiv-
ing stolen property and forgery,
and one count each of criminal
conspiracy to commit theft and
criminal attempt to commit
theft. He was jailed at the Lu-
zerne County Correctional Facil-
ity for lack of $7,000 bail.
According to the complaint:
A bank employee contacted
police Friday when Yanchick
tried to cash a $460 check.
Bank officials became suspi-
cious because the check number
was close to10 other checks Yan-
chick cashed and unsuccessful
attempts to contact the account
holder.
When the elderly woman was
reached, she realized her check
book was missing, the complaint
says.
Yanchick told police his ex-
girlfriend stole the checks dur-
ing a burglary at her grandmoth-
ers house. His former girlfriend
asked him to cash the checks be-
cause she did not have a bank ac-
count.
Court records say Yanchick is
serving a probation sentence im-
posed in August 2011 on a disor-
derly conduct conviction.
An arrest warrant was issued
for Yanchick on Oct. 24 when he
failed to appear for a court pro-
ceeding on charges of resisting
arrest, escape and providing a
false identification to police, ac-
cording to court records.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Feb. 15 before Dis-
trict Judge Joseph Carmody,
West Pittston.
Area man
charged
in theft
of $5,000
Man says love for ex-girlfriend
caused him to cash checks she
stole from 86-year-old woman.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Edward Lewis, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7196.
Pete Mailloux continues to
collect signatures on his nomi-
nating petitions to appear on the
April 24 primary ballot as a can-
didate for the121st District of the
state House of Representatives.
On Wednesday, hell file the pa-
pers and then wait, at least a
week, to see if he actually lives in
the district he hopes to repre-
sent.
Confused? Welcome to the re-
districting mess that has thrown
the election season into disarray.
A Legislative Reapportion-
ment Commission plan to remap
Pennsylvanias 203 House and 50
Senate districts was ruledinvalid
by the state Supreme Court, and
a federal judge said the existing
borders should be kept for this
years elections. Now the five-
member commission has only a
few days to come up with new
maps that reflect the distribution
of population in the 2010 census.
That bipartisan panel -- House
Majority Leader Mike Turzai,
Senate Majority Leader Dominic
Pileggi, House Minority Leader
Frank Dermody, Senate Minori-
ty Leader Jay Costa and Judge
Stephen McEwen Jr. has not
set a public meeting or hearing
to be held before Thursdays
deadline for candidates to file
nominating petitions.
So dozens of candidates across
the state, including Mailloux, are
collecting petitions to run in dis-
tricts they may not be able to rep-
resent.
Charles E. OConnor, execu-
tive director of the commission,
saidthe groupis followingthe or-
der of the state Supreme Court,
which is to draw maps that meet
constitutional mandates. In the
meantime, he said, the legisla-
tive lines used since 2001 are in
effect.
Erik Arneson, a spokesman for
Pileggi, said
commission
Chairman
McEwen had
told commis-
sioners to dis-
tribute pro-
posed new
maps by
Wednesday.
Arneson said
a meeting is
planned for
Feb. 22, with
details on the
time and specif-
ic location to be
announced. But thats a week af-
ter the petition-filing deadline
whichhas already beenextended
two days by the state Supreme
Court because of the mapping is-
sue.
The redistricting mess does
not affect voting districts for fed-
eral office, as those new maps
were approved by the Legisla-
ture and did not sustain a legal
challenge.
Its also possible that Republi-
cans, unhappy with the rulings
and not wanting to hold an elec-
tion with 2001 lines in effect, are
readying a legal appeal.
Terry Casey, the Luzerne
County Republican Party chair-
man, saidhe has heardfromstate
party officials that could happen.
Arneson didnt deny that pos-
sibility.
At this time, legal and legisla-
tive options remain under re-
view, he said. The litigants in
the federal appeal have 30 days
from the Feb. 8 ruling to file ap-
peals.
Also on the table, Casey said,
is holding two primary elections:
one on April 24 for federal and
statewide offices including presi-
dent, Congress, delegates and
row offices; and one in the sum-
mer for state House and Senate
seats.
Arneson shot down that idea,
which he said would cost tax-
payers $20 million.
Im not aware of anyone sup-
porting a split primary, Arneson
said.
Redistricting mess
has some in limbo
Candidates collecting petitions
to run in districts they may not
be able to represent.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
At this
time, legal
and legis-
lative op-
tions re-
main under
review.
Erik Arneson
Spokesman for
state Sen.
Pileggi
WILKES-BARRE A city
man pleaded guilty Monday to
charges relating to three sep-
arate incidents, including a
case in which police say he
stole metal from a construction
site to pay for food because he
had not eaten in a number of
days.
David Meyers, 46, of Wash-
ington Avenue, entered the
plea to two counts of receiving
stolen property and one count
each of fleeing/eluding police,
accidents involving damage
and criminal trespassing.
County Judge David Lupas
said Meyers will be sentenced
on April 9.
According to court papers,
on Aug. 12, 2010, police said
Meyers entered the Dolphin
Car Wash on Route 315 with-
out permission.
In October 2010, police said,
Meyers took aluminum from
Solomon Industries. In Janu-
ary, police said he stole metal
from a construction site. When
police tried to stop a vehicle he
was driving, he proceeded
through a stop sign and a brief
foot pursuit began, police said.
COURT BRIEF
WILKES-BARRE City
Council members are offered
generous benefits, including
health insurance. But after
Chairman Mike Merritt switch-
es his coverage from the city to
his employer, none of the five of-
ficials will be taking the city
plan.
Merritt, who represents Dis-
trict E, said Monday he is in the
process of making the change,
which he expects will save city
taxpayers approximately
$10,000per year.I reallywas un-
aware of how much the health
coverage cost the city, Merritt
said. When I read about it in
(The Times Leader) I decided
to look into the plan here at my
workplace.
Merritt, 50, said he will accept
the $2,400buyout the city offers to
those whodont take the coverage,
which costs the city $12,758. Mer-
ritt said he is comparing the citys
coverage with that of InterMetro.
He said he has a son in college and
he wants to be sure he has the best
possible plan.
Ill be taking the waiver, Mer-
ritt said. It should happen within
the next couple of weeks.
City Council members are paid
$13,199 per year, making themthe
highest-paid elected council mem-
bers in the region. They also have
the most generous benefits.
Bill Barrett, Maureen Lavelle,
George Brown and Tony George
each get the salary, while Merritt
receives $14,699 as chairman.
Council, the mayor and con-
troller also are offered benefits:
health insurance or a medical
buyout; life insurance valued at
$10,000 per member; dental
coverage (single is $26.85 per
month, family is $69.08 per
month); and vision coverage
(single $2.98/month, family
$8.38/month).
Lavelle and Brown take the
$200 per month medical
buyout, while George and Bar-
rett dont accept any healthcov-
erage.
The compensation package
offered council has come under
fire in recent months at council
meetings.
Merritt to give up city health insurance coverage
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 5A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
WASHINGTON
GOP backs payroll tax cut
I
n an abrupt about-face, House GOP
leaders announced Monday that they
are willing to extend the two percent-
age-point cut in the payroll tax through
the end of the year and add the approx-
imately $100 billion cost to the nations
$15 trillion-plus debt.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, Majority Leader Eric Cantor,
R-Va., and GOP Whip Kevin McCarthy
of California said the House could vote
on the payroll tax measure this week,
but that the fate of unemployment
benefits for millions of the long-term
jobless and efforts to forestall sched-
uled cuts in fees to doctors who treat
Medicare patients would remain in the
hands of a House-Senate negotiating
panel thats looking for ways to pay for
them.
WASHINGTON
Bills on birth control ripped
The White House said Monday legis-
lation in the Senate that would give
employers broad leeway to restrict
coverage for contraception is danger-
ous and wrong.
Press secretary Jay Carney took aim
at legislation by Sen. Marco Rubio,
R-Fla. a possible GOP vice presi-
dential candidate and Sen. Joe Man-
chin, D-W.Va., that would allow any
employer to deny birth control cov-
erage if it runs counter to their reli-
gious or moral beliefs.
Another bill, by Sen. Roy Blunt,
R-Mo., would go even further by allow-
ing health plans to deny coverage for
any service that violates their beliefs.
HARRISBURG
Internet sales to be taxed
The administration of Gov. Tom
Corbett is expecting about $50 million
from its new efforts to collect taxes on
items sold over the Internet.
The state Department of Revenue
provided the estimate Monday.
Corbett is pressuring Internet-based
sellers to collect the sales tax at the
time of purchase, as Pennsylvania-
based companies have to do.
In addition, the states 2011 personal
income-tax return for the first time
provides a line asking taxpayers to
declare how much they owe in use
tax on purchases they made online
without paying the state sales tax.
Both are 6 percent. By law, sellers
are supposed to collect the sales tax at
the time of purchase. If they dont,
buyers are expected to pay the state
the same amount in use tax.
BUCHAREST, ROMANIA
Snow, cold hammer Balkans
Military planes and police helicop-
ters flew in tons of emergency food to
snowbound villages and ships in the
Balkans on Monday, after blizzards so
fierce that some people had to cut
tunnels through 15 feet of snow to get
out of their homes.
Since the end of January, Eastern
Europe has been pummeled by a re-
cord-breaking cold snap and the heavi-
est snowfall in recent memory. Hun-
dreds of people, many homeless, have
died in the bitter cold and tens of thou-
sands have been trapped by blocked
roads inside homes with little heat.
Authorities declared a state of emer-
gency Monday in eastern Romania,
where 6,000 people have been cut off
for days. About a dozen major roads
were closed. The defense ministry sent
8,000 soldiers to clear roads across
Romania and help those trapped by the
overwhelming snow.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Rally held for militant groups merger
Armed members of the Somali mil-
itant group al-Shabab attend a rally
Monday on the outskirts of Mogad-
ishu, Somalia. Thousands gathered at
the demonstration in support of the
merger of al-Shabab with al-Qaida,
which was announced last week by
al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri.
NEW DELHI Israel
blamed Iran on Monday for
bomb attacks on its diplomats
cars in India and Georgia,
heightening concerns that the
Jewish state was moving clos-
er to striking its archenemy.
Iran denied responsibility
for the attacks that appearedto
mirror the recent killings of
Iranian nuclear scientists that
Tehran blamed on Israel.
The blast in New Delhi set a
car ablaze and injured four
people, including an Israeli
Embassy driver and a diplo-
mats wife; the device in Geor-
gia was discovered and safely
defused.
Iran is behind these attacks
and it is the largest terror ex-
porter in the world, Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Ne-
tanyahu told lawmakers from
his Likud Party.
The violence added further
tension to one of the globes
most contentious standoffs.
Iran has been accused of devel-
oping a nuclear weapons pro-
gramthat Israel says threatens
the existence of the Jewish
state. Tehran says its nuclear
program is for peaceful pur-
poses only.
Comments by Israeli offi-
cials in recent weeks have
raised fears Israel might be
preparing to strike Iranian nu-
clear facilities. While Israel
says it hopes that international
sanctions can curb Irans nu-
clear program, leaders point-
edly note that all options are
on the table and have warned
that as Iran moves closer to
weapons capability, time is
running out for action. Fearing
an Israeli attack could set off a
conflict across the region and
send oil prices skyrocketing,
U.S. and other Western coun-
tries have been pressing Israel
to give sanctions more time.
Israeli military analyst Reu-
ven Pedatzur said Mondays
action was unlikely to have any
bearing on whether Israel at-
tacks Iran, calling it an isolat-
ed incident with rather low
impact.
The attackers in India and
Georgia appeared to have used
sticky bombs attached to
cars by magnets, similar to
weapons used against Irans
nuclear officials. Netanyahu
said Israel had thwarted at-
tacks in recent months in Azer-
baijan and Thailand and un-
specified other countries.
In all those cases, the ele-
ments behind these attacks
were Iran and its protege, Hez-
bollah, Netanyahu said, refer-
ring to Irans Lebanese proxy.
He vowed to act with a strong
hand against international ter-
ror.
Israeli media reported that
the government blamed Iran
basedonprior intelligence and
that security officials feared
this could be the start of a
wave of attacks against Israeli
targets overseas.
Iranian officials rejected Ne-
tanyahus accusation.
Bombs target Israeli diplomats
Iran gets the blame for acts
in India and Georgia, raising
worries about an attack.
AP PHOTO
Persons believed to be from the Israeli Embassy look at a car
belonging to the embassy that exploded in New Delhi, India.
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama for the first time
has opened a sizable lead over
his most likely Republican op-
ponents, thanks to growing sup-
port among independent vot-
ers, according to a new Pew Re-
search Center poll.
The poll, re-
leased Mon-
day, showed
Rick Santorum
in a virtual tie
with Mitt Rom-
ney in the Re-
publican presi-
dential race.
Santorum, the
former Penn-
sylvania sen-
ator, has
moved up as a
result of his
backing from
tea party Re-
publicans and
white evangeli-
cals. He led Romney, the former
Massachusetts governor, 30
percent to 28 percent among
Republican and Republican-
leaning registered voters in the
survey, which was conducted
Feb. 8-12. In a Pewsurvey only a
month ago, Romney led Santo-
rum 31 percent to 14 percent.
But both Republicans trailed
Obama by sizable margins. Oba-
ma led Santorum by 10 points
among registered voters nation-
wide (53 percent to 43 percent)
and led Romney by 8 points (52
percent to 44 percent). Obamas
lead over Newt Gingrich, who
has faded in the GOP race, was
18 points (57 percent to 39 per-
cent). In previous polls in No-
vember and January, Romney
and Obama were roughly tied.
Obama has moved up because
of support from independent
voters, 51 percent of whom now
back him against Romney, a
gain of 11 points since last
month.
The latest poll by the Pew Re-
search Center for the People &
the Press was conducted among
1,172 registered voters nation-
wide. It found that Santorum
has become the clear favorite of
tea party supporters and white
evangelical Republicans. He
wins support from 42 percent of
tea party Republican voters
compared just 23 percent who
back Romney. Santorums mar-
gin among white evangelical
Republican voters was almost
the same, 41 percent to 23 per-
cent.
New poll
shows
shifting
attitudes
Santorum moves past
Romney, but both Republicans
are trailing Obama.
By DAVID LAUTER
Tribune Washington Bureau
Romney
Santorum
BEVERLYHILLS, Calif. Acoroners
official says some prescription medicines
were found in the hotel room where
Whitney Houston died but not in large
quantities.
Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter
said Monday that medications were
found but declined to offer any specifics
because police have requestedthat node-
tails about the investigation be released.
Winter says there werent a lot of pre-
scription bottles.
Police have said there were no indica-
tions of foul play.
Police declined to say earlier Monday
whether any medications were recovered
after Houstons deathonSaturday. Bever-
ly Hills police say the singer was found
under water in a bath tub by a member of
her staff around 3:30 p.m., just hours be-
fore she was scheduled to attend a pre-
Grammy Awards gala.
Investigators routinely look at pre-
scription medications when investigat-
ing unattended deaths. Meanwhile, the
singers family prepared to send her body
to her native New Jersey for a funeral.
She was pulled from the tub by mem-
bers of her staff, and hotel security was
promptly notified, Beverly Hills police
Lt. Mark Rosen said.
Further details of Houstons death are
not being released to preserve the integ-
rity of the investigation, he said.
As of right now, its not a criminal in-
vestigation, Rosen told a news confer-
ence. We have concluded our portion of
the investigation at the hotel.
Rosen said it was a coroners case and
police were awaiting the determination
of the cause of death. The coroners office
says toxicology testing is continuing.
There were no indications of foul play
and no obvious signs of trauma on Hous-
tons body, but officials were not ruling
out any causes of death until they have
toxicology results, which will likely take
weeks to obtain.
Houston struggled for years with ad-
diction to cocaine, marijuana and pills,
which took a toll on her voice.
However, Bishop T.D. Jakes, a Texas
minister and producer on Houstons final
film project, a re-make of the 1970s re-
lease Sparkle, said he saw no signs she
was having any substance issues.
WHITNEY HOUSTON
1 9 6 3 - 2 01 2
BEIRUT Syrian rebels fended off a
push Monday by government tanks into a
central town held by forces fighting Presi-
dent Bashar Assads regimeinan11-month
conflict that looks increasingly like a civil
war.
The military pressed its offensive on
Rastanadayafter theregimerejectedArab
League calls for the U.N. to create a peace-
keepingforce inSyria andfor anendtothe
violent crackdown on dissent. Damascus
called the League initiative a flagrant in-
terference in (Syrias) internal affairs and
an infringement upon national sovereign-
ty.
With diplomatic efforts bogged down,
theconflict istakingonthedimensionsof a
civil war, with army defectors clashing al-
most daily with soldiers. The rebels have
taken control of small swathes of territory
in central Homs province, where Rastan is
located, and the northwestern province of
Idlib, which borders Turkey.
The Britain-based activist group Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights said at
least threegovernment soldierswerekilled
in the attempt to stormRastan, which has
been held by the rebels since late January.
Rastan, home to about 50,000 people,
was one of the first areas in Syria where
people took up arms to fight the regime.
Theuprisingbeganlast Marchasmostly
peaceful protests against Assads author-
itarian rule, but has become more militar-
izedinthe face of the brutal military crack-
down.
The U.N. human rights chief Navi Pillay
toldtheGeneral AssemblyonMondaythat
more than 5,400 people were killed last
year alone, andthe number of deadandin-
jured continues to rise daily.
Assads bloody crackdown has left Syria
almostcompletelyisolatedinternationally,
except for one key ally Russia. China
and Russia outraged the U.S. and many
Arab countries earlier this month when
theydeliveredadoublevetotoblockaU.N.
Security resolution calling on Assad to
leave power.
RussianForeignMinister Sergey Lavrov
said there must be a cease-fire in Syria be-
fore any peacekeeping mission could be
senttothecountry, rejectingcallsforajoint
Arab-U.N. force as premature.
Activists: Syrian rebels repel attack on key town
Rebels have controlled central Homs
province town since late January.
By BASSEMMROUE
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Pauline Hayes sings the Whitney Houston hit I Wanna Dance with Somebody at a memorial for the singer outside the
Beverly Hills Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Monday. Houston was found unconscious in her hotel room Saturday.
Singer under water in tub, cops say
Police: Prescription meds in room
By ANTHONY MCCARTNEY
AP Entertainment Writer
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
K
PAGE 6A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
ST.M ARYS
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N S CREEK
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
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825.6477
Dallas, PA
FERN KNOLL
BURIAL PARK
Requests that all
winter decorations be
removed no later than
March 1, 2012
In Loving Memory Of
Rose Marie Walsh
Aug. 13, 1933 ~ Feb. 14, 2011
If tears could build a stairway,
and memories a lane,
Id walk right up to Heaven
and bring you home again.
We Love You and
Miss You Dearly By
Husband, Children,
Grandchildren,
Family and Friends
In Loving Memory Of
Sgt. Christopher Alan Daniel
Dec. 5, 1983 ~ Feb. 10, 2005
Memories of happy days
Along the road to yesterday
That leads me straight to you
Are memories of happy days
Together we once knew.
We love and miss you,
Youre in our hearts &
thoughts every day.
Mom, Jenni, Heather,
Matthew & all the family
BOSHA Eugene, funeral 6:30 p.m.
today in the H. Merritt Hughes
Funeral Home Inc., 451 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
4 p.m. until time of service.
Masonic service at 6 p.m.
BRIN Jacob Jr., funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Curtis L. Swanson
Funeral Home Inc., corner of
routes 29 &118, Pikes Creek.
Requiem services at 10 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Russian Ortho-
dox Church, Edwardsville.
CHAMBERLAIN Walter Jr., funer-
al 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Curtis
L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc.,
corner of routes 29 &118, Pikes
Creek. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. today.
CONNELL Gerald, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
in Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 2
to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. today in
the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
ELICK Catherine, funeral 9:30
a.m. today in the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
KROUSE Felix, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the Harman Funer-
al Homes & Crematory Inc., (East)
669 W. Butler Drive, Drums. Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in
Good Shepherd RC Church,
Drums. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. today.
MANCHINI Pastor Leo, funeral 10
a.m. Wednesday in The First
Baptist Church of Waymart.
Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 9 p.m. today at the church.
MIGNONE Anna, prayer service 2
p.m. Sunday in St. Judes school
cafeteria, Mountain Top.
ROWLANDS Jason, funeral 10
a.m. Wednesday in the Clarks
Summit United Methodist Church,
1310 Morgan Highway, Clarks
Summit. Friends may call 2 to 4
p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. today in the
Lawrence E. Young Funeral
Home, 418 S. State St., Clarks
Summit.
SNEE Florence, funeral 9:45 a.m.
Thursday in the Corcoran Funeral
Home, Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter &
Paul Church, Plains Township.
Friends may call 8:30 to 9:45 a.m.
VANCHURE Ida, funeral 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Friends may call 5 to 7
p.m.
VINCI Mary, funeral 9 a.m. Wednes-
day in the Graziano Funeral Home,
Pittston Township. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph Marel-
lo Parish (St. Roccos R.C. Church),
Pittston. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
WARREN Emil, funeral 9:30 a.m.
today in the Grontkowski Funeral
Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green St., Nanti-
coke. Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in St. Faustina Parish, Nanti-
coke.
FUNERALS
W
illiam F. Flock, of Dallas,
passed away quietly on Febru-
ary 12.
He was the son of Marion and Al-
len Flock. He was born on Novem-
ber 23, 1927, inSunbury. Upongrad-
uation from Sunbury High School,
he went toattendSusquehanna Uni-
versity and then joined the Army,
servingas a guardat the Nuremberg
Trials in Germany. After his return,
he worked for several insurance
companies.
In 1969 he joined with his broth-
er-in-law, Oscar Sipler, as owners of
Wilson H. Flock Inc. He guided the
insurance agency with his son until
his retirement. Bill took great pride
in his business, employees and cus-
tomers. He was a well-respected
business man.
Throughout his life, Bill was an
active member of the Irem Temple
and Shavertown United Methodist
Church. He was one to pitch in
whenever anyone needed help and
cared deeply for family and friends.
One of his greatest hobbies was
golf, which he shared with his lov-
ing wife of 60 years, Leah. They
were members of Irem Temple
Country Club and Huntsville. Bill
had boundless energy and spent his
entire life running at full speed. He
enjoyed and relished every moment
of life and will be sadly missed.
He was preceded in death by his
brother, Allen Flock, and sister,
Margaret (Peg) Sipler. Surviving
are his wife, Leah Hartman Flock;
son, WilliamJr., and his wife, Janet,
Swoyersville; daughter, Linda DeV-
ries, and her husband, David, War-
wick, N.Y.; grandchildren, Katja,
Danielle, Bonnie, Kristen, and two
great-grandchildren, Brody and
Chase.
Funeral will be on Thursday
at 11 a.m. at the Hugh B.
Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home,
1044 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort,
with his pastor, the Rev. M. Lynn
Snyder, officiating. The interment
will be in Fern Knoll Burial Park,
Dallas. Friends may call on Wednes-
day from 5 to 8 p.m.. and on Thurs-
day from10 a.m. until service time.
The family requests that any me-
morial donations be given to the
Shavertown United Methodist
Church, 163 North Pioneer Avenue,
Shavertown.
William F. Flock
February 12, 2012
D
elbert R. Lennon, age 86, of Fil-
bert St., Swoyersville, died on
Saturday, February 11, 2012 at the
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township.
He was born in Mountain Top, on
May 28, 1925, the son of the late
Clayton and Viola (Getz) Lennon.
Delbert attended the Mountain Top
area schools. He was proud to serve
his country as a Veteran of World
War II and the Korean War with the
U.S. Navy Reserve, Seaman First
Class, from 1943-54. He was the re-
cipient of the European, Pacific and
American Theater Ribbons, as well
as the Victory Medal.
He was employed for the past 20
years byTrade EasternWilkes Barre
as a Construction Inspector. Del-
bert was a former member of the
First Church of Christ, Wilkes-
Barre, and also of the Church of
Christ Uniting, Kingston. He was a
member of the Masonic Lodge, Ply-
mouth No. 332 F & A.M.
Preceding him in death were his
wife of 42 years, the former Eliza-
beth Jane Rogers, on January 9,
2001, and brothers, Donald and Ar-
thur Lennon.
Surviving are a daughter, Laurie
Lennon, Swoyersville; grandchil-
dren, Amy Niemkiewicz, Kingston,
and Brian Niemkiewicz and his
wife, Betty Jo, Wilkes Barre; great-
grandchildren, Kenly Golanoski,
Tristan Niemkiewicz and Gavin
Fincke; companion, Rose Mary
Murray and her family, David Sr.,
Rosz, David Jr. and Scott Murray;
Anne and Rob McDonnell and Jus-
tine Meghan, Kevin and Laura Mur-
ray. Several nieces and nephews al-
so survive.
MilitaryFuneral Services will
be held on Thursday at 9:30
a.m. from the George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 North Main St.,
Ashley, with Pastor Carol E. Cole-
manofficiating. Interment will be in
the Albert Cemetery, Wright Town-
ship. Friends may call on Wednes-
day from 5 to 8 p.m.
Delbert R. Lennon
February 11, 2012
J
ohn Jack P. McIntyre, 70, of
Plains Township, died Sunday
morning at Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains Town-
ship.
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was
thesonof thelateJohnandFlorence
(Sheeran) McIntyre.
Jack was employed as a Sales-
man, last working for MCI Corpora-
tion until his retirement. He was a
very good friend and supporter of
Bill W. andhis friends for the past 19
years. He was anArmy Veteranserv-
ing in the National Guard. Jack was
a graduate of Pace University, New
York, andDickinsonCollege, Carlis-
le, Pa.
He is survivied by his wife, the
former Sherian Rasiewicz; sons,
Todd and Scott McIntyre of New
Jersey; grandchildren, Jenna and
Drew McIntyre; brother, Robert
McIntyre, Seattle, Washington.
Funeral service will be held
Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Cor-
coran Funeral Home, Inc., 20 South
Main Street, Plains, with Pastor
Josh Masland of the First United
Methodist Church, West Pittston,
officiating. Interment will be held at
the convenience of the family.
Friends may call Thursday from5 to
7 p.m. at the Corcoran Funeral Home,
Inc.
Memorial donations may be made
tothe Luzerne County SPCA, 524 East
Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or the American Heart Association, 71
North Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre,
PA18702.
Online condolences may be made at
www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
John Jack P. McIntyre
February 12, 2012
S
ophia M. Schuetz, 84, passed
away February 11, 2012 at the
Scandinavian Home in Cranson,
R.I.
She was the wife of the late Ge-
orge J. Schuetz.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of the late Michael and
Pauline (Pastuszak) Meko. Mrs.
Schuetz had worked in the food ser-
vice industry for many years before
retiring. Sophias focus was tospend
time with family and friends; her
wit and sense of humor and smile
will be sadly missed.
She was sister of the late John, Jo-
seph, Michael, Nicholas and Peter
Meko.
She leaves a son, George J.
Schuetz, and his wife, Debora; three
sisters, Jule Tasco, Kathryn Balan,
HelenSager; grandchildren, Daniel,
Jonathon and Michael Schuetz; and
a great-granddaughter, Simone.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated Wednesday at 11 a.m. at
St. Aloysius Church, 143 Division St.,
Ashley. Burial will be at St. Marys
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Donations may be made to Scandi-
navian Home, 1811 Broad St., Cran-
ston, RI 02905
For condolences and information,
visit www.jwsfh.com.
Sophia M. Schuetz
February 11, 2012
TILLIE R. CAREY, 100, a resi-
dent of the East End Section of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away on Sat-
urday, February 11, 2012, at the
Golden Living Center-Summit in
Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral Arrangements are
pending from the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre.
MR. CLAYBERT A. EDDY, of
Midtown Village, Larksville, died
Monday morning, February 13,
2012, at his home.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe WilliamA. Reese
Funeral Chapel, Plymouth.
JEANNE S. FLETCHER,
passed away Friday, February 10,
2012, in the Harrisburg Hospital.
She was born Dec. 10, 1920 in
Wilkes-Barre to Sadie and Ross
White. She was a lifelong resident
of Kingston and graduated from
Kingston High School in1939. She
was the receptionist at Pennsylva-
nia Millers Insurance Co. before
retiring. In addition to spending
time with family, she enjoyed play-
ing cards, notably bridge and
cinch, with her many friends. She
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, William J. Fletcher. She is
survived by a sister, Marjorie Wills
of Casselberry, Fla.; daughters,
Marilynn Reese (husband Bob) of
Pittsburgh and Molly Solomon
(husband Doug) of Mechanics-
burg, Pa.; six grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be at the
St Marys Cemetery Chapel in
Wilkes-Barre in a private ceremo-
ny for the convenience of the fam-
ily. She will be deeply missed.
PATRICK M. CASEY, 69, of
Hawley, and beloved husband of
Diane (Gerdus) Casey passed
away Friday, January 20, 2012.
A Memorial Mass will be cele-
brated at the Blessed Virgin Mary
Queen of Peace Church, Hawley,
on Saturday, February 18, 2012, at
12:30 p.m. with the Rev. Brian
Clark officiating. Arrangements
are by Stroyan Funeral Home, 405
W. Harford St., Milford.
GRACE NOSSAVAGE, 95, of
Duryea, passedawayMonday, Feb-
ruary13, 2012, at Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
BARBARA WILLIAMS, of Pro-
vincal Towers, Wilkes-Barre,
passed away Monday, February13,
2012, at Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital. Born October 5, 1937, in
Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter
of the late Nellie Rokosz. Barbara
was a 1955 graduate of Wilkes-
Barre Township High School. She
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, Harry Williams, in 2002;
daughter Mary Ann Sawicki, in
2008; beloved grandson, Jason
Schaible, in 2007; and a sister, Ma-
rie Grula, in 2011. Surviving are
her daughter Karen Sawicki Schai-
ble and her husband, Vincent, of
Hampton, N.J.; son, Leonard Saw-
icki and his wife, Mary Ann, of
Wilkes-Barre; and grandchildren,
Katherine Schaible and Danielle,
Courtney, and Ashleigh Sawicki.
Private funeral services were
held at the convenience of the fam-
ily by the Jendrzejewski Funeral
Home, Wilkes-Barre.
B
ernadine Brodi, 90, of East State
Street, Larksville, passed away
early Monday morning at Manor
Care, Kingston. She was born in
Larksville on March 18, 1921. She
was the daughter of the late Frank
and Anne (Barteck) Magalski.
Bernadine was a graduate of
Larksville High School, Class of
1938. She was employed as a seam-
stress in the local garment industry
and retired from Wyoming Valley
West School District. Bernadine
was a member of St. Johns Church,
Larksville.
Preceding her in death was a
great-grandson; James Hankey III.
Surviving are her husband of 71
years of marriage, George Brodi,
Larksville; son Francis Frank Bro-
di, Larksville; grandchildren, Anne
Brodi, Kingston; Francis Brodi Jr.,
Larksville; great-grandchildren, Ka-
li and Frank Brodi, both of Larks-
ville; sisters, Viola Stelmack, Essex,
Md.; Nancy Adams, Larksville. Nu-
merous nieces and nephews also
survive.
Funeral services for Bernadine
will be held on Thursday at 9:30
a.m. from the Andrew Strish Funer-
al Home, 11 Wilson Street, Larks-
ville, withaMass of ChristianBurial
at 10 a.m. in St. John the Baptist
Church, Nesbitt Street, Larksville.
Interment will be held in St. Johns
Cemetery, Dallas. Family and
friends may call onWednesdayfrom
7 to 9 p.m.
Bernadine Brodi
February 13, 2012
Alice M.
Ernst, 63, of
Wernersville,
died February
11, 2012 in
Reading Hos-
pital.
She was the
wife of Lee E.
Ernst, whom
she married on June 14, 1969, in
Dupont.
Born in Pittston, she was the
daughter of Helen (Turkos) May-
hoff, Dupont, and the late Stanley
Mayhoff.
She was a graduate of Kutztown
University in 1971.
Alice was a lab manager for Wil-
low Creek Animal Hospital, Lees-
port, for 18 years, retiring in 2000.
She also was a substitute teacher
in the Reading, Muhlenberg, Gov-
ernor Mifflin and Schuylkill Valley
school districts.
She was a member of St. Albans
Episcopal, Wilshire, where she en-
joyed singing in the choir for over
40 years.
Alice was an avid bridge player;
she also belonged to a pinochle club.
She loved to read and sew. Alice won
a statewide sewing contest through
her local womens club.
Alice was predeceased by her son,
William Ernst III.
In addition to her husband and
mother, she is survived by her daugh-
ter, Rebecca L., wife of Donald Mear-
kle, Oley; three siblings, John May-
hoff, Dupont; Joseph Mayhoff, Peo-
ria, Ill., and Wanda Stash, West
Wyoming; and three grandchildren,
William Ernst Wingfield, and Dillon
and Alex Mearkle.
Services will be Thursday at 11
a.m. in St. Albans Episcopal. Burial
will be in St. Gabriels Cemetery,
Douglassville. Friends may call
Wednesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m., and
Thursday from 10 to 11 a.m. Both
viewings will be in the church.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to St. Albans Building
Fund, 2848 St. Albans Drive, Sinking
Spring, PA19608. EdwardJ. KuhnFu-
neral Home Inc., West Reading, is in
charge of arrangements. Online con-
dolences may be recorded at
www.kuhnfuneralhome.com.
Alice M. Ernst
February 11, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 8A
MARGUERITE CONNOR, 89,
formerly of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away on Monday morning, Febru-
ary 13, 2012 at the Meadows Nurs-
ing andRehabilitationCenter, Dal-
las, where she had been a guest.
Funeral Arrangements are
pending for a Thursday funeral
and have been entrusted to Jacobs
Funeral Service, 47 Old River
Road, Wilkes-Barre. There will be
a viewing on Wednesday, February
15, 2012 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the fu-
neral home. A complete obituary
will appear in Wednesdays edition
of the newspaper.
JOSEPH HOMETCHKO, 89, a
former resident of Swoyersville,
passed away on Sunday afternoon,
February12, 2012 at Bay Pines Vet-
erans Hospital, Bay Pines, Florida.
His belovedwifeis thelateHelenJ.
(Kender) Hometchko, who passed
away on October 8, 2007. Togeth-
er, Joseph and Helen shared 60
beautiful years of marriage.
Funeral Arrangements are
pending and have been entrusted
to the care of the Wroblewski Fu-
neral Home, Inc., 1442 Wyoming
Avenue, Forty Fort.
MR. BERNARD J. OSTROSKY,
P.E., of Duryea, passed away Sat-
urday, February 11, 2012, at River-
side Rehab and Nursing Center,
Taylor.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Bernard J. Pion-
tek Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main
St., Duryea.
MR. HARRY G. REESE, age 88,
of Plymouth, died Monday morn-
ing, February13, 2012, at the home
of his daughter.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe WilliamA. Reese
Funeral Chapel, Plymouth.
ESTHER M. OLIVER, 90, for-
mer resident of Hunlock Creek,
passed away Monday, February13,
2012, in Bonham Nursing Center,
Stillwater.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Clarke Piatt Fu-
neral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek.
D
orothy Rose Savakinas, 90, for-
merly of Luzerne, passed away
Friday, February10, 2012, of natural
causes at her home in Abingdon,
Md.
Born in Kingston, she was the
daughter of the late James and Ber-
tha Oncay Donnelly.
She was a member of St. Francis
De Sales Parish of Abingdon.
She was an avid reader and quil-
ter who also enjoyed cross-stitch,
cooking and keeping up with cur-
rent national and international
events.
Dorothy was the wife of the late
Michael Savakinas, who passed
away in 1996. She was preceded in
death by her sister Betty Couts Bur-
ney.
She is survived by three sons, Mi-
chael, husband of Nancy Simmers,
Abingdon, Md.; David, husband of
Jane Mesharer, Gap, Pa.; Richard,
husband of Marie Rodriguez, Me-
chanicsburg, Pa.; five grandchildren
and three great-grandchildren. She
is also survivedby two sisters, Patri-
cia Rider, Soldotna, Alaska, and Jac-
queline Reese, Lincoln, Calif.
Mass of Christian Burial will be
from St. Annes Church, Bennett
Street, Luzerne, onSaturday, Febru-
ary 18, 2012, at 11 a.m. Interment
will be in Chapel Lawn Memorial
Cemetery, Dallas.
Friends may call at Betz-Jastrem-
ski Funeral Home, 568 Bennett St.,
Luzerne, on Saturday from 9 to 11
a.m. Kindly omit flowers.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to St. Jude Childrens
Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Dorothy Rose Savakinas
February 10, 2012
J
ohn M. Dalton, 83, of Mountain
Top, entered into eternal rest on
Sunday, February 12, 2012, at Frit-
zingertown Senior Living Facility,
Drums.
Born December 9, 1928 in Moun-
tain Top, he was a son of the late
John and Flora (Kellmer) Dalton.
John served in the Korean War
with the U.S. Army.
He married the former Lois Dick-
inson in March of 1957.
He worked for the Scouten-Lee
Lumber Co., Wilkes-Barre, the Mid-
State Lumber Co., Kingston, and
most recentlywithPenskeTrucking
as a hiker.
He was very active with the
Mountain Top Ambulance and with
the Mountain Top Hose Co., No. 1,
where he served as Fire Chief for
many years.
He also volunteered for the Red
Cross. John graduated from Fair-
view High School in 1946.
John was preceded in death, in
addition to his parents, by his wife,
Lois, who passed away on Novem-
ber 24, 2002, brothers James and
Robert, and his sister, Claire Kirn.
He is survived by his daughters,
Lori Dalton and Carol Dalton Lada
and her husband, Ken; grandchil-
dren, Valerie Lada Miller and her
husband, Brent, and Brian Lada;
great-grandchildren, Everett and
Chelsea Miller; brother Patrick Dal-
ton, Sugar Notch; sister Dolores
Pavlick, Mountain Top, and several
nieces, nephews and cousins.
The Funeral Service will be
held on Wednesday, February
15, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. in Albert
Cemetery, Mountain Top.
Relatives and friends are invited
to call today from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
McCune Funeral Home, 80 S.
Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top.
In lieu of flowers the family
would appreciate memorial dona-
tions totheMountainTopHoseCo.,
No. 1, Lehigh St. and Woodlawn
Ave., Mountain Top, PA18707.
View obituaries online at mccu-
nefuneralserviceinc.com.
John M. Dalton
February 12, 2012
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 7A
N E W S
7
3
8
2
1
4
people who have done fantasti-
cally well over the last few dec-
ades but that alsobenefit themid-
dle class, those fighting to get in-
to the middle class and the econ-
omy as a whole, Obama said.
He used an appearance before
students at Northern Virginia
Community College to unveil the
budget and highlight a $8 billion
proposal that aims at boosting
the ability of the nations commu-
nity colleges to train students for
the jobs of the future. He told the
students his budget was a reflec-
tion of shared responsibility.
While administration officials
defendedthe overall planas a bal-
anced approach, Republicans at-
tacked it as failing to enough to
restrainthe deficit, whichObama
had promised in 2009 to cut in
half by the end of his first term.
This isnt really a budget at
all. Its a campaign document,
said Senate Republican Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.
The president is shirking his re-
sponsibility toleadandusingthis
budget to divide.
Republican Rep. Paul Ryan,
chairman of the House Budget
Committee, said that Obama had
ducked the responsibility to
tackle this countrys real fiscal
problems.
Ryan is preparing an alterna-
tive to Obamas budget that will
be similar to a measure that the
House approved last year but
failed in the Senate, where many
lawmakers objected to a major
overhaul to Medicare.
We do not intend on backing
off on anything, Ryan said in an
interview. We intend on giving
the country an alternative and a
solution to our biggest prob-
lems.
Republicans challenged the
math underlying Obamas bud-
get, saying it double-counteddef-
icit reductions already approved
inanAugust budget deal andalso
claimed $848 billion in savings
from ending the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan even though this
money would not have been
spent.
Republican presidential candi-
date Mitt Romney attacked Oba-
mas spending plan for failing to
take any meaningful steps to-
ward solving our entitlement cri-
sis.
This years budget debate is ex-
pected to dominate the presiden-
tial contest and congressional
elections with the issue not final-
ly resolved probably until a lame-
duck session of Congress after
the November election, when
lawmakers will have to decide
what to do with expiring Bush-
era tax cuts and looming across-
the-board spending cuts.
Obamas new spending plan
projects a deficit for the current
budget year of $1.33 trillion,
marking the fourth straight year
that the deficit would top $1 tril-
lion.
The spending plan projects the
deficit would decrease to $901
billion in the 2013 budget year,
whichbegins Oct. 1. That reflects
$3.8 trillion in spending next
year, an increase of 0.2 percent
over this years expected outlays,
anda17.5 percent increase inrev-
enues.
The deficits are projected to
gradually godownto$575 billion
in 2018, which would still be
higher in dollar terms than any
deficits run up before Obama
took office. It would be below 3
percent of the total economy,
however.
OBAMA
Continued from Page 1A
WEST WYOMING -- Council
announced Monday that the bor-
ough had recently won a lawsuit
filed by the owners of the former
Moonlight Drive-In.
Samuel L. Rizzo andSamuel P.
Rizzo filed a civil suit in county
court seeking $675,000.
TheRizzossayasewer pipe, in-
stalled by the borough in 1991,
had caused an increase in water
retention at the site.
The borough obtained an ease-
ment toinstall the pipe onthe 23-
acre property.
Wereveryhappywiththeout-
come, council President Eileen
Cipriani said.
In other business:
Councilman Len Tarreto
thanked residents for recycling
andnotedthat theincreaseincol-
lected recyclables means lower
trashcosts. Eachquarter, the bor-
ough is reimbursed for its recy-
cled newspapers from Solomons
Container Service, said Tarreto,
pointing out the reimbursement
for last quarter was $426.
Council voted to apply for
federal aid to restore a section of
wall along Abrahams Creek dam-
agedby storms Irene andLee last
September. Seventy-five percent
of the funding would come from
the National Resource Conserva-
tion Service. The remaining 25
percent wouldcome fromthe Lu-
zerne Conservation District.
Council accepted the resig-
nation of Department of Public
Works employee Mike Mikkel-
sen, and voted to hire Doug Con-
fletti Jr. as a full-time DPW em-
ployee at an hourly rate of $9.50.
West Wyoming wins lawsuit
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
Borough council next meets
March 12 at 7 p.m.
W H AT S N E X T
HUGHESTOWN -- Borough
Council announced Monday that
the Hughestown Hose Company
has received its new fire truck.
The highly anticipated new
American LaFrance rescue pum-
per gives the 40-member volun-
teer fire department two working
trucks to utilize for the residents
of borough and the neighboring
communities that it services.
The hose company has invited
interested members of the public
to come and view the new equip-
ment. Borough officials advised
that any who do intend to visit
the stationcall the hose company
at 654-4188 ahead of time.
The council has consistently
pointed to the boroughs volun-
teer fire department as a point of
pride. In addition to consistently
upgrading its equipment, person-
nel and capabilities, it regularly
hosts certified training sessions
for firefighters throughout the re-
gion.
In other business, Council-
woman Marie Griglock said she
would work to resolve a drainage
problem that has been affecting
municipal and residential sewers
along Rock Street.
Griglock has said the root of
the problem lies with improper
drainage practices at the Pittston
Area Primary School Center on
RockStreet. She has takenthis is-
sue upwiththe school district be-
fore and intends to do so again.
At a school board meeting in
January, district officials ac-
knowledged her complaints but
stated they have a different opin-
ion of what is causing the prob-
lem. Griglock was assured that
the matter will be looked into.
Griglock pledged to attend
next Tuesdays school board
meetingtoforce the school board
to revisit the issue.
Hughestown hails new fire truck
By B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
Next regular council meeting will
be at 7:30 p.m. March 12
W H AT S N E X T
NUANGOLA The $25,000
the Nuangola Sewer Authority
needs to proceed with its pro-
posed sanitary system has been
obtained after action taken Mon-
day night at meetings of borough
council and the authority.
Councilman Ted Vancosky re-
turned from a session of the
Mountain Top Area Joint Sewer
Authority with a check for the
amount. The money was loaned
to the Nuangola authority to ob-
tain permits that are required by
state and county agencies in ad-
vance of advertising and bidding
the project.
The MountainTopJoint Sewer
Authority grantedthe loanafter a
bare majority of council, four
members, approved Ordinance 2
of 2012 that unconditionally
guarantees a promissory note of
$25,000.
Because only two council
members, Vancosky and Ron
Kaiser, were present for the spe-
cial Nuangola meeting, twoother
votes, those of Regina Plodwick,
chairwoman, and Tony DeLuca,
had to be obtained via a confer-
ence call. Because of what was
statedas a combinationof illness-
es and pressing family issues,
other members of council, in-
cludingJoeTucker, JohnKochan,
and Elaine Donahue, did not par-
ticipate in the vote.
David Pekar, chairman of the
authority, said the money will be
deposited into a money market
and a business account at Citi-
zens Bank.
The authority voted unani-
mously to remit checks so that
Quad 3 Engineers of Wilkes-
Barre can secure permits from
Luzerne Conservation District
($15,800), LuzerneCountyClean
Water Fund ($500), Pennsylva-
nia Clean Water Fund ($2,360)
and Pennsylvania Water Quality
Management Agency ($500).
Rick Kresge of Quad 3 also dis-
cussed with authority members
the need to obtain permits from
Luzerne County Road & Bridge
Department and to file a zoning
permit application with Dor-
rance Township. Amajor portion
of the planned pipeline will paral-
lel the Dorrance side of Blyth-
burn Road.
The authority has a tentative
date of March 15 to advertise for
construction bids.
Final approval of Nuangolas re-
vised Act 537 plan is still needed
fromthe state Department of En-
vironmental Protection.
Nuangola gets loan to move forward on sewers
Borough will be able to get
permits in advance of
advertising, bidding project.
By TOMHUNTINGTON
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 8A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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An Eynon Buick GMC Dealership
screening later confirmed the
presence of opiates.
She was placed in a cell and
told staff the next morning she
wasfeelingnauseous. Twoprison
nurses examined her and found
no issues or evidence that she
was in labor.
Nurses were again contacted a
short time later because the
woman said she was not feeling
well. A prison doctor and two
nurses found she was in labor.
Prison officials immediately
contacted911, but the doctor and
nurses had delivered the babies
by the time emergency crews ar-
rived.
Piazza said she never told pris-
onstaff shethought shewas inla-
bor, and the woman acknowl-
edged she had no prenatal care.
Piazza, who did not return a
phonemessageMonday, hadsaid
last week he is confident every-
thingwasdoneright, andthat the
only error that may have oc-
curred was that he did not notify
Pribula.
BABIES
Continued from Page 3A
condemned land would be used
for recreation and for the Charter
Schools expansion, the judge
wrote.
Other evidence, the judges rul-
ing says, shows the townships re-
al purpose for condemnation was
for the school, not for recre-
ation.
The (charter school founda-
tion), not the township, initiated
the project and did the planning,
which included the dedication of
a portion of the land for recre-
ational areas, the ruling says.
The township supervisors testi-
mony also showed that they had
not identified any need for more
recreational facilities inthe town-
shipprior tobeingapproachedby
the charter school .
JimSmith, chief executive offi-
cer of the charter school, said he
has not yet seen or read the
courts filing, and could not com-
ment.
This is good news for the fam-
ily, Mary Harris said when reac-
hed by phone Monday. Harris is
the wife of Harold Harris, who
owns the landalong withsiblings
Brian Harris and Joan Riebel.
WilliamVinsko Jr., solicitor for
the township, did not return a
phone call seeking comment.
CHARTER
Continued from Page 3A
J
ohnPaul Antosh, 82, of Tunkhan-
nock, died Sunday evening at
Tyler Memorial Hospital.
He is survived by his wife of 61
years, Phyllis Fassett Antosh.
John was born in Plains, on Feb-
ruary 2, 1930, son of the late John
and Mary Wendrovich Wender An-
tosh.
He was a 1947 graduate of Tunk-
hannock High school, where he
played football and baseball for the
Tigers.
Following graduation, he joined
the Navy in 1948 and served a 20-
year career, attaining the rank of
Chief of Stores, serving the Navy
and his country in the Korean con-
flict as well as Vietnam. He served
upon the Presidential Yacht, the
USS Williamsburg, under President
Truman, USS Hyman, USS Card
and the USS Annapolis. John was a
recipient of the GoodConduct Med-
al, Navy Occupation Service Medal
and the National Defense Service
Medal. While aboard the USS Anna-
polis, John received a letter of Com-
mendation as Chief Petty Officer in
charge of Receiving/Stowage for an
Outstanding during Annual In-
spection. The inspectors remarks
included praise that the storerooms
of the Annapolis were the best in
the Westpac area. This pride in a
job well done would follow him
throughout his life.
Upon discharge from the Navy in
1967, John and Family returned to
Tunkhannock to become proprietor
of the former Fassetts Department
Store and subsequently The Wicker
Shop.
He also sponsored and coached
Fassetts Little League Teamfor sev-
eral years and was also part of the
committee formed to investigate
the possibility of the Tunkhannock
By-Pass.
John enjoyed fishing, hunting
and was an avid golfer. He would
talk golf to all who would listen. He
gave golf lessons for several dec-
ades, extending his love of the game
to hundreds of students including
his children and grandchildren. He
was a member of the Knights of Co-
lumbus and received the honor of
Third Degree. John was passionate
about the Pittsburgh Steelers and
Penn State football, rooting his
teams on to victory every Saturday
and Sunday. John will be greatly
missed by all who knew him.
He was preceded in death by
brothers, Fred and Albert Antosh.
In addition to his wife, John is
survived by his six children, Cathe-
rine and husband Paul Wendolow-
ski of Clarks Summi; Steven and
wife Karen Antosh of Mehoopany;
Patricia and husband Gary Kowal-
ski of Denver, N.C.; John Antosh of
Tunkhannock; Harry and wife Wen-
dy Antosh of Glendale, and Miche-
line and husband Robert MacDo-
nald of West Chester, Ohio; sisters,
Genevieve Nudo and Barbara Rus-
so, as well as 14 grandchildren, Paul
and wife Darcie Wendolowski, Car-
olyn Wendolowski, David Antosh,
Daniel Antosh, Chris and wife Ro-
bynn Markunas, Erin Antosh, Mi-
chael Antosh, Dusty Robinson and
fianc Heather MacLennen, Tanya
and husband Bryson McEwen, Rob-
ert and wife Elizabeth Hagemann,
Corey Kowalski, Kelli Kowalski,
Megan MacDonald, Andrea Mac-
Donald and four great-grandchil-
dren, LucieGrace Cusack, Chase
Markunas, Croix Markunas and Ta-
tumRobinson, as well as many cou-
sins, nieces and nephews.
A blessing service will be
held on Thursday at 11 a.m.
from the Sheldon-Kukuchka Funer-
al Home, 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhan-
nock, with Father Richard Pol-
mounter presiding. Friends and
family may call at the funeral home
on Wednesday from 6 to 9 p.m. In-
terment will be in Sunnyside Ceme-
tery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions made to a charity of the
donors choice. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www.sheldonkukuchkafuneral-
home.com.
John Paul Antosh
February 12, 2012
T
he Rev. Gary T. Jones, 64, a resi-
dent of West Wyoming, died
Sunday, February12, 2012 in Abing-
ton Memorial Hospital following a
lengthy illness.
The Rev. Jones was born in
Wilkes-Barre, son of the late John
and Mary Reese Jones, was a gradu-
ate of the Class of 1965 of James M.
Coughlin High School, Wilkes-
Barreandreceivedanassociates de-
gree from Kings College, Wilkes-
Barre. He served two tours of duty
with the U.S. Marine Corps in Viet-
nam and was discharged in 1969
with the rank of Sergeant. He later
joined the Pennsylvania Army Na-
tional Guard, West Pittston, and
was discharged with the rank of
First Lieutenant. He had owned and
operated the Jones Offset Printing
Co., West Wyoming, for more than
30 years and closed it in January
2011 due to ill health.
Pastor Jones had been a Licensed
Minister of the Penn Northeast
Conference of the United Church of
Christ, Palmerton, Pa. He had done
pulpit supply work in many church-
es throughout the Conference and
had served as pastor of St. Lukes
UCC Church, Wilkes-Barre; Trinity
UCC Church and First Congrega-
tional UCC Church, both of Scran-
ton. He hadbeena member andwas
raised in Miner Congregational
UCCChurch, Wilkes-Barre, andwas
currently a member of First Re-
formed Church, Plymouth.
He was a member of Wyoming
Lodge 468, Free and Accepted Ma-
sons; the St. Davids Society of
Wyoming Valley; Wilkes-Barre De-
tachment, Marine Corps League;
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and
the American Legion. He had also
been active in Little League and
helped with the Junior Bowling
League at Modern Lanes, Exeter.
He served West Wyoming Borough
as an auditor and as judge of elec-
tion. In addition to his parents, he
was also preceded in death by a sis-
ter, Mrs. Beverly Bella.
Surviving are his wife of 41years,
Catherine M. Herbert Jones, at
home; daughters, Catherine Marie
Miller and her husband, Clifton,
West Pittston, and Amy Maslousky,
at home; grandchildren, Gary A.,
Anthony, Carl III, Morgan, Felicia
and Tatum; step-grandchildren,
Becca, Charles, Christopher and
Carmie; step-great-grandchild, Isa-
bella; a brother, the Rev. Jack Jones,
Wilkes-Barre, and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral with full military
honors by the U.S. Marine
Corps will be held Thursday at 11
a.m. fromthe H. Merritt Hughes Fu-
neral Home Inc., a Golden Rule Fu-
neral Home, 451North Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, with the Rev. Jack
Jones, pastor, First Reformed
Church, Plymouth, brother of the
deceased, officiating. Interment
will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township. Friends may call
Wednesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.
WyomingLodge, F. &A.M. will con-
duct Masonic service Wednesday
evening.
The family requests that flowers
beomittedandthat donations inthe
Rev. Jones memory be made to a
charity of the donors choice.
The Rev. Gary T. Jones
February 12, 2012
Mr. Robert J.
Muchler, age
64, of Ashley,
died Sunday
morning at the
Wilkes-Barre
General Hospi-
tal.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre a
son of the late Ira and Jean Wilde
Muchler and attended the Ply-
mouth schools.
He had been self-employed for
most of his life as a handyman, car-
penter and had a lawn care busi-
ness. He also had been employed by
Offset Paperback for four years.
Mr. Muchler had attended the
First Welsh Baptist Church, Ply-
mouth.
In addition to his parents, he was
preceded in death by his grandpar-
ents WilliamandJennie Wilde; a sis-
ter, Diane Dopko, and a nephew,
Yancee Muchler.
He is survived by sons, Robert,
Kingston; Michael and Tim, both of
Wilkes-Barre; and Adam, Allen-
town; brother, William, Ashley; sis-
ters, Catherine Nesler, Shavertown;
Donna Gyle, Ashley; JackieZampet-
ti, Wyoming; Elizabeth Henderson,
Plains Township; numerous great-
and great-great-grandchildren and
several nieces and nephews.
Afuneral service will be held to-
day at 7 p.m. from the William A.
Reese Funeral Chapel, rear 56 Gay-
lord Ave., Plymouth, with the Rev.
Anita J. Ambrose officiating.
Friends may call today from 6
p.m. until time of service.
Mr. Robert J. Muchler
February 12, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 6A
E
leanor Gilsky, age 100, formerly
of Carlisle Street, Wilkes-Barre,
went to be with her Lord Sunday,
February 12, 2012. She had been a
resident of Smith Health Care Ltd,
Mountain Top.
Born in Kingston, Eleanor was a
daughter of the late John and Mary
LaRue. She was a graduate of
Coughlin High School, Wilkes-
Barre.
Eleanor was a longtime member
of Firwood United Methodist
Church, Wilkes-Barre, and very ac-
tive in its J.O.Y. class.
Preceding her in death, in addi-
tion to her parents, were her hus-
band, Edward Gilsky, and a son, Ed-
ward Charles Gilsky. Eleanor was
the last surviving of her seven sib-
lings.
Surviving are her daughters,
Elaine Thompson, Wyoming; Eve-
lyn Mika, Kingston; son, Earl J. Gil-
sky and wife Marita, Mountain Top;
10 grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren.
Private funeral services will be
heldat theconvenienceof family. In-
terment will be made in Denison
Cemetery, Swoyersville.
Arrangements have been entrust-
ed to the Harold C. Snowdon Home
for Funerals Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave-
nue, Kingston, PA18704.
Eleanor Gilsky
February 12, 2012
11 grandchildren, ages 2 to 14.
Those three children are in-
volved in a custody case, and
Cleland deferred decisions
about any visits from them to
the judge handling that matter.
A spokesman for the Attorney
Generals Office said the judges
orders were being reviewed.
Cleland said jury selection
will be a challenge, given the
pretrial publicity and the special
role that Penn State plays in the
Centre County community.
If, after a reasonable attempt
it is apparent that a jury cannot
be selected within a reasonable
time, then I will reconsider this
ruling, Cleland wrote.
Cleland encouraged state
prosecutors to work with the
judge who supervised a grand ju-
ry that investigated Sandusky to
figure out how to release grand
jury transcripts to Sanduskys
lawyers on a schedule which
balances the appropriate inter-
ests of maintaining the secrecy
of the grand jury while still as-
suring the trial can proceed
without unnecessary disrup-
tion.
Cleland also ordered prosecu-
tors to tell defense lawyers
where and when the purported
crimes occurred and howold the
children were at the time. He ad-
dressed disputes between the
sides over material that should
be turned over to the defense by
directing prosecutors to put
their objections in writing by
Feb. 20. Sanduskys lawyers will
be allowed to reply by Feb. 27.
Sandusky lost a request to
force prosecutors to disclose the
names, addresses and birth
dates of witnesses.
While we are happy with the
outcome of Fridays hearings, we
realize, nevertheless, a number
of difficult legal battles lie ahead
of us, his lawyer, Joe Amendola,
said in a statement.
Cleland has tentatively sched-
uled trial to start in mid-May.
The 68-year-old Sandusky was
also granted the right to see
adult visitors. Under the courts
latest order, he will list up to 12
adults he would like to be able to
see, subject to approval by the
county officials overseeing his
home confinement. His visits
will be limited to a total of two
hours, three times a week.
Also Monday, Penn State ad-
ministrator TimCurley filed mo-
tions in Dauphin County Court
that argued the death of football
coach Joe Paterno last month
left prosecutors without a re-
quired second witness to sup-
port the perjury charge. He
wants the charges thrown out.
He said allegations he didnt
report suspected abuse in 2002
were filed under a revision of the
law that was passed five years
later and that the statute of limi-
tations has expired. The Attor-
ney Generals Office said it, too,
was under review.
The 57-year-old Curley is on
leave as athletic director as he
awaits trial. Former Penn State
Vice President Gary Schultz,
who faces the same charges as
Curley, has not filed similar mo-
tions. Both have denied the alle-
gations.
SANDUSKY
Continued from Page 1A
ley said.
Speed may be a factor in the
crash, the chief said. The
speed limit in the area is 40
mph.
Lynch was taken to Geisin-
ger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township,
where he was pronounced
dead at 8:43 a.m., the coroners
office said.
Dallas Superintendent
Frank Galicki said students
were informed of the tragedy
during an assembly Monday
afternoon. Grief counselors
will be available for students
for the remainder of the week,
he said.
He was a very wonderful
young man, Galicki said. Its
an unfortunate situation.
Were all parents, grandpar-
ents. Our hearts and prayers
go out to his family.
Lynch was a member of the
Boy Scouts Two District Coun-
cil in Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia, and earned his Eagle
badge in December.
Galicki said Lynch enlisted
in the U.S. Army and was
scheduled to report to Fort
Benning, Ga., on Aug. 8.
He was going to be a caval-
ry scout, thats all he wanted to
be, Galicki said.
CRASH
Continued from Page 1A
M
ary Jo Kolessar, 68, of Church
Street, Dallas, formerly of
Glen Lyon, passed away on Sun-
day at her home.
She was born in Hanover Town-
ship, on Aug. 3, 1943. She was the
daughter of the late Louis & Jose-
phine Yacubuski Kiscunas.
She was a graduate of Hanover
High School.
She was an avid dog lover who
enjoyed taking her therapy dogs to
various local nursing homes. She
was a member of the Dandie Din-
mont Terrier Club and several lo-
cal kennel clubs.
She also enjoyed collecting an-
tiques and was an avid reader.
She was preceded in death by
her daughter, Cynthia Williams,
and her brother, Louis Kiscunas.
She is survived by her husband
of 47 years, Joseph Kolessar, two
grandsons, Kris and Zach, 1 great-
grandson, Kris Jr., numerous niec-
es and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial is at
10 a.m. on Thursday in Holy Spirit
Parish/St. Adalberts Church,
Market St., Glen Lyon. Interment
at a later date will be in St. Adal-
berts Cemetery, Glen Lyon.
Family and friends may call on
Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 211W. Main St., Glen Lyon.
Mary Jo Kolessar
February 12, 2012
Vandalism and destruction have
no place in a democracy and will
not be tolerated.
Lucas Papademos
Greeces prime minister called for calm earlier this
week amid violent public protests. Lawmakers
approved new austerity measures as rioters torched buildings and
looted shops in Athens.
Lost drilling revenue,
education cuts hurt Pa.
O
nce again, Gov. Tom Corbetts pri-
orities are out of order.
While refusing to tax his corporate
sacred cows in the gas drilling industry,
Corbett promises to make Pennsylvania
the Mississippi of the North by slashing
funding for higher education. By slashing
PHEAA grants, Corbett also ensures that
many more of our young people wont be
able to afford to go to college this fall. Is a
miserable, minimum-wage job at a fast-
food restaurant the best future we can offer
them?
Pennsylvania is the only state that does
not impose a severance tax on natural gas.
While greedy out-of-state corporations
suck a precious resource out of our state,
taking the profits to Texas, Oklahoma and
elsewhere, Pennsylvania loses millions of
dollars of revenue annually by refusing to
tax these companies.
That said, our state colleges and uni-
versities can cut a lot of waste in their
budgets, starting with the bloated adminis-
trative salaries. A university president
sucks down a six- or seven-figure salary.
What, exactly, does a university president
do, other than sit in a plush office and look
important? How is he or she contributing
to the quality of the education that our
young people receive?
Equally obscene are the salaries paid to
athletic coaches. Is the purpose of a uni-
versity to educate or to provide a farm
system for the NFL? Put some of that
money into research grants to attract top
scholars and use the rest to reduce tui-
tions, so that a college education once
again becomes affordable for working-class
people.
Our colleges and universities could learn
a lesson from the honeybee. When times
are tough, the bees throw the drones out of
their hives.
Philip E. Galasso
Shickshinny
Preserve part of Sterling
for vendors, food court
S
aving the first two floors of the Hotel
Sterling in downtown Wilkes-Barre
would be a great idea! It can be used to
rent spaces to vendors. A food court could
tie the idea together.
This could tie in with the riverside
events. It would be a place where people
could go and even just relax and have a
cup of coffee. The rent money could pay
for any maintenance on the building.
This could be a win-win solution.
Think of how successful the Reading
Market in Philadelphia is. Providing free
parking, such as Boscovs in Scranton
does, would be a great addition to the
facility.
Florence Mokris
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the
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phone number for verification. Letters
should be no more than 250 words. We
reserve the right to edit and limit writers
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Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 9A
W HATS THAT scary holi-
day where youre encouraged
to dress up, hope for a trick
or a treat, and expect candy?
Where chatting up a virtual
stranger after dark seems
normal? When whispering
voices warn to be afraid, to be very afraid,
especially if youre on your own?
Why, its Valentines Day!
Only the truly brave can face Valentines
Day without either compulsory cynicism or a
craven sense of neediness.
On Halloween, after all, youre supposed to
assume a mask and pretend to be somebody
else. On Valentines Day, youre supposed to
strip your emotional soul naked and run
shrieking toward the oceanic vastness of your
partners essence. This can be tricky if youre
only on a second date.
Thats why a lot of men do on Feb. 14 what
others do on Oct. 31 turn off the lights and
pretend to be not home.
For men, Valentines Day is filled with hor-
ror. Is that really a surprise? They cant win.
For men, all they know is that theyre going to
spend time searching for a way to spend mon-
ey on who knows what for some woman who
will, when she receives it, force that little tight
smile, like a cat taking a poop, to indicate her
insincere gratitude.
Its a holiday celebration of inadequacy. He
will fail. He always has failed. Just like Jack
Nicholson in The Shining who always has
been at that hotel, this guy always has been in
the lingerie section of the department store
muttering: I think she likes mauve. But I
dont know what mauve is.
And hes one of the lucky ones. A lucky
person on Valentines Day has a significant
other, no matter how miserable that relation-
ship might be. Thats romance in America.
Two miserable people thanking God they
have each other for one night in February.
The unlucky ones are opening sparkly
elementary school-type cards from their par-
ents during a call about their younger siblings
adorable newest child, all while trying not to
detect a note of disappointment in their moth-
ers voice when she asks about their cat.
Frankly, it could be worse.
For women, in a relationship or not, Valen-
tines Day is filled with ghosts. Usually these
ghosts are properly deceased. They exist only
in the womans imagination. Theres a nostal-
gic aspect to the whole thing, which drives
womens current partners, should they have
any, nuts.
For example, I remember every Valentines
Day card ever sent to me. The one from the
cute boy in third grade whose mother signed
his name; cute but not so bright, that kid. The
one from my high school boyfriend who drew
73 hearts on the envelope, one for each day of
our relationship; affectionate but overdid
things. One from the guy I crushed on in
college that had a drunk dog, a spilled beer
and dead plant on the cover. That sure said,
love in every language, right? I should have
regarded it as a warning sign rather than an
invitation, but what did I know?
These days, my husband of 20 years cant
remember that he sent me the same card
three Valentines in a row. Im starting to
suspect he bought a fistful of them just so he
wouldnt have to go into Hallmark again.
A heart remains our most recognizable
symbol of love. The cautious, the beaten
down the man, mostly pick that cardio-
vascularly intimidating card off the rack and
see, first and foremost, the thing that he sus-
pects will one day attack and kill him. He
buys it anyhow. Now thats gotta be love. Or
maybe a little fear. With their red corn syrup
and heart-shaped cards, Halloween and Valen-
tines Day cant help but bleed into one anoth-
er.
Is it a surprise, then, that houses of horror
are pretty much like tunnels of love on Valen-
tines Day? That theyre hyped up, tricked out,
clichd, and yet you still go in expecting to
have a good time?
Next to Valentines Day, Halloween is a
celebration for sissies. Give me the Wicked
Witch of the West (or Freddy Krueger, for that
matter) over Cupid, that grotesque son of
Venus who drags a bow and arrow around as
if its the AK-47 of romance. Cupid is just a
sniper of love. Beware.
Gina Barreca is an English professor at the Uni-
versity of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has
written eight books and a columnist for the Hart-
ford Courant. She can be reached through her
website at www.ginabarreca.com.
Its another Valentines Day: Be afraid, be very afraid
COMMENTARY
G I N A B A R R E C A
A
NY PENNSYLVANIA
group that has an
award for outstand-
ing civic achieve-
ment should consider Amanda
E. Holt for a prize. She drew a
legislative reapportionment
map that won a rare accolade
from the state Supreme Court,
which rejected the version pro-
duced by a panel heavy with
politicians.
It would be one thing if Holt
were a political scientist well
versed in the intricacies of de-
signing legislative districts.
But she is a 29-year-old piano
teacher and self-employed
graphic artist who lives in Le-
high County.
In rejecting the plan offered
by the five-member state Leg-
islative Reapportionment
Commission, thereby ruling in
favor of Holt and other plain-
tiffs, the Pennsylvania Su-
preme Court clearly was
moved by what she had done.
Referring to the Holt plan,
Chief Justice Ronald Castille
wrote in his opinion: This
powerful evidence, challeng-
ing the Final Plan as a whole,
suffices to show that the Final
Planis contrarytolaw. Simply
put, too many municipalities
and counties were divided un-
necessarily.
There are two morals to this
story. The first concerns how
much one civic-minded citizen
can single-handedly achieve
withdedicationandhardwork.
The second has to do with the
flawed nature of the systemfor
redistricting itself. Because of
the botched plan, the Pennsyl-
vania primary might have to be
held later than April 24.
Redistricting should not be
about what politicians want,
but what best serves the peo-
ple of Pennsylvania for whom
they work. The next time
Pennsylvania calls a constitu-
tional convention, it should in-
sist the future redistricting be
performed by a truly neutral
panel. Holt has shown what
can be done.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
OTHER OPINION: REDISTRICTING
A sensible map
minus self-interest
S
TOPPING THE vio-
lence at GARMemorial
Junior-Senior High
School in Wilkes-Barre
wont be accomplished until
adults fromschool administra-
tors to parents andothers stop
shirking their responsibilities.
A machete attack outside the
school last week maimed a 14-
year-old student, whose hand
was nearly chopped off. Subse-
quent news reports, as well as
readers comments posted on
The Times Leaders website,
suggest that fights inside and
outside the school flare up far
too frequently and often involve
swarms of students rather than
only two combatants.
This festering problem re-
flects a school district failure;
and it is the districts duty to
fashion a communitywide re-
sponse for the safety of its stu-
dents, its faculty and city resi-
dents who live near the South
Grant Street school.
The first sentence of the dis-
tricts Secondary Schools
Handbook reads, It is the goal
of the Wilkes-Barre Area School
District to provide a safe, pro-
ductive learning environment
for each of our students. Later,
the handbook also states:
Fighting will not be tolerated
and Assaults on staff members
or on fellowstudents will not be
tolerated.
If so, why hasnt district Su-
perintendent Jeffrey T. Namey,
GARHighSchool Principal Col-
leen Robatin or a concerned
group of teachers publicly
brought escalating student-on-
student conflicts to the atten-
tion of the school board? Or par-
ents? For that matter, why
havent neighbors lodgedformal
complaints after witnessing af-
ter-school, student brawls?
If, as is widely suspected, ra-
cial tensions are fueling these
dangerous incidents, the solu-
tiondoesnt lieindishingout de-
tention or suspension. It in-
volves consulting with experts
in the field and, most likely, con-
ducting a prolonged anti-vio-
lencecampaignthat involvesad-
ministrators, teachers and the
community.
District officials cannot afford
to foot-drag on this safety con-
cern as they have been prone
to do with issues such as imple-
mentation of a written, teacher-
hiring policy and high school
consolidation.
Make a plan for dealing with
school violence.
Make it public.
And make it work.
OUR OPINION: VIOLENCE AT GAR
Formulate plan
for safer schools
Explore online resources for
establishing safe schools.
www.safeschools.info
www.safeschools.org
www.teachsafeschools.org
R E S O LV E C O N F L I C T
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
C M Y K
PAGE 10A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
enforcement officers will earn
that rate, an analysis of county
payroll records shows.
Salaries have become a major
concern for Luzerne County
Council members, a majority of
whom recently voted to lay off an
estimated 56 employees and raise
taxes 2percent inorder tobalance
the 2012 budget.
The widely disparate compen-
sationamongdepartments serves
as a prime example of why the
county needs to overhaul salary
structures and hiring practices,
said County Council Chairman
Jim Bobeck and Interim County
Manager Tom Pribula.
Consider:
Salariespaidtoprobationand
domestic relations officers rank
the workers among the top 3.5
percent of the highest wage ear-
ners employed by the county, ex-
ceeding salaries of nearly 97 per-
cent of the1,573 full-time employ-
ees, including many who have ad-
vanced degrees.
Most probationanddomestic
relations officers have a bachelors
degree or less, yet they will earn
more than14 of the15 full-time as-
sistant district attorneys, whose
salaries range from $41,200 to
$49,284, and five of the eight full-
time public defenders, who will
earn$41,200to$50,135. Theyalso
will top nearly every department
head in the county, most of whom
earn between $40,000 to $55,000,
and several county engineers,
who will earn between $41,200
and $57,680.
Bobeck said he knew wages in
probation and domestic relations
were high, but he hadnoidea how
great the disparity was between
other departments until advised
of findings in The Times Leaders
analysis.
Those numbers are startling
tome. I knewprobationwas good.
I didnt know it was that good,
Bobecksaid. Imnot sayingsome
people should not be paid more if
there are certain requirements for
jobs. But there is no parity Ive
been preaching to council that we
need a countywide salary struc-
ture and countywide hiring prac-
tices.
Court controls hirings
All positions within the county
hadtobeapprovedbythenow-de-
funct county salary board, which
ceased to exist once home rule
took effect. But the president
judgehassolediscretionover who
gets court-related jobs, appoint-
ing them via a court order.
As a department, Probation
Services will have the third high-
est base payroll (not including
overtime) in the county this year,
behind only the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility and Chil-
dren and Youth Services.
Thecountyis set tospend$5.91
million on base salaries for Proba-
tions113employees, includingpro-
bation officers, supervisors and
support staff. Domestic Relations,
meanwhile, is the fifth most costly
department with a base payroll of
$3 million.
And those costs are going to es-
calate in the coming years as most
unionized employees will receive
raises of roughly $1,300 to $1,800
annually for each of the next two
years of thefive-year pact. That will
bring the top rate from $60,557 to
$64,266 in 2014.
Under the current contract, a
probation officer reaches the top
ratewithineight years. That means
a person hired in January 2010 at a
salary of $42,511 will earn $54,918
in 2014 a $12,407 raise, or 29 per-
cent. If thenumberof stepsremains
the same in the next contract, they
would reach top rate by 2017.
Probation and Domestic Rela-
tions each require employees to
hold a college degree, but there are
a handful of employees in both de-
partments who do not have a de-
gree because they were grandfa-
thered in prior to that becoming a
requirement.
Employees in both departments
are covered under a five-year con-
tract withtheCourt AppointedPro-
fessional Employees Association
that runs through Dec. 31, 2014.
Challenges, dangers
Charles Majikes, a probationoffi-
cer who heads the union, agreed
the salaries are high compared to
most other departments, but those
departments dont face the same
challenges and dangers as proba-
tionanddomesticrelationsofficers,
he said.
Probationofficers monitor crimi-
nal offenders released from prison
to ensure they are complying with
conditions of probation or parole.
Their jobs includeconductingdrug
tests and pre-sentence investiga-
tions, referringclients tothe appro-
priate agencies and, in the case of
higher risk offenders, conducting
spot checks at their homes.
People dont understand the
dangers we are subjected to every
day. Were dealing with convicted
felons. When we go knock on a
door, wehavenoideawhatsbehind
that door, Majikes said.
He acknowledged the domestic
relations officers, most of whomsit
behindadeskinanofficeprotected
by metal detectors and guards,
dont face the same degree of dan-
ger as probation officers.
He said theyre still at risk, giv-
en the nature of their jobs and the
unpredictability of how people
will react.
They subject themselves to
danger every day, too, Majikes
said. If someone is out there not
holding up to their responsibility
as far as childsupport, theyretold
were going to take this much
money off of you, people react dif-
ferently.
Bobeck said he doesnt dis-
count the challenges of the jobs,
but other employees, including
prison guards and sheriffs depu-
ties, also face dangers.
You want to pay people an ap-
propriate salary, but it has to be in
line with the work, Bobeck said.
Bobeck isnt the only person
questioning the salaries.
The disparity has long been a
source of consternation for Chief
Public Defender Al Flora Jr., who
has questioned how compensa-
tion levels were determined.
The salary structure in the
county does not make any sense,
Florasaid. WhenI seeayoungas-
sistant district attorney or public
defender with all those years of
education behind them, and they
have a starting salary of $20,000
less than someone with a bache-
lors degree, Im offended.
Managers pay lower
Michael Vecchio, director of
Probation Services, said he also
has concerns regarding the differ-
ences in pay for unionized work-
ers compared to managers.
At a salary of $78,159, Vecchio
will earn more than any union
member in his department, but
thats not the case for five super-
visors in the office, who will earn
$59,685-- $892less thana toprate
union employee.
Its not conducive to keeping
managers if the officers get a pay
increase each year and manage-
ment doesnt, Vecchio said.
Majikes said he believes union
workers are being unfairly target-
ed as an easy scapegoat for
county officials looking to layoffs
as a quick fix for the countys fi-
nancial problems.
The salaries paid in Probation
andDomesticRelationsarethere-
sult of years of raises contained in
collective bargaining agreements
reached with the county, Majikes
said. If county officials were not
happy with the contracts, they
didnt have to approve them.
Contractual negligence
Bobeck, who took office in Ja-
nuary along with the other 10
county council members, said he
doesnt know why former county
commissioners, who approved
the union contracts, agreed to
such generous terms.
I have to assume there were
years of contractual negligence,
Bobeck said.
Bobeck said council intends to
take a close look at union contracts
and seek concessions. He and Prib-
ula acknowledged that could be a
tough challenge. Any changes
would have to be negotiated with
each of the county unions.
Its hard to cut a collective bar-
gaining agreement. Im not saying
it cant be done, but its pretty diffi-
cult, Pribula said. You need to
start by tiering future contracts
down with new hires. Its pretty
difficult to get a major concession
fromexisting people.
Bobeck said hes committed to
doing just that.
A majority of council members
agreedtoraisereal estatetaxes this
year, allowing the county to reduce
the number of layoffs. He said
unionsshouldnot expect council to
take that action again.
If theycantgetahandleonesca-
lating costs, there are going to be
serious issues down the road that
lead to greater cuts, Bobeck said.
SALARIES
Continued from Page 1A
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Interim County Manager Tom Pribula, far right, answers questions
at Mondays county council meeting at the EMA building.
Parole.
Juvenile probation officers also
fared exceptionally well in 2010,
earning an average of $56,732
the second highest average salary
out of all counties in the state, ac-
cording to report by the Juvenile
Court Judges Commission.
Compensation paid to proba-
tionemployeeshascomeunderin-
creased scrutiny by Luzerne
Countyofficials, whoarequestion-
ing the disparity in wages with
other departments in the county,
as well as the state.
The overall statewide average
salary for adult probation officers
was $45,861in 2010 with the high-
est average pay offered by Bucks
County ($65,560) and the lowest
in Forest County ($20,462), ac-
cording to County Adult Proba-
tion and Parole Statistical Report
(CAPP) issued by the state Board
of Probation and Parole.
For juvenile probation officers,
the overall state average was
$43,934. Lehigh County had the
highest average salary at $57,972,
while Huntingdon County paid
the lowest average at $25,139, ac-
cording to the Juvenile Probation
Personnel report issued by the Ju-
venileCourt Judges Commission.
Disparities noticed
Mike Shucosky, deputy court
administrator, said the court sys-
tem, which controls all hirings
within court branches, has also
taken notice of the disparities.
Officials are vowing to under-
take a reviewof the department to
determine whether staffing levels
are appropriate, he said.
The proposed review was
prompted in part, Shucosky said,
by the CAPP report, which
showed Luzerne County adult
probation officers had an average
caseload of 97 offenders in 2010 --
the third lowest caseload out the
all third-class counties.
One of the courts concerns is
whether or not we are in variance
with the caseloads of other coun-
ties that are comparable in size to
us and whether or not we are mis-
managing resources, Shucosky
said. The statistics we are getting
leadus torequireaccountabilityof
the probation office and request a
good solid reason for the staffing
and work load.
The CAPP report, released in
November, showed wide dispari-
ties between caseloads and sala-
ries amongst counties.
Probationofficers inYorkCoun-
ty, for instance, had an average
caseload of 173 offenders 78 per-
cent higher than Luzerne County
probation officers. Yet officers in
Yorkhave the thirdlowest average
salary at $43,010.
In Berks County, probation offi-
cershadanaveragecaseloadof196
offenders more than double the
Luzerne County caseload. Those
officers earned an average of
$52,809.
Longevity factors in
Tom Pribula, interim county
manager for Luzerne County, said
thehighsalarycostsherearelarge-
ly tied to longevity bonuses con-
tained in the union contract,
which allow probation officers to
attain top rate within eight years.
In2012, 62 of 72 probationofficers
will earn the top rate of $60,577.
A lot of people were hired
around the same time. As you go
throughtheprogressivesteps, you
get to the highest level, plus they
get a salary increase. There are a
lot of people hitting their peak sal-
aries, Pribula said.
Whilethats costly, it has alsore-
duced turnover, resulting in the
county having one of the most ex-
periencedprobationstaffs, with87
percent of employees having five
or more years of experience in
2010, according to the CAPP re-
port.
Compare that to York County,
which has had high turnover rates
for years, due largely to the high
caseload and lower than average
salaries, said Al Sable, director of
adult probation.
Just 57 percent of his staff had
five or more years of experience in
2010, according to the CAPP re-
port.
Experience factors in
Sable said thats been a major
concern. His staff has struggled to
keepupwithcaseloads. Fortunate-
ly, he said, he was able toconvince
the county commissioners this
year to restore several positions
that were eliminated several years
ago.
Frequent turnover creates a
lack of stability. The less stable
youare, themoreroomthereis for
things to slip through the cracks,
Sable said. For every new proba-
tion officer we bring in, its a mini-
mum of a year before they get to
knowthe operation.
What is anappropriatecaseload
for probation officers?
The American Probation and
Parole Association, an organiza-
tionthat represents probationoffi-
cers, has saidthats adifficult ques-
tion to answer given the variance
inthe types of offenders andsetup
of county probation offices.
The organization recommends
caseloads be based on a work-
load model, which factors in the
complexity of the case.
A case with a high priority
would require four hours per
month equaling 30 as a total case-
load. Medium priority would re-
quire two hours per month equal-
ing 60 as a total caseload. Lowpri-
ority would require one hour per
monthequalinga total caseloadof
120.
Michael Vecchio, county direc-
tor of Probation Services, said he
has always set the standard at
around100 cases per probation of-
ficer, with some officers having
more or less, basedonthe types of
cases they handle.
ProbationServicesisamongnu-
merous departments that have
beentargetedfor layoffs bycounty
council, whichis set tovote onthe
budget tonight.
Shucosky said the department
expects to eliminate six to10 posi-
tions through layoffs or by not fill-
ing open positions.
Vecchio said he understands
concerns of county officials strug-
glingtobalancethebudget. But he
cautioned that we cant lose sight
of the importance of the work his
department does.
Every person we supervise is a
convicted felon, Vecchio said.
The fact we have lower caseloads
allows us to make more field con-
tacts and be more in tune with
what anoffender is doing. ... If you
start cutting staff, it will certainly
impact thedeliveryof thoseservic-
es.
CASELOADS
Continued from Page 1A
Lehigh
Luzerne
Chester
Berks
Dauphin
Westmoreland
Northampton
Erie
York
Lancaster
Lackawanna
$56,077
$53,544
$53,396
$52,809
$48,725
$52,708
$48,566
$43,123
$43,010
$41,351
$41,181
$10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000
Chester
Berks
Lehigh
Westmoreland
York
Northampton
Lackawanna
Erie
Luzerne
Lancaster
Dauphin
50 100 150 200
205
196
176
174
173
148
71
97
74
Average Salary
Average Caseload
ADULT PROBATION COMPARISON
Data show how Luzerne County adult probation services compares to the 10 other
third-class counties statewide. Information is from the 2010 County Adult Probation
and Parole report compiled by the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole.
107
105
Lehigh
Luzerne
Berks
Westmoreland
Northampton
Lancaster
Dauphin
York
Chester
Lackawanna
Erie
$57,972
$56,732
$53,260
$48,950
$48,421
$42,484
$41,728
$40,434
$40,411
$37,922
$37,215
$10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
JUVENILE PROBATION COMPARISON
These are average salaries for third-class counties in Pennsylvania, taken from the
2010 Juvenile Probation Personnel Report of the Juvenile Court Judges Commission.
about $10.50 more on a proper-
ty assessed at $100,000. Proper-
ty taxes are currently 5.215
mills, or $521 on a $100,000
property.
Many workers are equally un-
happy because the $122.7 mil-
lion operating budget is a $1.56
million reduction from last
years actual spending. The
planrequires anestimated50 to
60 layoffs in addition to 23 cuts
from recent retirements and
row officer eliminations.
County managers will final-
ize the roster of layoffs on
Wednesday, said
county Interim
Manager Tom
Pribula.
Plains Town-
ship resident Tim
Turnbaugh, one of
14 speakers, said
he lives in a neigh-
borhood with
many elderly resi-
dents who cant
affordanincrease, even$10. His
neighbor gets by on $560 a
month in Social Security, he
said.
Its going to hurt some peo-
ple, and I just want you to be
aware of that, Turnbaugh said.
He advised county officials to
compare staffing levels and sal-
aries to those in other similarly
sized counties to identify po-
tential overstaffing and out-of-
whack compensation.
Wilkes-Barre resident Robert
Shortz said he will make do
with the tax hike but cautioned
council that many county resi-
dents have diminishing in-
come, including him.
Kingston taxpayer Ed Gusti-
tus pointed to the cost of sala-
ries and benefits, particularly
for union workers, saying all
they do is take.
Im just fighting for the tax-
payers, Gustitus said.
Attorney Matthew Muckler,
who works in the county Dis-
trict Attorneys Office, told
council members they are
playing with fire reducing
budgets in the district attor-
neys, clerk of courts and public
defenders offices.
Muckler said all three offices
are understaffed and facing dif-
ficulties keeping up with de-
mands. Budget cuts shouldnt
drive decisions on which cases
should be prosecuted, he said.
Prison union representative
Tony Seiwell questioned how
the prison will be able to absorb
14 layoffs, noting the prison
warden recently hired five new
workers because they were
needed.
Seiwell also said people crit-
icizing the benefits for prison
workers may not realize they
have a managed care plan that
does not include dental or eye
insurance. Unionized prison
workers wont start paying to-
ward health care until the start
of 2013, when they will contrib-
ute $60 per month.
Duryea resi-
dent Kevin
OBrien chal-
lenged the pay-
ment of on-call
stipends to work-
ers and health
care for part-time
court attorneys.
OBrien said he
accepted paying
toward health in-
surance and always being on
call without additional com-
pensation when he was county
emergency management direc-
tor because he was glad to have
a job. County employees should
look for other work if they be-
lieve they can do better, he
said.
County Controller Walter
Griffith asked council to cancel
the tax hike. Union representa-
tives complain about layoffs but
are not willing to freeze their
pay hikes or give up extras such
as longevity bonuses and uni-
form allowances in some de-
partments that dont require
special uniforms, he said.
Griffith said he is sharing in
cuts by eliminating two em-
ployees, which will leave him
with a staff of four, including
him.
Brian Shiner, also of King-
ston, said his 95-year-old father
lives on Social Security and
isnt thrilled with a $10.50 in-
crease, but viewed it as a pen-
alty on county taxpayers who
did not speak up when the
countys debt ballooned to
more than $400 million.
The 2 percent hike will equa-
te to a fast food meal, he said.
Shiner said the new council
had limited timely options be-
cause the sins of forefathers
were heaped upon them and
unions werent willing to freeze
pay hikes or take off 12 days
without pay.
He challenged the council
and incoming manager Robert
Lawton to implement efficien-
cies that would allow taxes to
be reduced 2 percent in 2013.
BUDGET
Continued from Page 1A
The Luzerne County Council will
adopt the 2012 amended budget
at 6:01 tonight in the countys
Emergency Management Agency
building, 185 Water St., Wilkes-
Barre.
The amended budget may be
viewed on the county website,
www.luzernecounty.org, under
the county council link.
I F YO U G O
Its going to hurt
some people, and I
just want you to
be aware of that.
Tim Turnbaugh
Plains Township resident
on proposed tax hike
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012
timesleader.com
N
ot so fast on that possibility
of the New York Mets mov-
ing their Double-A affiliate
out of the country.
The Eastern League isnt even
certain it wants to extend its
boundaries across the Canadian
border.
So the team in Binghamton isnt
bound for Ottawa.
When reports surfaced late last
week concerning the Mets shifting
their Double-A farm team to Cana-
das capital city, Eastern League
president Joe McEacharn didnt just
stop at calling that scenario prema-
ture.
He said its false.
A complete fabrication, McEa-
charn said.
Truth be told, though, the league
is entertaining the possibility of
putting someone there.
A big-town atmosphere in a town
that once hosted Triple-A baseball
can appear pretty tempting to a
league of lesser talent.
Its a big city, the capital city of
Canada, McEacharn said. It al-
ready has a stadium. Its got 1.3
million people.
He also cited the Eastern
Leagues success after moving a
team to Richmond, following the
departure of the old Triple-A R-
Braves.
But going to Ottawa would be a
brave move at this point for any
league.
Unless that leagues made up of
hockey teams.
Ottawas citizens prefer their
games played on ice, as evidenced
by the success of the NHLs Ottawa
Senators and the lack of interest in
the Triple-A teams that formerly
played there.
Ottawa couldnt draw in the 1990s
even after their Triple-A team, the
Lynx, won the Governors Cup title.
Thats why the International
League pulled out of town.
When it came back for a season,
with the old Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Red Barons using Ottawa as a tem-
porary stop on the way to Lehigh
Valley during the 2006 season,
those Phillies prospects were met
with indifference by the home
crowd.
Still, the Eastern Leagues curi-
ous if things will change in Ottawa
with a different new brand of ball.
The Eastern League is in the
process of exploring whether or not
Ottawa makes sense for an Eastern
League franchise, McEacharn said.
We havent made a commitment.
Before they do, Eastern League
officials want to find out a few
things.
Is Ottawas stadium still in play-
ing shape?
Does the Eastern League have a
team that wants to play in Ottawa?
Would its parent team allow it?
Will people in a hockey town ever
turn out to see their hometown
heroes swing sticks at baseballs
instead of pucks?
Were far from an answer,
McEacharn said.
It looks like a continued short
drive for area Mets fans who desire
to watch their teams Double-A
players in action, about an hour or
so north of Scranton.
Theres going to be baseball in
Binghamton, McEacharn said. We
have a team there, were going to
play there in 2012; theyve signed a
lease extension. Certainly, the Mets
are very committed to their com-
munity up there. They have a long-
term relationship with the Mets.
Its doubtful the Binghamton
Mets want to break any of that by
bolting across the border and into
the obscurity of Ottawa.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Ottawa is fit
more for pucks
than baseballs
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
Amare Stoudemire watched Linsanity from
Florida, a welcome break as he grieved the
death of his brother.
Carmelo Anthony had a front-row seat right
in New York, where
he couldnt escape
fears he was eventual-
ly going to mess
things up.
Both superstars
will return soon, but
the question is no
longer whether they
can coexist.
Now, its how do
they fit on Jeremy Lins team.
Linsanity entered its second week Monday,
with the Knicks on a roll they feel can keep
right on going behind their surprising point
guard, whocoachMike DAntoni saidhas given
the team a spirit and a swagger.
You go into every game thinking youre go-
ing to win, and it changes everybodys mood,
DAntoni said.
Linwas chosenas EasternConference player
of the week after averaging 27.3 points and 8.3
assists in his first four starts. The Knicks have
won five in a row heading into Toronto today,
turning things around after an 8-15 start.
The Knicks used
words like fun and
exciting to describe
the last week as they
met withanenormous
media contingent for a
mid-February prac-
tice. Lin sat out prac-
tice to rest, but Stou-
demire was back on
the floor after leaving
the team last Monday after his older brother,
Hazell, was killed in a car crash.
The only positive for us during that whole
week was we were watching the basketball
games andwe were watching Linsanity andmy
family was getting a kick out of it, Stoudemire
AP PHOTO
New Yorks Jeremy Lin (17) seen playing
against the Lakers, was chosen as Eastern
Conference player of the week after averag-
ing 27.3 points and 8.3 assists in his first
four starts.
N B A
Stoudemire, Anthony watch Linsanity evolve
By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
See LINSANITY, Page 4B
Knicks stars,
who have
missed the last
week, watched
the newest
addition to the
New York lineup
catch the whole
countrys
attention.
Stoudemire
missed time
after brother
was killed in
accident, while
Anthony was
injured.
Its more exciting than anything,
just to see the buzz that hes cre-
ated here in New York, here in the
NBA as a whole. I just want to get
back there and be a part of it.
Carmelo Anthony on teammate Jeremy Lin
WRIGHT TWP. Coming off of
back-to-back losses with playoff seed-
ing looming, Crestwood finished off
Dallas with a strong fourth quarter and
guaranteeditself a spot inthe District 2
Class 3Aplayoffs Monday night by out-
lasting the Mountaineers 51-47 at
home.
With the win Crestwood (14-7, 3-3)
moves into a tie with Pittston Area for
the third seed in the Wyoming Valley
Conferencefor theupcomingDistrict 2
Class 3A playoffs. Dallas (12-7, 3-3)
bumps down to a tie
for fifth with Tunk-
hannock. The top five
teams from the WVC
will make the District
2 playoffs.
Crestwood will
have a chance to im-
prove its seeding Thursday with a
home game against Coughlin. Dallas
will host Tunkhannock on the same
day to decide the final spot.
You know, we started slow tonight
but once we got that out of the way the
girls really got into this game, said
Crestwood head coach Isiah Walker.
We know that were a good team, but,
we havent been getting a lot of wins
lately, we had been in a little bit of a
slump. We definitely needed this as a
pickup.
Walkers squad can certainly take a
lift from how decisively it turned the
fourth quarter in its favor.
After fighting off a feisty Dallas de-
fense through three quarters, Crest-
wood kept the Mountaineers from
scoring for two separate two-minute
HI GH SCHOOL GI RL S BASKETBAL L
Comets prevail
AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR TIMES LEADER
Carly Hislop (42) of Crestwood tries to protect the ball as SamMissel (13) and Tanner Engilehart (10) try to block.
Crestwood survives Dallas stingy D
By MATTHEWSHUTT
For The Times Leader 51
CRESTWOOD
47
DALLAS
See COMETS, Page 3B
Nowthat the PIAA
has released its enroll-
ment classifications
for the next two
seasons of boys bas-
ketball, its an ideal
situation to fix the
Wyoming Valley
Conference divisional alignments.
After all, GARwill be moving up to
Class 3Aand shouldnt stay in Division
III. But thats just a small part of what
should happen.
Its time to give two struggling pro-
grams Berwick and Wyoming Area
the opportunities to get back to respect-
ability.
First a little background. Berwick and
Wyoming Area have been in Division II
the last four seasons, banging heads
with perennial powers Crestwood,
Hazleton Area and Holy Redeemer
among other programs far more ad-
vanced.
During the last three seasons, which
includes the current one, Wyoming
Area is a combined 6-59 overall. Four of
those victories have come against Ber-
wick. The Warriors have won more than
six games in a season once since 2005-
06 when they finished12-11in 2008-09.
Berwick is 7-57 during that same
H I G H S C H O O L B OY S B A S K E T B A L L
WVC realignment should be considered
JOHN ERZAR
N O T E B O O K
See ERZAR, Page 4B
The students have started showing up
in waves at the Anderson Center. Fans
are officially scoreboard watching. The
Misericordia mens basketball teamis in
the midst of its best stretch in recent his-
tory, and it shows.
Winners of eight straight, the Cougars
are in sole possession of first place in the
Freedom Conference headed into the fi-
nal week of the regu-
lar season. And that
has the programand
its followers feeling
good before to-
nights game against
Kings.
Everybody loves
a winner theres
been a lot of seasons
nobody would talk
tome, coachTrevor
Woodruff joked. Its
easier to support a winner, and our fans
have been tremendous during this
whole stretch since weve gotten it go-
ing.
Hopefully we can keep winning and
giving them something fun to watch.
The men tip off at 8 p.m. at the Ander-
son Center, with the womens game
opening the doubleheader at 6 p.m.
Misericordia (17-6, 9-3) has already
clinched a spot in next weeks Freedom
Conference tournament and can guaran-
tee a home game in the opening round
by beating the Monarchs.
Thats a high priority for the Cougars,
who are10-1at the Anderson Center this
season and are unbeaten there in league
play. Their winstreakmay have received
its biggest boost back on Jan. 25 with a
last-second bucket to beat Kings 62-60
in Wilkes-Barre.
I think they believe, Woodruff said.
They believe in each other. They en-
joy working. They enjoy playing togeth-
er, and you can tell that on the court I
think. They stick together. Thats the
key, down the stretch.
We dont have the best players but
collectively theyre pretty good.
The Monarchs (9-14, 4-8) enter the re-
match coming off of one of their best ef-
forts of the season. Kings endeda seven-
game slide on Saturday with a 79-54
thrashing of Manhattanville.
Though the Monarchs are out of post-
season contention, they head into to-
nights game with some newfound confi-
dence.
For these kids, the hardest part of it
was the mental aspect of it, Kings
coach J.P. Andrejko said. Being in so
many games and being so close losing
by six points or less. It just gets disheart-
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Misericordia
can secure
postseason
home game
A win for the men tonight against
Kings will guarantee a home game,
where they are 10-1 this season.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
UP NEXT
Freedom
Conference
basketball
Kings at
Misericordia
Tonight,
Anderson
Center
Women: 6 p.m.
Men: 8 p.m.
See BASKETBALL, Page 4B
C M Y K
PAGE 2B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
Mountain Top Area Little League
will hold registrations for baseball
and softball Thursday from 5:30-7
p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 25 from
1-3:30 p.m. at Crestwood High
School. Baseball and Softball
programs are for boys between
the ages of 6-15. Participants must
turn 6 by April 30. For more in-
formation, call Terry at 823-7949
or visit www.mountaintoparealit-
tleleague.com.
Greater Pittston Stoners Youth
Soccer will hold registrations for
spring soccer on Feb. 21, 23 and 29
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Exeter
Scout Home, located in the rear of
the Exeter Borough Building on
the corner of Wyoming Ave. and
Lincoln St., Exeter. Cost is $25 if
you do not need a uniform and
$40 with a uniform. For more
information, go to http://stone-
rsoccer.org.
Wilkes-Barre American Legion
Baseball will be holding regis-
trations Thursday from 7-9 p.m. at
Vinsko & Associates, located at
253 S. Franklin St. Players ages
13-19 who reside in Wilkes-Barre
and go to Meyers, GAR or Holy
Redeemer are eligible. The fee for
the season is $50 and players are
required to bring a copy of their
birth certificate to the signup. Call
Corey at 332-2794 for more in-
formation.
South Wilkes Barre Little League
will be holding sign ups for this
season on the following dates and
times. Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 pm
and Saturday 10:00 - 1:00pm. Sign
ups will be held at 2 locations.
Firwood church 130 Old River Road
and at Stanton Bowling Lanes.
Players ages four through 14 are
eligible to play. Any player residing
in the mayflower section of Wilkes-
Barre is now eligible to play for
south Wilkes-Barre Little League.
Cost is $45 per player and $60 per
family for t ball through little
league. $55 or $80 for family for
Junior League. There will also be a
$30 deposit for lottery ticket
fundraiser. More information on
our web site at www.swblittlelea-
gue.com.
Avoca/Dupont Little League will
hold registrations at the upper
Avoca Little league field clubhouse
from 6-8 p.m. on Wednesday.
Registration fee is $60 per player
and $75 per family. Teener base-
ball sign-up fee is $60 for each
player. Programs include: T-ball
(ages 4-6), coach pitch (ages 7-8),
minor softball and baseball (ages
8-10), major softball and baseball
(ages 10-12), junior baseball (ages
13-14), senior baseball (ages 15-16)
and big league baseball (ages
17-18).
UPCOMING EVENTS
Coughlin Wrestling Hall of Fame will
induct its first class on Wednesday
in the high school gym beginning
at 6:45 p.m. The inaugural in-
ductees will be Rick Bartoletti,
Dana Balum and Bill Pfeffer.
Coughlin alumni, faculty and fans
are invited. For more information,
contact coach Steve Stahl at
826-7201 or by email at sfs8@hot-
mail.com.
MEETINGS
Birchwood Over 40 and Over 50
Softball League will meet Wednes-
day at 7 p.m. at the leisure tavern.
Checkerboard Inn Golf League will
hold an organizational meeting,
Monday, Feb. 20 at 7 p.m. at the
Checkerboard Inn in Trucksville. All
members must attend or contact
the league. Any questions can be
directed to Frank at 675-7532.
The Crestwood Football Booster
Club will meet Thursday, Feb. 16, at
7 p.m. at Tonys Pizza in the back
room. For more information, call
Melanie at 606-4223.
The GAR Memorial High School
Football Booster Club will meet
Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Choral
at the high school.
Wyoming Area 7th and 8th Grade
Baseball will have a mandatory
meeting for all players parents.
Meeting will take place at the high
school Wednesday, Feb. 15, in Room
129 at 6 p.m.
Wyoming Area Diamond Club will
conduct a meeting Wednesday,
Feb. 15, in Room129 at the high
school at 7 p.m. All baseball par-
ents from grades 7-12 are urged to
attend. For more information, visit
www.wyomingareabaseball.org.
REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS
Dupont Softball/T-ball signups will
be held at the Dupont field house,
200 Elm St., on the following
dates: Feb. 19 from noon to 3 p.m.,
Feb. 20 from 6-9 p.m., Feb. 27-29
from 6-9 p.m. Signups are open to
all boys and girls of the greater
Pittston Area and surrounding
communities. T-ball is for boys and
girls ages 4-7 and is $25 per player
with no family discount or fun-
draiser. Softball is for girls ages
7-17 and is $50 per player, $85 per
two players and $110 for three
players of the same family (sisters)
with no fundraiser. For more in-
formation, call Bob Cappelloni at
881-8744.
Mt Top Area Little League Baseball
and Softball Registrations will be
held on Thursday for boys & girls
ages six through 15. For additional
dates, fees, info call Terry 823-
7949, or visit our website at
www.mountaintoparealittleleague-
.com
Plains American Legion Baseball
Teams will hold registration Sun-
day, Feb. 19, at the Plains American
Legion home on East Carey Street
from1-3 p.m. Players between the
ages of 13-19 who reside in Plains,
Laflin, Bear Creek, Parsons, Miners
Mills, North End, East End, Avoca,
Dupont, Jenkins Township and
Pittston Township, East of the
Pittston Bypass, are eligible to sign
up. For more information, call Don
at 822-0537 or Jack at 947-7246.
Pittston Township Little League will
have final registrations for T-Ball,
baseball and softball on Wednes-
day, Feb. 15, from 6-8 p.m. at the
Pittston Township Municipal Build-
ing. Fees due at sign up are $50
per player or $75 per family. For
more information, call Nick at
690-2748 or visit www.Ptll.us.
Mountain Top Babe Ruth Baseball
programwill hold registrations
Thursday from 5:30-7 p.m. and
Sunday, Feb. 25, from1-3:30 p.m. at
Crestwood High School. Babe Ruth
is for ages 13-15, and includes a
13-year-old developmental league.
For more information, call Terry at
823-7949 or visit www.mountain-
toparealittleleague.com.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off
at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Heat 1 PACERS
Knicks [3] RAPTORS
Spurs 7.5 PISTONS
THUNDER 12.5 Jazz
GRIZZLIES 3.5 Rockets
BULLS [11] Kings
NUGGETS 8 Suns
BLAZERS 14.5 Wizards
LAKERS 5.5 Hawks
[]-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a va-
riety of reasons, withtheprimefactor beinganinjury.
When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wa-
gering. The line could move a fewpoints in either di-
rection, depending on the severity (probable, ques-
tionable, doubtful, out) of the injury.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
CLEMSON PK Virginia
SETON HALL 9.5 St. Johns
Texas A&M 3.5 TEXAS TECH
Georgia St 3 JAMES MADISON
KENT ST 4 Buffalo
C MICHIGAN 4.5 E Michigan
BUTLER 15 Loyola-Chicago
DREXEL 18.5 William & Mary
HOFSTRA 3.5 Delaware
OLD DOMINION 13 NC-Wilmington
NORTHEASTERN 15.5 Towson
INDIANA ST 4 Illinois St
Florida [4] ALABAMA
Unlv 9 TCU
Creighton 7.5 SO ILLINOIS
WISCONSIN-MILW 1 Cleveland St
VALPARAISO 14 Illinois-Chi
WISC-GREEN BAY 4.5 Youngstown St
Texas 2.5 OKLAHOMA
GEORGE MASON 1 Virginia Comm
Ohio St 8 MINNESOTA
Mississippi St PK LSU
Pacific 5 CAL-DAVIS
Manhattan 3 SIENA
TENNESSEE ST 8 Jackville St
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Blues -$180/
+$160
BLUE JACKETS
LIGHTNING -$125/
+$105
Senators
BRUINS -$135/
+$115
Rangers
SABRES -$125/
+$105
Devils
RED WINGS -$210/
+$175
Stars
WILD -$110/-
$110
Ducks
PREDATORS -$145/
+$125
Blackhawks
JETS -$125/
+$105
Islanders
FLAMES -$125/
+$105
Maple Leafs.
AME RI C A S L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Knicks - Raptors circle is for New
York forward Amare Stoudemire (probable) and forward Carmelo Anthony (doubt-
ful); the Bulls - Kings circle is for Chicago guard Derrick Rose (questionable).
On the college hoop board, the Alabama - Florida circle is for Bama forward and
leading scorer JaMychal Green (suspended) and forward Tony Mitchell (suspend-
ed).
Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/vegasvigorish.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las
Vegas, Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$600 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$400; in the
WBA/IBF welterweight title fight on May 19 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Amir Khan is
-$450 vs. Lamont Peterson at +$350; in the WBO welterweight title fight on June 9
in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$400 vs. Timothy Bradley at +$300.
W V C B O Y S B A S K E T B A L L
S T A T I S T I C S
(Statistics are for WVC divisional games only; divisional and overall records in parentheses)
DIVISION I
COUGHLIN (2-3, 6-14) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Marcus Cobb..................................... 11 67 10 33 57 .579 177 16.1
Nate Oliver......................................... 11 45 18 17 27 .630 125 11.4
Phil Trout............................................ 11 30 11 28 48 .583 99 9.0
Connor Flaherty ................................ 11 31 0 17 26 .654 79 7.2
Devon Davis ...................................... 11 34 0 7 13 .538 75 6.8
Eric Heffers........................................ 10 9 7 7 8 .875 32 3.2
CRESTWOOD (4-1, 11-9) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
John Fazzini ...................................... 10 46 16 55 60 .917 163 16.3
Chris Fazzini ...................................... 10 37 3 17 27 .630 94 9.4
Steve Roberts.................................... 11 29 19 4 9 .444 81 7.4
Brady Gallagher ................................ 11 19 10 12 16 .750 60 5.5
Mike Judge......................................... 11 23 5 9 16 .563 60 5.5
Josh Jones......................................... 11 16 5 5 9 .556 42 3.8
HAZLETON AREA (5-0, 17-3) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Travis Buckner .................................. 11 73 10 31 43 .720 187 17.0
Frankie Vito........................................ 11 48 7 22 36 .611 125 11.4
Sal Biasi ............................................. 11 45 23 9 16 .563 122 11.1
Tyler Plaksa....................................... 11 34 1 28 38 .737 97 8.8
Adam Hauze...................................... 9 28 0 8 20 .400 64 7.1
Corey Joseph .................................... 11 13 13 3 4 .750 42 3.8
PITTSTON AREA (1-4, 11-9) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Steve Stravinski ................................ 11 87 28 29 35 .829 231 21.0
Steve Sklanka ................................... 11 46 16 19 24 .792 127 11.5
Jordan Houseman............................. 11 37 9 20 29 .690 103 9.4
Shaun McDermott............................. 11 23 15 9 12 .750 70 6.4
Mason Gross..................................... 10 24 3 10 11 .909 61 6.1
Mike Schwab..................................... 11 5 1 7 13 .538 18 1.6
WYO. VAL. WEST (3-2, 10-11) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
James McCann ................................. 10 48 12 22 30 .733 130 13.0
Jaquan Ingram.................................. 10 42 0 25 35 .714 109 10.9
Jonathan Gimble............................... 11 41 1 11 20 .550 94 8.5
Ryan Hoinski ..................................... 10 27 0 23 30 .767 77 7.7
Brett Good.......................................... 11 29 13 12 20 .600 83 7.5
Chris McCue...................................... 11 14 7 3 7 .429 38 3.5
DIVISION II
BERWICK (0-5, 3-16) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Jimmy Gaizick.................................. 11 29 7 23 32 .719 88 8.0
James Morrison............................... 8 20 1 7 11 .636 48 6.0
Eric May............................................ 10 22 8 6 12 .500 58 5.8
Zach Ladonis ................................... 11 27 0 12 20 .600 66 6.0
Jeremy Clausen .............................. 8 6 3 11 20 .550 26 3.3
Will Morales...................................... 8 10 5 2 2 1.000 27 3.4
DALLAS (3-2, 13-6) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Shane Dunn..................................... 11 60 6 36 62 .580 162 14.7
Paul Brace........................................ 11 54 5 13 30 .433 126 11.5
Jason Simonovich........................... 11 49 1 19 35 .543 118 10.7
Bob Saba.......................................... 11 32 16 16 20 .800 96 8.7
Don Behm ........................................ 10 22 0 7 14 .500 51 5.1
Matt Ross ......................................... 11 7 2 11 14 .786 27 2.5
HOLY REDEEMER (3-2, 9-11) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Ryan DeRemer................................ 11 45 29 11 17 .647 130 11.8
Shahael Wallace.............................. 11 37 4 28 33 .848 106 9.6
Will Cavanaugh ............................... 11 28 17 15 25 .600 88 8.0
Dalton Ell .......................................... 10 19 5 18 26 .692 61 6.1
Mike Prociak .................................... 11 23 0 14 29 .500 60 5.5
Mike Boutanos................................. 11 17 5 11 14 .786 50 4.5
TUNKHANNOCK (3-2, 12-8) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
James Hawk .................................... 11 70 0 28 43 .651 168 15.3
Brian Stephenson............................ 11 44 0 14 32 .438 102 9.3
Austin Yanora .................................. 11 26 20 11 15 .733 83 7.5
A.J. Bevan........................................ 11 28 2 5 13 .385 63 5.7
Jordan Faux ..................................... 11 15 11 9 18 .500 50 4.5
Derik Franklin................................... 11 15 7 2 3 .667 39 3.5
WYOMING AREA (1-4, 2-18) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Lou Vullo........................................... 11 48 13 28 31 .903 137 12.5
Bart Chupka..................................... 5 15 0 16 28 .571 46 9.2
Jordan Zezza ................................... 11 22 2 9 19 .474 55 5.0
Dan Newhart .................................... 11 30 1 10 14 .714 71 6.5
Mike Carey....................................... 11 23 11 3 6 .500 60 5.5
E.J. Driving Hawk............................ 11 18 0 3 19 .158 39 3.5
DIVISION III
GAR (5-0, 19-1) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Darrell Crawford ............................. 12 55 32 9 16 .563 151 12.6
Isaiah Francis.................................. 12 51 0 13 27 .481 115 9.6
Matt Sharpe .................................... 12 43 5 22 39 .564 113 9.4
Shaliek Powell ................................ 12 44 6 15 24 .625 109 9.1
Christian Skrepenak ...................... 12 52 0 5 25 .200 109 9.1
Zach Ellis......................................... 12 19 4 7 12 .583 49 4.1
HANOVER AREA (3-2, 9-11) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
ShaQuille Rolle............................... 11 86 5 43 59 .729 220 20.0
Jeorge Colon .................................. 11 35 5 31 41 .756 106 9.6
Jacob Barber .................................. 12 44 10 12 20 .600 110 9.2
Austin Bogart .................................. 12 23 13 3 3 1.000 62 5.2
Martin Steve.................................... 11 15 0 4 11 .363 34 3.1
Parrish Bennett............................... 10 9 3 3 6 .500 24 2.4
LAKE-LEHMAN (2-3, 11-9) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Pete Borum..................................... 12 62 0 31 61 .508 155 12.9
Chris OConnor............................... 9 45 0 14 31 .452 104 11.6
Kevin Bohan.................................... 10 36 6 11 21 .524 89 8.9
Jared James ................................... 12 42 6 13 30 .433 103 8.6
Cody Poepperling........................... 12 19 5 11 21 .524 54 4.5
Adam Dizbon .................................. 12 20 12 0 4 .000 52 4.3
MEYERS (5-0, 18-2) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Eugene Lewis................................. 12 104 2 21 36 .583 231 19.3
Ryan Krawczeniuk ......................... 12 59 17 38 48 .792 173 14.4
Rasheed Moore.............................. 12 72 1 19 32 .594 164 13.7
Tyriek Steward................................ 5 13 1 4 6 .667 31 6.2
Fabian Smith................................... 11 25 9 5 11 .455 64 5.8
Dominic Johnson............................ 11 19 14 2 4 .500 54 4.9
MMI PREP (0-5, 4-16) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
George Gera................................... 9 25 3 13 17 .765 66 7.3
Cory Rogers.................................... 11 26 13 12 13 .923 77 7.0
Charlie Karchner ............................ 11 27 3 3 4 .750 60 5.5
Aaron Kollar .................................... 10 24 6 4 9 .444 58 5.8
Alex Van Hoekelen ........................ 8 11 1 3 6 .500 26 3.3
Tim Connors ................................... 9 8 4 7 10 .700 27 3.0
NANTICOKE (2-3, 6-14) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Luke Casey..................................... 11 46 0 37 56 .661 129 11.7
Kevin Zaykoski ............................... 10 49 3 14 25 .560 115 11.5
Joey Yudichak ................................ 11 20 10 33 40 .825 83 7.5
Zak Matulewski............................... 9 18 3 15 25 .600 54 6.0
Brian Bevan..................................... 11 16 7 10 20 .500 49 4.5
Evan Reakes .................................. 9 6 0 3 5 .600 15 1.7
NORTHWEST (1-4, 6-14) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Devon Mazonkey ............................ 12 70 11 37 59 .627 188 15.7
Christian Foley................................. 12 32 8 26 42 .619 98 8.2
Garret Yustat.................................... 10 18 12 7 15 .467 55 5.5
Kyle Cragle....................................... 10 24 10 2 4 .500 60 6.0
Jeff Nelson ....................................... 11 11 3 4 6 .667 29 2.6
Dalton Tomko................................... 12 9 7 2 2 1.000 27 2.3
WYO. SEMINARY (2-3, 7-12) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Seth Callahan.................................... 11 37 18 21 29 .724 113 10.3
E.J. Flippen........................................ 11 39 0 29 36 .806 107 9.7
Josh Lefkowitz................................... 12 37 0 10 19 .526 84 7.0
Jason Ellis.......................................... 10 27 8 4 8 .500 66 6.6
Alex Barilla......................................... 12 29 0 11 19 .579 69 5.8
Brad Sedor......................................... 10 16 0 7 11 .636 39 3.9
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
Wyoming Area at Tunkhannock, 7 p.m.
Berwick at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
HS RIFLE
State Individual Tournament, 1 p.m. at Hellertown
HS SWIMMING
Hanover Area at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Pittston Area at Lake-Lehman, 4 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Berwick, 4:30 p.m.
Scranton Prep at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Abington Heights at Tunkhannock, 4:30 p.m.
Scranton High at Elk Lake, 4:30 p.m.
Valley View at West Scranton, 4:30 p.m.
HS Wrestling (all matches 7 p.m.)
Meyers at Coughlin
Lackawanna Trail at Nanticoke
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Hazleton at PSU Worthington, 8 p.m.
DeSales at Wilkes, 8 p.m.
Kings at Misericordia, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
DeSales at Wilkes, 6 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at PSU Worthington, 6 p.m.
Kings at Misericordia, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Kings at Centenary (N.J.), 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15
HS WRESTLING
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Valley West, 7 p.m.
Meyers at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Dunmore at Pittston Area, 4 p.m.
Meyers at Nanticoke, 4 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Florida at Alabama
ESPN2 Texas A&M at Texas Tech
CSN --- William & Mary at Drexel
8 p.m.
YES Texas at Oklahoma
9 p.m.
ESPN Ohio St. at Minnesota
CSN --- Virginia Commonwealth at George Mason
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
MSG New York at Toronto
NHL
7 p.m.
MSG N.Y. Rangers at Boston
PLUS --- New Jersey at Buffalo
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Anaheim at Minnesota
8:30 p.m.
PLUS2 N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTONREDSOXAgreedtoterms withDHDa-
vid Ortiz on a one-year contract.
CLEVELAND INDIANSAgreed to terms with
RHP Jon Garland on a minor league contract.
OAKLANDATHLETICSAgreed to terms with OF
Yoenis Cespedes on a four-year contract.
BASKETBALL
Women's National Basketball Association
ATLANTA DREAMSigned F Aneika Henry to a
training camp contract.
MINNESOTA LYNXSigned G Erin Thorn.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALSNamedMark Carrier de-
fensive backs coach. Promoted Paul Guenther to
linebackers coach.
DETROIT LIONSPromoted secondary coach
Tim Walton to secondary/third-down package
coach. NamedMarcus Robertsondefensiveassist-
ant/secondary coach.
GREENBAY PACKERSAnnounced they moved
Ben McAdoo to quarterbacks coach and Jerry Fon-
tenot to tight ends coach. Named Alex Van Pelt run-
ning backs coach, John Rushing offensive assist-
ant/special teams and Joel Hilgenberg assistant of-
fensive line coach.
NEWYORKJETSNamed Karl Dunbar defensive
line coach and Mike Smith outside linebackers
coach and Justus Galac and Paul Ricci assistant
strength and conditioning coaches. Promoted Bob
Sutton to assistant head coach/linebackers coach,
Lance Taylor to assistant tight ends coach/quality
control.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHLC Mike Comrie announced his retirement.
BOSTON BRUINSRecalled D Andrew Bodnar-
chuk from Providence (AHL).
EDMONTON OILERSAgreed to terms with D
Andy Sutton on a one-year contract extension.
FLORIDA PANTHERSReassigned G Jacob
Markstrom to San Antonio (AHL).
MINNESOTA WILDRecalled DMarco Scandella
and F Kris Foucault from Houston (AHL).
NEWYORK ISLANDERSRecalled D Ty Wishart
fromBridgeport (AHL). Assigned F Rhett Rakhsha-
ni to Bridgeport.
WINNIPEG JETSTraded F Riley Holzapfel to
Anaheim for F Maxime Macenauer.
American Hockey League
AHLSuspended Adirondack D Cullen Eddy one
game for his actions in a Feb. 11 game at Norfolk.
HAMILTON BULLDOGSAnnounced D Olivier
Dame-Malka was recalled from Wheeling (ECHL).
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGEAssigned G Brian
Foster to Cincinnati (ECHL).
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
EDMONTON RUSHAcquired T Paul Rabil and a
2012 first-round draft pick from Washington for F
Athan Iannucci and a 2012 second-round draft pick.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEWENGLANDREVOLUTIONAcquired FSaer
Sene on a free transfer from Bayern Munich (Ger-
many).
PHILADELPHIAUNIONSigned DChris Albright.
COLLEGE
ALABAMAReinstated basketball G Trevor Rele-
ford and G Andrew Steele from suspension.
ARMSTRONGATLANTICSTATENamed Taavo
Roos mens and womens tennis assistant coach.
CONNECTICUTNamed Warde Manuel athletic
director.
MONTANAPromoted linebackers coach Ty
Gregorak to defensive coordinator.
MONTANA STATENamed Kyle Weindel wom-
ens volleyball coach.
RUTGERSNamed Dave Brock offensive coordi-
nator/wide receivers coach, Dave Cohen lineback-
ers coach, Darnell Dinkins tight ends coach, Ben
Sirmans running backs coach, Rob Spence quar-
terbacks coach and Damian Wroblewski offensive
line coach. Promoted Robb Smith to defensive co-
ordinator, Phil Galiano to special teams coordinator
and Jeremy Cole to head strength and conditioning
coach.
ST. SCHOLASTICAAnnounced the resignation
of defensive coordinator TomParkevich to become
football coach at Iowa Wesleyan.
WAGNERNamed Mike Teel quarterbacks
coach.
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers............... 54 36 13 5 77 153 110
Philadelphia ................ 56 31 18 7 69 182 169
Pittsburgh .................... 56 32 19 5 69 175 148
New Jersey ................. 55 31 20 4 66 154 155
N.Y. Islanders.............. 55 23 24 8 54 131 159
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston.......................... 53 34 17 2 70 184 120
Ottawa.......................... 58 28 22 8 64 169 181
Toronto ........................ 56 28 22 6 62 171 166
Montreal....................... 56 23 24 9 55 149 149
Buffalo.......................... 55 24 25 6 54 136 158
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida.......................... 55 27 17 11 65 141 152
Washington................. 55 28 22 5 61 153 155
Winnipeg...................... 57 26 25 6 58 139 161
Tampa Bay................... 55 24 25 6 54 155 185
Carolina ....................... 56 20 25 11 51 142 172
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit .......................... 57 38 17 2 78 182 135
St. Louis....................... 55 34 14 7 75 139 111
Nashville...................... 56 32 18 6 70 158 148
Chicago........................ 56 29 20 7 65 174 171
Columbus .................... 56 16 34 6 38 131 185
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ................... 55 34 15 6 74 178 138
Calgary ........................ 56 26 22 8 60 134 151
Colorado...................... 57 28 25 4 60 146 159
Minnesota.................... 55 25 22 8 58 125 144
Edmonton.................... 55 22 28 5 49 147 165
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 53 30 17 6 66 153 127
Los Angeles ................ 57 27 19 11 65 124 124
Phoenix........................ 56 27 21 8 62 148 144
Dallas ........................... 55 28 24 3 59 145 157
Anaheim ...................... 55 22 24 9 53 144 163
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2
Florida 4, N.Y. Islanders 1
Anaheim 5, Columbus 3
Los Angeles 4, Dallas 2
Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 2
St. Louis 3, San Jose 0
Detroit 4, Philadelphia 3
Monday's Games
San Jose 5, Washington 3
Carolina 5, Montreal 3
Phoenix at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Anaheim at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. Johns .............. 50 32 12 5 1 70 169 142
Manchester ........... 53 28 23 0 2 58 138 146
Worcester.............. 47 23 15 4 5 55 128 122
Portland ................. 50 23 21 3 3 52 140 162
Providence............ 51 23 22 3 3 52 119 141
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Penguins.............. 50 29 14 2 5 65 162 150
Hershey................. 50 28 14 4 4 64 180 147
Norfolk ................... 51 30 18 1 2 63 178 142
Syracuse............... 48 19 22 4 3 45 149 159
Binghamton........... 50 20 27 2 1 43 136 161
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Connecticut........... 50 24 16 5 5 58 148 143
Bridgeport ............. 48 25 18 3 2 55 147 137
Albany.................... 48 22 18 5 3 52 126 141
Springfield............. 50 23 23 2 2 50 144 157
Adirondack............ 48 22 24 1 1 46 131 145
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte................ 51 29 18 2 2 62 145 136
Chicago................. 49 27 18 1 3 58 142 126
Peoria .................... 50 26 21 2 1 55 154 143
Milwaukee ............. 48 24 21 2 1 51 134 132
Rockford................ 50 21 24 1 4 47 146 169
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................. 50 27 17 4 2 60 149 126
Rochester.............. 50 22 19 6 3 53 143 151
Lake Erie............... 50 24 22 2 2 52 123 137
Grand Rapids........ 48 20 20 4 4 48 155 159
Hamilton ................ 49 21 23 1 4 47 119 148
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City...... 49 32 12 2 3 69 145 104
Houston................. 50 25 13 3 9 62 140 134
San Antonio .......... 50 27 21 2 0 56 130 139
Abbotsford ............ 49 26 20 3 0 55 115 124
Texas..................... 49 21 24 2 2 46 145 157
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday's Games
St. Johns 6, Binghamton 3
Worcester 5, Portland 2
Springfield 5, Manchester 1
Bridgeport 2, Connecticut 1, OT
Hamilton 2, Texas 0
Lake Erie 2, Syracuse 1
Albany 3, Providence 1
Grand Rapids 7, San Antonio 4
Hershey 5, Penguins 1
Peoria 4, Milwaukee 2
Norfolk 3, Charlotte 1
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Adirondack at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Texas at Lake Erie, 10:45 a.m.
Worcester at Portland, 6:30 p.m.
Syracuse at Albany, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Penguins, 7:05 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Peoria at Rockford, 8:05 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
College Basketball
Men's College Basketball Schedule
Today's Games
EAST
William & Mary at Drexel, 7 p.m.
Delaware at Hofstra, 7 p.m.
Towson at Northeastern, 7 p.m.
St. Johns at Seton Hall, 7 p.m.
Manhattan at Siena, 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Florida at Alabama, 7 p.m.
Virginia at Clemson, 7 p.m.
UNC Asheville at Coastal Carolina, 7 p.m.
Radford at High Point, 7 p.m.
Georgia St. at James Madison, 7 p.m.
UT-Martin at Kennesaw St., 7 p.m.
VMI at Liberty, 7 p.m.
UNC Wilmington at Old Dominion, 7 p.m.
Presbyterian at Winthrop, 7 p.m.
Gardner-Webb at Charleston Southern, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville St. at Tennessee St., 8 p.m.
VCU at George Mason, 9 p.m.
Mississippi St. at LSU, 9 p.m.
MIDWEST
Loyola of Chicago at Butler, 7 p.m.
E. Michigan at Cent. Michigan, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Kent St., 7 p.m.
Detroit at Wright St., 7 p.m.
Illinois St. at Indiana St., 7:05 p.m.
Youngstown St. at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Cleveland St. at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Creighton at S. Illinois, 8:05 p.m.
Ill.-Chicago at Valparaiso, 8:05 p.m.
Ohio St. at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Texas A&M at Texas Tech, 7 p.m.
UNLV at TCU, 7:30 p.m.
Texas at Oklahoma, 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Montana Tech at Utah St., 9:05 p.m.
CS Bakersfield at Nevada, 10 p.m.
New Orleans at Hawaii, Mid
Women's College Basketball Schedule
Today's Games
EAST
Louisville at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Georgetown at Villanova, 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Davidson at UNC Greensboro, 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
Ohio at Akron, 7 p.m.
South Florida at Marquette, 7 p.m.
Providence at Notre Dame, 7 p.m.
Texas A&M at Missouri, 8 p.m.
Mayville St. at North Dakota, 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Boise St. at Colorado St., 9:30 p.m.
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia................... 20 9 .690
Boston ............................ 15 12 .556 4
New York ....................... 13 15 .464 6
1
2
Toronto........................... 9 20 .310 11
New Jersey.................... 8 21 .276 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami .............................. 21 7 .750
Atlanta............................. 18 10 .643 3
Orlando........................... 18 11 .621 3
1
2
Washington.................... 6 22 .214 15
Charlotte ........................ 3 25 .107 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago......................... 23 7 .767
Indiana .......................... 17 10 .630 4
1
2
Milwaukee..................... 12 15 .444 9
1
2
Cleveland...................... 10 16 .385 11
Detroit ........................... 8 21 .276 14
1
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio.................. 19 9 .679
Dallas ............................ 17 11 .607 2
Houston ........................ 16 12 .571 3
Memphis....................... 14 14 .500 5
New Orleans ................ 4 23 .148 14
1
2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City............... 21 6 .778
Denver............................ 16 12 .571 5
1
2
Utah ................................ 14 12 .538 6
1
2
Portland.......................... 15 13 .536 6
1
2
Minnesota ...................... 13 16 .448 9
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers.................. 17 8 .680
L.A. Lakers..................... 16 12 .571 2
1
2
Phoenix .......................... 12 15 .444 6
Golden State.................. 10 14 .417 6
1
2
Sacramento ................... 10 17 .370 8
Sunday's Games
L.A. Lakers 94, Toronto 92
Boston 95, Chicago 91
Washington 98, Detroit 77
Miami 107, Atlanta 87
Golden State 106, Houston 97
Utah 98, Memphis 88
Monday's Games
Philadelphia 98, Charlotte 89
Orlando 102, Minnesota 89
New Orleans 86, Utah 80
Miami 114, Milwaukee 96
Dallas 96, L.A. Clippers 92
Phoenix at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Miami at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New York at Toronto, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m.
Washington at Portland, 10 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
B A S E B A L L
Major League Baseball
MLB Calendar
Through Feb. 17 Salary arbitration hearings, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Feb. 12 Voluntary reporting date for Oakland and
Seattle pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 17 Voluntary reporting date for other Oak-
land and Seattle players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date for other teams
pitchers, catchers and injured players.
Feb. 24 Voluntary reporting date for other teams
other players. Mandatory reporting date for Oakland
and Seattle.
March 2 Mandatory reporting date for other
teams.
March 2-11 Teams may renew contracts of un-
signed players.
March 19 Last day to place a player on uncondi-
tional release waivers and pay 30 days termination
pay instead of 45 days.
March 28-29 Seattle vs. Oakland at Tokyo.
April 2 Last day to request unconditional release
waivers on a player without having to pay his full
2012 salary.
April 4 Opening day, St. Louis at Miami. Active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
May 9-10 or 16-17 Owners meetings, NewYork.
June 4 Amateur draft.
July 10 All-Star game, Kansas City, Mo.
July 13 Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign.
July 22 Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown,
N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player without securi-
ng waivers.
Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
November TBA Deadline for teams to make
qualifying offers to their eligible former players who
became free agents, fifth day after World Series.
November TBA Deadline for free agents to ac-
cept qualifying offers, 12th day after World Series.
Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2013 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 3-6 Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
Feb. 17
At College Park Center, Arlington, Texas (ESPN2),
Mike Dallas Jr. vs. Miguel Gonzalez, 10, junior wel-
terweights.
At Chumash Casino, Santa Ynez, Calif. (SHO),
Thomas Dulorme vs. Aris Ambriz, 10, for the vacant
NABFwelterweight title; Jonathan Gonzalez vs. Bil-
ly Lyell, 10, junior middleweight.
Feb. 18
At Brondby, Denmark, Brian Magee vs. Rudy Mar-
kussen, 12, for the interim WBA World super mid-
dleweight title.
At Olympic Hall, Munich, Vitali Klitschko vs. Dereck
Chisora, 12, for Klitschkos WBC heavyweight title.
At American Bank Center, Corpus Christi, Texas
(SHO), Paul Williams vs. Nobuhiro Ishida, 12, junior
middleweights; Tavoris Cloud vs. Gabriel Campillo,
12, for Clouds IBF light heavyweight title; Chris Ar-
reola vs. Eric Molina, 10, heavyweights.
At Durango, Mexico, Jorge Arce vs. Lorenzo Parra,
12, for Arces WBO bantamweight title.
Feb. 24
At Dover (Del.) Downs Hotel & Casino (ESPN2),
Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Cristobal Cruz, 10, for the
WBC Silver super featherweight title; Edgar Santa-
na vs. Manuel Perez, 10, for Santanas NABA junior
welterweight title.
At the Galen Center, Los Angeles (ESPN2), Juan
Carlos Burgos vs. Cristobal Cruz, 12, junior light-
weights; Efrain Esquivias vs. Roberto Castaneda,
10, super bantamweights.
At the DoubleTree Hotel, Ontario, Calif., Artemio
Reyes vs. Victor Hugo Correa, 10, welterweights.
Feb. 25
At Stuttgart, Germany, Alexander Povetkin vs. Mar-
co Huck, 12, for Povetkins WBA World heavy-
weight title.
Monday's College Basketball Scores
EAST
Immaculata 71, Marywood 63
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 3B
S P O R T S
Hovey won the event in
2:09.50, which was four one-
hundreds of a second off the
school record. He also finished
second in the 100 breast
(1:00.44) and fifth in the 200 IM
(2:00.32) to help the Royals
finish second behind five-time
champion Merchant Marine
Academy. Scrantons 724 points
are a school record.
NEW ROLE FOR KRAVITZ
Katie Kravitz (Dallas) is listed
as a distance runner on the
Lock Haven womens track
roster but the freshman has
shortened up this indoor sea-
son.
Kravitz finished 16th out of 43
runners in the 800 meter run in
a time of 2:28.29 at last week-
ends Bucknell Winter Classic in
Lewisburg. She also ran the
leadoff leg on the 4x400 relay
which finished 10th in 4:22.61.
Katie has been working hard
and her diligence has been
paying off, coach Aaron Russell
said. We have been racing her
in some events she has never
done, such as the 500 and 500
meters, to work on her speed
and shes doing a great job.
The Lady Eagles are prepping
for the PSAC Championships
Feb. 25-26 in Edinboro.
and the Ivy League Heptagonals
Saturday, Feb. 25, both in Itha-
ca.
BIG EFFORT FOR BULL
Gettysburg sophomore Alex
Bull (Berwick Area) came up
with a sparkling effort in the
recent DuCharme Invitational
at Dickinson. She captured the
5,000 meter run with a time of
19:04.66. That was a personal
record by over 27 seconds and
came up less than a second
from setting the school record.
Last weekend, she dropped
down to the 3,000 and finished
14th out of 32 runners at the
Bucknell Winter Classic with a
time of 11:12.48. She was run-
ning against a number of Divi-
sion I and II athletes.
Coach Aubrey Shenk talks
about her effort in the 5,000.
Alex ran her race, put her-
self in position early, main-
tained her focus, regained the
lead after a brief challenge by
the eventual second place fin-
isher in the middle of the race,
and adopted a catch me if you
can approach the remainder of
the race, the coach said.
Shenk wasnt surprised with
the effort.
Alex is one of the hardest
workers on our team, is dedi-
cated and committed to her
sport and is willing to do what-
ever is necessary to succeed.
She exemplifies the model dis-
tance runner and she is well
ahead of where she was at this
time last year.
The Bullets compete in the
Susquehanna Open this week-
end in a prep for the Centennial
Conference Championship Sat-
urday, Feb. 25 in Collegeville.
HOVEY GOES OUT IN
STYLE Scranton senior David
Hovey (Wyoming Valley West)
captured the 200 breaststroke at
the Landmark Conference
Swimming Championships last
Sunday. It was the final race of
his college career.
Its tough to make an impres-
sion when youre a freshman
with the Penn State track team
but Shelley Black is doing that
in her first season with the
Nittany Lions.
Black (Coughlin) is compet-
ing in the 60 hurdles and the
200 meter dash this winter and
her efforts in the 60 hurdles has
been impressive. In her first
college meet, she finished third
in the event at the Penn State
Relays with a time of 8.62. She
improved that time with an 11th
place finish (8.59) at the Penn
State Nationals and came up
with a season-best 8.56 to finish
third in the Sykes-Sabock Chal-
lenge, also at Penn State. This
past weekend Black finished
14th in the Tyson Invitational at
the University of Arkansas.
I think that Shelley has tran-
sitioned well, associate head
coach Chris Johnson, who
works with the hurdlers, said.
Obviously its a big challenge
from high school, but shes
adapted very well.
The coach feels that Black
will make some vast improve-
ments later in the season.
Her transition has been very
smooth but its a lot different
than what shes accustomed to,
Johnson said. But her hard
work will pay off later in the
year.
The Nittany Lions are prep-
ping for the Big East Champion-
ships Saturday, Feb. 25 in Lin-
coln, Neb.
MARSHALL MAKING
CHANGES Mandissa Mar-
shall already holds the indoor
and outdoor record in the pole
vault at George Mason Uni-
versity but according to coach
Kevin McGorty, shes training
harder than ever this season.
Marshall (Crestwood) has
cleared 13-1 both indoors and
outdoors. Shes qualified for the
ECAC championships four
times and last season, earned
All-American honorable men-
tion outdoors after her school-
record attempt earned her a
berth in the NCAA Champion-
ships.
Mandissa has been training
hard, McGorty said. She has
really focused on breaking down
her technique and trying to
make major improvements. It is
a very hard process to learn to
change especially when she
has had success with her jump-
ing so far.
Marshall and McGorty are on
the same page on the decision.
We both believe to jump
really high, she will need to
make these changes, the coach
said.
Marshall has been red-shirted
during the indoor season so that
she could focus on the technical
adjustments and not worry too
much about qualifying stan-
dards or winning meets.
She has jumped in meets but
honestly our focus is more on
what we have been working on
in practice than really how high
she jumps on any given week,
McGorty said. I feel that Man-
dissa will make a significant
breakthrough during the second
half of the outdoor season and if
we get a few weekends with
good weather we could see her
jumping well over 13-6. Its
exciting to see her working so
hard and focusing on training in
order to become a great ath-
lete.
McGorty feels that Marshall
could compete in a couple of
indoor meets for the season
ends.
Who knows, if she hits it
right, we may even see a big
jump indoors, the coach said.
That would be a pleasant sur-
prise.
MICIKAS RUNNING WELL
Junior Bobby Micikas (Crest-
wood) has come up with a pair
of solid efforts the past two
weekends for the Cornell mens
indoor track team.
In the Sykes-Sabock Invita-
tional at Penn State he finished
sixth in the 3,000 with a time of
8:27.17. And, last weekend, he
finished 20th out of 78 runners
in the 5,000 at the Valentine
Invitational in Boston with a
time of 14:41.88. Both times
have qualified him for the IC4A
Championships (March 3-4 in
Boston).
Bobby is in the midst of his
best indoor season for us,
coach Robert Johnson said. Im
certainly encouraged that hes
ahead of where he has been his
first two years and both Bobby
and myself are hoping that
outdoors he has a big break-
through like he did his senior
year in high school when he
really became one of the top
runners on the East Coast.
Johnson feels that Micikas
has the physical talent to make
the NCAA Regionals and be one
of the top 100 collegians in the
5,000.
Its just a matter of whether
he can do it while trying to be a
top pre-med student at Cornell,
the coach said.
One area where Micikas
doesnt need any improvement
in is the classroom according to
Johnson.
Bobby is regularly right near
and even occasionally above 4.0
in a very demanding course of
studies, he said. Balancing
that type of academic load with
running has been difficult to say
the least but he is doing a better
job of balancing everything this
year. Bobby is a pleasure to
have on the team and we hope
before hes done he has at least
one magical season.
The Big Red competes in the
Deneault Invitational Saturday
Katie will most likely be part
of some of our relays including
the DMR and the 4x800, Rus-
sell said.
MUSINSKI BACK IN AC-
TION Junior Krista Musinski
(Wyoming Area) is competing
in the high jump, long jump and
triple jump for the Rider wom-
ens indoor track team. She
finished 14th in the triple jump
(34-0) at the Rider-Lafayette
Invitational last Saturday at The
Armory in New York City. Prior
to that, she finished third in
both the high jump and triple
jump and sixth in the long jump
in a meet against The College of
New Jersey.
Krista got off to a decent
start this indoor season but
then experienced a strained
hamstring which kept her out of
three meets, coach Bob Hamer
said. She returned and had a
very good meet against TCNJ.
She jumped very well.
The Broncs compete in the
Metro Atlantic Athletic Confer-
ence Championships Friday at
The Armory.
Krista is very close to her
personal bests and I am very
hopeful that she will be a big
factor for us in the conference
championship, Hamer said.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Mandissa Marshall
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Shelley Black
Black catching on with PSU track team
ON CMAPUS
B I L L A R S E N A U L T
stretches and got big points
when it needed from Kayla Ge-
garis, Taryn Wojnar and Sydney
Myers. The trio accounted for
all 13 of Crestwoods points in
the quarter.
I know that once we get go-
ing as a team offensively, that
were usually going to be ok,
said Walker. With us, though, I
really do think that we come out
nervous to start the game. I
thinkonce we get that slowstart
out of the way, though, that
were usually ok, but, were still
going to have to work on avoid-
ing that with the playoffs com-
ing up.
The Comets managed just six
points over the first quarter and
turned the ball over numerous
times in the face of Dallas pres-
sure, leading to some fast-break
layups for Ashley Dunbar and
Talia Szatkowski and a 14-6
lead.
Were a very aggressive
team, defensively, said Dallas
head coach Kelly Martin-John-
son. We believe that we can get
some offense through our de-
fense if we keep coming after a
team and try to pressure them
as they come up the floor.
The Mountaineers opened
the second quarter with the
same planearly. However, as the
quarter wore on Dallas couldnt
find any answer for Crestwoods
response: find Myers in the
paint.
The junior center scored
eight of her game-high23points
in the second quarter on a varie-
ty of drop-step moves to the
baseline and turnaround jump
shots. Dallas attempt to shift its
focus defensively left some
holes for Carly Hislop and Dei-
dra Ciaveralla to step through
with Hislop picking up four
points in the quarter and Ciave-
rella knocking down a three-
point jumper late in the quarter,
cutting Dallas lead down to
four, 27-23.
She has some nice low post
skills and she can just be such a
mismatch some nights, such an
advantage for us to have, offen-
sively, said Walker of Myers.
Myers went to work again in
the third quarter, this time tally-
ing seven more points while
pulling down four of her 12 re-
bounds. Dallas tried to keep
pace again behind the quick
drives to the basket and pesky
defense of Dunbar, who finished
with 13 points and five steals,
and Szatkowski, who netted 11.
Gegaris and Corina Mazzoni
added scoring drives during a
13-5 run for the Comets that cut
the lead to one point for the
start of the fourth quarter.
DALLAS (47): Comitz 1 2-2 4, Dunbar 5 3-6
13, Englehart 12-24, Flaherty22-26, Hiscox11-2
4, Michael 0 2-2 2, Missal 1 0-0 3, Szatkowski 4 3-4
11. Totals 15 15-20 47.
CRESTWOOD(51): Mazzoni 1 0-0 2, Myers 9
5-6 23, Rutkowski 1 1-2 3, Wojnar 3 0-1 8, Gegaris
1 4-4 6, Hislop 1 2-2 4, Andrews 0 0-0 0, Ciavarella
10-03, Cronauer 00-00, Jesikiewicz 10-02, Ken-
dra 0 0-0 0, Lutz 0 0-0 0. Totals 18 12-15 51.
Dallas......................................... 14 13 12 8 47
Crestwood................................. 6 19 15 13 51
3-Point Field Goals DAL 2 (Hiscox, Missal);
CRE 3 (Wojnar 2, Ciavarella)
AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR TIMES LEADER
Crestwoods Sydney Myers (33) tries to get the ball as Talia
Szatkawski (11) gets ready for a play. Playing defense is Jess
Hiscox (12).
COMETS
Continued from Page 1B
SHICKSHINNY The sign of
a champion is to be able to
overcome adversity.
Lake-Lehman missed its first
12 shots Monday night. A lively
Northwest crowd hounded the
Black Knights.
But, by the final minute, those
same Rangers fans were count-
ing down the final 40-plus sec-
onds to Lake-Lehmans title.
The Black Knights locked up
at least a share of the Wyoming
Valley Conference Division III
second-half championship with
an impressive 40-23 girls basket-
ball victory over Northwest.
We knew coming in here
they would be tough, Lake-
Lehman guard Nikki Sutliff said.
Last time, we made that come-
back on our home court. We
knew they wanted to win this
one, and they have that student
section behind them.
Lake-Lehman (6-0 WVC III,
16-5) missed its first 12 field
goal attempts, trailing North-
west for the first six minutes.
Then Nikki Sutliff dished to
Cayle Spencer (11 points) in the
right corner, and Spencer made
Lehmans first shot from the
field, giving the Knights a 7-6
lead.
That jumper sparked a 17-0
run by the Knights, who quickly
put the game away.
The big thing was when we
made that (first) basket, said
Sutliff, who had a game-high 15
points to go along with five
rebounds, five assists and five
steals. We couldnt press until
we made a basket. Then we
were able to play our pressure
game like we did in the final two
minutes of the last game (a
43-41 come-from-behind victory
over the Rangers on Jan. 18).
The lead remained at eight or
more the rest of the way for
Lehman. The lead grew to as a
many as 19 (40-21) when Sutliff
drove through three Northwest
players for a layup.
We broke down and couldnt
get into our offensive sets,
Northwest coach Chris Piatt
said. Were a team thats capa-
ble of scoring 50, 60, 70 points.
We just struggled tonight.
Northwest (4-2, 13-8) used
baskets by Christa Bosak and
DeAnna Gill to take an early
lead. A stickback by Alivia Wo-
melsdorf made it 6-3 four min-
utes into the game.
After missing their first 12
shots, the Knights made their
next six and tacked on a trio of
free throws. Their defense also
clicked into high gear, forcing 14
Northwest turnovers in the first
quarter.
We tried to use that intensity
from the last game, said Levan,
whose team has won 13 straight
games. Sure, we were a little
rough around the edges, but our
press got us going. They started
turning the ball over left and
right.
Lehman also has the top WVC
Class 2A seed in the upcoming
District 2 tournament. North-
west remains entrenched in the
third spot in the Class A brack-
et.
This was still a big game for
us looking down the line, Piatt
said. They knew a division title
was on the line, and it was more
or less nerves that showed. That
game was something we needed
to prepare for districts.
Womelsdorf finished with 10
points and 10 rebounds for the
Rangers.
Lake-Lehman 40,
Northwest 23
LAKE-LEHMAN (40): N. Sutliff 4 6-8 15,
Sutton 2 2-4 6, Mosier 0 0-0 0, Moosic 0 0-0 0,
Leskowsky 1 0-0 2, Mahoney 0 0-0 0, Spencer 4
3-4 11, D. Sutliff 2 1-2 6. Totals 13 12-18 40.
NORTHWEST (23): Yustat 0 1-2 1, Shaffer 0
0-0 0, Womelsdorf 3 4-4 10, Koehn 2 0-0 4, Bosak
1 2-2 4, Gill 2 0-0 4. Totals 8 7-8 23.
Lake-Lehman ................................... 18 6 10 6 40
Northwest.......................................... 6 8 6 3 23
3-Point Field Goals LAKE 2 (N. Sutliff, D.
Sutliff); NW 0.
Berwick 45, Coughlin 19
The Bulldogs held the Cru-
saders to only six first-half
points on their way to a victory.
Alexis Steeber led Berwick
with 13 points scoring.
Danielle Georgetti led the
effort for Coughlin with seven
points.
COUGHLIN (19): Hayward 1 1-4 3, Oliver 0 0-0
0, Eaton 1 0-0 3, Flaherty 1 0-0 2, Zigler 0 0-0 0,
Sebastian 1 0-0 2, Harper 0 0-0 0, Georgetti 1 4-6
7, Williams 1 0-0 2. Totals 6 5-10 19.
BERWICK (45): Steeber 6 1-2 13, Davenport 4
1-2 9, Shortlidge 0 0-0 0, Welsh 1 0-1 2, Kishbaugh
0 0-0 0, Bridge 2 1-1 5, Simmons 0 0-0 0, Flo-
ryshak 1 0-0 2, Seely 1 1-3 3, Lynn 1 0-0 3,
Rinehimer 1 2-2 5, Bailey 1 0-0 3. Totals 18 6-11
45.
Coughlin ....................................... 2 4 2 11 19
Berwick ......................................... 11 11 11 12 45
3-Point Field Goals COU 2 (Eaton, Georgetti);
BER 3 (Lynn, Rinehimer, Bailey)
Tunkhannock 60,
Wyoming Area 39
Kassie Williams totaled 25
points, hitting six three-point
field goals, to lead the Tigers to
a win over the Warriors.
Lisa Kintner contributed 17
points for Tunkhannock.
Serra Degnan led Wyoming
Area with 12 points.
TUNKHANNOCK (60): Ayers 0 3-4 3, Custer 0
0-0 0, Nafus 0 0-0 0, Proulx 1 1-2 3, Alguire 3 6-6
12, Williams 8 3-3 25, Kintner 8 1-1 17. Totals 20
14-16 60.
WYOMING AREA (39): Degnan 4 4-7 12, N.
Turner 0 0-2 0, Radzwilka 3 1-4 8, Blannett 2 1-2 5,
Thornton 3 2-4 8, Bott 0 0-0 0, Coolbaugh 2 0-2 4,
F. Turner 1 0-0 2. Totals 15 8-21 39.
Tunkhannock ................................. 19 8 16 17 60
Wyoming Area............................... 11 8 15 5 39
3-Point Field Goals TUNK 6 (Williams 6); WA 1
(Radzwilka)
GAR 45, Wyoming Seminary 23
The Grenadiers took a 28-10
lead going into the half and
went on to defeat the Blue
Knights.
Quieterriua Gross led all
scoring with 20 points for GAR.
WYOMING SEMINARY (23): Neare 3 0-0 6,
Gabriel 1 0-0 2, Karg 3 0-1 6, Henry 2 1-3 5,
McMullan 2 0-4 4, Romanowski 0 0-0 0, Dressler 0
0-0 0, Williams 0 0-0 0, Davis 0 0-0 0, Stemrich 0
0-0 0. Totals 11 1-8 23.
GAR (45): Twyman 3 0-4 6, Nichols 0 0-2 0,
Spence 3 0-3 6, Leco 1 0-0 2, Seabrook 2 1-2 5,
Quinniea Gross 3 0-0 6, Quieterriua Gross 7 6-16
20, Domzalski 0 0-0 0. Totals 19 7-27 45.
Wyoming Seminary .................... 6 4 10 3 23
GAR............................................... 12 16 7 10 45
3-Point Field Goals None
Wyoming Valley West 42,
Pittston Area 40
Kate Smicherko led the way
with 15 for Valley West.
Pittston Area was led by Mia
Hopkins, who scored 16 points.
PITTSTON AREA (40): Barber 1 0-1 2, Waleski
3 0-0 6, Mitchell 0 2-2 2, Rabender 1 1-2 3, ONeil
3 2-21 11, Hopkins 6 4-9 16. Totals 14 9-16 40.
WYOMING VALLEY WEST (42): Judge 2 0-0
5, C. Smicherko 2 1-2 6, Reese 0 0-0 0, Reilly 0
1-2 1, K. Smicherko 6 2-2 15, Zdancewicz 2 2-4 6,
Hoffman 3 3-4 9. Totals 15 9-14 42.
Pittston Area................................... 9 12 8 11 40
Wyoming Valley West .................. 11 16 7 8 42
3-Point Field Goals PA 3 (ONeil 3); WVW 3
(Judge, C. Smicherko, K. Smicherko)
Holy Redeemer 46,
Hazleton Area 44
Leading 21-20 at halftime, the
Royals managed to hang on to
their small lead and defeat the
Cougars.
Alexis Lewis scored 14 points
to lead Holy Redeemer.
Alyssa Sitch led the effort for
Hazleton Area with 16 points.
HOLY REDEEMER (46): Wignot 0 3-4 3,
Makowski 2 1-2 5, Dougherty 1 0-0 21, Warnagiris
0 2-2 2, Murray 3 2-3 9, Altemose 0 0-0 0, Slavoski
1 1-2 3, Platko 2 4-6 8, Lewis 5 4-6 14, Totals 14
17-25 46.
HAZLETON AREA (44): Bono 1 0-1 2,
Schoennagle 2 0-6 5, Marchetti 0 0-0 0, Sitch 6 2-2
16, Pfeil 2 0-0 5, Woznicki 0 1-3 1, Bachman 3 1-1
7, Ciccozzi 0 1-2 1, Carter 0 1-2 1, Zamonas 1 3-3
6, Totals 15 9-20 44.
Holy Redeemer ........................... 9 11 7 19 46
Hazleton Area.............................. 16 5 14 9 44
3-Point Field Goals HR 1 (Murray); HAZ 5
(Sitch 2, Schoennagle, Pfeil, Zamonas)
Hanover Area 66, MMI Prep 56
Danielle Tuzinski led all
scorers with 26 points as the
Hawkeyes defeated the Prep-
pers.
Kayla Karchner led the effort
for MMI Prep with 19 points.
HANOVER AREA (66): Smith 3 0-0 6, Mizenko
4 1-2 9, Zuranski 0 0-0 0, Grohowki 3 0-1 7,
Kaminski 4 0-0 10, Miller 2 2-2 6, Tuzinski 9 7-13
26, Masher 1 0-0 2, McCary 0 0-0 0. Totals 26
10-18 66.
MMI PREP (56): Purcell 2 0-1 4, Stanziola 8
2-4 18, Lobitz 1 1-3 3, Carrato 4 0-2 8, Shearer 1
2-2 4, Karchner 9 0-0 19, Lara 0 0-0 0, Ferry 0 0-0
0. Totals 25 5-12 56.
Hanover Area............................... 12 14 29 11 66
MMI Prep...................................... 10 21 12 13 56
3-Point Field Goals HAN 4 (Kaminski 2,
Grohowski, Tuzinski); MMI 1 (Karchner)
Nanticoke 48, Meyers 36
The Trojans defeated the
Mohawks behind 20 total points
from Kayley Schinski.
Meyers effort was led by
Brianna DiMaggios 11 points.
NANTICOKE (48): Higgins 0 0-0 0, Brassing-
ton 3 0-0 8, Sugalski 1 0-0 2, Wolfe 5 0-1 10,
Schinski 5 7-7 20, Yalch 0 0-0 0, Gow 3 0-0 8, Holl
0 0-2 0. Totals 17 7-10 48.
MEYERS (36): DiMaggio 2 7-9 11, Quinones 0
0-0 0, Kowalczyk 3 2-5 9, Biggs 1 0-0 2, Robertson
3 0-1 6, Wider 4 0-1 8. Totals: 13 9-16 36.
Nanticoke ............................................ 26 9 9 4 48
Meyers................................................. 12 7 8 9 36
3-Point Field Goals NAN 7 (Schinski 3,
Brassington 2, Gow 2); MEY 1 (Kowalczyk)
WOMENS BASKETBALL
LCCC 80, Valley Forge 46
Michele Bugonowich and
Chelsea Cormier totaled 17
points each in LCCCs victory
over Valley Forge Military Acad-
emy on Monday night.
Stephanie Hopkins contrib-
uted with 14 points while Nicole
Maxomovich totaled 11 points
and Holly Kile scored 10 points.
Valley Forges leading scorer
was Carly Shafer with 19 points
L O C A L R O U N D U P
Lehman clinches tie for crown
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 4B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
span. Twowins were against
WyomingArea. One this season
came against winless Midd-West.
Addthe 2008-09season, andthe
recorddrops to8-80withthe win
that seasoncomingagainst a1-22
WesternWayne team.
The solutionseems obvious
use a power systemtoconstruct
the divisions. It has workedwell in
soccer, where teams despite their
enrollment playagainst compara-
ble opponents. Andina sense,
basketball does it as well, with
Class 3Aschools scatteredacross
three divisions. But a better jobis
necessary.
BerwickandWyomingArea
shouldbothslide downtoDivi-
sionIII. GARandMeyers should
replace theminDivisionII. Sure,
Meyers will onlybe the fourth
biggest Class 2Aschool inthe
WVCthe next twoseasons. But
size is irrelevant since Meyers will
have twostarters andsome prom-
isingbackups fromthis season
returning.
Andthe wayGARandMeyers
have runroughshodover Division
III this season, does anyone really
want tosee that again? Or would
fans prefer goodmatchups, not
onlyfor thembut Berwickand
WyomingArea as well, that would
put more people inthe gyms?
Another move toconsider, if the
aforementionedare done, is mov-
ingCoughlintoDivisionII and
movingeither Dallas or Tunk-
hannocktoDivisionI. That way
all three Wilkes-Barre Area School
District teams wouldbe inthe
same divisionandplaytwomea-
ningful games against eachother
rather thananearly-seasonexhibi-
tioncontest. Plus, Redeemer is
alsoinWilkes-Barre.
The WVChadtoscramble after
St. Michaels andWest Side Tech
droppedout after last season. It
alsolikes the boys andgirls basket-
ball divisions tobe mirror images
of eachother. That makes for an
easier time bangingout schedules.
But it shouldnt be about sim-
plicity. It shouldbe about compet-
itive balance andgeneratingin-
terest.
D2PLAYOFFPICTURE
Hanover Areas victoryover
Northwest onSaturdayset the
three WVCplayoff qualifiers inthe
District 2Class 2Aplayoffs. Either
GARor Meyers will be the WVC
No. 1seeddependingonwhich
wins the DivisionIII title. The
other will be the WVCNo. 2seed.
Hanover Area is lockedintothe
thirdWVCspot. The Lackawanna
Conference gets five teams inthe
bracket.
Four of the five WVCspots in
the D2-3Atournament are set.
Crestwood(136pts.), Dallas
(134), HolyRedeemer (114) and
Tunkhannock(114) are in. Crest-
woodneeds towinthe WVC
DivisionI title tohave a shot at the
topWVCseedbecause one of
those other three will winthe
WVCDivisionII crown. Divisional
championshiptops the criteria list
for seeding.
PittstonArea (96), Lake-Leh-
man(90) andCoughlin(86) are
alive for the final berth. Teams get
10points for a conference victory,
but Lehmancangainanadditional
14points if it finishes as the top3A
teaminDivisionIII. It will get
sevenif it ties Nanticoke for the
topspot inthe division.
The Lackawanna Conference
gets three teams inthe D2-3A
tournament.
All teams qualifyfor the D2-4A
andD2-Atournaments unless
theyinformDistrict 2chairman
FrankMajikes byWednesdaythey
dont want toparticipate. William-
sport alsoplays inthe D2-4A
tournament since its the only4A
school inDistrict 4.
STATERANKINGS
Its beena quiet seasonfor
District 2teams inthe Harrisburg
Patriot-News state rankings.
Meyers (18-2) is rankedseventh
inClass 2AandGAR(19-1) is
rankedninth. HolyCross (16-4) is
anhonorable mention.
The rest of the district was shut
out inthe other three classifica-
tions.
NONANTICOKEATMMI
Nanticoke was scheduledto
playat MMI Preplast Tuesday.
But that game as well as MMIs
game withBentonwere cancelled.
Yet, the District 2website listed
the game as wonbyNanticoke.
Heres what happened.
The PIAAallows teams to
schedule 22games prior tothe
postseason. MMI discoveredit
hadscheduled24andhadtocut
twoinorder toparticipate inthe
D2Class Aplayoffs. SoBenton
andNanticoke got the axe.
The reasonNanticoke was cut,
andthis is purelyspeculation, is
probablybecause MMIs two
WVCopponents this week
Northwest andHanover Area
were incontentionfor a D2-2A
playoff berthenteringlast week.
Nanticoke was at the bottomof
the WVCClass 3Astandings with
nohope of advancingtodistricts.
SCHEDULINGREMINDER
Nanticoke will be playingat
Meyers tonight, althoughthe
game is listedonthe District 2
website as beingat Meyers.
The teams flip-floppedhome-
awaydates earlier inthe season.
ERZAR
Continued fromPage 1B
said. Thats the only smiles real-
ly they had all week.
Plenty of others were watch-
ing. The Knicks said Saturdays
victory at Minnesota was their
highest-rated game on MSG Net-
work since Anthonys Knicks de-
but last Feb. 23 against Milwau-
kee, and that ratings are up 70
percent over their season aver-
age since Lin became a starter.
Its more exciting than any-
thing, just to see the buzz that
hes created here in New York,
here in the NBA as a whole, An-
thony said. I just want to get
back there and be a part of it.
But amid all the good feelings
around the Knicks, there was the
question that wont go away until
the whole team is together in a
game.
Anthony, who has battled inju-
ries much of the season, strained
his right groin just six minutes
into Lins starting debut against
Utah last Monday, and the
Knicks hope hell be back at the
end of this week. Hes never
seemed a natural in the pick-and-
roll offense, given his preference
to isolate andtake his man1-on-1.
Thats created questions of how
or if he will adapt to play-
ing with Lin.
And yes, Anthony has heard
them.
It doesnt bother me, he said.
I knowwhat I bring to the game,
I know what I bring to this team,
my teammates know what I
bring to the team and the only
thing I can do is just go out there
and continue doing what Im do-
ing. Like I said, Jeremy, hes our
point guard right now, hes pro-
ven that, hes playing extremely
well, and I look forward to play-
ing with him, Ill tell you that.
Lin, the NBAs first American-
born player of Chinese or Taiwa-
nese decent, came with little ex-
pectations after he was undrafted
out of Harvard and cut by two
other teams before the Knicks
pickedhimup inDecember. That
underdog quality made him easy
to root for in New York, even be-
fore he turned around the
Knicks season.
Hes Rudy, Anthony said.
Anthony is the superstar
whom the Knicks broke up a
promising team to acquire from
Denver last season, and that
comes with pressure to play
great and make sure the team is,
too. So perhaps playing with Lin
can alleviate that.
This is like a dreamcome true
to me, Anthony said, referring
to the ease that playing with a
pass-first point guard can pro-
vide.
Lin understands the skepti-
cism, but pointed out that Antho-
ny whose 4.2 assists per game
are just ahead of Lins 4.1 for the
team lead is a willing and ca-
pable distributor.
I can see why theyre ques-
tioning it, just because hes a
playmaker as well and he has the
ball in his hands a lot, but I think
when he comes back were just
going to continue to run what
works for us, and hes actually in
my opinion an underrated pas-
ser, Lin said. I think well be
fine once he gets back.
DAntoni calls the talk ludi-
crous, chalking it up the same
doubters who refused to believe
that Lin was the real thing after
his first couple of starts.
Thats normal. Youve got to
say something. Lets wait and
see. Thats part of sports, DAn-
toni said.
LINSANITY
Continued fromPage 1B
ening after awhile.
It was never a lack of effort, it
was never a lack of trying.
Theyre busting their tail every
day. And for everything to come
together for them (against Man-
hattanville) andget somesuccess
was great.
On the womens side, both
Kings (20-3, 12-0) and Misericor-
dia (14-9, 9-3) are comfortably in
the playoffs as the top two teams
in the league.
There is still plenty to play for,
however, as Misericordia fights
to host a first-round Freedom
Conference tournament game
next week and Kings looks to
bolster its resume for a potential
run at the NCAA tournament.
Bothsquads have their eyes set
on the conference championship
and the automatic bid to the na-
tional tournament that goes with
it. The Lady Monarchs debuted
at No. 3 in the Mid-Atlantic Re-
gion ranking released last week
bythe NCAAandshouldbe a can-
didate for an at-large bid to the
field of 64.
Kings topped Misericordia 51-
44 in their first meeting.
In other league action, Wilkes
hosts DeSales in a womens/
mens doubleheader tonight at
the Marts Center. The Wilkes
men trail Misericordia by a game
for first place and are aiming for a
playoff home game themselves.
BASKETBALL
Continued fromPage 1B
KINGS (20-3, 12-0)
No Player Pos Ht PPG Yr
12 Brittany Muscatell G 5-7 4.3 Sr.
21 Katlin Michaels G 5-7 9.3 Jr.
22 Lindsay Atchison G 6-0 5.9 Jr.
5 Samantha Simcox G/F 5-8 11.5 Sr.
25 Marissa Manning F 6-0 7.3 Fr.
MISERICORDIA (14-9, 9-3)
No Player Pos Ht PPG Yr
10 Tyann McDaniel G 5-3 11.0 Jr.
15 Katie Drayton G 5-6 1.6 Jr.
00 Jesse Robinson G 5-8 11.7 Sr.
13 Hannah Seely G 5-6 10.8 Jr.
33 Christine Marks F/C 6-1 19.4 Sr.
WO M E N S M AT C H U P
KINGS (9-14, 4-8)
No Player Pos Ht PPG Yr
20 Kyle Stackhouse G 6-0 8.5 Sr.
22 Kyle Hammonds G 6-0 11.5 So.
33 Nick Reisig G/F 6-2 6.0 Jr.
23 Tim OShea F 6-3 7.7 Fr.
52 Ian Oakley F 6-4 2.3 Jr.
MISERICORDIA (17-6, 9-3)
No Player Pos Ht PPG Yr
10 Matt Greene G 5-9 9.6 So.
12 Chris Undersinger G 6-0 5.0 Sr.
33 Jeff Slanovec G 6-3 9.7 Sr.
23 Ethan Eichhorst F 6-4 17.9 Sr.
21 Steve Artzerounian F 6-5 13.9 Jr.
M E N S M AT C H U P
had pulled within 71-69.
He also hit a 3-pointer in the
final minute to seal Philadel-
phias second straight win.
Corey Maggette scored a
season-high 22 points for Char-
lotte, which fell to 3-25 on the
season. Its the worst record in
the NBA and drops the Bob-
cats winning percentage below
that of the 1972-73 76ers, who
finished with the worst record
ever in the NBA at 9-72.
Magic 102, Timberwolves 89
ORLANDO, Fla. Jason
Richardson scored 17 points,
and Jameer Nelson and Hedo
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Lou
Williams scored 23 points off
the bench as the Philadelphia
76ers built an early lead and
held on to send the Charlotte
Bobcats to their 15th straight
defeat, 98-89 Monday night.
Thaddeus Young added 20
points on 6 of 9 shooting, and
Jrue Holiday chipped in with
19 points for the 76ers (20-9).
Williams was averaging 19
points over the previous four
games. He stayed hot Monday
night, making several big shots
including a 3-pointer with 6:11
remaining after the Bobcats
Turkoglu each added 14 as the
Orlando Magic used a big
second half to beat the Minne-
sota Timberwolves 102-89 on
Monday night.
Hornets 86, Jazz 80
NEW ORLEANS Chris
Kaman scored a season-high 27
points and grabbed 13 re-
bounds, and the New Orleans
Hornets snapped an eight-
game skid with a victory over
the Utah Jazz.
Marco Belinelli and Gustavo
Ayon each added 13 points for
New Orleans, which led by as
many as 20 in the third quarter
before holding on for only its
third victory in 26 games.
Greivis Vasquez had 12 points
and 10 assists.
Heat 114, Bucks 96
MILWAUKEE LeBron
James scored 35 points and the
Miami Heat finally found a way
to beat Milwaukee, using a
third-quarter surge to beat the
Bucks.
Dwyane Wade scored 22 and
Mario Chalmers added 13 for
the Heat, who were 0-2 against
the Bucks coming into Monday
nights game.
N B A R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
The Charlotte Bobcats Matt Carroll, left, and the Philadelphia 76ers Thaddeus Young scramble for a loose ball during the second
half of the 76ers 98-89 win in Charlotte, N.C., Monday.
76ers send Bobcats to 15th straight loss
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Joe Pavel-
ski had two goals and two as-
sists against a goalie playing in
the NHL for the first time in
nearly a year, leading the Sharks
past the Capitals 5-3 Monday
night, San Joses 16th victory in
its last 17 games against Wash-
ington.
Patrick Marleau, Ryane Clowe
and Brent Burns also scored on
Braden Holtby, who was
brought up from Hershey of the
American Hockey League earlier
Monday to make a surprise start
for Washington something he
hadnt done since last March.
Washingtons No. 1 goalie, To-
mas Vokoun, was ill, and No. 2
Michal Neuvirth played Sunday
in a loss at the New York Rang-
ers. Joe Thornton collected
three assists for the Pacific Divi-
sion-leading Sharks, and Tho-
mas Greiss made 39 saves.
Hurricanes 5, Canadiens 3
MONTREAL Jaroslav
Spacek scored in his return to
Montreal and the Carolina Hur-
ricanes snapped the Canadiens
four-game winning streak with a
victory.
Captain Eric Staal scored
twice for the for the Hurricanes,
who won for the third time in
their last five games and collect-
ed at least a point for the fifth
straight game (3-0-2). Jiri Tlusty
and Jamie McBain had goals as
well.
Tomas Plekanec, Erik Cole
and David Desharnais replied
for Montreal, which lost to Car-
olina for the first time this sea-
son.
Cam Ward stopped 29 shots
for his 21st win of the season.
Carey Price stopped 30 shots for
the Canadiens.
N H L
Pavelski,
Sharks top
Capitals
The Associated Press
NEWYORKWobblingthewholeway, apeo-
ple-pleasing Pekingese made quite a walk down
the green carpet at Madison Square Garden.
Malachy the Peke drewcheers that grewloud-
er with every tiny step Monday night and repeat-
ed as the top toy at the Westminster Kennel Club
dog show. Pink tongue peeking out from his
black face, he beat a prize affenpinscher called
Banana Joe in a most competitive group.
He doesnt run. He has a dignified Pekingese
gait, handler David Fitzpatrick said.
Malachy also has 114 best in show ribbons on
his resume, and is aiming to add the one from
Americas most prestigious dog show. His early
work done here, he rested on a cool pack after
competing.
A wire-haired dachshund called Cinders won
the hound group, then wanted to sit rather than
stand for her victory picture.
Shes a clown, handler Cheri Koppenhaver
said.
More than 2,000 entries in 185 breeds and va-
rieties were at the 136th Westminster. The non-
sporting and herding champions were to be
picked later Monday night, and the best in show
will be chosen Tuesday evening.
Among the early winners in breed judging: a
chow chow co-owned by Martha Stewart and a
xoloitzcuintli called Giorgio Armani, a nice start
for the alphabetically challenged contestant dur-
ing Fashion Week in New York City.
Still to come Tuesday: a wire fox terrier who
won the National show and a standard poodle
who took the Eukanuba event. Theres also a
black cocker spaniel who was the No. 1showdog
last year hes named Beckham, maybe a good
omensince a12-storyadfeaturingsoccer star Da-
vid Beckham posing in his underwear is painted
on a building that overlooks the Garden.
Oh, and a Valentines Day treat on tap, too: A
couple from Washington state who entered a Ti-
betan mastiff plans to hold their wedding among
all the pooches.
A Brussels griffon named Tina Fey, a barking
petits bassets griffons vendeen and a sprightly
Chihuahua were among the fan favorites. Also
getting noticed was a Manchester toy terrier, a
breed that can live to be 20 years old.
W E S T M I N S T E R D O G S H O W
Wobbling Pekingese repeats as top in toy group
AP PHOTO
A Pekingese named Malachy walks across the
floor during the judging of the toy group at the
136th annual Westminster Kennel Club dog
show in New York on Monday. Malachy went on
to win the group.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 5B
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. C.J. Fair
scored13 points and No. 2 Syra-
cuse scored the final six points
of the game to beat No. 19
Louisville 52-51 on Monday
night, snapping a seven-game
losing streak against the Cardi-
nals.
Syracuse (26-1, 13-1 Big East)
used an 8-0 run to take an eight-
point lead, only to see Louis-
ville (20-6, 8-5) rally with a 15-2
run of its own. But the Orange
held the Cardinals without a
point over the final 3
1
2 minutes
and Fair hit the go-ahead layup
with 2:11 left.
Fab Melo scored11 points and
the best shooting team in the
Big East overcame a 34.4 per-
cent effort, including 1 of 15
from 3-point range, to win for
the sixth straight time since
losing at Notre Dame.
Freshman Chane Behanan
had16 points and nine rebounds
for the Cardinals, who had won
six straight conference games.
It was a whiteout at the KFC
Yum! Center with 22,738 fans
wearing white and coach Rick
Pitino donning his cream-col-
ored suit, but it was far from a
shootout with both sides strug-
gling from the field.
Syracuses Scoop Jardine
missed all eight of his shots and
leading scorer Kris Joseph
struggled with foul trouble,
while Cardinals forward Kyle
Kuric went 1 for 8 from the field,
including 1 for 6 from 3-point
range.
The Orange came in shooting
48.1 this season, while the Car-
dinals defensive field goal per-
centage was fourth-best in the
nation at 37.2. Neither team
could reach that mark against
the others zone looks.
Louisville guard Chris Smith
finished with10 points, while
Gorgui Dieng had10 rebounds
and five turnovers, including a
costly one late for the Cardinals,
who shot 34.7 percent from the
field.
Brandon Triche scored eight
points, while Dion Waiters and
Joseph added seven each for the
Orange.
Triche hit a jumper Syra-
cuses first field goal outside the
paint in the second half Melo
hit two free throws and Fair
added a layup to give Syracuse a
52-51 lead with 2:11 left.
Dieng committed a turnover
instead of trying a 15-foot jump-
er, throwing it away and Smith
missed a reverse layup with 57
seconds left.
Baylor 79, Iowa St. 64
WACO, Texas Perry Jones
III scored18 points and Baylor
rebounded from consecutive
losses.
Jones already had10 points
by halftime, one more than he
had combined last week when
Baylor (22-4, 9-4 Big 12) lost to
No. 4 Kansas and No. 3 Mis-
souri for the second time in four
weeks. The Bears are undefeat-
ed against the rest of the Big 12
and everybody else they have
played.
WOMENS ROUNDUP
Tennessee 91, Kentucky 54
KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
Meighan Simmons scored a
season-high 25 points and No.
13 Tennessee routed No. 7 Ken-
tucky 91-54 on Monday night.
Shekinna Stricklen added18
points for the Lady Volunteers,
who shot 59 percent while
holding Kentucky to 33.3 per-
cent.
Tennessee (18-7, 9-3 South-
eastern Conference) never
trailed. Simmons hit consec-
utive 3-pointers to make it 10-2.
innesota 64, Nebraska 58.
MINNEAPOLIS Kionna
Kelloggs basket broke a tie with
1:01 left as Minnesota beat No.
16 Nebraska.
The Gophers (13-14, 5-8 Big
Ten) used a 20-0 run to forge a
40-24 lead with17:00 to go. But
the Cornhuskers (19-5, 8-4)
fought back, turning a 58-51
deficit into a 58-58 tie on Kait-
lyn Burkes basket with 3:17 left.
M A J O R C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Syracuse sneaks
past Louisville
AP PHOTO
Syracuses Fab Melo, right, attempts to block the shot of Louis-
villes Chane Behanana during the first half of an NCAA basket-
ball game Monday in Louisville, Ky.
The Associated Press
Kentucky stays
runaway No. 1
Kentucky and Syracuse remain
Nos. 1 and 2 in The Associated
Press Top 25, and Wichita
State and Notre Dame are
ranked for the first time this
season.
The Wildcats received 63
first-place votes from the
65-member national media
panel on Monday, while the
Orange got the others.
Missouri moves up one spot to
third and is followed by
Kansas, Duke, Ohio State,
Michigan State, North
Carolina, Baylor and
Georgetown.
Notre Dame, winners of six
straight and ranked as high as
fourth last season, is No. 23.
Wichita State, which has won
12 of 13 and is ranked for the
first time since 2007, and
Gonzaga, which returns after
being out for one week, are
tied for 24th. Creighton, losers
of three straight, dropped out
from17th. Mississippi State fell
out from 20th and Harvard
from 25th.
SAN FRANCISCO Freddie
Solomon, the former Miami Dol-
phinsand49erswidereceiver who
became knownas Fabulous Fred-
die and committed himself to
community service for decades,
died Monday. He was 59.
The 49ers announced the pass-
ing of Solomon, who lived in Flor-
ida and had battled cancer over
the past year. He played on the
first of the franchises four Super
Bowl championship teams in the
1980s during an 11-year NFL ca-
reer.
The49ers lost amember of our
family today. Well miss you, Fred-
die Solomon, 49ers CEO Jed
York posted on his Twitter ac-
count.
The Dolphins selected Solo-
mon in the second round of the
1975 draft out of the University of
Tampa. He spent his first three
NFL seasons with Miami and his
final eight inSanFrancisco, finish-
ing with 371 receptions for 5,846
yards and 48 touchdowns in 371
games.
During his stint in San Francis-
co, Solomonalsoranfor 329yards
and three TDs as an important
memberof lateHall of Famecoach
Bill Walshs West Coast offense.
Freddie was very influential to
me and my career, and taught me
about workethicandprofessional-
ism. He inspired me to go out
thereeverydayandemulatehim,
Hall of Fame wideout Jerry Rice
said.
After his foot-
ball career end-
ed, Solomon
worked for two
decades in com-
munity rela-
tions with the
Hillsborough
County Sheriffs Office in Florida,
where he mentored youth and
taught vital life lessons through
football fundamentals.
Freddie Solomon was a dear
friendandagreat teammate, Hall
of Fame quarterbackJoe Montana
said. There was no one who gave
more on and off the field than
Freddie. The kindness he demon-
stratedwasinspirational toall that
knewhim, and a joy to be around.
The warmth of his smile will be
forever imbedded in my mind and
heart.
Solomon was born on Jan. 11,
1953, in Sumter, S.C. He is sur-
vivedby wife, Dee; mother, Bessie
Ruth Solomon; brothers Richard,
Oneal and Roger; and mother-in-
lawMae Jeffers.
I am deeply saddened by the
passing of my dear friend Freddie
Solomon today, former 49ers
owner Eddie DeBartolo Jr. said.
My heart goes out to Dee, his
family, the 49ers football family,
the Hillsborough County Sheriffs
office and football fans every-
where. Freddie and I have been
friends for 35 years, and he was
one of the most gentle and best
men I have ever met in my life.
F R E D D I E S O L O M O N 1 9 5 3 - 2 01 2
Former WR loses
battle with cancer
By JANIE McCAULEY
AP Sports Writer
Solomon
C M Y K
PAGE 6B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
erations of Wyeth works are on
display.
Add Michael Matz the train-
er of 2006 Derby winner Barbaro
to the team, and racing could
have quite a story line by the time
the Derby at Churchill Downs
rolls around on May 5.
Union Rags, by the way, has
quite the resume himself: three
victories, including the Saratoga
Special and the Champagne, and
a narrow loss to Hansen in the
Breeders Cup Juvenile in No-
vember.
Spendingthewinter inFlorida,
Union Rags is in training for his
3-year-old debut in the Fountain
of Youth at Gulfstream Park on
Feb. 26. He will be ridden by Ju-
lien Leparoux, who replaces reg-
ular rider Javier Castellano.
On Monday, Union Rags
worked five furlongs in1:03.08 at
Palm Meadows Training Center
in Boynton Beach, Fla., with Lep-
aroux aboard for the first time.
Castellano gave up the ride on
Union Rags to stick with Algo-
rithms, who is No. 2 on this
weeks Top 10 list.
There are three Derby preps
this weekend the El Camino
Real Derby (G3) at Golden Gate
Fields on Saturday, the San Vi-
cente (G2) at Santa Anita onSun-
day, and the Southwest (G3) at
Oaklawn next Monday.
One horse to watch in the
Southwest is Reckless Jerry,
owned by country music star To-
byKeith. The colt has twowins in
sixstarts, withrunner-upfinishes
in two stakes races.
A total 398 3-year-olds were
nominated for the Triple Crown
races, a significant increase over
last years total of 366. Todd
Pletcher leads all trainers with32
nominees including Algo-
rithms for the Derby, Preak-
ness and Belmont Stakes.
Some bloodlines run really
deep.
And were not even talking
about the lineage of Union Rags,
the No. 1KentuckyDerbyconten-
der on The Associated Press
opening Run to the Roses Top 10
list.
Its the owner of the 3-year-old
colt and her husband who have
caught the attention of the racing
world. And why not? Owner
Phyllis Mills Wyeth is the daugh-
ter of the late Alice duPont Mills,
a thoroughbredowner andbreed-
er, notedaviatrix, environmental-
ist, philanthropist, and promi-
nent member of the du Pont fam-
ily. Her husband is contemporary
realist painter Jamie Wyeth, son
of artist Andrew Wyeth, grand-
son of artist and illustrator N.C.
Wyeth.
Mrs. Wyeth, though, almost
ended up as Union Rags former
owner. She sold the horse for
$145,000 as a yearling, then
dreamedshe hadto buy himback
because his bloodlines trace back
to horses ownedby her family. To
do so, she paid $390,000 at a 2-
year-olds in training sale early
last year.
Its really an amazing story,
Jamie Wyeth has said. The
dream was that she really should
ownthehorseinthefamilyname.
It turned out to be a pretty good
bet.
The listed owner is Chadds
Ford Stable, a one-horse oper-
ationnamedfor the Pennsylvania
town where the Wyeths reside
and is home to the Brandywine
River Museum, where three gen-
H O R S E R A C I N G
Top contender
has loaded team
Union Rags, the AP No. 1
Derby favorite, is backed by
experienced crew.
By RICHARD ROSENBLATT
AP Sports Writer
RUN FOR THE ROSES TOP10
1. Union Rags, pictured above, (Michael Matz, trainer; Javier Cas-
tellano, jockey): Won three in a row, including Champagne (G1)
before losing to Hansen by head in BC Juvenile (G1). ... Castellano
looking for first Derby win. ... Next start: Fountain of Youth (G2),
Gulfstream, Feb. 26. ... Derby future wager odds: 7-1.
2. Algorithms (Todd Pletcher, Castellano): Defeated 2-year-old
champ Hansen in Holy Bull (G3) on Jan. 29. ... Son of Bernardini
3-for-3 lifetime. ... Next start: Fountain of Youth. ... Odds: 12-1.
3. Hansen (Mike Maker, Ramon Dominguez): Stumbled at start of
Holy Bull, had little left in stretch and finished second by 5 lengths.
... Capped 3-for-3 2-year-old season with close win in BC Juvenile.
... Son of Tapit headed to New York. ... Next start: Gotham (G3),
Aqueduct, March 3. ... Odds: 26-1.
4. Liaison (Bob Baffert, Rafael Bejarano): The 3-2 favorite in Rob-
ert B. Lewis (G2) on Feb. 4 clipped heels with another horse in
stretch and unseated rider. ... Won 3-of-4 as 2-year-old, including
CashCall Futurity (G1). ... Next start: San Felipe (G2), Santa Anita,
March 10. ... Odds: 56-1.
5. Gemologist (Pletcher, Castellano): Kentucky Jockey Club (G2)
winner 3-for-3 as he readies for 3-year-old debut. ... Next start:
Tampa Bay Derby (G2), Tampa Bay Downs, March 10 or Rebel (G2),
Oaklawn Park, March 17. ... Odds: 22-1.
6. Creative Cause (Mike Harrington, Joel Rosario): Strong third in
BC Juvenile followed win in Norfolk (G1). ... Training at Hollywood
Park for 3-year-old debut. ... Next start: San Vicente (G2), Santa
Anita, Feb. 19. Odds: 17-1.
7. Discreet Dancer (Pletcher, Castellano): Won first two races by
combined 15
1
4 lengths at Gulfstream. ... Castellano says Its almost
scary how good he is. He was quick out of the gate and just did
everything right. ... Next start: Fountain of Youth. ... Odds: 30-1.
8. Alpha (Kiaran McLaughlin, Dominguez): Won Withers (G3) by 3
1
4
lengths. ... With two winning preps this year, one more planned for
Godolphin-owned colt before Derby. ... Next start: Wood Memorial
(G1), Aqueduct, April 7. ... Odds: 19-1.
9. Ill Have Another (Doug ONeill, Mario Gutierrez): A $35,000
purchase, colt won Robert B. Lewis by 2
3
4 lengths at odds of 43-1.
... Has two wins in four starts for owner J. Paul Reddam. ... Next
start: Santa Anita Derby (G1), Santa Anita, April 7. ...Odds: 29-1.
10. Mr. Bowling (Larry Jones, Robby Albarado): Won Lecomte (G3)
by a head Jan. 21. ... Colt has three wins in five starts. ... Next start:
Risen Star (G3), Fair Grounds, Feb. 25. ... Odds: 85-1.
Keep an eye on: Dullahan, Ever So Lucky, Fed Biz, Out of Bounds,
Reckless Jerry.
MIAMI Ozzie Guillen says
Hanley Ramirez is reluctant,
Carlos Zambrano is rejuvenated
and the Miami Marlins much-
maligned uniforms are redeem-
able.
They look bad, Guillen said
Monday. But if we win, those
are going to be the best uni-
forms in the game.
With spring training a week
away, Guillen spoke at the Mar-
lins media day about the teams
offseason makeover, which in-
cluded new colors, a name
change and a spending spree as
the franchise moves into a new
ballpark. Among the acquisi-
tions were manager Guillen and
former All-Star pitcher Zambra-
no, two ex-Chicagoans in the
market for a fresh start, along
with All-Star free agents Jose
Reyes, Mark Buehrle and Heath
Bell.
When asked if Ramirez has
embraced his move to third
base so Reyes can play short-
stop, Guillen said no.
I dont think hes 100-percent
on board, Guillen said. Not
yet. I dont expect him to be.
Guillen said he has talked
with Ramirez only once since
the signing of Reyes. But he ex-
pects Ramirez to accept the po-
sition switch once he realizes it
gives the Marlins their best
chance to win.
This is Hanleys team, Guil-
len said. Those guys they
brought fromoutside are tohelp
him to win the championship.
When you lose its not fun to
come to the ballpark. That hap-
pened to Hanley a lot.
The Marlins finished last in
the NL East in 2011 and havent
reached the playoffs since 2003.
But this year theyre expectedto
contend for a postseason berth
and make lots of headlines.
The transformation of the
Marlins profile is such that
theyll be the focus of Show-
times series The Franchise
this year, Major League Base-
ball said Monday. Thanks in
part to Ramirez, the talkative
Guillenandthe combative Zam-
brano, the program could be-
come a soap opera.
Zambrano wore out his wel-
come with the Cubs feuding
with teammates, management
and umpires. The Marlins be-
lieve they can revive his career
by pairing him and fellow Vene-
zuelan Guillen.
I have people in Venezuela
betting to see whens the first
time me and Carlos are going to
fight, Guillen said. He did a
lot of bad things in Chicago. He
was out of hand. He was kind of
like phony. But Carlos is a great
guy. Hes healthy. Hes hungry.
Hes going to show people who
Carlos Zambrano is.
The historically thrifty Mar-
lins acquired Zambrano in a
trade and spent $191 million to
sign Reyes, Buehrle and Bell.
They were spurned in court-
ships with Cuban defector Yoe-
nis Cespedes, who signed Mon-
day with the Oakland Athletics,
and with top free-agent prize Al-
bert Pujols.
You dont land everybody
you want to land, president of
baseball operations Larry Bein-
fest said. But I think weve
been aggressive. Were really
happy with the way the club
looks.
Beinfest said the teamshould
be fully healthy heading into
spring training. That includes
ace Josh Johnson, who has been
throwing off a moundafter mak-
ing only nine starts in 2011 be-
cause of right shoulder inflam-
mation.
I feel great, Johnson said.
No problems. I havent really
been sore yet, and Ive been let-
ting it go.
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Guillen likes the look
of Marlins makeover
By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
7
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7
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C M Y K
Google deal OKd by EU
Googles $12.5 billion acquisition of
cellphone maker Motorola Mobility has
won the approval of European antitrust
regulators, moving Google a major step
closer to completing the biggest deal in
its 13-year history.
Google just needs to clear a few
more regulatory hurdles before it can
take control of Motorola Mobility Hold-
ings Inc. and expand into manufactur-
ing phones, tablet computers and pos-
sibly other consumer devices.
Google is counting on gaining Moto-
rola Mobilitys more than 17,000 pat-
ents a crucial weapon in an intellec-
tual arms race with Apple, Microsoft
and other rivals .
Google still needs government ap-
provals in the U.S., China, Taiwan and
Israel.
AT&T slows down some
AT&T has started cutting the data
speeds of some users with unlimited
data plans as part of an attempt to
manage data usage on its network.
AT&T no longer offers unlimited
data plans to new customers, but those
who already had them could keep
them. AT&T has some 17 million cus-
tomers with such plans, representing
just under half of its smartphone users.
AT&T has been slowing down
speeds of the heaviest data users.
Fund outflow ends
Industry consultant Strategic Insight
reported on Monday that deposits into
stock mutual funds roughly equaled
withdrawals in January.
It snapped an eight-month streak of
investors pulling their money out each
month. From May through December,
net withdrawals totaled about $137
billion.
Near-zero returns continued to hurt
money-market mutual funds. Investors
withdrew a net $44 billion in January
from money funds.
Bear Stearns execs settle
Two former Bear Stearns executives
reached settlements Monday with
federal regulators over civil charges
they misled investors about risky mort-
gage securities when the housing mar-
ket was collapsing.
The Securities and Exchange Com-
mission said Ralph Cioffi will pay
$800,000 and be barred from the indus-
try for three years, and Matthew Tan-
nin will pay $250,000 and be banned
for two years.
I N B R I E F
$3.61 $3.17 $3.47
$4.06
07/17/08
JacobsEng 46.29 +.44 +14.1
JohnJn 64.68 +.08 -1.4
JohnsnCtl 33.38 +.43 +6.8
Kellogg 50.02 +.21 -1.1
Keycorp 8.09 +.15 +5.2
KimbClk 71.74 +.18 -2.5
KindME 88.83 +1.04 +4.6
Kroger 23.54 +.03 -2.8
Kulicke 11.37 +.14 +22.9
LSI Corp 8.39 +.06 +41.0
LancastrC 68.02 +.28 -1.9
LillyEli 38.85 +.03 -6.5
Limited 45.20 +.24 +12.0
LincNat 24.77 +.61 +27.5
LizClaib 9.69 -.06 +12.3
LockhdM 88.23 +.72 +9.1
Loews 38.42 +.32 +2.0
LaPac 8.12 +.06 +.6
MarathnO s 33.24 +.09 +13.6
MarIntA 35.94 +.22 +23.2
Masco 13.23 +.51 +26.2
McDrmInt 13.61 +.37 +18.2
McGrwH 45.89 +.37 +2.0
McKesson 81.66 +.32 +4.8
Merck 38.11 +.20 +1.1
MetLife 37.68 +.79 +20.8
Microsoft 30.58 +.09 +17.8
NCR Corp 21.92 +.78 +33.2
NatFuGas 47.65 -.23 -14.3
NatGrid 50.30 +.30 +3.8
NY Times 7.40 +.14 -4.3
NewellRub 18.97 +.09 +17.5
NewmtM 59.41 -.21 -1.0
NextEraEn 60.04 -.32 -1.4
NiSource 22.94 -.12 -3.7
NikeB 105.22 -.19 +9.2
NorflkSo 71.05 -.48 -2.5
NoestUt 34.99 -.21 -3.0
NorthropG 60.30 +.49 +3.1
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OGE Engy 52.89 +.05 -6.7
OcciPet 104.06 +1.36 +11.1
OfficeMax 5.69 +.07 +25.3
Olin 21.86 +.02 +11.2
PG&E Cp 41.33 +.09 +.3
PPL Corp 27.92 -.53 -5.1
PennVaRs 25.98 +.39 +1.8
PepBoy 15.15 +.04 +37.7
Pfizer 21.30 +.25 -1.6
PitnyBw 18.48 -.02 -.3
Praxair 107.18 +.02 +.3
ProgrssEn 54.55 -.07 -2.6
ProvEn g 12.05 -.03 +24.4
PSEG 30.67 +.16 -7.1
PulteGrp 9.09 +.30 +44.1
RadioShk 7.52 -.08 -22.6
RLauren 172.37 -.23 +24.8
Raytheon 50.31 +.78 +4.0
ReynAmer 40.15 +.41 -3.1
RockwlAut 80.90 +.64 +10.3
Rowan 37.96 +.90 +25.2
RoyDShllB 73.59 +.85 -3.2
RoyDShllA 72.90 +.85 -.3
Ryder 54.85 +1.05 +3.2
Safeway 21.87 +.13 +3.9
SaraLee 20.04 +.24 +5.9
Schlmbrg 78.03 +.86 +14.2
Sherwin 99.15 +.78 +11.1
SilvWhtn g 35.72 +.16 +23.3
SiriusXM 2.15 +.01 +18.1
SonyCp 19.48 -.05 +8.0
SouthnCo 44.42 -.19 -4.0
SwstAirl 9.72 +.10 +13.6
SpectraEn 30.98 +.20 +.7
SprintNex 2.31 +.02 -1.3
Sunoco 39.10 +.09 +14.6
Sysco 29.28 -.03 -.2
TECO 17.63 -.02 -7.9
Target 52.36 +.23 +2.2
TenetHlth 5.77 +.05 +12.5
Tenneco 37.35 +.51 +25.4
Tesoro 27.64 -.12 +18.3
Textron 28.04 +1.08 +51.6
3M Co 88.03 +.89 +7.7
TimeWarn 37.88 +.36 +4.8
Timken 53.33 +1.44 +37.8
UnilevNV 33.72 +.38 -1.9
UnionPac 113.18 +1.55 +6.8
UPS B 77.16 +.47 +5.4
USSteel 29.16 -.24 +10.2
UtdTech 84.88 +1.38 +16.1
VarianMed 65.12 +.39 -3.0
VectorGp 18.01 +.06 +1.4
ViacomB 49.39 +.17 +8.8
WestarEn 28.25 -.06 -1.8
Weyerhsr 20.55 +.53 +10.1
Whrlpl 71.94 +1.90 +51.6
WmsCos 29.52 +.46 +9.5
Windstrm 12.41 +.05 +5.7
Wynn 110.56 -2.64 +.1
XcelEngy 26.44 -.06 -4.3
Xerox 8.02 +.10 +.8
YumBrnds 64.58 -.16 +9.4
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrB m 15.40 +.07 +6.4
CoreOppA m 13.14 +.09 +8.7
American Cent
IncGroA m 26.21 +.21 +7.8
ValueInv 6.00 +.03 +6.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 20.69 +.15 +9.9
BalA m 19.24 +.10 +5.7
BondA m 12.68 ... +1.4
CapIncBuA m50.66 +.31 +2.9
CpWldGrIA m34.72 +.29 +8.1
EurPacGrA m38.69 +.33 +10.0
FnInvA m 38.22 +.30 +8.0
GrthAmA m 31.82 +.25 +10.8
HiIncA m 11.02 +.02 +4.3
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InvCoAmA m 29.08 +.21 +7.3
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NwWrldA m 51.27 +.38 +11.2
SmCpWldA m37.79 +.36 +13.9
WAMutInvA m29.72 +.20 +4.6
Baron
Asset b 49.33 +.40 +7.9
BlackRock
EqDivI 19.04 +.12 +4.7
GlobAlcA m 19.39 +.13 +6.8
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CGM
Focus 29.95 +.33 +16.8
Mutual 27.84 +.16 +14.0
Realty 29.26 +.34 +9.1
Columbia
AcornZ 31.21 +.34 +13.2
DFA
EmMktValI 31.17 +.38 +20.1
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.46 +.03 +4.9
HlthCareS d 26.13 +.30 +8.1
LAEqS d 43.26 +.68 +16.0
Davis
NYVentA m 35.02 +.17 +7.8
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Dodge & Cox
Bal 72.91 +.48 +8.1
Income 13.61 ... +2.3
IntlStk 32.17 +.29 +10.0
Stock 111.55 +.94 +9.8
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 33.75 +.24 +13.0
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.35 ... +3.7
HiIncOppB m 4.36 +.01 +3.6
NatlMuniA m 9.94 +.01 +6.2
NatlMuniB m 9.94 +.01 +6.2
PAMuniA m 9.15 ... +4.0
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.08 +.03 +2.9
Bal 19.29 +.09 +6.0
BlChGrow 47.58 +.49 +12.1
CapInc d 9.11 +.02 +5.8
Contra 73.45 +.64 +8.9
DivrIntl d 28.00 +.27 +9.7
ExpMulNat d 22.43 +.23 +8.5
Free2020 13.91 +.08 +6.0
Free2030 13.76 +.09 +7.2
GNMA 11.87 ... +0.6
GrowCo 92.42+1.28 +14.3
LatinAm d 55.38 +.75 +13.3
LowPriStk d 39.50 +.32 +10.6
Magellan 69.74 +.71 +10.7
Overseas d 29.75 +.31 +12.3
Puritan 18.89 +.11 +6.8
StratInc 11.04 +.02 +2.7
TotalBd 11.02 ... +1.3
Value 70.59 +.55 +11.2
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 26.60 +.24 +14.2
Fidelity Select
Gold d 45.57 +.07 +7.9
Pharm d 13.99 +.16 +3.0
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 47.93 +.33 +7.7
500IdxInstl 47.93 +.33 +7.7
500IdxInv 47.93 +.34 +7.7
First Eagle
GlbA m 48.01 +.26 +6.4
FrankTemp-Frank
Fed TF A m 12.42 ... +2.6
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.30 ... +3.0
GrowB m 46.91 +.40 +10.0
Income A m 2.16 +.01 +4.0
Income C m 2.18 +.01 +3.9
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon Z 12.56 +.07 +7.5
Discov Z 29.05 +.13 +5.8
Euro Z 20.24 +.14 +6.8
Shares Z 21.20 +.11 +6.3
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 13.25 +.07 +7.2
GlBond C m 13.27 +.06 +7.1
GlBondAdv 13.21 +.06 +7.2
Growth A m 17.86 +.12 +9.6
GMO
QuVI 23.07 +.15 +4.6
Harbor
CapApInst 41.37 +.33 +12.1
IntlInstl d 59.02 +.74 +12.5
Hartford
CpApHLSIA 41.90 +.35 +12.6
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 48.91 +.91 +13.1
AT&T Inc 30.04 +.20 -.7
AbtLab 55.16 +.05 -1.9
AMD 7.29 +.24 +35.0
Alcoa 10.33 +.04 +19.4
Allstate 31.16 +.19 +13.7
Altria 29.23 +.02 -1.4
AEP 39.71 +.41 -3.9
AmExp 52.07 +.26 +10.4
AmIntlGrp 26.82 +.16 +15.6
Amgen 68.20 +1.20 +6.2
Anadarko 87.34 +.30 +14.4
Apple Inc 502.60 +9.18 +24.1
AutoData 54.23 +.22 +.4
AveryD 29.89 +.69 +4.2
Avnet 36.02 +.29 +15.9
Avon 17.53 -.34 +.3
BP PLC 47.37 +1.02 +10.8
BakrHu 47.90 +.28 -1.5
BallardPw 1.40 ... +29.6
BarnesNob 13.26 +.20 -8.4
Baxter 57.04 +.20 +15.3
BerkH B 79.44 +.65 +4.1
BigLots 43.78 -.22 +15.9
BlockHR 16.43 -.37 +.6
Boeing 74.85 -.10 +2.0
BrMySq 31.99 +.09 -9.2
Brunswick 23.82 +.88 +31.9
Buckeye 62.20 -1.55 -2.8
CBS B 30.21 +.31 +11.3
CMS Eng 21.55 -.08 -2.4
CSX s 21.94 -.11 +4.2
CampSp 31.63 -.04 -4.8
Carnival 30.53 -.52 -6.5
Caterpillar 113.70 +1.95 +25.5
CenterPnt 18.86 -.05 -6.1
CntryLink 38.08 +.06 +2.4
Chevron 106.38 +1.10 0.0
Cisco 20.03 +.14 +11.2
Citigrp rs 32.88 -.05 +25.0
ColgPal 91.64 +.47 -.8
ConAgra 26.74 +.09 +1.3
ConocPhil 72.81 +.56 -.1
ConEd 57.91 -.61 -6.6
ConstellEn 36.34 -.12 -8.4
Cooper Ind 60.88 +.79 +12.4
Corning 13.67 +.07 +5.3
CrownHold 37.35 -.15 +11.2
Cummins 122.88 +2.58 +39.6
DTE 53.72 -.23 -1.3
Deere 88.68 +1.13 +14.6
Diebold 37.94 +3.19 +26.2
Disney 41.79 +.34 +11.4
DomRescs 49.93 +.02 -5.9
Dover 66.04 +1.53 +13.8
DowChm 34.19 +.19 +18.9
DryShips 3.34 +.34 +67.0
DuPont 50.60 -.14 +10.5
DukeEngy 21.44 -.04 -2.5
EMC Cp 26.45 +.25 +22.8
Eaton s 52.05 +.61 +19.6
EdisonInt 40.66 -.43 -1.8
EmersonEl 52.80 +.60 +13.3
EnbrEPt s 32.01 +.05 -3.6
Energen 50.07 +.80 +.1
EngyTEq 42.57 +.77 +4.9
Entergy 67.39 -.41 -7.7
EntPrPt 50.47 +.28 +8.8
Exelon 39.23 -.08 -9.5
ExxonMbl 84.42 +.62 -.4
FMC Corp 93.74 +2.56 +8.9
Fastenal s 50.58 +2.16 +16.0
FedExCp 96.98 +1.71 +16.1
FirstEngy 43.03 +.38 -2.9
FootLockr 27.07 +.14 +13.5
FordM 12.54 +.10 +16.5
Gannett 14.90 +.29 +11.4
Gap 21.72 +.13 +17.1
GenDynam 70.12 -.18 +5.6
GenElec 19.07 +.20 +6.5
GenMills 39.34 +.25 -2.6
GileadSci 54.90 +1.15 +34.1
GlaxoSKln 45.43 +.68 -.4
Goodrich 125.46 +.11 +1.4
Goodyear 13.97 +.09 -1.4
Hallibrtn 36.14 +.08 +4.7
HarleyD 46.47 +.38 +19.6
HarrisCorp 42.33 +.15 +17.5
HartfdFn 20.23 +.33 +24.5
HawaiiEl 26.25 +.11 -.9
HeclaM 5.02 -.07 -4.0
Heico s 58.86 +.89 +.8
Hess 62.26 +.44 +9.6
HewlettP 28.75 +.05 +11.6
HomeDp 45.93 +.60 +9.3
HonwllIntl 60.14 +.81 +10.7
Hormel s 28.85 -.13 -1.5
Humana 86.89 +1.15 -.8
INTL FCSt 23.02 +.51 -2.3
ITT Cp s 22.45 -.15 +16.1
ITW 55.95 +.24 +19.8
IngerRd 38.93 +.95 +27.8
IBM 192.62 +.20 +4.8
IntPap 33.02 +1.43 +11.6
JPMorgCh 38.30 +.69 +15.2
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
98.01 72.26 AirProd APD 2.32 90.52 +.12 +6.3
34.67 25.39 AmWtrWks AWK .92 33.95 -.04 +6.6
50.22 36.76 Amerigas APU 3.05 43.44 +.29 -5.4
23.57 19.28 AquaAm WTR .66 22.38 +.31 +1.5
38.02 23.69 ArchDan ADM .70 30.93 +.36 +8.1
356.80 247.36 AutoZone AZO ... 358.46 +4.36 +10.3
14.95 4.92 BkofAm BAC .04 8.25 +.18 +48.4
32.11 17.10 BkNYMel BK .52 21.36 -.06 +7.3
17.49 2.23 BonTon BONT .20 4.87 -.04 +44.5
44.09 31.30 CVS Care CVS .65 42.83 -.35 +5.0
52.95 38.79 Cigna CI .04 43.18 -.36 +2.8
71.77 61.29 CocaCola KO 1.88 68.44 +.50 -2.2
27.50 19.19 Comcast CMCSA .45 27.41 +.24 +15.6
28.95 21.67 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.04 28.15 +.41 +1.3
42.50 14.61 CmtyHlt CYH ... 20.14 +.11 +15.4
42.34 29.57 CoreMark CORE .68 41.22 +.37 +4.1
64.56 39.50 EmersonEl EMR 1.60 52.80 +.60 +13.3
13.63 4.61 Entercom ETM ... 8.01 +.09 +30.2
21.02 10.25 FairchldS FCS ... 14.73 -.06 +22.3
9.55 3.81 FrontierCm FTR .75 4.14 +.10 -19.6
18.16 13.09 Genpact G .18 15.62 +.26 +4.5
13.24 7.00 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.49 +.15 +4.4
55.00 46.99 Heinz HNZ 1.92 52.03 +.16 -3.7
62.38 49.46 Hershey HSY 1.52 59.83 +.28 -3.2
39.06 30.26 Kraft KFT 1.16 38.40 -.18 +2.8
27.57 18.07 Lowes LOW .56 27.39 +.30 +7.9
91.05 66.40 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 80.66 +.86 +5.7
102.22 72.89 McDnlds MCD 2.80 99.65 +.18 -.7
24.10 17.05 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 22.69 +.38 +2.5
10.28 5.30 NexstarB NXST ... 8.39 +.07 +7.0
65.19 42.70 PNC PNC 1.40 60.09 +.42 +4.2
30.27 24.10 PPL Corp PPL 1.40 27.92 -.53 -5.1
17.34 6.50 PenRE PEI .60 13.69 +.30 +31.1
71.89 58.50 PepsiCo PEP 2.06 63.69 -.26 -4.0
80.99 59.09 PhilipMor PM 3.08 81.61 +1.17 +4.0
67.72 57.56 ProctGam PG 2.10 64.23 +.35 -3.7
67.52 42.45 Prudentl PRU 1.45 60.17 +1.17 +20.1
1.61 .85 RiteAid RAD ... 1.46 -.08 +15.9
17.11 10.91 SLM Cp SLM .50 16.01 +.13 +19.5
60.00 39.00 SLM pfB SLMBP 4.63 47.61 +.36 +22.1
44.65 26.83 SoUnCo SUG .60 43.58 +.54 +3.5
34.94 23.92 TJX s TJX .38 34.41 +.05 +6.6
33.53 24.07 UGI Corp UGI 1.04 27.18 +.08 -7.6
40.48 32.28 VerizonCm VZ 2.00 38.13 +.44 -5.0
62.63 48.31 WalMart WMT 1.46 61.79 -.11 +3.4
44.22 36.52 WeisMk WMK 1.20 43.03 +.53 +7.7
34.19 22.58 WellsFargo WFC .48 30.62 +.36 +11.1
USD per British Pound 1.5774 +.0034 +.22% 1.6280 1.6024
Canadian Dollar .9988 -.0034 -.34% .9904 .9878
USD per Euro 1.3202 +.0032 +.24% 1.4245 1.3541
Japanese Yen 77.61 +.01 +.01% 76.75 83.49
Mexican Peso 12.6900 -.1187 -.94% 12.2922 12.0512
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Copper 3.84 3.86 -0.58 -4.30 -17.00
Gold 1723.00 1723.30 -0.02 -0.99 +26.26
Platinum 1649.70 1659.80 -0.61 -8.18 -9.73
Silver 33.70 33.57 +0.36 -13.82 +10.37
Palladium 698.15 702.65 -0.64 -6.63 -16.11
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Foreign Exchange & Metals
INVESCO
ConstellB m 21.18 +.17 +11.2
GlobEqA m 11.04 +.10 +7.4
PacGrowB m 19.63 +.15 +10.0
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.91 -.01 +0.9
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 13.03 +.07 +6.7
LifGr1 b 12.93 +.09 +8.6
RegBankA m 13.46 +.17 +11.4
SovInvA m 16.57 +.13 +7.3
TaxFBdA m 10.27 ... +2.6
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.47 +.21 +15.9
Loomis Sayles
BondI 14.61 +.04 +5.2
MFS
MAInvA m 20.36 +.15 +9.0
MAInvC m 19.68 +.14 +8.8
Merger
Merger m 15.68 +.02 +0.6
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.52 ... +2.0
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 19.39 +.28 +10.0
Oakmark
EqIncI 28.55 +.13 +5.5
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 41.12 +.32 +9.5
DevMktA m 33.01 +.34 +12.6
DevMktY 32.63 +.33 +12.6
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.21 +.05 +5.8
ComRlRStI 6.90 +.02 +5.5
HiYldIs 9.27 +.01 +4.0
LowDrIs 10.41 ... +1.5
RealRet 12.03 +.01 +2.2
TotRetA m 11.11 ... +2.6
TotRetAdm b 11.11 ... +2.6
TotRetC m 11.11 ... +2.5
TotRetIs 11.11 ... +2.6
TotRetrnD b 11.11 ... +2.6
TotlRetnP 11.11 ... +2.6
Permanent
Portfolio 49.11 +.14 +6.6
Principal
SAMConGrB m13.73+.09 +6.9
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 30.58 +.19 +10.0
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 16.50 +.12 +11.0
BlendA m 18.24 +.15 +11.1
EqOppA m 14.99 +.09 +10.2
HiYieldA m 5.52 +.01 +3.8
IntlEqtyA m 5.87 +.06 +9.5
IntlValA m 19.17 +.17 +9.3
JennGrA m 20.27 +.16 +12.1
NaturResA m 51.55 +.33 +11.2
SmallCoA m 21.91 +.24 +10.1
UtilityA m 11.07 +.06 +2.4
ValueA m 15.25 +.08 +10.6
Putnam
GrowIncB m 13.67 +.10 +9.6
IncomeA m 6.85 -.01 +1.5
Royce
LowStkSer m 16.23 +.11 +13.4
OpportInv d 12.07 +.18 +17.0
ValPlSvc m 13.68 +.17 +14.0
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 21.08 +.15 +7.7
Scout
Interntl d 30.95 +.32 +10.7
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 43.09 +.46 +11.5
CapApprec 21.92 +.09 +6.3
DivGrow 24.78 +.13 +6.2
DivrSmCap d 17.42 +.27 +12.8
EmMktStk d 32.28 +.44 +13.2
EqIndex d 36.48 +.25 +7.7
EqtyInc 24.83 +.16 +7.7
FinSer 13.41 +.10 +13.0
GrowStk 35.55 +.35 +11.7
HealthSci 37.14 +.63 +13.9
HiYield d 6.72 +.01 +4.4
IntlDisc d 41.83 +.24 +12.1
IntlStk d 13.70 +.16 +11.5
IntlStkAd m 13.65 +.16 +11.4
LatinAm d 45.96 +.89 +18.4
MediaTele 52.23 +.51 +11.3
MidCpGr 58.05 +.44 +10.1
NewAmGro 34.78 +.24 +9.3
NewAsia d 15.52 +.16 +11.6
NewEra 46.31 +.36 +10.1
NewHoriz 34.74 +.44 +12.0
NewIncome 9.74 ... +1.0
Rtmt2020 17.13 +.12 +7.7
Rtmt2030 18.04 +.15 +9.1
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.9
SmCpVal d 37.97 +.52 +10.1
TaxFHiYld d 11.29 +.01 +3.6
Value 24.62 +.18 +9.2
ValueAd b 24.38 +.18 +9.2
Thornburg
IntlValI d 26.92 +.22 +9.5
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 22.91 +.11 +4.9
Vanguard
500Adml 124.74 +.87 +7.7
500Inv 124.72 +.87 +7.7
CapOp d 32.28 +.24 +9.4
CapVal 10.73 +.11 +16.3
Convrt d 12.87 +.06 +8.7
DevMktIdx d 9.29 +.10 +9.4
DivGr 16.07 +.09 +4.2
EnergyInv d 64.61 +.60 +7.7
EurIdxAdm d 56.65 +.60 +9.8
Explr 80.18+1.02 +12.2
GNMA 11.08 ... +0.4
GNMAAdml 11.08 ... +0.5
GlbEq 17.60 +.17 +10.6
GrowthEq 11.91 +.09 +10.4
HYCor d 5.85 ... +3.6
HYCorAdml d 5.85 ... +3.7
HltCrAdml d 56.45 +.48 +3.9
HlthCare d 133.78+1.13 +3.9
ITGradeAd 10.17 ... +2.3
InfPrtAdm 28.20 +.04 +1.8
InfPrtI 11.49 +.02 +1.8
InflaPro 14.36 +.03 +1.8
InstIdxI 123.93 +.87 +7.7
InstPlus 123.93 +.86 +7.7
InstTStPl 30.76 +.23 +8.6
IntlExpIn d 14.46 +.11 +12.8
IntlGr d 18.31 +.24 +12.0
IntlStkIdxAdm d24.20+.26 +10.8
IntlStkIdxIPls d96.79+1.05 +10.8
LTInvGr 10.41 ... +1.8
MidCapGr 20.96 +.20 +11.3
MidCpAdml 98.84 +.72 +10.9
MidCpIst 21.83 +.16 +10.9
MuIntAdml 14.26 ... +2.0
MuLtdAdml 11.21 ... +0.7
MuShtAdml 15.95 ... +0.3
PrecMtls d 21.79 +.25 +12.4
Prmcp d 66.86 +.55 +8.3
PrmcpAdml d 69.36 +.57 +8.3
PrmcpCorI d 14.42 +.09 +6.9
REITIdx d 20.83 +.25 +8.2
REITIdxAd d 88.91+1.08 +8.2
STCor 10.73 -.01 +1.2
STGradeAd 10.73 -.01 +1.2
SelValu d 19.95 +.11 +7.3
SmGthIdx 24.06 +.32 +12.0
SmGthIst 24.10 +.32 +11.9
StSmCpEq 20.93 +.27 +11.2
Star 19.99 +.11 +6.7
StratgcEq 20.47 +.18 +11.6
TgtRe2015 12.97 +.06 +5.4
TgtRe2020 23.03 +.14 +6.2
TgtRe2030 22.48 +.16 +7.5
TgtRe2035 13.52 +.10 +8.1
Tgtet2025 13.11 +.09 +6.8
TotBdAdml 11.03 ... +0.6
TotBdInst 11.03 ... +0.6
TotBdMkInv 11.03 ... +0.6
TotBdMkSig 11.03 ... +0.6
TotIntl d 14.47 +.16 +10.8
TotStIAdm 33.99 +.26 +8.6
TotStIIns 34.00 +.27 +8.6
TotStIdx 33.98 +.26 +8.6
TxMIntlAdm d10.71 +.12 +9.4
TxMSCAdm 30.17 +.40 +10.7
USGro 20.35 +.17 +12.7
USValue 10.95 +.09 +7.4
WellsI 23.49 +.06 +2.4
WellsIAdm 56.93 +.15 +2.5
Welltn 32.89 +.16 +4.9
WelltnAdm 56.81 +.28 +5.0
WndsIIAdm 49.00 +.31 +7.1
WndsrII 27.61 +.18 +7.1
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 6.88 +.03 +8.2
DOW
12,874.04
+72.81
NASDAQ
2,931.39
+27.51
S&P 500
1,351.77
+9.13
RUSSELL 2000
824.81
+11.48
6-MO T-BILLS
.13%
+.01
10-YR T-NOTE
1.98%
...
CRUDE OIL
$100.91
+2.24
p p p p p p q q
n n p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$2.43
-.05
BUSINESS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012
timesleader.com
AFEWWEEKSago, I
reviewedthe Droid
RAZR, Motorolas
super-slimsuper
smartphone.
Well, it looks like
Motorola feels that
youcant have too
muchof a goodthing, soit has giventhe
RAZRa newer, chunkier siblinginthe
RAZRMAXX.
The RAZRMAXXis identical in
nearly every functional aspect tothe
DroidRAZR: It features an8megapixel
camera, a1.2Ghz dual-core processor,
and1gigabyte of RAM. Like its sibling,
the RAZR, it operates onVerizons 4G
high-speednetwork. It alsofeatures
scratch-resistant Gorilla Glass from
Corninganda reinforcedcase. It also
shares the Motorola interface running
onAndroid2.3.5(Gingerbread).
We nowarrive at the one bigdiffer-
ence betweenthe twodevices, andthis
has the potential tobe important: bat-
tery life. The MAXXfeatures a battery
withnearly 90percent more capacity
thanthe original RAZR. Whena phone
operates ona 4Gnetwork, battery usage
goes updramatically youre pullingina
lot more bandwidthandgivingthe
processors inthe phone a real workout.
This is where this device shines. The
battery inthe MAXXlasts about 21
hours, vs. the original RAZRs12-hour
lifespan.
Is this important enoughtojustify
releasinganentirely newmodel? I reluc-
tantly conclude that it is. The Droid
RAZRis a goodphone, nodoubt about
it. What stops it frombecominga great
phone is the limitedbattery potential.
The RAZRMAXXswaps
a tiny bit of sleekfor a
whole lot of functional,
andits a worthwhile
trade, inmy opinion.
Havinga really thin
phone is cool andall, but havingone
that works is muchbetter. At 8.9mmits
still one of the thinnest 4Gphones avail-
able (the original DroidRAZRis just
7.1mmthick), andit actually seems to
be a bit more comfortable tohandle
the original RAZRwas thinenoughthat
it coulddigintoyour handif it was
grippedtootightly. If I were Motorola,
Idhave releasedbothat the same time,
giventhe similarities.
The DroidRAZRMAXXcosts
$299.99witha new2-year contract, and
$649.99at the full retail price.
NICK DELORENZO
T E C H T A L K
Review: The Droid RAZR MAXX, sibling to the old RAZR
Warning: Be on the lookout for
crooks sinking their digital paws into
your brokerage account.
The Financial Industry Regulatory
Authority recently issued an investor
alert to guard your account against
hackers after it said it received an in-
creasing number of reports of stolen
customer funds.
FINRA, the self-regulatory organiza-
tion of the brokerage industry, said the
thefts occurred as a result of instruc-
tions emailed to firms from customer
email accounts that have been compro-
mised.
These incidents highlight some of
the risks associated with accepting in-
structions to transmit or withdraw
funds via email, the organization said.
Among the ways to protect yourself:
Guard your passwords and PINs
and dont store them on your comput-
er.
Make sure your computer has up-
to-date security software, including se-
curity patches.
For laptops, be sure to use encryp-
tion software.
Dont use public computers to ac-
cess your brokerage account.
Check your computer occasionally
to make sure no one has attached any
device or added programs without
your knowledge or consent.
Always log out of your brokerage
account completely when you finish.
Dont respond to emails requesting
personal information. Legitimate com-
panies will not ask you to provide or
verify sensitive information through
email.
Brokerage
accounts
targeted
By PAMELA YIP
The Dallas Morning News
W
ASHINGTON Gen-
eral Electric Co. plans
to hire 5,000 veterans
over the next five years
and invest $580 million to expand
its aviation business.
The announcements Monday
were part of a four-day event that
the global conglomerate is hosting
with partners in Washington, D.C.,
that focuses on issues such as man-
ufacturing and job creation in
America.
GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt heads up
President Obamas 27-member jobs
council.
GE said Monday that its Hiring
Our Heroes partnership will help
match veterans with jobs. The
company, whose products range
from jet engines to light bulbs, will
also team with the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce to sponsor 400 veter-
ans job fairs this year. GE current-
ly employs more than 10,000 veter-
ans and has about 100 U.S. employ-
ee reservists currently serving
overseas.
In addition, its aviation unit will
add more than 400 new manufac-
turing jobs and open three new
plants in Ellisville, Miss., Auburn,
Ala., and Dayton, Ohio, next year.
GE said that the plants are part of
its efforts to create or rebuild 16 fa-
cilities and more than 12,000 new
jobs. The company started produc-
tion on its first new appliance line
in more than 50 years last week at
Appliance Park in Louisville, Ky.
The company expects to double
its number of engineering interns
to more than 5,000 as part of the
Presidents Council on Jobs and
Competitiveness initiative to grad-
uate 10,000 more engineers a year
in the U.S. GE says this often leads
to jobs, as 80 percent of its full-time
engineers have been hired from the
internship program. It has more
than 19,000 engineers on staff.
It also plans pilot programs to re-
duce health care costs in Louis-
ville, Ky. and Erie, Pa. GE, which is
based in Fairfield, Conn., also
plans to open several manufactur-
ing training centers in locations
such as Houston and Cincinnati to
help build job skills.
AP FILE PHOTO
Disabled vet Ken Higgins finishes with a recruiter as he and other veterans attend a job and education fair last
week at Turner Field in Atlanta. General Electric Co. plans to hire 5,000 veterans over the next five years.
GE hiring veterans
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 8B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 38/23
Average 36/20
Record High 59 in 1937
Record Low -6 in 1914
Yesterday 34
Month to date 423
Year to date 3397
Last year to date 4190
Normal year to date 4063
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date 0.13
Normal month to date 0.99
Year to date 2.03
Normal year to date 3.36
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 3.59 -0.27 22.0
Towanda 2.21 -0.20 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.35 -0.20 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 34-38. Lows: 27-30. Chance of
snow showers. Scattered snow showers
tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 43-47. Lows: 34-39. Mostly cloudy.
Slight chance of showers tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 36-39. Lows: 27-32. Chance of snow
showers. Scattered snow showers
tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 42-44. Lows: 35-36. Slight chance
of showers. Isolated showers possible
tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 46-51. Lows: 36-42. Slight chance
of showers. Isolated showers possible
tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 33/30/.00 32/24/sn 33/20/sn
Atlanta 54/25/.00 48/36/sh 65/50/s
Baltimore 47/20/.00 48/37/sh 52/34/pc
Boston 41/17/.00 45/33/pc 46/32/c
Buffalo 33/23/.00 36/32/sn 37/33/sn
Charlotte 50/19/.00 53/34/sh 61/44/s
Chicago 36/15/.00 37/32/c 41/38/rs
Cleveland 33/19/.00 35/31/sn 40/34/pc
Dallas 46/34/.21 60/52/s 67/44/t
Denver 37/20/.00 35/20/c 34/15/c
Detroit 37/17/.00 35/29/sn 39/30/c
Honolulu 82/70/.00 78/69/s 78/67/s
Houston 61/43/.47 75/63/s 76/55/t
Indianapolis 35/18/.00 36/29/sn 43/36/sh
Las Vegas 58/50/.00 55/42/sh 58/43/c
Los Angeles 58/52/.00 62/48/pc 61/48/pc
Miami 71/48/.00 78/66/pc 80/69/pc
Milwaukee 31/16/.00 36/29/c 39/32/c
Minneapolis 30/15/.00 37/24/pc 37/26/c
Myrtle Beach 48/25/.00 56/44/sh 62/46/pc
Nashville 40/18/.00 47/32/sh 59/49/sh
New Orleans 62/39/.00 71/57/sh 73/60/t
Norfolk 50/22/.00 56/41/c 56/40/pc
Oklahoma City 37/30/.03 51/40/pc 61/33/s
Omaha 32/25/.11 37/23/pc 37/26/i
Orlando 67/33/.00 75/58/pc 80/61/pc
Phoenix 65/48/.00 63/40/c 65/44/pc
Pittsburgh 35/18/.00 41/30/rs 42/32/sn
Portland, Ore. 45/39/.05 44/35/sh 48/38/pc
St. Louis 35/28/.02 42/29/pc 46/41/sh
Salt Lake City 47/33/.00 45/32/rs 44/31/c
San Antonio 64/40/.46 73/64/s 72/55/s
San Diego 60/56/.00 60/49/pc 59/49/pc
San Francisco 52/47/.09 55/44/pc 56/42/pc
Seattle 45/41/.44 46/36/sh 47/35/pc
Tampa 63/37/.00 75/61/pc 80/63/pc
Tucson 66/39/.00 59/36/pc 63/41/pc
Washington, DC 49/24/.00 50/38/sh 54/35/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 41/32/.00 40/35/sh 40/33/sh
Baghdad 66/39/.00 68/47/pc 67/49/c
Beijing 39/18/.00 38/19/pc 37/16/s
Berlin 32/23/.00 34/21/sn 35/16/sn
Buenos Aires 90/70/.00 86/73/pc 88/75/pc
Dublin 46/41/.00 45/43/c 49/40/c
Frankfurt 30/23/.00 38/36/sn 39/29/rs
Hong Kong 77/59/.00 71/65/c 74/69/sh
Jerusalem 68/39/.00 63/46/pc 64/48/c
London 45/34/.00 41/38/c 44/37/pc
Mexico City 68/54/.00 63/49/t 64/49/t
Montreal 27/16/.00 31/29/sf 35/31/c
Moscow 0/-11/.00 10/0/pc 22/9/sf
Paris 41/30/.00 42/39/sh 45/42/c
Rio de Janeiro 90/75/.00 91/70/pc 89/70/pc
Riyadh 70/48/.00 77/53/s 82/55/s
Rome 45/27/.00 45/28/pc 46/28/pc
San Juan 82/71/.00 84/72/sh 82/72/sh
Tokyo 48/36/.00 51/40/sh 52/42/sh
Warsaw 23/16/.00 26/22/c 32/11/sn
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
46/36
Reading
39/32
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
37/28
38/29
Harrisburg
41/29
Atlantic City
46/39
New York City
46/37
Syracuse
39/29
Pottsville
39/27
Albany
39/26
Binghamton
Towanda
37/28
38/27
State College
37/28
Poughkeepsie
42/28
60/52
37/32
35/21
64/42
37/24
62/48
55/47
43/30
41/19
46/36
46/37
35/29
48/36
78/66
75/63
78/69
37/28
32/24
50/38
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:00a 5:36p
Tomorrow 6:59a 5:37p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 12:44a 10:38a
Tomorrow 1:52a 11:28a
Last New First Full
Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 29 March 8
Today's date
marks the fth
anniversary of a
crippling snow
storm that para-
lyzed our area
with 14 to 23
inches of snow.
That's about how
much snow
we've had since
the middle of
last October and
today's snowfall
is certainly noth-
ing to write
home about with
less than one
inch expected
into tonight.
Like back in
2007, February
snow storms
have a reputa-
tion to 'bomb' or
explode with
intensity along
the East Coast.
So far this win-
ter, the atmos-
phere has not
conspired to cre-
ate any monster
storms of this
nature. There
was a 'bomb'
which dumped
37 inches on
Gouldsboro in
February 1978.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system will push onshore in the Pacic Northwest, allowing for rain
and higher elevation snow to develop over western Washington and Oregon. An upper-level trough of
low pressure will also produce rain and snow from the eastern Great Basin and portions of the
Southwest into the Rocky Mountains.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Light snow, little
wind
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny
43
28
FRIDAY
Flurries
40
35
SATURDAY
Cloudy
40
25
SUNDAY
Snow
possible
35
25
MONDAY
Partly
sunny
40
25
THURSDAY
Rain
and
snow
45
33
36

26

K
HEALTH S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012
timesleader.com
Q: What causes osteoar-
thritis?
M.S., Frederick, Pa.
A: Osteoarthritis, the
progress wearing down
of the cartilage in joints,
is generally thought to
occur because of progres-
sive wear and tear of the joint especially
the joints in the knees, hips and low back.
Excess body weight and repetitive injury to
certain joints are known risk factors for
developing osteoarthritis, but its actually
not as simple as that. Its not known, for
example, why some joints are affected by
arthritis if they have not suffered any previ-
ous injury or disease. Osteoarthritis of the
fingers is more likely to be seen in women
than in men. Osteoarthritis definitely has a
genetic factor, as osteoarthritis is more
likely to develop in folks who have a moth-
er or father who suffered with it.
New research suggests that there may be
a link between our chromosomes and
osteoarthritis. Every time a cell divides, the
protective tips of the chromosomes called
telomeres become shorter. Think of
them like the protective tips of your shoe-
laces. When cells divide, they duplicate
their DNA genetic information contained
on chromosomes. Eventually, cells cant
divide any longer to replace old worn out
cells because the telomeres tips of chromo-
somes become too short and wont allow
it. That spells death for that cell and repre-
sents what it is to age. That process in
terms of joint cartilage means that new
joint cartilage can no longer be produced.
As we age, the process of telomere short-
ening contributes to the eventual death of
cartilage cells and osteoarthritis.
Daily fish oil supplementation, cardio-
vascular exercise and vitamin D supple-
mentation can actually reverse the process
of telomere shortening and possibly slow
down the development of osteoarthritis.
Smoking causes oxidative stress to cells by
causing telomeres to prematurely shorten.
Q: I avoid getting flu shots because I
have a latex allergy. Why is there latex in a
flu shot? It doesnt make any sense to me.
G.G., Sewell, N.J.
A: Its not the vaccine itself that may
contain latex; its the prefilled syringes that
are the potential problem. I say potential,
because there are several manufacturers
that do not use latex in the manufacturing
of their flu vaccine.
Heres a flu vaccine list from the Amer-
ican Latex Allergy Association: Afluria:
The rubber tip cap and plunger used for
both the single-dose syringes and the
rubber stoppers used for the multi-dose
vial contain no latex; Fluarix: The tip
caps of the prefilled syringes may contain
natural rubber latex which may cause an
allergic reaction in folks with a latex
allergy; FluLaval: The multi-dose vials do
not contain latex; Fluvirin: The tip caps
of the single-dose syringes may contain
natural rubber latex. Their multi-dose
vials do not contain latex; Fluzone: The
tip caps of the single-dose syringes mat
contain natural rubber latex. Their multi-
does vials do not contain latex; FluMist
live-attenuated single-use nasal sprayers
do not contain latex.
ASK DR. H
M I T C H E L L H E C H T
Wear and tear
of joints causes
osteoarthritis
Dr. Mitchell Hecht is a physician specializing in
internal medicine. Send questions to him at:
Ask Dr. H, P.O. Box 767787, Atlanta, GA 30076.
Due to the large volume of mail received, per-
sonal replies are not possible.
Next Call the Doctor topic
Prescription predicament will
be the next topic on Call the
Doctor at 7 tonight on WVIA-
TV. Viewers will learn how to
properly dispose of prescription
medications.
Moderator George Thomas
will be joined by panelists John
Jones, a pharmacist with Geis-
inger Health System; Robert
Buehner Jr., Montour County
district attorney; John Arway,
executive director of the Fish
and Wildlife Commission; and
Kara Malitsky, director of phar-
macy management at BlueCross
of Northeastern Pennsylvania.
Viewers may call in questions
during the live show at (800)
326-9842 or submit their ques-
tions online at wviatv.org/live-
show-comments.
An encore episode will air at 2
p.m. Sunday.
Y offers free classes today
In celebration of February as
American Heart Month, the
Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA, 40
W. Northampton St., is offering
free fitness classes today.
Classes include Spinning,
Zumba, Step and Kick, Power
Train or Ab Lab. There will also
be information available on
heart disease, nutrition and the
importance of physical activity.
Free blood pressure screenings
will also be provided. Anyone
who joins the Y today will also
receive a free T-shirt.
Drug safety workshop
The Friends of the Wyoming
Library and Todd Glynn, a local
CVS pharmacist, invites the
public to a free workshop entit-
led, Over the Counter Drug
Safety. Glynn will teach partici-
pants how to read over-the-
counter drug labels, safely store
medication, choose medications
that are safe to use, and keep an
accurate prescription history.
The session will be held at 1
p.m. Feb. 24 at the Wyoming
Free Library, 358 Wyoming Ave.
Call 693-1364 to register by Feb.
22.
Free womens health screening
A free Healthy Woman Cancer
Screening Event will be offered
on Feb. 28. Women ages 40-64
who have no or limited health
insurance and meet income
guidelines will be provided with
free pap tests and clinical breast
examinations, as well as a re-
ferral for a free mammogram if
necessary. A family of two can
make up to $3,065 per month.
Screenings will be provided, by
appointment only at Women to
Women Inc., Park Office Build-
ing Suite 208-209, 400 Third
Ave., Kingston. Space is limited
and appointments are required;
call 714-5880.
Red Cross class
The Wyoming Valley Chapter
of the American Red Cross is
hosting a Preparedness &
Health and Safety Services
Instructor class from 5:30-9 p.m.
Feb. 29 and 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
March 10.
Participants must attend both
classes and bring a copy of their
First Aid and CPR/AED cards.
Pre-registration is required;
call (800) 733-2767 or go online
at www.Redcross.org.
IN BRIEF
Pizza from Provence
There are probably as many recipes for pissaladiere, the classic onion
pizza from southern France, as there are cooks to make it.
The basics of the recipe are the
same - finely sliced onions that are
sauted in olive oil with garlic and
thyme, then spread on top
of a pizza-like crust and baked
Some cooks garnish their
pissaladiere with olives, others
with anchovies; both are optional
Pissaladiere can be round,
oblong or square, depending
on the pan used
These pizzas are rich in olive oil,
a healthy dietary fat that can help
lower cholesterol; they can also be
high in calories, so dont overdo
Source: NPR Kitchen Window, BBC Good Food,
MCT Photo Service
Graphic: Pat Carr 2012 MCT
Olives and onions
Healthy Living
Weve all grabbed a candy bar or
an extra box of something-or-
other that we dont need at the
supermarket. Here are some
strategies for restraint from
Brian Wansink, director of Cor-
nell Universitys Food and Brand
Lab and author of the book
Mindless Eating: Why We Eat
More Than We Think:
Dont shop when youre hungry.
Not only will you likely buy more,
youll be attracted to heavily
processed foods.
Start in the healthiest aisles. If
you fill your cart with fruit,
vegetables and other nutritious
foods, youll have less room for
junk and your brain will under-
stand that youre not going to
starve. An empty cart in the chip
or cookie aisle, on the other
hand, is dangerous.
Beware of numerical deals.
Offers such as buy two, get one
free or limit 12 per person can
make people buy 30 to 100
percent more than they other-
wise would, much of which they
dont need.
Put numbers in your grocery list.
Dont just write that you need
soup, for example write how
many cans you need.
Use baskets when possible. If you
have a short list of items, avoid
shopping carts so you have to
carry everything youre going to
buy.
Try a mind game at the checkout.
If you always seem to pick up a
last-minute candy bar, set a
rule that to buy any food item
you also have to buy a non-
food item such as a magazine.
Suddenly youre spending $7
on a chocolate bar, which just
might interrupt a mindless
grab and get you thinking
about what you really need.
MCT Information Services
H O W T O avoid impulse grocery buys
Duringanexercisesession, vig-
orous cardiovascular workouts
suchasrunningorbikingcantyp-
icallytorchmorecaloriesthanre-
sistanceor strengthtraining.
But what happens once the
workout is over?
Exercisescientistshavelongde-
bated the wondrous notion of an
exercise afterburn, or the bodys
ability to keep burning calories
evenafter youveshoweredandre-
turnedtoyour desk. Meanwhile, if
such an effect exists, it is not clear
whichformofexercisecardioor
strength training has a greater
metabolism-boostingpotential.
Studies have shown post-exer-
cise calorie burnvaries quite a bit,
largely because of differing study
designsandmethodologies. Some
research has suggested that mod-
erateexerciseof anytypehaslittle,
if any, effect on fat burning after a
workout, inpart becauseit doesnt
push the body far enough fromits
comfort zone, which would then
requireanincreaseinmetabolism.
By contrast, a recent, careful-
ly controlled study by North
The afterburn: Calories may continue
to shed after high-intensity workouts
By JULIE DEARDORFF
Chicago Tribune
See AFTERBURN, Page 3C
T
oday, Valentines Day, make a date
with what else? chocolate.
During Valentines week, Ameri-
cans are expected to buy more than 58 mil-
lion pounds of chocolate candy. And more
than 36 million heart-shaped boxes of choc-
olate will be sold, according to the National
Confectioners Association.
If chocolate indeedis the way toyour swee-
ties heart, it may be truer thanever. Ongoing
researchsupports the healthbenefits of choc-
olate, particularly the dark variety.
Cocoa beans contain flavanoids that have
antioxidant qualities. Antioxidants combat
free radicals that damage cells. They also
help reduce cholesterol, lower blood pres-
sure and improve cardiovascular health.
By SUSAN M. SELASKY
Detroit Free Press
How do you melt chocolate? Chop the chocolate
into small pieces so it melts evenly. Microwave it in
25- to 45- second increments, making sure to stir in
between. Do not overheat it or it will burn. Or you
could place it in a heat-proof bowl set over simmer-
ing water; stir until melted.
What does it mean to temper chocolate? Its a
process of heating chocolate (120 degrees for dark
chocolate and 1 10 for milk chocolate) and then cooling
it to 82 degrees to stabilize the crystals that can form
from the cocoa butter. The chocolate is then brought
back up to about 90 degrees so you can pour it into
molds or use it for dipping confections like truffles.
Tempering gives a glossy finish. If chocolate isnt tem-
pered, gray streaks called bloom can form.
What does the cacao percentage mean on a pack-
age of chocolate? This refers to the total cacao
(cocoa bean) content of the chocolate. Generally, the
higher the percentage, the more intense the flavor. If
the product is labeled 60 percent cacao, it means
that percentage is made up of cocoa butter and
chocolate liquor (pure ground cocoa beans). The
remaining 40 percent is sugar and other ingredients.
What is ganache? Pronounced ga-NAHSH, it is a
mixture of heavy whipping cream, chocolate, butter
and sometimes corn syrup. It can be used as a glaze
for desserts and cakes, a filling for pies and tarts and
for making classic truffles.
CHOCOLATE Q&A
See CHOCOLATE, Page 3C
F
O
T
O
L
IA
.C
O
M
P
H
O
T
O
C M Y K
PAGE 2C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
H E A L T H
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826-1700
Wilkes-Barre
Dr. Shelley Eskin
Dr. Frank Gazda
Dr. Frank Kleinsorge
288-7471
Wyoming
Dr. Lew E. Lisses
675-8888
Dallas
Dr. Deborah Gdovin
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Dr. Mark Pensak
Dr. Frank Kleinsorge
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FEBRUARY 18th & 19th
SATURDAY 9am-5pm
SUNDAY 9am-4pm
620 W. 3rd St. (Bloomsburg Fairgrounds) Bloomsburg, PA
Bloomsburg, PA
$1.00 Off Admission
Gun Show Feb. 18th, 19th 2012
7
3
8
9
1
7
Va lentinesD a y
Rose S a le
Febru a ry
12,13 & 14
All proceeds s u pportth e
W es tPitts ton H os e
Com pa ny No.1
Febru a ry
12th from 8 a m -7 pm
13th from 7 a m -7 pm
14th from 6 a m -7 pm
Corner ofBos ton Ave.&
W yom ing Ave.
(old CVS Pa rking L ot)
$30 D ozen Red Ros es
$25 Two D ozen
Pa s tel Ros es
$5 Ba bies Brea th &
Greens
Dr. Nickolas Togias, of Shavertown
and Binghamton, N.Y., recently
became board
certified in the
medical spe-
cialty of psychi-
atry and neu-
rology.
He is the son of
Dr. Kirk and Dr.
Aphrodite
Togias.
Ericka Roback, a pharmacist at
Harrolds Pharmacy, Wilkes-
Barre, recently completed dia-
betes educa-
tion programs
with the Amer-
ican Associ-
ation of Dia-
betes Educa-
tors and the
American
Pharmacists
Association.
The training
qualifies her to work with diabet-
ic patients one-on-one or in
group classes, providing them
the tools and support needed to
learn to manage their diabetes.
She will continue her training to
become a certified diabetes
educator.
Roback is currently teaching a
monthly class on diabetes man-
agement at the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, Wilkes-Barre.
Therapists Rob Bogdan, Karen
Johns and Dr. Paul Termini will
be joining Childrens Service
Centers behavioral health staff
within the next few weeks in
conjunction with the opening of
its new Robinson Counseling
Center.
Bogdan is a child and adolescent
therapist who will provide indi-
vidual, family, and group therapy.
He also runs social skills groups
for children ages 5 to 15.
Johns specializes in individual and
marital therapy for adults.
Termini is a board certified child
and adolescent psychiatrist.
The Center, located at 318 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, is named
for Dr. J. Franklin Robinson,
medical director of CSC from
1942 until his death in 1966.
Eight Geisinger locations recently
received accreditation from the
American College of Radiology.
Geisinger clinics in Mt. Pocono,
Tunkhannock, Lewistown and
Phillipsburg , which host
Geisingers mobile CT and
MRI unit, received new ac-
creditations along with Geis-
inger-Grays Woods PET-CT
scanner. Meanwhile, the
nuclear medicine depart-
ment, two MRI units and
three CT scanners at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Med-
ical Center, the Woodbine
Clinics CT scanner and two
MRIs and the mammography
services at Geisinger-Lake
Scranton received renewed
accreditations.
The ACR gold seal of accred-
itation represents the high-
est level of image quality and
patient safety. It is awarded
only to facilities meeting
ACR practice guidelines and
technical standards, follow-
ing a peer-review evaluation
by board-certified physicians
and medical physicists who
are experts in the field.
Image quality, personnel
qualifications, adequacy of
facility equipment, quality
control procedures, and
quality assurance programs
are assessed.
HEALTH PEOPLE
Togias
Roback
LUZERNE COUNTY: The Wyoming
Valley Chapter of the American
Red Cross hosts community
blood drives throughout the
month. Donors who are 17 years
of age or older, weigh at least 1 10
pounds and are in relatively
good health or 16 years old and
have a parental permission form
completed, may give blood every
56 days. To learn more about
how to donate blood or platelets
or to schedule a blood donation,
call 1-800-REDCROSS (733-
2767). In addition to those listed
below, blood drives are conduct-
ed at the American Red Cross
Regional Blood Center, 29 New
Commerce Blvd., Hanover Indus-
trial Estates, Ashley, Mondays
and Tuesdays from 9:30 a.m.-7
p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays from
7:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; and Sundays
from 7:30 a.m.-noon. Appoint-
ments are suggested but walk-
ins are accepted. Platelet ap-
pointments can be made by
calling 823-7164, ext. 2235. Blood
drives also take place from 9
a.m.-noon on the first and third
Monday of each month at the
Hazleton Chapter of the Amer-
ican Red Cross, 165 Susquehan-
na Blvd., Hazleton.
For a complete donation schedule,
visit: REDCROSSBLOOD.ORG or
call 1-800-REDCROSS (733-
2767). Area blood donation sites
include:
Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Ashley.
Thursday, noon-6 p.m., Dallas
American Legion, 730 Memorial
Highway.
Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Wilkes-Barre
Blood Donation Center, 29 New
Commerce Blvd., Ashley.
Saturday, 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Ashley;
9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Bear Creek
Township Building, 3333 Bear
Creek Blvd., Bear Creek Town-
ship.
Sunday, 7:30 a.m. noon, Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Ashley.
Monday, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Ashley;
noon- 6 p.m., Thomas P. Saxton
Medical Pavilion, 468 North-
ampton St., Edwardsville; 8:45
a.m. noon, Hazleton Chapter
House, 165 Susquehanna Blvd.,
West Hazleton; 1-6 p.m., St. Mon-
icas Parish, 363 W. Eighth St.,
West Wyoming.
Tuesday, Feb. 21, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.,
Wilkes-Barre Blood Donation
Center, 29 New Commerce Blvd.,
Ashley; noon- 6 p.m., Christ
Lutheran Church, 467 Main St.,
Conyngham.
BLOOD DRIVES
Editors note: The complete
health calendar can be viewed
at www.timesleader.com by
clicking the Health link under
the Features tab. To have your
health-oriented event listed,
send information to Health,
Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250; by
fax: 829-5537; or email
health@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 3C
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Introducing the i110
Carolina researchers showed 45
minutes of intense exercise boost-
edthemetabolicrateinmalepartic-
ipants for a whopping14hours.
Researchers dont exactly know
howpost-exercisecalorieburningcan
occur. It is calculated by measuring
the increase in oxygen consumption
(or metabolism) after a bout of exer-
cise. If your oxygen consumption is
above your normal level after exer-
cise, youreburningmorecalories.
The secret to triggering the effect
maylieintheworkoutsintensityand
duration,accordingtotheNorthCar-
olina study, which was published in
the journal Medicine & Science in
Sports&Exercisein2011.
What matters is exercising at a
high, unrelentingintensity for a pro-
longedperiodoftime,saidstudyco-
author DavidNieman, aprofessor of
healthandexercise science at Appa-
lachian State University. Nieman, a
cardioproponent, believes thestudy
resultshelpsettlethedebate. Vigor-
oussweatgetsthehormonescycling
andcanalterthebodystemperature
andabilitytostorefuel.Ittakesalong
time for the body toget backtonor-
mal, hesaid.
Short-duration, high-intensity
exercises, meanwhile, have a high
post-exercise bump in oxygen con-
sumption that quickly falls to nor-
mal, Niemansaid.
Thestudydifferedfrommost oth-
er research in that Nieman and his
teamaskedvolunteers tospendtwo
24-hourperiodsinametaboliccham-
ber, a small lablike room, large
enough to house a desk, bed, toilet,
laptop, telephone and bike or tread-
mill.Thechamber,whichhadtwoair
locks, allowed tight control over the
environment, including spontane-
ousactivity, sleep, diet andotherfac-
torsthat couldinfluencetheresults.
During one day, the participants
sat, ate andslept; duringthe second
day, theyremainedinactivewiththe
exceptionofavigorous45-minutecy-
cling exercise. On the exercise day,
they were given extra food to keep
their energylevelsinbalance.
Based on previous work, the re-
searchers expected metabolism to
beelevatedfor anhour or twoafter
the workout. Totheir surprise, ev-
ery single subject had an extended
increase in their metabolism after
their vigorous cycling, an average
14.2 hours, said Nieman, director
of the Human Performance Lab at
the North Carolina Research Cam-
pus in Kannapolis. The net energy
expenditure was about 193 extra
calories above the rest stage. This
increase could have implications
for weight loss and management,
the study found, especially when
combined with the more than 500
extracaloriesburnedduringthe45-
minutecyclingbout.
Still, others sayit is important not
to overlook the hidden benefits of
strength or resistance exercise,
whichbuilds muscle andgreatlyim-
provesbodycomposition.
Both resistance training and
high-intensity exercise causes nor-
mal, small-scale damage to muscle
tissues. Repairing this damage re-
quires energy, whichincreases me-
tabolism. Moreover, simply sus-
taining a larger amount of muscle
mass raises your metabolic rate.
There are also hormone and in-
flammatory responses, said Mark
Schuenke, anassistant professor of
anatomy at the University of New
England College of Osteopathic
Medicine.
In the early post-exercise stages,
youalsoconsumeextraoxygeninan
attempt to bring your body temper-
ature, heart rate and blood oxygen
levelsbacktorestinglevels,hesaid.
AFTERBURN
Continued from Page 1C
BACK MOUNTAIN FREE MED-
ICAL CLINIC: 6:30 p.m.
Fridays, 65 Davis St., Shaver-
town. Volunteers, services
and supplies needed. For
more information, call 696-
1144.
PEDIATRIC HEALTH CLINIC
for infants and children up to
age 1 1, former Seton Catholic
High School, 37 William St.,
Pittston. Registrations ac-
cepted from 4:30-5:30 p.m.
the first and third Thursday of
each month. Parents are
required to bring their chil-
drens immunization records.
For more information, call
855-6035.
THE HOPE CENTER: Free basic
medical care and preventive
health care information for
the uninsured or under-
insured, legal advice and
pastoral counseling, 6-8 p.m.
Mondays; free chiropractic
evaluations and vision care,
including free replacement
glasses, for the uninsured or
underinsured, 6-8 p.m. Thurs-
days; Back Mountain Harvest
Assembly, 340 Carverton
Road, Trucksville. Free dental
hygiene services and teeth
cleanings are available 6-8
p.m. on Mondays by appoint-
ment. Call 696-5233 or email
hopecenterwv@gmail.com.
VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE:
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through
Friday, 190 N. Pennsylvania
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Primary
and preventive health care
for the working uninsured
and underinsured in Luzerne
County with incomes less
than two times below federal
poverty guidelines. For ap-
pointments, call 970-2864.
FREE CLINICS
The higher the cocoa content of
the chocolate, the better.
I knew if I was in business
long enough theyd say chocolate
is good for you, says Gayle
Harte, owner of Gayles Choco-
lates in Royal Oak, Mich.
More andmore people are try-
ing dark chocolate now, and they
are finding out dark chocolate is
good tasting.
Harte started her chocolate
business more than 33 years ago,
making hand-rolled and -dipped
truffles. Theyre still being made
that way at her flagship store in
Royal Oak and two outlets at De-
troit Metro Airport.
I think Valentines is a truffle
holiday, Harte says. Its a special
piece of candy, and I havent seen
them go in or out of fashion.
Homemade truffles can be a rel-
atively effortless gift from the
heart.
You can do as we did with our
chocolate ganache truffles and
cover theminathinlayer of choco-
late to protect their melt-in-your-
mouth center. Or take the simpler
approach and merely dust them
with cocoa powder. Looking for
something even easier? Just roll
them in chopped nuts for another
little antioxidant hit.
For cupcake lovers, the dried
cherries in our chocolate cup-
cakes also add some antioxidant
power to the bittersweet choco-
late. And theres more chocolate
ganache in our tarts, an easy
dessert for two that pairs the rich
chocolate with caramel and a
sprinkling of sea salt.
Despiteall thegoodhealthnews
about chocolate, that shouldnt be
a license to overindulge. (OK, its
Valentines Day.) Chocolate still
has calories, fat and saturated fat.
There are no hard-and-fast guide-
lines, but a moderate portion of
chocolate 1 ounce a few
times a week is fine.
SALTED CHOCOLATE
CARAMEL TARTS
Makes: 2 tarts / Preparation
time: 10 minutes / Total time: 1 hour
One of these tarts is enough to
share with your sweetie.
FOR CARAMEL FILLING
3 tablespoons heavy whipping
cream
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 baked pastry shells
1/4 cup coarsely chopped al-
monds (or other favorite nut)
FOR GANACHE
3 tablespoons heavy whipping
cream
1 teaspoon light corn syrup
1
1
2 ounces bittersweet chocolate,
chopped
1 tablespoon hot water
Maldon sea salt crystals or other
coarse sea salt
To prepare caramel filling: Place
the creamand butter in a small,
microwave-safe bowl; microwave on
high power until simmering, about 15
seconds. Place the sugar, water and
corn syrup in a small, heavy sauce-
pan; bring to a boil, stirring until the
sugar melts. Boil, uncovered, until
the mixture is caramel-colored.
Remove fromthe heat and immedi-
ately, but slowly, whisk in the hot
creammixture with a long-handled
whisk. ( The mixture will splatter.)
Whisk in the vanilla. Pour into the
pastry shells. Divide nuts and sprin-
kle evenly over the caramel. Refrig-
erate until cool.
To prepare the ganache: Place
the cream and corn syrup in a
small microwave-safe bowl; micro-
wave on high power until simmer-
ing, about 25 seconds. Stir in the
chocolate until smooth. Stir in the
hot water until blended. Pour over
caramel in tarts, dividing evenly.
Let stand until chocolate is set,
about 1 hour. Sprinkle lightly with
sea salt and serve.
Adapted from Small Batch
Baking for Chocolate Lovers by
Debby Maugans (Thomas Dunne
Books, $21.99).
From and tested by Susan M.
Selasky for the Free Press Test
Kitchen. Analysis per
1
2 tart.
409 calories (54 percent
from fat), 25 grams fat (12
grams sat. fat), 42 grams car-
bohydrates, 6 grams protein,
184 mg sodium, 109 mg choles-
terol, 1 gram fiber.
CHOCOLATE
Continued from Page 1C
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C M Y K
PAGE 4C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must be
typed or computer-generated.
Include your childs name, age
and birthday, parents, grandpar-
ents and great-grandparents
names and their towns of resi-
dence, any siblings and their
ages.
Dont forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
We cannot return photos sub-
mitted for publication in commu-
nity news, including birthday
photos, occasions photos and all
publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious
or original professional pho-
tographs that require return
because such photos can become
damaged, or occasionally lost, in
the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birth-
days, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711-0250.
GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Dakota Ryleigh Ashton, daughter
of Gina Caffrey and Scott Ash-
ton, Hanover Township, cele-
brated her fifth birthday Feb. 12.
Dakota is a granddaughter of
Dorothy Ashton and Rose Ann
Caffrey, both of Wilkes-Barre;
Robert Ashton, Exeter; and
Thomas and Carol Caffrey, Plains
Township. She is a great-grand-
daughter of Anthony Zlobik,
Florida. Dakota has three broth-
ers and four sisters.
Dakota R. Ashton
Nico Max Baldoni, son of Anita
and Teclo Baldoni Jr., Duryea, is
celebrating his first birthday
today, Feb. 14. Nico is a grandson
of Dorothy Ostrowski and the
late Joseph Ostrowski Sr. and
the late Gloria and Teclo Baldoni
Sr., all of Plains Township. He has
a brother, Teclo Mason, 3.
Nico M. Baldoni
Tahir Bolden, son of Raheem and
Theresa Bolden, Wilkes-Barre, is
celebrating his fourth birthday
today, Feb. 14. Tahir is a grandson
of Melida Bolden, Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla., and James Scott, Far Rocka-
way, N.Y. His siblings are Nubia
Bolden, 17, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.;
Chanel Brown, 15, Far Rockaway,
N.Y.; and Raheem Bolden Jr., 1 1,
Amir Bolden, 7, and Taraina
Bolden, 2, all of Wilkes-Barre.
Tahir Bolden
Shawn Robert Collins, son of
Mike and Sue Collins, Dallas,
celebrated his sixth birthday Feb.
10. Shawn is a grandson of Bob
and Geri Valatka, Pringle, and
Dee Perks, Ashley. He is a great-
grandson of Agnes Perks, Pitt-
ston. Shawn has two brothers,
Michael, 1 1, and Ryan, 8.
Shawn R. Collins
Gabrielle Sabatini, daughter of
Robert and Christine Sabatini,
Dallas, is celebrating her 10th
birthday today, Feb. 14. Gabrielle
is a granddaughter of Sandra
Wall, Nanticoke; the late Edward
Wall; and the late James and
Helen Sabatini. She has a broth-
er, Jonathan, 14.
Gabrielle Sabatini
Nicholas James Shovlin, son of
Leonard and Shannon Shovlin,
Plymouth, is celebrating his first
birthday today, Feb. 14. Nicholas
is a grandson of Patrick and
Kathleen Shovlin, Luzerne, and
James Klug and Gail Williams,
Hanover Township.
Nicholas J. Shovlin
Oakwood Terrace, memory care community, 400 Gleason Drive,
Moosic, is sponsoring a community forum at 2 p.m. Thursday. The
public forum is free. Topics are aging in place, when to transition a
loved one, a lower cost reverse mortgage, essential estate planning
documents, veterans aid and attendance benefits and long-term
care insurance. For reservations, or more information, call Sylvia at
451-3171, ext. 116. Finalizing plans, from left, are guest speakers
Rhondi Nachlis, Muskey Financial; Representative Kenneth Smith;
and Sylvia Kolosinsky, community relations coordinator. Second
row: Nancy Burns, MetLife Home Loans; Anissa Fetchen, veterans
affairs coordinator; and Janine Starinsky, executive director, Oak-
wood Terrace. Attorney Brenda Colbert is also a guest speaker.
Oakwood Terrace holding forum on aging
EXETER: The Cosmopolitan
Seniors will meet at 1 p.m. Feb.
21 in St. Anthonys Center. A
pizza lunch will be served and
Vic Malinowski will preside.
Dues will be collected. Hosts/
hostesses are Virginia Craig,
Kathy Loucks and Fran Lepo.
Reservations must be made by
Monday.
At the last meeting, 50-50
winners were Aggie Abromav-
age, Marie Cheskiewicz, Mau-
reen Gosart, Antoinette Manga-
nello and Cheryl Pipher. Toni
Hall won the special bingo game
and Mary Ann Markowski won
the jackpot game.
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on
Wednesday and a trip to Wood-
lock Pines Resort on May 1.
Pickups in Exeter and Pittston.
Non-members welcome on trips.
For more information call Jo-
hanna at 655-2720.
FALLS: The Falls Senior
Center, State Route 92, will hold
free blood pressure screenings
by Julie Grodis, a registered
nurse from the Golden Living
Center, at 11:15 a.m. Thursday.
A historical presentation on
Iwo Jima will be given by Mary
Beth Voda at 1 p.m. Friday.
The center is closed on Mon-
day in observance of Presidents
Day.
A Mardi Gras party will take
place at 11 a.m. Feb. 21. Piano
and saxophone music will start
at 1 p.m.
Anyone wishing to attend
lunch for a $2 donation should
contact Twila at 388-2623 by
12:30 p.m. the previous day.
KINGSTON: The Kingston
Senior Center, 680 Wyoming
Ave., is holding its Valentine
dinner today. A special wed-
ding ceremony will take place
at 12:30 p.m.
Zumba Gold classes are being
offered at 10 a.m. on Thursdays.
Cost is $2 per class. Anyone 60
years of age or older is welcome.
The center will be closed on
Feb. 20 in observance of Presi-
dents Day.
A special Mardi Gras dinner
will be held on Feb. 21.
MOUNTAIN TOP: The Moun-
tain Top Social Club will meet
at 3:15 p.m. today at St. Judes
Church Father Nolan Hall day
room. New members are wel-
come. Due are being collected.
A Valentine party will be held
and pizza will be served. Cost is
$2 per person. Correct change
would be appreciated. Hosts
will be Otto Eime, Stanley
Fischer and Ralph Savarese.
Money is being collected for
the next trip to Mount Airy
Casino on March 22. For more
information call Otto at 474-
0641.
NANTICOKE: The Rose
Tucker Center, 128 W. Washing-
ton St., is holding a session on
aquatic therapy presented by
Phoenix Rehab and Health
Services at 11 a.m. Wednesday.
Representatives from Special
Care Hospital Dietary Services
will speak on heart health at 11
a.m. on Thursday.
Zumba Gold classes will be
held from 2-3 p.m. Thursday.
Cost is $2 for members and $3
for non-members.
A Mardi Gras celebration will
take place on Feb. 21.
New members are welcome to
join for a $5 donation. For more
information, or to receive a
complimentary lunch coupon,
call Maureen or Gail at 735-
1670.
PITTSTON: The St. Josephs
Senior Social Club will meet at
2 p.m. Thursday in St. Roccos
School auditorium. New mem-
bers are welcome. Bingo and
card games will follow refresh-
ments. Servers are Liz Braccio,
Shirley Cardoni, Theresa Chiu-
mento, Rose Marie Amico and
Helen Adonizio. Plans for the
second annual St. Josephs table
on March 15 will be discussed.
Payments are being collected
for the trip to Mount Airy Casi-
no on March 7. Cost is $25,
which includes $25 slot play and
a $10 food voucher.
Additional trips planned for
this year: April 11-13, Niagara
Falls, $299 per person; Aug.
27-31, Cape Cod, $475 per per-
son; and Sept. 19-28, Reflections
of Italy, $3,499.
For more information call
Theresa at 654-2967.
PLAINS TWP.: The UGI
Electric Retirees Association
will meet at 1 p.m. Wednesday
at The River Grille, 670 N. River
St. for a Dutch-treat luncheon. A
business meeting will be held
after the luncheon. Loretta
Wilski, president, will be in
charge of the meeting. All UGI
Electric retirees are invited.
PLAINS TWP.: Plains Senior
Citizens Project Head will meet
at 1 p.m. Wednesday Feb. 15 at
SS. Peter and Paul School cafe-
teria, Hudson Road. A Valentine
party will be hosted by Mary
Hoinski and her committee.
Bakers are Cecelia Dunsmuir,
Alice Krommes, Joan Marchetti,
Dolores McDermott, Yolanda
Mariani and Frances Mattiucci.
Hostesses should report by
11:30 a.m. Members should
bring canned goods and paper
products for the SS. Peter and
Paul Food Pantry.
WILKES-BARRE: The RCA
Nipper Club will meet at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at the Old Country
Buffet, East End Center. New
members are welcome.
WILKES-BARRE: The Tequi-
la Rose Chapter of the Red Hat
Society will meet at 1 p.m. today
at Bob Evans. Members attend-
ing National Red Hat Day on
April 25 must have their money
and reservations in at the March
13 meeting.
WILKES-BARRE: The Char-
les T. Adams Senior Center, 5 E.
Market St., is holding a Valen-
tines Day party today.
A free dinner and show will
be available at 5 p.m. on Friday.
Call the center at 825-3484 for
details and to make reserva-
tions.
Pancake Week will be cele-
brated next week. Homemade
pancakes will be served all
week.
A Mardi Gras celebration will
take place at noon on Feb. 21.
NEWS FOR SENIORS
PETS OF THE WEEK
Name: Benji
Sex: male
Age: 10
Breed/type: Schnauzer mix
About this dog: neutered
Name: Pinky
Sex: female
Age: 3
Breed/type: domestic, short hair
About this cat: spayed
How to adopt: Call or visit the
Hazleton Animal Shelter, 101 N.
Poplar St. (corner of Hemlock) in
Hazleton. Phone 454-0640. Hours
for adoptions are Monday through
Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m.; Sunday
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Business hours are
Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. and Sunday 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Wish List: donations of cat
food, cleaning supplies, paper
products, and blankets are in need.
The eighth annual Red Hat Day luncheon, sponsored by the Wilkes-
Barre Area Queens Council, will be held noon to 4 p.m. April 25 at the
Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $18 and
includes door prizes, entertainment and a cash drawing. Red Hat
vendors will be available at 10 a.m. All Red Hat chapters and female
guests are invited. For more information contact Loraine Risley, chair-
person, at 288-1430, or Cathy Lanyon, reservations, at 310-1263. Dead-
line for reservations is March 31. Members of the Queens Council,
fromleft, first row: Amanda Mitchell, queen, Heather Highlanders;
RoseAnn Rink, queen, Foxy Red Hat Sisters; and June Dowling,
queen, Frolicking Fedoras. Second row: Patti Nee, Heather Highlan-
ders; Jane Scott, queen, Country Cousins; Kay Steele, queen, Red
Roses of White Haven; Mary Orluk, queen, Pleasant Valley Red Hats.
Red Hat Day luncheon to be held at Genettis
Cura Hospitality and the Meadows Nursing and Re-
habilitation Center, Dallas, recently participated in the
American Heart Associations National Wear Red Day.
Cura Hospitality provided heart-healthy snacks, recipes
and educational materials and staff members who
wore red made monetary donations to enjoy an extra
dress down day. Some of the participants, from left:
Stephanie Jones; Betty Sorchik; Arnie Black, dentist,
Cura; Camille Fioti; Christina Tarbox, meadows admin-
istrator; Phyllis Sorber; Kate Groboski; Deborah Malviz-
zi; Rebecca Sims, dietician, Cura; Christine Beyer;
Megan Nemshick; and Joan Krispin.
Wear Red Day held at Meadows center
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 5C
7
3
8
5
2
2
C M Y K
PAGE 6C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
T E L E V I S I O N
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Cu b Ca d etStihl Ariens
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6 8 7 M em o ria l Hw y., D a lla s
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 -
PHANTOM MENACE
STARWARS: EPISODE 1: PHANTOMMENACE
(XD-3D) (PG) 1:30PM, 4:30PM, 7:30PM, 10:30PM
ARTIST, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:00PM, 7:35PM, 10:00PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (3D) (G)
1:10PM
BIG MIRACLE (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:20PM, 4:00PM, 7:05PM, 9:40PM
CHRONICLE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:20PM, 1:25PM, 2:30PM, 3:40PM, 4:40PM,
5:50PM, 6:50PM, 8:00PM, 9:00PM, 10:15PM
CONTRABAND (DIGITAL) (R)
(2:30PM, 5:05PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON SAT, 2/11),
7:50PM, 10:25PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
1:45PM, 4:35PM, 7:20PM, 10:20PM
EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:35PM, 3:30PM, 6:55PM, 9:50PM
GREY, THE (2012) (DIGITAL) (R)
1:40PM, 4:25PM, 7:45PM, 10:35PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
4:05PM, 7:00PM, 9:55PM
JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (3D) (PG)
11:55AM, 2:15PM, 3:30PM, 4:45PM, 5:55PM,
7:15PM, 8:30PM, 9:45PM
JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:00PM
MAN ON A LEDGE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON SAT, 2/11
ONE FOR THE MONEY (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 2:25PM, (4:55PM, 7:10PM, 9:30PM,
DOES NOT PLAY ON THURS, 2/16)
SAFE HOUSE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:45PM, 2:05PM, 3:25PM, 4:45PM, 6:15PM,
7:25PM, 8:55PM, 10:05PM
STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 - PHANTOM MENACE
(3D) (PG) 3:05PM, 6:05PM, 9:05PM
STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 - PHANTOM MENACE
(DIGITAL) (PG) 12:05PM
VOW, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM, 1:05PM, 2:20PM, 3:35PM, 4:50PM,
6:10PM, 7:20PM, 8:40PM, 9:50PM
WOMAN IN BLACK, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:15PM, 1:35PM, 2:40PM, 3:55PM, 5:10PM,
6:25PM, 7:40PM, 8:50PM, 10:10PM
Sneak Preview of THIS MEANS WAR on
Tuesday, February 14th at 8:00pm
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Gtterdmmerung LIVE
Saturday, February 11 at 12:00pm only
LA PHIL LIVE Dudamel Conducts Mahler
Saturday, February 18 at 5:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Ernani LIVE
Saturday, February 25 at 12:55pm only
National Theater Live: The Comedy Of Errors
Thursday, March 1 at 7:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Manon LIVE
Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
SNEAK PREVIEW *This Means War - PG13 -
110 min 7:10pm Tuesday, February 14th
***Journey 2: The Mysterious Island in 3D
- PG - 105 min.
(1:15), (3:40), 7:00, 9:15
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D in
D-BOX - PG - 105 min.
(1:15), (3:40), 7:00, 9:15
*Journey 2: The Mysterious Island - PG -
105 min.
(12:40), (3:00)
*Safe House - R - 125 min.
(12:30), (3:10), 7:10, 9:45
***Star Wars: The Phantom Menace in 3D
- 140 min.
(12:55), (3:45), 7:05, 7:20, 9:55, 10:10
**The Vow - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:10), (3:50), 7:30, 10:10
Chronicle - PG13 - 95 min.
(1:00), (3:30), 7:20, 9:40
The Woman In Black - PG13 - 105 min.
(12:50), (3:10), 7:10, 9:30
Big Miracle - PG - 115 min.
(12:50), (3:15), 7:10, 9:40
One For The Money - PG13 - 100 min.
(12:40), (2:50), 7:20, 9:30
The Descendants - R - 125 min.
(12:50), (3:40), 7:15, 9:50
The Grey - R - 130 min.
(12:40), (3:20), 7:15, 10:00
Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
PG13 - 140 min.
7:00, 9:50
Red Tails - PG13 - 130 min.
7:00, 9:45 (No 7:00 Show On 2/14)
***Underworld Awakening in 3D -
R - 100 min.
(1:20), (3:40), 7:30, 9:50
***Beauty and the Beast in 3D -
G - 95 min.
(12:30), (2:40), (4:45) (No shows Sat 2/11)
Alvin and the Chipmunks:
Chipwrecked - G - 95 min
(12:30), (2:40), (4:50)
Man on a Ledge - PG13 - 115 min.
(2:50) only
ALL JUNK CARS &
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Free hearing evaluation and consultation Free demonstration of our most advanced hearing aid technology
Trial-period and nancing options available
We make traditional hearing aides a thing of the past
Experience ReSound Alera, a platform of hearing aids that provide
superior sound quality and personalized settings that ensure your comfort
throughout the day. Youll be amazed at how ReSound Alera automatically
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Schedule an appointment during our February Open House event!
Park Ofce Bldg.
400 Third Ave. Suite 109
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(570) 714-2656
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Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA
(570) 675-8113 www.afamilyhearingcenter.com
Zeigler - Asby Audiology
Family
Hearing Centers
NEW LOCATION
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News World
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watch 16
Inside
Edition
Last Man
Standing
Cougar
Town (N)
The River Los
Ciegos (N) (TV14)
Body of Proof (N)
(CC) (TVPG)
News (:35)
Nightline

Sweet Hearts
Dance (5:00)
Maude
(TVPG)
High School Basketball Abington Heights
vs. Scranton. (N) (Live)
Maude
(TVPG)
News-
watch 16
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Only You (PG, 94)
Marisa Tomei.
6
Judge
Judy
Evening
News
The
Insider (N)
Entertain-
ment
NCIS Secrets (N)
(CC)
NCIS: Los Angeles
Crimeleon (N)
Unforgettable (N)
(CC) (TV14)
Access
Hollywd
Letterman
<
News Nightly
News
Wheel of
Fortune
Jeopardy!
(N)
The Biggest Loser Two players go home
with their trainer. (N) (CC) (TVPG)
Parenthood Tough
Love (N) (TVPG)
News at
11
Jay Leno
F
30 Rock
(TV14)
Family
Guy (CC)
Simpsons Family
Guy (CC)
Hart of Dixie (CC)
(TVPG)
Ringer (N) (CC)
(TV14)
Excused
(TV14)
TMZ (N)
(TVPG)
Extra (N)
(TVPG)
Always
Sunny
L
PBS NewsHour (N)
(CC)
Call the Doctor (TVG) Tupperware!: Ameri-
can
Frontline The Interrupters Former gang
leaders prevent shootings. (N) (CC)
Nightly
Business
Charlie
Rose (N)
U
The Peoples Court
(N) (CC) (TVPG)
The Doctors (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Cold Case Bad
Night (CC) (TVPG)
Cold Case The
Promise (TVPG)
True Hollywood
Story (CC) (TV14)
Friends
(TVPG)
Old Chris-
tine
X
Two and
Half Men
Two and
Half Men
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Glee Heart (N) (CC)
(TV14)
New Girl
(TV14)
Raising
Hope (N)
News
First Ten
News
10:30
Love-Ray-
mond
How I Met

Criminal Minds (CC)


(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Flashpoint A Day in
the Life (TV14)
Flashpoint Last
Dance (TVPG)
#
News Evening
News
Entertain-
ment
The
Insider (N)
NCIS Secrets (N)
(CC)
NCIS: Los Angeles
Crimeleon (N)
Unforgettable (N)
(CC) (TV14)
News Letterman
)
King of
Queens
King of
Queens
How I Met How I Met Cold Case Bad
Night (CC) (TVPG)
Cold Case The
Promise (TVPG)
The 10
News
The Office
(CC)
Excused
(TV14)
The Office
(CC)
+
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Two and
Half Men
Two and
Half Men
Hart of Dixie (CC)
(TVPG)
Ringer (N) (CC)
(TV14)
PIX News at Ten
Jodi Applegate. (N)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
1
30 Rock
(TV14)
Two and
Half Men
Two and
Half Men
Big Bang
Theory
Cold Case Bad
Night (CC) (TVPG)
Cold Case The
Promise (TVPG)
Phl17
News
Friends
(TVPG)
Big Bang
Theory
30 Rock
(TV14)
AMC
CSI: Miami Wreck-
ing Crew (TV14)
CSI: Miami Cheat-
ing Death (TV14)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R, 95) Bruce Willis. A
New York cop must stop a mad bombers game of revenge.
Die Hard (R, 88)
Bruce Willis.
AP
River Monsters: The
Lost Reels
River Monsters:
Unhooked (TVPG)
Wild Japan (CC)
(TVPG)
Echo: Queen of the Elephants (TVPG) Wild Japan (CC)
(TVPG)
ARTS
The First 48 (CC)
(TV14)
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
CNBC
Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report
(N)
Love at First Byte:
The Secret of
60 Minutes on
CNBC
60 Minutes on
CNBC
Mad Money
CNN
John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett Out-
Front (N)
Anderson Cooper
360 (N) (CC)
Piers Morgan
Tonight (N)
Anderson Cooper
360 (CC)
Erin Burnett OutFront
COM
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
30 Rock
(TV14)
30 Rock
(TVPG)
Key &
Peele
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Key &
Peele (N)
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
CS
SportsNite Hot Stove College Basketball William & Mary at
Drexel. (N) (Live)
College Basketball Virginia Commonwealth
at George Mason. (N) (Live)
SportsNite (CC)
CTV
Choices
We Face
Men,
Women
Daily
Mass
The Holy
Rosary
Our Faith...Our
Diocese
Focus (TVG) Threshold of Hope
(TVG)
Season
Preview
Women of
Grace
DSC
Dirty Jobs (CC)
(TV14)
Dirty Jobs (CC)
(TV14)
All-Star
Dealers
All-Star
Dealers
Dirty Jobs Onion
Processor (TVPG)
Close Calls (N) (CC)
(TV14)
Dirty Jobs Onion
Processor (TVPG)
DSY
Shake It
Up! (CC)
(TVG)
Good
Luck
Charlie
Jessie
(CC)
(TVG)
A.N.T. Farm Chyna
may not make it to
Los Angeles. (TVG)
Camp Rock (08) Joe
Jonas, Kevin Jonas, Nick
Jonas. (CC)
(:15) Fish
Hooks (N)
(TVG)
Jessie
(CC)
(TVG)
A.N.T. Farm Chyna
may not make it to
Los Angeles. (TVG)
E!
Keeping Up With the
Kardashians
E! News (N) Fashion Police
(TV14)
Georgia Rule (R, 07) Jane Fonda,
Lindsay Lohan, Felicity Huffman.
Chelsea
Lately
E! News
ESPN
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
College Basketball Florida at Alabama.
(N) (Live)
College Basketball Ohio State at Minne-
sota. (N) (Live)
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
ESPN2
NFL32 (N) (Live) (CC) College Basketball Texas A&M at Texas
Tech. (N) (Live)
NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) (CC) SEC Storied (N)
FAM
Jane by Design The
Image Issue
Switched at Birth
(CC) (TV14)
Switched at Birth (N)
(CC) (TV14)
Jane by Design (N)
(CC) (TV14)
Switched at Birth
(CC) (TV14)
The 700 Club (CC)
(TVG)
FOOD
Chopped On the
Line
Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Chopped Easy
Peasy?
Chopped Chewing
the Caul Fat (N)
Chopped Piquillo
peppers. (TVG)
FNC
Special Report With
Bret Baier (N)
FOX Report With
Shepard Smith
The OReilly Factor
(N) (CC)
Hannity (N) On Record, Greta
Van Susteren
The OReilly Factor
(CC)
HALL
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
HIST
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Top Gear Big Rigs
(N) (TVPG)
Top Shot Sweating
Bullets (TVPG)
Swamp People (CC)
(TVPG)
H&G
Income
Property
Income
Property
Hunters
Intl
House
Hunters
My First
Place (N)
My First
Place
Property
Virgins
Property
Virgins
House
Hunters
Hunters
Intl
Love It or List It (CC)
(TVG)
LIF
Reba
(TVPG)
Reba
(TVPG)
Dance Moms (CC)
(TVPG)
Dance Moms (CC)
(TVPG)
Dance Moms (N)
(CC) (TVPG)
Americas Super-
nanny (CC) (TVPG)
Americas Super-
nanny (CC) (TVPG)
MTV
Teen
Mom 2
Teen Mom 2 (TVPG) Teen Mom 2 (TVPG) Teen Mom 2 Jenelle decides to
go to rehab. (TVPG)
Teen Mom 2 Corey arranges
visitation. (N) (TVPG)
Teen
Mom 2
NICK
Victorious Victorious House of
Anubis
iCarly
(TVG)
That 70s
Show
That 70s
Show
Friends
(TVPG)
Friends
(TV14)
George
Lopez
George
Lopez
Friends
(TVPG)
Friends
(TVPG)
OVAT
Dune (5:00) (PG-13, 84) Kyle
MacLachlan, Sting, Francesca Annis.
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (PG-13,
09) Heath Ledger, Verne Troyer. Premiere.
The Imaginarium of Doctor
Parnassus (10:45)
SPD
NASCAR Race
Hub (N)
Pass Time Pass Time Stunt-
busters
Stunt-
busters
Dumbest
Stuff
Dumbest
Stuff
Wrecked
(TVPG)
Wrecked
(TVPG)
Stunt-
busters
Stunt-
busters
SPIKE
Ink Master Fresh
Meat (CC) (TV14)
Ink Master (CC)
(TV14)
Ink Master (CC)
(TV14)
Ink Master (CC)
(TV14)
Ink Master Game
On (N) (TV14)
Ink Master Game
On (CC) (TV14)
SYFY
The Odyssey (4:00) (PG-13, 97)
Armand Assante, Greta Scacchi. (CC)
Troy (R, 04) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom. Achilles
leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. (CC)
Odysseus: Voyage
to the Underworld
TBS
King of
Queens
King of
Queens
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Conan Reese With-
erspoon. (N) (TV14)
TCM
Romeo
& Juliet
A Farewell to Arms (32)
Helen Hayes.
Top Hat (35) Fred Astaire, Ginger
Rogers. (CC)
Summertime (55) Katharine Hep-
burn, Rossano Brazzi. (CC)
TLC
19 Kids-
Count
19 Kids-
Count
19 Kids-
Count
19 Kids-
Count
19 Kids and Count-
ing (CC) (TVG)
19 Kids and Count-
ing (N) (CC) (TVG)
Virgin Diaries (CC)
(TV14)
19 Kids and Count-
ing (CC) (TVG)
TNT
Gran Torino (5:00) (R, 08)
Clint Eastwood. (CC)
Shooter (R, 07) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pea,
Danny Glover. (CC)
Southland Legacy
(N) (TVMA)
CSI: NY Shop Till
You Drop (TV14)
TOON
Advent.
Time
Advent.
Time
Advent.
Time
World of
Gumball
Level Up
(N)
Looney
Tunes
King of
the Hill
King of
the Hill
American
Dad
American
Dad
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
TRVL
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Mysteries at the
Museum (TVPG)
Hidden City (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Off Limits San Fran-
cisco (TVPG)
Legends of the
Ozarks (CC) (TVG)
TVLD
M*A*S*H
(TVPG)
M*A*S*H
(TVPG)
M*A*S*H
(TVPG)
M*A*S*H
(TVPG)
Home
Improve.
Home
Improve.
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Cleveland King of
Queens
King of
Queens
USA
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit
Dog Show 136th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show: Closing
Night (N) (Live)
Royal Pains Bot-
toms Up (TVPG)
VH-1
40 Greatest Pranks 3 Practical jokes.
(TVPG)
Sports Illustrated:
Swimsuit
100 Greatest
Women in Music
100 Greatest
Women in Music
Pop Up
Video (N)
Sports
Illustrated
WE
Charmed Witch
Trial (CC) (TVPG)
Charmed Morality
Bites (CC) (TVPG)
Joan & Melissa: Joan
Knows Best?
Joan & Melissa: Joan
Knows Best?
Joan & Melissa: Joan
Knows Best?
Joan & Melissa: Joan
Knows Best?
WGN-A
30 Rock
(TV14)
30 Rock
(TV14)
Americas Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine
(N) (CC)
30 Rock
(TV14)
Scrubs
(TV14)
WYLN
Rehabili-
tation
Lets Talk WYLN
Report
Topic A Tarone
Show
Ghost
Detect
WYLN
Kitchen
Storm
Politics
Late Edition Classified Beaten
Path
YOUTO
(5:45) The X-Files
(CC) (TV14)
Howcast
TV
Digivan-
gelist
Geek Beat Live The X-Files (CC)
(TV14)
(:15) The X-Files Zoo animals
are abducted. (CC) (TV14)
Adrena-
lina
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO
The X-Files (5:00)
(PG-13, 98)
David Duchovny.
Something Borrowed (PG-13, 11)
Ginnifer Goodwin. A tipsy attorney lands in
bed with the fiance of her best friend.
The Loving Story (11)
Premiere. (CC)
Making
Lifes
Luck Ace meets with
a talented whiz kid.
(CC) (TVMA)
HBO2
Dead Again (6:05) (R, 91) Kenneth
Branagh. An amnesiac may be the reincar-
nation of a murdered pianist. (CC)
Devil (PG-13, 10) Chris
Messina, Logan Marshall-
Green, Geoffrey Arend. (CC)
On Fred-
die Roach
Real Time With Bill
Maher (CC) (TVMA)
D.O.A.: Dead or
Alive (PG-13, 06)
Devon Aoki. (CC)
MAX
Sniper 2
(5:00) (R,
02)
Due Date (6:35) (R, 10)
Robert Downey Jr., Zach Galifi-
anakis. (CC)
Love Dont Cost a Thing (8:15) (PG-
13, 03) Nick Cannon. A teen hires a
cheerleader to pose as his girlfriend.
The Crush (R, 93) Cary
Elwes, Alicia Silverstone, Jen-
nifer Rubin. (CC)
Emman-
uelle
MMAX
Big Fish (4:50) (PG-
13, 03) Ewan
McGregor.
The Rite (PG-13, 11) Anthony Hop-
kins. A skeptical seminary student attends
a school for exorcists. (CC)
Cradle 2 the Grave (R,
03) Jet Li, DMX, Anthony
Anderson. (CC)
(:45) The Best Sex Ever A
woman plans a surprise for her
friend. (CC) (TVMA)
SHO
On the Shoulders of Giants
(11) iTV.
Next Day Air (R, 09) Don-
ald Faison, Mike Epps, Wood
Harris. iTV. (CC)
Penn &
Teller:
Bulls...!
Inside
Comedy
(CC)
House of
Lies (iTV)
(TVMA)
Califor-
nication
(TVMA)
Shameless Can I
Have a Mother (iTV)
(CC)
STARZ
Jack Goes Boating (5:45) (R,
10) , John Ortiz (CC)
Easy A (7:20) (PG-13, 10)
Emma Stone. (CC)
Secretariat (PG, 10) Diane Lane,
John Malkovich, Dylan Walsh. (CC)
Friday After Next
(11:10) (R, 02)
TMC
Blind Horizon (6:15) (R, 04) Val
Kilmer, Neve Campbell. A man thinks he is
involved in a plot to kill the president.
Fair Game (PG-13, 10) Naomi
Watts, Sean Penn, Sam Shepard. Valerie
Plame is revealed as a CIA agent. (CC)
Paranoid Park (R, 07)
Gabe Nevins, Taylor Momsen,
Jake Miller. (CC)
Inter-
mission

6 a.m. 22 The Daily Buzz (TVG)


6 a.m. FNC FOX and Friends (N)
7 a.m. 3, 22 CBS This Morning
Actress Raquel Welch. (N)
7 a.m. 56 Morning News with
Webster and Nancy
7 a.m. 16 Good Morning America
Mariah Carey; Courteney Cox;
Anne Rice; Oscar countdown. (N)
7 a.m. 28 Today Eric Ripert;
dieting; Valentines Day gifts. (N)
7 a.m. CNN Starting Point (N)
8 a.m. 56 Better Date-night
discounts; chocolates; improving
in the bedroom. (N) (TVPG)
9 a.m. 3, 22 Anderson A former
criminal explains what makes
people targets and how to protect
oneself (N) (TVG)
9 a.m. 16 Live! With Kelly George
Eads; Idris Elba; Randy Jackson.
(N) (TVPG)
10 a.m. 16 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show Kris and Bruce Jenner;
Sophia Grace and Rosie. (N) (TVG)
TV TALK
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 7C
D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: At this
time of year I have
seen letters in your
column from couples
describing how they
met. I hope you will
print ours.
During a study
break one evening in April 1937, I
walked to Bruckner Boulevard Park
in the Bronx to sit on a bench and
watch the cars drive by. A cyclist
whizzed through the center walkway,
then stopped and slowly backed up to
where I was sitting.
Hello, he said. I responded. Who
are you? he asked. Im Queen Eliza-
beth the First, I told him without
batting an eye. Well, he replied,
Im Sir Walter Raleigh unfortu-
nately, I dont have a coat to place at
your feet. Then he sat down beside
me. We talked, we laughed, and he
walked me home.
Four years later, Ben and I eloped.
That was April 3, 1941.
This year we will celebrate our 71st
anniversary and have, in our lifetime
together, accumulated three beauti-
ful daughters, nine grandchildren,
20 great-grandchildren, three great-
great-grandchildren and another on
the way.
We have shared our tears, our joys,
our failures and our successes. We
have worked long hours, taken vaca-
tions, participated in sports and trav-
eled. We have enjoyed every moment.
Now in our 90s, we are financially
secure, have a caring family and many
beautiful memories. Ben, however,
has not as yet placed his coat at my
feet.
Bella in New York
Dear Bella: No he took you on a
lifetime magic carpet ride instead.
May you enjoy many more years of
happiness together.
Dear Abby: Last weekend I went to
a birthday slumber party at a friends
house. We played poker as we often
do, then one girl suggested we play
strip poker. She was kind of pushy
about it. I wasnt comfortable with
the idea and chose not to partici-
pate. I was the only one. Everybody
laughed at me. They called me a
prude and told me all girls look the
same.
I dont think Im a prude. Im not
shy about undressing in front of my
sister and friends. Im just not com-
fortable about something like this and
saw no point to it. I mean, if were all
the same, then whats the reason for
exposing our bodies to each other?
Everybody thought it was fun, and
those who ended up taking it all off
laughed about it.
Is there something wrong with
me? Now theyre talking about doing
it at future slumber parties, so Im
not sure how to handle it. I could
just not attend, but this is the group
I hang out with, and I dont like to
miss out.
No Prude in Sacramento
Dear No Prude: Not only is there
nothing wrong with you, I applaud
you for not giving in to peer pressure
and doing something you didnt feel
was right. It took maturity to refuse.
Because youre not comfortable
playing strip poker, you should make
other plans for those nights. This
doesnt mean you shouldnt socialize
with your friends but consider
cultivating a few more relationships
with girls who have broader interests.
That way youll have something to do
on nights they are playing.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Queen and her gallant knight have shared a lifetime of love together
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
come alive in a small group and
will steal the show with your
charm. If youre not already
planning to be around a few
close friends, pull a last-minute
soiree together.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Partners and friends may want
more of your time than you
expected to give. Keep the
schedule loose, and youll be
able to accommodate the fun
surprises and twists of the day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Being
enamored causes you to stretch
your usual bounds of reason.
You may act silly, believe the
unbelievable or suddenly want
with your heart.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Not
wanting to perpetuate generic
sentiments, youll find a way to
celebrate this holiday that high-
lights the unique way you give
your love.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Even when
your activities are relatively
down to earth, exciting escapes
and miraculous fantasies domi-
nate your thoughts. Tonights
rendezvous turns out even bet-
ter than you could have planned.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Your
presence is calming, your
warmth disarming. The one
whos always on will feel com-
fortable enough to relax and be
real around you. Tonights con-
versation reveals deep affection.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You have
many people to please, and
you dont want to leave anyone
out. Be careful not to spend so
much time on your large circle
of friends that you neglect the
circle of your dearest.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Youre not one for sappy senti-
ments. You say the honest truth,
and it will be the most loving and
affectionate expression anyone
could want to hear. Tonight fea-
tures a sit-down dinner and lively
conversation.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You have a plan, but youre
always willing to ditch it for
something with exciting promise.
Unexpected twists of plot will
carry you into the arms of love.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
have a way of inspiring others
to bring their A game. Tonight:
You may be moved to spend
your money on something you
didnt used to consider valuable.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). In
an act that blends your musical
and emotional intelligence, youll
learn the song thats inside the
heart of your love so you can
sing it back in quiet moments.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You
know that you will change and
so will your relationship. You
endeavor to take those changes
in a positive direction. You
welcome the chance to make
romance a priority.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Feb. 14).
Youll dare to dream and create
the future. Next month brings
greater self-discipline and a
new fitness regimen. Youll love
the boost you get from helpful
people in April. This summer,
someone treats you like a special
date again and again. It will
feel lovely to be cherished. New
financial avenues open up in
June. Taurus and Gemini people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 30, 50, 7, 22 and 19.
F U N N I E S TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Wednesday Feb. 15 Special
.35 cent Wings
Minimum purchase of a dozen.
Thursday Feb. 16 Special
$6.95 Large Pie
One per Party/Table.
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
I
n
H
o
u
s
e
S
p
e
c
i
a
l
s
2012 CHEVY
2012 CHEVY 2012 CHEVY
SILVERADO
SILVERADO SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4x4 1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4x4 1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4x4
Vortec 5.3L V8 Engine
Aluminum Block, Flex Fuel
w/Active Fuel management
6 Speed Automatic
Transmission
ALL STAR ED ITIO N
Automatic Dual Zone AC
Power Rear Side Windows
Power Windows/Door
Locks
Remote Vehicle Starter
Prep Pkg.
Locking Tailgate w/EZ Lift
Dual Power Heated Mirrors
Stabilitrak
Power 6 Way Drivers Seat
Electric Windows defogger
Locking Rear Differential
Cruise Control
18 Aluminum, Wheels
Off Road Skid Plate Package
Trailering Package
Bluetooth for Phone
Fog Lamps
OnStar w/Turn-by-Turn
Navigation
AM/FM CD w/Enhanced Audio
Speakers
XM Satellite Radio
USP Port
Chrome Grille
LOOK WHAT YOU GET:
M S RP - $36,550
EX IT 170 B O FF I-8 1TO EX IT 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW W YO M IN G V ALLEY M ALL.
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Pa ym e n tplu s ta x & ta gs . Le a s e fo r$299 pe rm o n th plu s ta x & ta gs fo r3 9 m o n ths ; 10K m ile s pe rye a r; $853 .41 d u e a tle a s e s ign in g to qu a lifie d
b u ye rs . Le a s e pa ym e n tin c lu d e s G M C o m pe titive Le a s e Offe r(m u s tc u rre n tly le a s e a 1999 o rn e w e rNON-G M ve hic le to qu a lify -le a s e te rm in a tio n
is n o tre qu ire d ); Le a s e c a n b e tra n s fe rre d to a n o the rin d ivid u a l in s a m e ho u s e ho ld . Artw o rk fo rillu s tra tio n . No tre s po n s ib le fo rtypo gra phic a l e rro rs .
M u s tta ke d e live ry b y Fe b . 29, 2012.
Z71 ALLSTAR EDITION Z71 ALLSTAR EDITION Z71 ALLSTAR EDITION
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A
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415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Cars in
Color
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
FREE GAS when you nance a vehicle
up to 36 months
7
3
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3
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1
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AAA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
08 Chevy Cobalt 61K...................
$
7,495
07 Chevy Aveo 84K.....................
$
6,950
05 Mitsubishi Lancer 75K ...
$
6,495
02 Nissan Altima......................
$
6,450
07 Saturn Ion.................................
$
5,895
00 VW Jetta....................................
$
5,495
04 Suzuki Forenza 86K...........
$
5,275
00 Buick Regal 86K....................
$
4,550
03 Kia Optima..............................
$
4,250
02 Pontiac Sunre Moonroof..
$
4,250
01 Mitsubishi Galant............
$
3,895
01 Nissan Sentra......................
$
3,895
94 Ford Escort.............................
$
2,450
Cars
05 Hyundai Santa Fe............
$
6,595
04 Chevy Venture.....................
$
5,995
03 Chevy Tracker.....................
$
5,450
01 Kia Sportage EX...............
$
4,850
01 Ford Windstar LX.............
$
4,495
01 Subaru Legacy....................
$
4,495
99 Subaru Outback................
$
3,550
4x4s & Vans
TAX REFUND SALE
JER-DONS
S A N S OUC IA UT O M A RT
W E SA Y YES W HEN OTHERS SA Y N O
100% Gua ra n te e d
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TA X
REFUN D TIM E
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Y O U TO C HO O SE FRO M
JER-DONS
S A NS S OUC IA UT O M A RT
(SansSouci P kw y N ext to N im rod H aven)
H anover Tw p., P A 18706
270-3434
A llV ehicles Safety C hecked & Inspected
W arranty - G roup Insurance A vailable on A llV ehicles
LO W DO W N PA Y M ENTS
FLEXIBLE RA TES / PA Y M ENTS
N e e d A N e w Ca r?
1339N. River Street,
Plains, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
J
O
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DAN
MOTORS
TAX AND TAGS ADDITIONAL We Now Offer Buy Here-Pay Here!
LOWDOWN PAYMENT CLEAN, INSPECTED VEHICLE
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We Service ALL Makes & Models
Family Owned & Operated for over 40 years
01 PONTIAC TRANS AM WS6 CONV
Red, Auto. , 1 of 796 Built! 45K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
19,995
08 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
Blue, Sunroof, 52K, Sharp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
16,995
07 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
Silver, PW, PDL, Only 45K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
15,995
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
Red, PW, PDL, Only 34K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
14,995
07 DODGE NITRO SXT
White, 4x4, CD, PW, PDL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
14,995
08 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS
Copper, 5 Speed, 48K Miles, Nicely Equipped. . .
$
13,995
08 BUICK LACROSSE
Maroon, PW, PDL, 58K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
13,495
09 CHEVY AVEO LT
Black, Only 9,000 Miles, Auto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,495
08 CHEVY HHR PANEL
White LS, Nicely Equipped. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . ..
$
10,995
04 DODGE STRATUS
Gold SXT, Sunroof, 48K Miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
07 FORD FOCUS SE
Red, 4 Dr. , Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
7,995
NORTHEAST PA TOP JOBS
The following companies are hiring:
Your company name will be listed on the front page
of The Times Leader Classieds the rst day your ad
appears on timesleader.com Northeast PA Top Jobs.
For more information contact The Times Leader sales
consultant in your area at 570-829-7130.
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LOST IPHONE
at the casino
(Mohegan) Saturday
February 4th. White
with a white, pink
and aqua case.
REWARD!
570-233-7235
110 Lost
WANTED
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-9885
120 Found
Wanted
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G Anytime
570-574-1275
CAT FOUND; by
Mohegan Sun,
Plains. Large male.
Call to describe.
570-881-1555
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters of Adminis-
tration were grant-
ed in the Estate of
Marion Sperrazza,
deceased, late of
Wyoming Borough,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who
died on January 4,
2012. Sylvia Sper-
razza and Lillian
Boise, Co-Adminis-
tratrices, Frank J.
Aritz, Esquire, 23
West Walnut Street,
Kingston, PA 18704,
Attorney. All per-
sons indebted to
said Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims and
demands to pres-
ent same without
delay to the Admin-
istratrices or
Attorney.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
CHOICES Program
of Wyoming Valley,
a Division of Wilkes-
Barre Behavioral
Hospital Company
LLC. A comprehen-
sive carrier for
treatment of drug
and alcohol abuse
located at 562
Wyoming Avenue,
Kingston, PA 18704
has completed its
2011 annual report
and is making it
available for public
review. Interested
parties may call
CHOICES at 570-
552-3700 to
arrange an
appointment.
LEGAL NOTICE
February 9, 2012
BID NOTICE
Medical & Dental
Paper &General
Physical
Education
Bids will be
received in the
Wyoming Valley
West Administration
Building, 450 N.
Maple Ave,
Kingston, not later
than 11:00 AM on
Tuesday, March
13, 2012. Bids will
be opened in the
Administration
Building, 450 N.
Maple Avenue at
11:00 AM on
Tuesday, March
13, 2012
Bid sheets together
with instructions for
bidding, may be
obtained at the
Wyoming Valley
West Administration
Building, 450 North
Maple Avenue,
Kingston, PA
The Board reserves
the right to accept
or reject any or all
bids or any part of
any bid.
BY: Joanne Wood
Board Secretary
Wyoming Valley
West School District
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters Testamen-
tary in the Estate of
Ursula A. Burke,
deceased, who
died November 1,
2011, late of the
Borough of West
Pittston, Luzerne
County, PA, having
been granted, all
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to
Theresa Schwartz,
Executrix, c/o
William F. Roberts,
Esquire
Burke Vullo Reilly
Roberts
1460 Wyoming
Avenue
Forty Fort, PA
18704-4237
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that the
Luzerne Borough
Council is contem-
plating the adoption
of a new Landlord
Nuisance Ordi-
nance. The pro-
posed Ordinance
can be viewed at
the Luzerne Bor-
ough Building, 144
Academy Street,
during normal busi-
ness hours of Mon-
day through Friday,
from 8 AM to 4:00
PM. The proposed
Ordinance will be
considered for a
vote at the March
Council meeting
scheduled for
March 14, 2012 at
7:00 PM at the Bor-
ough Building.
LUZERNE
BOROUGH
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Joyfilled home,
endless love,
security awaits.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
Expenses Paid
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Active couple
longs to be
blessed with your
newborn to cher-
ish and educate in
our loving home.
EXPENSES PAID
Please call
Kim & Chris
888-942-9899
Happy
Valentines Day
Everyone!
bridezella.net
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
COOKS PHARMACY
OF SHAVERTOWN
Is looking for
people who
have had
sports related
knee injuries
for a study to try a
new product
called WilloMD, a
mini computer to
help with knee
pain. Free of
charge.
Interested? Please call
570-675-1191
Ask for Meagan
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly,
814-237-7900
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
150 Special Notices
WORK WANTED
Experienced in
homecare. I will
work in your home
taking care of your
loved one. Person-
al care, meal
preparation & light
housekeeping pro-
vided. References,
background check
also provided.
Salary negotiable.
570-836-9726 or
cell 570-594-4165
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
RFM Services, Inc.
Keystone Garden Estates
PAGE 2D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
539 Legal 539 Legal
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 29
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
LATONA LAW, P.C.
Immediate Full-Time
Attorney Position
Experience required in the areas of
Workers Compensation, Personal Injury
and Social Security Disability.
Salary based on Experience.
Email resume to tlorince@epix.net
Fax to 570-822-5169
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
SUNDAY IN
PHILADELPHIA
MARCH 11, 2012
Brunch @
The Waterworks,
a National Historic
Landmark
Van Gogh Exhibit
@ Philadelphia
Museum of Art
For more details
call
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
CRUISE of a
LIFETIME!
CELEBRITY CRUISE
LINES Newest Ship
SILHOUETTE
12 night
Caribbean
Cruise
from NJ -
no airfare
needed!
ONLY
$1329/PP, TWIN
includes all taxes &
fees
March 29 -
April 10, 2012
Subject to Availability
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRiP
(288-8747)
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`09 REKON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
REDUCED
$3,650.
(570) 814-2554
POLARIS`03
330 MAGNUM
Shaft ride system.
True 4x4. Mossy
oak camo. Cover
included. $3,000
negotiable. Call
570-477-3129
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
DODGE `02 NEON
SXT. 4 door. Auto-
matic. Yellow with
black interior. Power
windows & locks.
FWD. $3,500. Call
570-709-5677 or
570-819-3140
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVY 00
Cavalier Z24
Black 2 door,
134,000 miles. Runs
great, has new
water pump. Needs
tires & A/C switch.
Asking $1500
570-233-2117
LEOS AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
GE0 93 TRACKER
2 door, soft top, 4
cylinder, auto, 4x4
$1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
GMC 99 YUKON
4 WD, 115,600 mi.
runs 100%, fully
loaded. Vehicle
comes complete
w/power wheel
chair lift in rear.
$3400 OBO
570-299-5920
TOYOTA `94
CAMRY LE
All power, CD play-
er, leather interior,
sun roof. Just
inspected. Runs
great. Only $3,995.
570-498-2959
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA 06 TSX
Leather.
Moonroof.
$9,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
AUDI `01 A6
QUATTRO
123,000 miles, 4.2
liter V8, 300hp, sil-
ver with black
leather,heated
steering wheel, new
run flat tires, 17
rims, 22 mpg, Ger-
man mechanic
owned.
$6,495. OBO.
570-822-6785
AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO
3.0 V6. Silver. New
tires & brakes. 130k
highway miles.
Leather interior.
Heated Seats.
$7,500 or best offer.
570-905-5544
AUDI `05 A4 1.8T
Cabriolet Convert-
ible S-Line. 52K
miles. Auto. All
options. Silver.
Leather interior.
New tires. Must
sell. $17,500 or best
offer 570-954-6060
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `04 325i
Automatic. Dark
blue with black inte-
rior. Showroom con-
dition. 20,000 origi-
nal miles. Garage
kept.
$14,900
(570) 814-8106
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $11,500
OBO. 570-466-2630
BMW 98 740 IL
White with beige
leather interior.
New tires, sunroof,
heated seats. 5 cd
player 106,000
miles. Excellent
condition.
$5,300. OBO
570-451-3259
570-604-0053
BUICK 01 PARK AVE
66k original miles,
rebuilt tranny in
12/11, great condi-
tion. Green with
gray interior. fully
loaded. $6200 OBO
570-824-9614
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD, AWD, silver,
grey leather
06 VW PASSAT 3.6
silver, black
leather, sunroof,
66k miles
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
06 DODGE STRATUS
SXT, red
05 CHRYSLER 300C
TOURING, black,
gray, leather
05 DODGE NEON SXT,
red, 4 cyl, auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
burgundy, tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
MAXX, white, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL,
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 SAAB 9-3, silver,
auto, sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 VW JETTA GLS,
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 PLYMOUTH NEON
purple, 4 door,
auto
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS, black
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 KIA SPORTAGE
black, 4 cylinder
auto, 2WD
07 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LS blue (AWD)
07 Chrysler Aspen
LTD, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT, blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 PONTIAC TURRANT
black/black
leather, sunroof,
AWD
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
AWD, blue auto, V6
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat,
4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
05 FORD F150 XLT,
extra cab, truck,
black, V8, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, burgundy,
auto (AWD)
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO RT
red, 2 tone
leather imterior,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
reg. cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 FORD RANGER XLT
X-CAB, red, auto,
V6, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT XLT, gold,
sunroof, 2 door,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 GMC SIERRA SLE,
extra cab, pewter
silver, V8, 4x4,
truck
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS
black, auto,
2 door AWD
98 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SE, silver, V6, 4x4
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
CADILLAC `05 SRX
All wheel drive,
traction control,
3.6 L V-6, power
sunroof, auto-
stick, leather inte-
rior, auto car
starter, factory
installed 6 CD disc
changer, all
power, memory
seat. 39,000
miles.
$21,000
570-453-2771
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
CADILLAC 00 DTS
Tan, satellite
radio, leather,
moon roof, loaded
excellent
condition. 136k
miles. $4,995.
570-814-2809
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `03
SILVERADO
EXTENDED CAB
2500 Series. 4 x 4
pick up. 145K miles.
$6,500, OBO.
570-406-5128
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `08
IMPALA
Excellent condition,
new tires, 4 door,
all power, 34,000
miles. $13,500.
570-836-1673
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 5,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell
REDUCED!
$39,500 FIRM
570-299-9370
CHEVY 09 IMPALA
LTZ, Grey, leather,
heated seats, sun-
roof. Bluetooth,
AM/FM, CD, Bose
speakers. 35,000
miles. 18 mo. war-
ranty remaining.
$17,000 OBO
After 4pm call
570-430-3041
CHEVY 95 ASTRO
MARK III CONVERSION
VAN. Hightop. 93K.
7 passenger.
TV/VCP/Stereo.
Loaded. Great con-
dition. $3,495
(570) 574-2199
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. FWD. Leather
interior. Great
shape. A/C. CD.
All power.
$7,200. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
CHRYSLER 04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5900.
570-991-5558
11 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA 3950
miles. Factory War-
ranty. New Condi-
tion. $17,699
10 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT 32K. Silver-
Black. Power slides.
Factory warranty.
$16,799
09 JEEP LIBERY
LIMITED Power sun-
roof. Only 18K. Fac-
tory Warranty.
$19,499
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$11,699
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. Factory War-
ranty. $11,999
08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed. AWD.
Factory warranty.
$12,799
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,299
05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner. Just
traded. 65K.
$12,799
06 FORD FREESTAR
Rear air, 62k
$8199
05 SUZUKI VERONA
LX Auto. 64K. Fac-
tory warranty.
$4,999
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,599
99 JEEP LARADO
LTD Leather. 75K
$4,699
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
DODGE `02
DURANGO SLT
All power, 4.7, all
leather, 7 passen-
ger, running boards,
80,000 miles, CD
player, new tires.
$6,500.
570-877-9896
DODGE `90 CARAVAN
Blue. 181k miles. 3rd
row seating. All
power accessories.
Lots of new parts.
$800 or best offer.
CALL 570-763-0767
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 08 AVENGER
4Leather, Alloys,
Low miles$13,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
FORD `08 ESCAPE
XLT. 56,800 miles.
Grey metallic with
grey cloth interior.
2WD. Auto. Power
windows & locks.
Dual air bags. A/C.
Alloy Wheels. Excel-
lent condition.
$14,500
Trades Welcome
570-328-5497
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S
Excellent condition
inside & out. Garage
kept. Regularly
serviced by dealer,
records available.
Option include alloy
wheels, decklid
spoiler, sport seats,
interior accent light-
ing (blue), Nose
mask and custom
cut floor mats. Dark
grey with black inte-
rior. 56K highway
miles. REDUCED!
$13,300. Call
570-709-4695
HONDA 04
Civic LX Sedan
PRICE REDUCTION
Fully loaded, gas
stingy 4 cylinder,
1.7 liter engine, well
maintained, very
good condition,
driven less than
10.1 k miles per
year. $7995
570-855-0095
HONDA 08 ACCORD
15K miles. Auto.
Excellent condition!
$15,999
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
HONDA 08 ACCORD
4 door, EXL with
navigation system.
4 cyl, silver w/
black interior. Satel-
lite radio, 6CD
changer, heated
leather seats, high,
highway miles. Well
maintained. Monthly
service record
available. Call Bob.
570-479-0195
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HYUNDAI 04 ELANTRA
Only 52K miles,
cruise, power win-
dows & locks.
$8,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LINCOLN 05
TOWN CAR
39K miles. Looks &
runs perfect!
$13,500
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
PONTIAC `96
FIREBIRD
105,000 miles,
auto-matic,, black
with grey interior,
new inspection.
$4,000, OBO.
570-706-6565
PONTIAC 08 VIBE
Low miles. AWD.
$12,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
Biarritz white, con-
vertible,new
$58,000, 3.2 liter, 6
cylinder, 250HP.
Loaded with all the
extra options. Less
than 15,000 miles.
$21,000
570-586-0401
SAAB 9.3 99
5 speed convert-
ible. 130,000 miles
Runs excellent,
everything works,
25 mpg. Like new,
recently inspected,
new tires. Depend-
able, fun & eco-
nomical transporta-
tion. $3,250.
570-639-1121 or
570-430-1095
SAAB 900`98
Low mileage, 25
mpg, 5 speed
convertible. Perfect
shape, everything
works. New
stereo, recent
inspection, good
tires. Very
dependable, no rust
FUN IN THE SUN!
$3,950
570-639-1121 or
570-430-1095
SCION `06 XA
67,000 miles,
power windows &
locks, great gas
mileage.
$8,200/OBO
570-606-5634
SUBARU 10 IMPREZA
OUTBACK SPORT
33,000 miles, new
inspection & tires. 5
speed wagon. Bal-
ance of 6 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty and tire and
wheel insurance.
$19,000 OBO
570-814-9400
TOYOTA 00
SOLARA SE
SUPER CLEAN
All power, new
tires, new back
brakes. 125,000
miles.
$6,400 negotiable.
570-417-8353
TOYOTA 04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$12,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
VOLKSWAGEN `09
BEETLE
Excellent condition,
20,000 miles, all
power, sun roof,
kayak and bike rack
included. $14,900.
570-864-2300
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `77 COUPE
70,000 original
miles. Leather inte-
rior. Excellent condi-
tion. $2,500. Call
570-282-4272 or
570-877-2385
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 CYLINDER
Very Good
Condition!
$5,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
Chrysler 68 New Yorker
Sedan. 440 Engine.
Power Steering &
brakes. 34,500
original miles.
Always garaged.
Reduced to $5995
FIRM! 883-4443
DESOTO CUSTOM
49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In its
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
shes beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
FORD SALEEN 04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
documented #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$13,500 or best
offer. 570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$10,500.
or best offer.
Tony 570-237-1631
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 FLHTCU. Ultra
classic, mint condi-
tion. white & black
pearls. 6,500 miles.
Reduced to $17,500
Call Bill
570-262-7627
HYOSUNG `04 COMET
250. 157 Miles.
Excellent Condition.
$1,200. Call
570-256-7760
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
WINNEBAGO 02
ADVENTURER
35 Foot, double
slides, V-10 Ford.
Central air, full awn-
ings, one owner,
pet & smoke free.
Excellent condition
and low mileage.
$68,000.
Call 570-594-6496
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,000.
(570) 540-0975
CHEVY `00 SILVERADO
1500. 4x4. 8 box.
Auto. A/C. 121K
miles. $5,995.
570-332-1121
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO
4x4. Extra clean.
Local new truck
trade! $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY 10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
Travel
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriffs Ofce
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 3D
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE 07 CALIBER
R/T. AWD. Alloys.
$14,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 06 F150
4WD, Auto, Alloys
$15,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA 08 CRV
AWD. Auto. 34K
miles. Extra Sharp!
$18,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HONDA 09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI 06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$11,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `98 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder. New
items: 4 tires, bat-
tery, all brakes,
complete exhaust.
$3,895
(570) 417-4731
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
4x4. Auto. 6 cylin-
der. $8,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
JEEP 06 WRANGLER
Only 29K miles!
$15,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $8,995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
NISSAN 04 FRONTIER
XE King Cab,
87,000 miles, 4 cyl,
auto, good on gas,
in good condition.
$6,000
570-466-5921
NISSAN 09 ROGUE SL
Leather. Moon-
roof. Alloys.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 02 TACOMA
4WD. SR5. TRD.
V-6. $10,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
TOYOTA 04 4 RUNNER
Moonroof, alloys,
4 WD $16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 06 4 RUNNER
Moonroof. Alloys.
CD Player.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 07 YARIS
GREAT MPGS,
AUTO, CD $7995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
BOOKKEEPER
Part time leading to
full time. Duties:
P&L & BS Account
reconciliation
AR / AP posting
Journal entries
Processing payroll
and quarterly tax
Experience with
QuickBooks, Word
and Excel a plus
Compensation com-
mensurate with
experience
e-mail resume to
btime60@gmail.com
506 Administrative/
Clerical
Administrative
Assistant
Highly successful
business in the
Wilkes-Barre Area
with immediate
need for an experi-
enced administra-
tive assistant. Data
entry, preparing
reports & corre-
spondence, record-
ing meeting notes,
etc. Strong under-
standing of Excel a
must.
-Competitive Salary
-401k
-Paid Vacation
-Health Care
Send resume to
collette@gocolours.
com Deadline 2/24
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
Entry Level
Construction Laborer
Two person crew,
no experience nec-
essary, company
will train. The work
is outdoor, fast-
paced, very physical
and will require the
applicant to be out
of town for eight day
intervals followed by
six days off. Appli-
cants must have a
valid PA drivers
license and clean
driving record.
Starting wage is
negotiable but will
be no less than
$14.00 per hour plus
incentive pay with
family health, dental
and 401k. APPLY AT
R.K. HYDRO-VAC,
INC., 1075 OAK ST
PITTSTON, PA
18640
E-MAIL RESUME TO
TCHARNEY@
RKHYDROVACPA.COM
OR CALL 800-237-
7474 MONDAY TO
FRIDAY, 8:30 TO
4:30 E.O.E. AND
MANDATORY DRUG
TESTING.
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CSR
Do you have
internet or modem
knowledge?
RFM is looking for
someone with the
ability to prioritize
and organize
requests. Self moti-
vated individual with
a dedicated sense
of follow through.
Call center or help
desk experience is
necessary.
Must have comput-
er knowledge &
possess good peo-
ple skills. Competi-
tive starting rate.
Pleasant office
environment. Must
be dependable.
Call 1-888-514-8883
for details, ask for
Stephanie.
Fax resume to:
570-517-5003
522 Education/
Training
DAYCARE
STAFF NEEDED
Experience a must.
Early Childhood
Education a plus.
To inquire call Scott
at 570-655-1012.
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
VICE-PRINCIPAL
of S.T.E.M.
Magnet School
Hazleton Area
School District
The Hazleton Area
School District is
seeking qualified
applicants for the
position of Vice-
Principal of the
S.T.E.M. The posi-
tion is an adminis-
tration and organi-
zational position
responsible for
school organization
and management.
It requires re-
searching and inte-
grating S.T.E.M.
education. It
includes instruction-
al design/delivery
and support of the
S.T.E.M. curriculum.
Additionally the
development and
extensions of
school, higher edu-
cation, and busi-
ness partnerships in
S.T.E.M. areas are
essential compo-
nents of this posi-
tion.
Interested appli-
cants should submit
a letter of applica-
tion, resume, PA
Teaching applica-
tion, copy of certifi-
cate, Act 24, 34,
114, and 151 clear-
ances, 3 letters of
recommendation
from educators and
1 letter of recom-
mendation from
someone from out-
side the field of edu-
cation to Dr. Francis
X. Antonelli, Acting
Superintendent,
Hazleton Area
School District, 1515
West 23rd Street,
Hazleton, PA 18202
by 4:00 PM on
Friday, February
24, 2012.
The Hazleton Area
School District is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
HV HVAC/R AC/R
WWW.RITE-TEMP.COM
Visit our website
for job postings.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
DATA/ PHONE /SOUND
Our Client is hiring
experienced techni-
cians to install
phones, fiber optics,
data and sound sys-
tems. Customers
include hospitals,
schools, churches
and businesses.
Must interpret blue-
prints, troubleshoot
wiring and read
schematics. Will use
hand tools, laptop,
and climb ladders.
Full time 8am-
4:30pm. Must have
clean driving record.
Contact Harvis
570-542-5330 with
questions or send
resume to:
jobs.harvis@
gmail.com
INVISIBLE FENCE
INSTALLER
Invisible Fence
technology keeps
dogs safer. Training
is provided to oper-
ate ditch witch and
install underground
wire and compo-
nents. Full time
physical job. Must
have good math
skills, clean driving
record and be cour-
teous. Must pass
physical & drug test.
Call or email Brian
at Harvis Interview
Service for applica-
tion or questions:
542-5330 or ifnepa.
jobs@gmail.com
NOW HIRING! NOW HIRING!
COCCIA COCCIA
FORD LINCOLN FORD LINCOLN
Has immediate
openings for
Class A, B, C
Technicians
Ford Certificated
Diesel Technician
Parts Counter
Personnel
We are
expending our
facility & need
experienced
applicants.
Excellent pay and
benefits are
offered.
Please apply to:
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
Coccia Ford
Lincoln
570-823-8888
rpodest@
cocciacars.com
All Applicants are
Confidential
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
Service Writer/
Assistant Manager
Automotive Experi-
ence Preferred.
RYMER AUTOMOTIVE
SPECIALISTS
WILKES-BARRE
CALL 570-970-8840
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
Berwick Area-
Part Time Cleaner
Monday-Wednes-
day and Friday-
8pm-10:30pm and
Tuesday and Thurs-
day anytime after
4:30pm for 2.5
hours a night. $9.25/
hour to start. Gen-
eral office cleaning.
Apply online at: www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVER WANTED
Class A CDL.
5 Eastern States
and Home Daily.
Call 570-823-8955
If no answer, please
leave message
INDEPENDENT
CONTRACTORS
NEEDED
All shifts available.
Please visit our
office at:
777 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre
to pick up an
application today.
OIL TRUCK DRIVER
Greater Hazleton
Area. Class B
License. Tanker
Hazmat Required.
Steady Work. Good
Driving Record.
Insurance, Vacation
and Holiday Pay.
Wargo Coal & Oil
(570) 929-2843
542 Logistics/
Transportation
O/O'S & CO
FLATBED DRIVERS
SIGN ON BONUS
Hazleton/
Scranton, PA
Growing dedi-
cated account
needs Drivers
Now! SIGN ON
BONUS: $1,000
after 3 months &
$1,000 after 6
months for Owner
Operators & com-
pany drivers. Dri-
ver Home Loca-
tions: Hazleton, PA,
or surrounding
Area. Miles per
Week Target is
2,275. Runs will go
into North east
locations. $1.15 all
dispatched miles
plus fuel surcharge
for ALL Dispatch/
Round Trip Miles at
$1.50 Peg, paid at
$.01 per $.06
increments. Truck
must be able to
pass a DOT
inspection. Plate
provided with
weekly settle-
ments and fuel
card.
Also needing up
to 10 Company
Drivers. Excellent
Benefits! .45cents
a mile, with tarp
pay. Flatbed freight
experience
required. Class A
CDL drivers with 2
years of experi-
ence.
Feel free to
contact
Kevin McGrath
608-207-5006
or Jan Hunt
608-364-9716
visit our web site
www.blackhawk
transport.com
GREAT PAY, REGU-
LAR/SCHEDULED
HOME TIME & A
GREAT/ FRIENDLY/
PROFESSIONAL STAFF
TO WORK WITH!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT/SCHEDULER
for In-Home Care
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
COMPUTER SKILLS
Email resume:
comfortkeeper
swb@gmail.com
CAREGIVERS
Looking for com-
passionate people
to work with elderly
in their homes.
Personal care and
transportation
required.
All Shifts available.
Call: 570-338-2681
EXPERIENCED COOK
Full time.
Work independently,
flexible hours.
PER DIEM LPN AND
RSAS NEEDED.
No phone calls.
Apply in person.
TIFFANY COURT
700 NORTHAMPTON ST
KINGSTON, PA
DENTAL RECEPTIONIST
Full Time. Day and
Evening Hours.
Benefits. Prior Den-
tal Office Experi-
ence preferred.
DENTAL HYGIENIST:
Part Time. Tuesday
3-8, Thursday 3-7
Email, Fax, Send
resume to
Carpenter Dental,
1086 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort,
18704. Carpenter
Dental@hotmail.com
Fax 570-714-5184.
HEALTH ASSISTANT
Hazleton Area
School District
The Hazleton Area
School District is
seeking applicants
for the position of
Health Assistant.
This a temporary
position for the
remainder of the
2011-2012 school
year under the
supervision of a
Certified School
Nurse. Interested
applicants must be
registered in Penn-
sylvania as a Regis-
tered Nurse, cur-
rently certified in
First Aid, CPR and
AED, and must pos-
sess a valid motor
vehicle operators
license.
Interested persons
should submit a let-
ter of application,
application form,
copy of certificate
and copies of
required clearances
to Dr. Francis X.
Antonelli, Acting
Superintendent,
Hazleton Area
School District, 1515
West 23rd Street,
Hazleton, PA 18202
no later than 4:00
PM on Thursday,
February 16,
2012.
The Hazleton Area
School District is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Lakeside Nursing
Center
is looking for:
CNA
Part Time 3 - 11 pm
Apply in person
245 Old Lake Rd
Dallas Pa 18612
(570) 639-1885
E.O.E
548 Medical/Health
Part Time
LPN Positions
Looking for caring
& compassionate
people for
Alzheimers Per-
sonal Care Facility.
Reliable applicants
need only apply. No
phone calls please.
Apply within.
KEYSTONE
GARDEN ESTATES
100 NARROWS RD
ROUTE 11
LARKSVILLE
Physical/Occupational
Therapists
CareGivers America
Home Health Ser-
vices has Full Time
openings for
PTs & OTs. Join
our expanding ther-
apy team and learn
to translate Evi-
dence-Based Ther-
apy into practice!
Company car pro-
vided. Resumes to
rjacobs@caregivers
america.com
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!
FCCY is looking for
people to help meet
the growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested in
becoming foster
parents call 1-800-
747-3807. EOE.
554 Production/
Operations
TOOLMAKER
Full time 2nd shift
position. Ability to
use all shop tools
and machines,
experience in set-
up and operating
CNC equipment a
plus. Job requires
working to close
tolerances and from
prints.
Excellent salary and
benefits package.
Submit resume to:
MICHAEL HOLCOMB,
DIAMOND
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY,
P. O. BOX 4174
WYOMING, PA
18644
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MRG
A Phenomenal
Place to Work!
Marshall Retail
Group is Ameri-
cas largest and
premier independ-
ent specialty
retailer in the casi-
no and resort
industry.
We are currently
looking for an
experienced
Assistant
Store Manager
&
Customer Sales
Associates
The qualified can-
didate must have
a background in
retail manage-
ment, including
excellent verbal
and written com-
munication skills,
Phenomenal Cus-
tomer Service
Skills and be
detailed oriented.
We offer a com-
petitive salary
including bonus
potential, medical
and dental insur-
ance, 401(K), PTO
and a generous
employee dis-
count.
Please apply
online at
www.marshall
retailgroup.com
or fax your
resume to
609-317-1126
SALESPERSON
Expanding commer-
cial disposal com-
pany seeks motivat-
ed sales rep to call
on existing cus-
tomers and develop
new commercial
accounts. Experi-
ence required.
Salary with com-
plete benefit pack-
age. Please send
resume to:
Attn: Jack,
500 N Poplar St,
Berwick PA 18603
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
LIQUOR LICENSE
FOR SALE. Luzerne
County. $23,000.
570-574-7363
610 Business
Opportunities
LIQUOR LICENSE
and equipment for
sale. Luzerne Co.
By appointment
only 570-824-3223
MOSS COLLECTOR
who owns/or has
access to large
tract (s), private
woodlands. Must
I.D. moss & eco-
harvest in bulk, dry
& deliver to Hones-
dale. 570-253-4704
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
PEDAL CAR 1980s
era black Copen-
hagen AJ Foyt Indy
pedal car and red
1980s era Marlboro
pedal Indy car $200
for both. 696-3988
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
FREEZER, Frigidaire
23 cu. ft. upright in
great condition. Call
$300. 592-1193
GENES
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
WASHER & electric
dryer, Moving. Very
good condition ask-
ing $400. for both.
570-693-1462
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
CRADLE & SWING:
baby girl purple fish-
er Price purchased
at Babies R Us. paid
$169. asking $75.
Excellent condition.
570-301-3484 or
570-631-6635
CRIB/TODDLER BED
brand new no mat-
tress $30. Pack n
Plays $25. Graco
Snap N Go $20.
Jumparoo $25,
Wedding Dress $50,
Tiara $20. Travel
System like new, 2
car seat bases $75,
Bird Cages $25
each. 693-3028
726 Clothing
CLOTHING boys
name brand jeans
sizes 7 reg, 8 reg,
10 slim $5 each
Childerns Place
winter coat 5/6 $20
Columbia winter
coat 8 $25 570-
823-4432 aft 4pm
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
COMMUNION SUIT
boys, worn twice,
size 14 $30.
570-654-4113
JACKET, leather,
black, small new
$50. Dolce Gab-
bana handbag
$200. 654-4440
726 Clothing
DRESSES (2) adult
Oratorio black with
empire waist and
velvet top, Formal
Fashions, size 10
$20. Black satin
short sleeve formal
gown Southeast-
ern, size 6. 100%
polyester $15.
(570) 574-8766
JACKETS black
medium, $60. Fox
jacket small $50.
570-822-2641
SUITS 5, mens,
32l, sizes between
38-39. All for $150
or sold separately
call 570-654-4793
WEDDING GOWN
size 9-10 used
once, preserved in
box $30. Kids
clothes 6 months -
12 months, brand
new $1. and up.
570-825-0569
732 Exercise
Equipment
ELLIPTICAL/STAIR
STEPPER excellent
condition, barely
used. $200.00 Call
570-332-4869
TREADMILL
Cadence 2300,
excellent condition .
$200 Exercise Bike
stationary. $ 60
570-735-2081
TREADMILL electric
with pad, proform
$65. 570-822-2641
744 Furniture &
Accessories
A BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in plastic!
$150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
A BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in plastic!!
$150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
BED FRAME with
headboard, queen
$50. Kitchen table
$40. 570-235-9385
or 570-820-8023
BED FRAME, queen,
tubular steel head &
foot board, $200.
Black wicker chair
$25. SHELVING,
metal, 4 shelves,
$5. (570) 654-4440
BEDROOM SET: 6
pc. Dresser, mirror,
door chest, 2 night
stands and head-
board that is good
for full, queen or
king size. Must see
great shape. $450
570-814-5477
COMPUTER DESK,
walnut wood, 5h
x5l, used 2 months.
Moving, paid $595
sell for $200.
570-592-1541.
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
RECLINER SOFA
burgundy, like new
$300. Futon, wood
frame, thick mat-
tress with cover
$100. Microwave
cart $50. 824-4185
ROCKER, wood/tap-
estry, $75. RECLIN-
ER, Burgundy velour
cloth, $125. SOFA,
chair, ottoman, 3
tables, great for
den. Wood and
cloth, all in excellent
condition. $450.
Call after 6 PM
570-675-5046
SOFA & matching
chair, excellent con-
dition, 2 years old
$400. 288-2062
SOFA, like new,
microfiber, beige
color, kick-out
recliners on sides,
beautiful. $300.
Call 570-287-4933
750 Jewelry
VALENTINES DAY
is just around the
corner. Are you
looking for that
special gift for the
man or women in
your life or just a
friend? We have
gold, gold filled,
silver, rings,
necklaces,
watches, trinkets
for both men &
women so why not
come in & see us?
OPEN ON
VALENTINES
DAY!
Visit us as 134 Rt.
11, Larksville or call
570-855-7197
Bring this ad &
we will give you
an extra 10% off
your purchase
of $50 or more.
Line up a place to live
in classified!
758 Miscellaneous
WANTED
ALL JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
ANGELS set of 2
Syrocco for wall
$20. Beautiful 2
piece wall planter by
Syrocco, top half
has a spout bottom
can be filled with
flowers or greenery
$25. Deluxe all-in-
one paper cutter/
dispenser 1 com-
plete welded frame,
regular blade, light
gray includes paper/
dispenser (Bulman
Products) $35.
Hearing impaired
(Opentech miracle
phone), feel your
caller voice, visual
ringer flashes when
there is an incoming
call, instructional
video also included
$20. Sears 36 TV
display technology:
C RT (tube), $65.
570-288-8689
CABINET from old
Singer sewing
machine $10.
570-474-5653
CANES & walking
sticks, new batch.
Variety of 30+ avail-
able. Made from
slippery maple
trees. $4-$5 each.
Over 200 Christmas
& household items.
Includes, Christmas
trees, ornaments,
flowers, vases, bas-
kets, lamps, candle
lights, Samsonite
belt massager, 4
pieces of luggage.
all for$60. 735-2081
CHRISTMAS TREE
7 1/2 used 3 times
asking $50.
570-825-0569
DINNERWARE 64
piece $35. Black
carpet 60x*0 $20.
White lace 50 yards
8 straight piece
with 3 gather riffle
$40. Wedding
bows, white lace 24
for $12. Farberware
coffee urn 12 to 55
cups, need stem
$25. 570-654-4440
DINNERWARE SET
service for 8 with
matching silver-
ware, white raised
edges $45.
570-696-0187
DONUT DISPLAY
CASE, white, lighted
29 deepx42 w
x68H, 5 shelves, 2
lower compart-
ments, originally
$400 asking $200.
Cappaccino Mr.
Coffee maker $10. 2
coffee grinders $20.
2 paper towel dis-
pensers $40. 74 oz
airpot containers
$10. 6 shelf condi-
ment display $30.
570-885-6584
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GRILL/GAS small,
good condition $25.
neg. 570-510-7763
HEATER, tower
quartz, electric,
$20. Yale fireproof
safe 13x17 1/2 $50.
School desk $15.
570-825-5847
NOOK COLOR in
box. Used approxi-
mate 1 hour. $150
firm. Call 823-5943
758 Miscellaneous
HELMET Fly Venom
ATV/BMX /motorcy-
cle helmet unisex
adult xl, pink/black,
like brand new, only
used once. $60
Christmas casse-
role dish ceramic
casserole dish, holly
berry design, like
new $10 Tampa Bay
Buccaneers clock
NFL clock, like new.
$15. 570-235-6053
MILK CAN & lid,
painted black has
decal, $30. Kaz
cool moisture
humidifier with air
cleaning filter, 20-24
hour operation,
$12. Beautiful hand
made 25 Raggedy
Ann & Andy doll,
hand made clothes
with embroided
faces, sold in set
$75.HP FAX-900 a
stand alone plain-
paper inkjet facsimi-
le (fax) machine
$15. Canon CB-2LV
battery charger for
the Canon NB-4L Li-
Ion also comes with
the Canon NB-4L Li-
Ion battery for
Canon SD1400IS,
SD940IS, SD960IS
and Other Select
Canon digital cam-
eras $20. 650-8710
PING PONG TABLE
asking $25.
570-825-5847
SWIFTER wet jet
mop $8. 2 - X-
box live 3 months -
$20.00 or $21.00 if
mailed. 868-6018
SWING
$20.
570-510-7763
TABLE TOP. Oval
glass. 40x51.5
FREE. 570-735-7331
TABLEWARE gold
color $100.
570-822-2641
TANNING BED, Full
Size Excellent Con-
dition. $1,000
570-332-4869.
TIRES. Studded
snow (2) Traction
King plus/10 ply.
245-75-16-M&S.
Lightly used. $149.
570-333-4827
774 Restaurant
Equipment
GRILL: 24 electric
table top. 208
phase. Made by
Anvil. $400.
570-542-7532
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV Sony Trinitron
36 tube with flat
front. HD ready. V.
good condition.
$30.
(570) 855-9221
TVS Magnavox 60
projection $175. 4
TVS all sizes &
makes, work great
all for $50. Must go.
570-235-9385 or
570-820-8023
784 Tools
CHAINSAW Ryobi
20 cut with carry-
ing case, used
once, sell $165.
570-878-2849
COMPOUND SAW
Craftsman with fold-
ing metal stand
$225. 457-7854
GENERATOR Troy-
bilt, 10HP, 550
watts, with 4-way
electrical splitter,
like new, great buy
$650.
570-457-7854
786 Toys & Games
RADIO FLYER items-
Liberty Horse $125.
Rocket $40. First
scooter $20. Wagon
$50. Butterscotch
the horse , fabric
saddle included.
$125. All in very
good condition.
570-855-8966
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HIGHEST PRICE
PAID FOR YOUR
UNWANTED
GOLD!
We Will Come to
Your Location
1-800-822-6253
570-885-2766
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PAGE 4D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
FREE STATE INSPECTION AS
LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months
payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate.
Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. BUY FOR prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of
vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends FEBRUARY 29, 2012.
15K MILES!
TO CHOOSE
FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING
AT
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
27K MILES!
2,000 MILES!
23K MILES!
30K MILES!
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
33K MILES!
13K MILES!
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
LOW LOW MILES!
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
48K MILES!
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 5D
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
545 Marketing/
Product
554 Production/
Operations
545 Marketing/
Product
554 Production/
Operations
566 Sales/Business
Development
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
548 Medical/Health
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
548 Medical/Health
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
Earn Extra Cash
For Just A Few
Hours A Day.
Deliver
To nd a route near you and start
earning extra cash, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Hunlock Creek/Sweet Valley
(MOTOR ROUTE)
$1200 Monthly Prot + Tips
165 daily papers / 216 Sunday papers
Main Road, State Route 118, Trojan Road,
Grassy Pond Road, Evergreen Est.
Jackson Hill Road, Mooretown Road
Hunlock Creek
(MOTOR ROUTE)
$800 Monthly Prot + Tips
116 daily papers / 145 Sunday papers
Benscoter Avenue, Gray Road, Main Road,
Sweet Valley Road, Broadway Road
Wilkes-Barre/North
$700 Monthly Prot + Tips
174 daily / 198 Sunday
Custer Street, N. Empire Street,
Logan Street, New Market Street
Hillside Street, E. Northampton Street
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons)
7
3
9
1
9
5
290 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre 570-301-2277
NEPAs PREMIER PRE-OWNED
AUTO DEALERSHIP IS SEEKING AN
AUTO SALES
EXECUTIVE
EARN THE TOP COMPENSATION YOU DESERVE
Superior Pay Plan
Paid Benefts Pkg.
Paid Vacation
Aggressive Advertising Budget
Huge, Constantly
Replenished Inventory
5 Day Work Week
Excellent Working Conditions
Modern Facility
High Traffc Location
FAX RESUME: 570-824-1599
EMAIL RESUME: jbaloga@nationwidecarsales.net
AMERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
The economy may be slowing, but GWC Warran-
ty is growing! GWC, a nationwide leader in vehi-
cle service contracts, is seeking a Marketing Man-
ager for our brand new Wilkes-Barre executive
office. The ideal candidate will possess an analyt-
ical mind, an eagerness to manage a variety of
projects and the ability to drive those projects to
completion. Typical projects would include:
Strategic differentiation, market segmentation,
gathering voice of the customer data, market-spe-
cific growth strategies and brand messaging.
This job is MBA-level work but may also be per-
fect for the high-performing individual who has
experience overseeing process development and
execution of strategic, corporate initiatives. Can-
didates must possess a bachelors degree and have
strong working knowledge of the Microsoft
Office Suite (Excel, Project & PowerPoint in par-
ticular). Additional knowledge of other database
& operating platforms is a plus.
GWC Warranty offers a competitive salary &
comprehensive benefits package including med-
ical and 401k.
Marketing
Manager
Interested candidates may submit their
resumes via email to
careers@gwcwarranty.com
or by fax at 570-456-0967
Area manufacturer is accepting applications for
Production Manager. This position reports direct-
ly to the V.P. of Operations and oversees a multi
department production facility. Candidates will
have several years experience in the manufactur-
ing of products in a fast pace manufacturing envi-
ronment. Motivating employees and developing
on floor work flow strategy and methodology is
the core of this position. Daily interaction and
problem solving with several departments in oper-
ations.
The successful candidate has 5 years experience
in management; self motivated, able to work in a
fast paced environment, has the ability to multi-
task; is highly organized; knowledge of lean man-
ufacturing and six sigma are a plus but not
required. Experience working in a manufactur-
ing/assembly facility preferred.
We offer a competitive salary and benefits.
Send resume and salary history to:
c/o The Times Leader
Box 2935
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250
Production Manager
Franklin Security Bank, a local independent
community bank, is seeking a Deposit
Operations Clerk at our Wilkes-Barre location.
Duties include reconciling general ledger
accounts, processing Federal Reserve daily
returns, processing Internet banking and debit
card requests, monitoring supply room inventory
and ordering supplies, and providing backup for
mail service.
Candidates must have a high school diploma or
equivalent, good communication skills, ability to
follow directions, strong organizational skills, and
proficiency in the use of Microsoft Excel and
Word. Banking industry/systems experience
preferred.
For consideration, please submit a resume to
Franklin Security Bank, Human Resources, 1065
Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 or email
to hr@franklinsecuritybank.net.
EOE
7
3
9
1
4
2
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
NEEDED
VALLEY CHEVROLET
SERVICE COMPLEX
221 Conyngham Avenue, Wilkes-Barre
Valley Chevrolet Is Seeking
Class A and BTechnicians.
GM Experience Preferred. ASE Is A Plus
Inspection License & OwnTools Required
We Offer:
Competitive Compensation Program
(Potential earnings over $20/hour)
Benefts Uniforms
Apply in Person to Jerry Kruszka 8:30am - 4:30pm
CNAs
Certified Nurse Assistants
FULL TIME 3-11
PART TIME 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7
Great Pay & Benefits
To apply or to learn about our
endless career opportunities
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Or visit us and apply in person!
395 Middle Road, Nanticoke
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Feb. 13: $1,720.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT: Snowy, pure
white DSH male. 19
months, playful,
special, sheds very
little, very good, all
veted have papers,
FREE to loving
home with TLC. call
Nina 570-851-0436
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BOXER PUPPIES
3 male & 1 female
purebred puppies.
No papers. Shots &
dewormed. Tails
docked & dew
claws removed.
$600 each.
570-885-3431
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
CORGI PUPS
Pembroke. Males &
Females. Shots &
wormed. Reds &
Tris. $400-$495.
Ready to go. Pic-
tures available.
570-799-0192
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
3 males left. Black
& rust. Ready to
go! $500 each.
570-542-7532
GERMAN SHEP-
HERD, purebred,
female, no children,
fenced yard. FREE
570-262-1917
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPS
ACA registered with
Pedigrees. Vet
checked, wormed.
1st shots. $600
Ready NOW!
570-336-6162
POMERANIANS
AKC, 8 weeks, 3
females. Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. Home
Raised. $550.
570-864-2643
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
COCKATEIL, FREE,
white approximate 4
years old, cage,
stand & food includ-
ed. Call 570-287-
0148 between 9am-
8pm anyday.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
AVOCA
30 Costello Circle
Fine Line construc-
tion. 4 bedroom 2.5
bath Colonial. Great
floor plan, master
bedroom, walk in
closet. 2 car
garage, fenced in
yard. 2 driveways,
above ground pool
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3162
$248,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
BACK MOUNTAIN
Beautiful 5 bed-
room, 2.2 baths &
FANTASTIC Great
Room with built in
bar, private brick
patio, hot tub &
grills! 4 car garage
with loft + attached
2 car garage.
Situated on over 6
acres of privacy
overlooking Francis
Slocum with a great
view of the lake!
Lots of extras & the
kitchen is out of this
world! MLS#12-475
$599,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
BACK MOUNTAIN
Between Dallas &
Tunkhannock
Updated well main-
tained 2 story house
with 4 bedrooms, 2
kitchens and 2 story
addition. 1 car
garage. On 2 lots.
Can be furnished for
rental income. Lots
of possibilities. Only
asking $153,000.
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search homes in
Tunkhannock.
$275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion optional mem-
bership. Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $259,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
CENTERMORELAND
Wyoming County
Home with 30 Acres
This country estate
features 30 acres of
prime land with a
pretty home, ultra
modern kitchen, 2
full modern baths,
bright family room,
den, living room and
3 good sized bed-
rooms. This proper-
ty has open fields
and wooded land, a
stream, several
fieldstone walls and
lots of road
frontage. Equipment
and rights included.
$489,000. 11-3751
Call Jerry Bush Jr.
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate
570-288-2514
906 Homes for Sale
COURTDALE
57 White
Rock Terrace
Spacious contem-
porary custom built
home on 6.4 acres
with 4-5 bedrooms
& 3.5 baths. Coun-
try living in town. 3
car garage, heated
in-ground pool, liv-
ing room features
floor to ceiling win-
dows, marble entry-
way with spiral
staircase, spectac-
ular lower level rec
room with wet bar &
gas fireplace. Great
views from 61x9
deck! Home war-
ranty included. All
measurements
approximate.
MLS #11-3971
$ 438,000
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
DALLAS
143 Nevel Hollow
Road
Great country living
in this 3 bedroom, 2
& 1/2 bath home
with 1 car attached
garage, large enter-
tainment room
lower level. Plus a
30'x30' detached
garage with open
2nd floor ready to
finish & mechanics
pit in one stall.
MLS 11-4124
$195,000
570-675-4400
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
20 Fox Hollow Drive
Well maintained
two story with
fully finished lower
level awaits its
new family. 4-6
bedroom, 3.5 bath,
2 fireplaces. One
year home warranty
included. Wonderful
neighborhood.
$270,000
MLS #11-3504
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
DALLAS
244 Overbrook Rd.
Great starter home
- move-in condition
3 bedroom. All
appliances included.
Rear Deck with
Mountain View.
MLS 12-234
$109,000
570-675-4400
DALLAS
3 bedroom brick
Cape Cod, with 2
baths, on a corner
lot near
Dallas Schools,
with easy access
to shopping.
MLS# 12-12
$125,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
Charming 2 bed-
room Cape Cod in
Franklin Township.
L-shaped living
room with hard-
wood floors, eat in
kitchen & private
driveway.
$119,900
MLS#11-3255
Call Joe moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Fantastic country
home on 2.5 acres
on a very private
road with a 32 x
48 barn and 2 car
& 1 car detached
garages. Very
charming home
with a family room
& fireplace, and a
library or office.
The barn was used
for horses a few
years ago and, with
proper zoning, may
be used as
such again.
MLS# 12-468
$289,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Four bedroom
Colonial with hard-
wood floors in for-
mal dining and living
room. Modern eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with 24
x 30 recreation
room. Deck, hot tub
and ceiling fans.
MLS#11-4504
$229,900
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Line up a place to live
in classified!
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
HUGE REDUCTION
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$114,900
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
Just minutes from
309 this Bi-level is
ideally located near
shopping, schools
and major high-
ways. Complete
with an oak kitchen
with dining area
leading to deck, 3
bedrooms and bath
on the main level
plus L shaped family
room, 4th bedroom,
power room & stor-
age/ laundry area it
awaits its new own-
ers. It offers a spa-
cious rear yard, an
enclosed patio and
has dual access
from 2 streets.
$ 129,900.
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
DALLAS
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
Two bedroom
condo, 2nd floor.
Living/dining room
combination. 1,200
square feet of easy
living. Two bal-
conies, one car
garage nearby.
Security system,
cedar closet, use of
in ground pool.
$109,000
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DALLAS OAK HILL
3 bedroom ranch.
Remodeled kitchen.
Added family room.
Master bedroom
with 1/2 bath. Beau-
tiful oak floor. 3 sea-
son room. Deck &
shed. Garage. 11-
4476. 100x150 lot.
$154,900. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
PRICE
REDUCED
Charming 4 bed-
room, 3 bath
home situated on
1 1/4 acre on a
private setting.
Close to schools
and shopping. Liv-
ing room with
beautiful stone
fireplace and built
ins. Hardwood
floors throughout.
Master suite on
1st floor. Kitchen
has cherry cabi-
nets with tile
floors. Screened
porch. Detached
2 car garage.
$335,000
For appointment
570-690-0752
DALLAS TWP
Step out of your
spacious lower
level family room to
your large fenced
backyard with 2
tiered patio. This 3
bedroom country
setting on over
1 acre of land also
features 2 car
detached garage
with loft.
$230,000
MLS 11-3657
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DALLAS
Lush setting on
almost 5 acres with
magnificent stone
walls and fish pond!
This 4400SF home/
offices is in need of
TLC & lots of work.
Living room with oak
walls & coffered oak
ceiling, family room
with large wood
burning fireplace.
Large master suite
with master bath.
Four bedrooms with
three full baths and
two half baths.
Owners had offices
& storage adjacent
to house included in
the 4400SF. Large
two-car garage and
separate out-build-
ing. MLS#11-1628
REDUCED TO
$239,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
DRUMS
263 Trapper
Springs
Beautiful setting on
a corner lot in
Beech Mt resorts
area. 3 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath home has
plenty of extra
space in the finished
basement which
includes washer
dryer hookup, fire-
place, walk out
patio. The 1st floor
master bedroom
has large master
bath with jacuzzi
tub. Breakfast nook
with lots of win-
dows, a partial wrap
around deck and
another deck off the
dining room or fami-
ly room, living room
also has a fireplace.
$179,900. 11-1243
Call Louise Gresh
570-233-8252
CENTURY 21
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
DRUMS
35 Sand Springs Dr
Exceptional quality
home with many
upgrades on level
lot with mature land-
scaping, covered
stone patio, a shed/
playhouse & jungle
gym. 4 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath, study on
1st floor, 2 story
open foyer, kitchen
with island & break-
fast nook open to
family room with
fireplace, formal liv-
ing room & dining
room, all appliances
stay including wash-
er & dryer, laundry
on 2nd floor. Lots of
closet space.
$269,000
Louise Gresh
570-233-8252
CENTURY 21
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Immediate openings
for part-time work in
Dallas and Laflin
Local manufacturing plant
Up to 22.5 hours per week
Flexible shifts and days
Shifts pay $10.15/$10.40/$10.46 per hour
Must be a minimum of 18 years of age
Employment applications can be
obtained at:
Offset Paperback Mfrs., Inc.
2211 Memorial Hwy.
Dallas, PA 18612
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PAGE 6D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS
Practically new
ranch home in
beautiful St. Johns
Estates. Just a few
minutes from Rts.
80 & 81. This home
features tile floors
thruout the spa-
cious living area.
Green area behind
the property and no
building lots on one
side makes for a
beautiful country
setting with the con-
veniences of public
water & sewer. Spa-
cious back yard with
walk-in access to
basement. 2 decks
& a covered patio.
MLS 12-162
$237,000
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
DURYEA
1107 Spring Street
Superb two story
with 3 bedrooms & 1
baths. Hardwood
floors, gas heat,
vinyl siding, large
yard with garage.
Call Jim for details.
Offered at $169,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
DURYEA
125 McAlpine St
Ideal starter is this
appealing two bed-
room 2 story with
large lot and 1.5 car
garage. Plenty of off
street parking, in
solid neighborhood.
MLS 11-4313
$85,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, 4 bed-
room, 10 year old
home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or rec room. Mod-
ern oak kitchen,
living room, central
air, in ground pool,
fenced yard, att-
ached 2 car garage.
Great home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732. $239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
youre looking for a
Ranch, dont miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
REDUCED
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$315,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283. $89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247. $52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath single,
modern kitchen
with appliances,
sunroom, hard-
wood floors on
1st and 2nd
floor. Gas heat,
large yard, OSP.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
Nice size four
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
EXETER
REDUCED
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$119,900
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY-FORT
167 Slocum St
Completely renovat-
ed 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath. New high effi-
ciency gas warm air
furnace with central
a/c. All new plumb-
ing & wiring. New
siding, windows,
doors, roof, insula-
tion, carpeting, dry-
wall & tile. New
kitchen with stain-
less stove, fridge &
dishwasher. New
baths. 1st floor
washer/dryer hook-
up. 50x150 lot.
$139,900.
Call 570-954-8825
gckar1@yahoo.com
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
171 Boland Avenue
Motivated seller!
Well kept starter
home with nice size
rooms, 2nd floor
replacement win-
dows and great
yard with possible
off street parking
from alley access.
MLS 11-3043
$59,900
570-675-4400
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
235 Pfouts Street
Well cared for 1/2
double with gas
heat, modern
kitchen, 1st floor full
bath & laundry area.
Fenced yard,
detached garage,
front porch, back
yard patio & newer
roof. MLS 11-3436
REDUCED
$42,000
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
146-148 Regal St
Newer kitchens
Large baths
Tenant occupied
3 bedroom each
side.
Call for appointment
$74,900
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
20 Dexter St.,
Nice starter
home with shed -
M MOVE OVE-I -IN N R READY EADY! !
3 bedroom. Fenced
yard. Security sys-
tem. Roof 2006.
Hanover Area
Schools. This home
would be eligible for
the LUZERNE COUNTY
GROWING
HOMEOWNERS
INITIATIVE. Seller will
help with closing
cost expenses.
MONTHLY PAYMENT
$191 ON A 30 YEAR
MORTGAGE- HOW CAN
YOU BEAT THAT?
MLS #11-3023
$39,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HANOVER TWP.
20 Knox Street
Two homes, front &
rear, on 1 lot. One
car garage, patio.
Front home has 3
bedrooms, huge
kitchen, lots of
storage and a
workshop in the
basement; Rear
home features new
kitchen, 2 bed-
rooms and good
storage space.
Call for appointment
$78,900
MLS# 10-4597
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
285 Lyndwood Ave.
Brick 3 bedroom
Ranch with full fin-
ished basement.
Home features
large modern
kitchen, 3 nice size
bedrooms, all with
closets, hall coat
closet, w/w, mod-
ern bath, ceiling
fans, fenced yard.
Private driveway,
newer furnace.
Assessed value and
taxes recently
reduced!
MLS 12-222
$89,900
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
Antonik &
Associates, Inc.
570-735-7494
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on nice
sized lot. Newer
windows, walk up
attic. 3 bedrooms,
nice room sizes,
walk out basement.
Great price you
could move right in.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HANOVER TWP.
Double block with
both sides having
nice secluded yards
and decks. Close to
area schools. Wood
floors just redone on
owners side. Won-
derful opportunity to
live in one side and
rent the other side
to help pay your
mortgage!
MLS#11-4537
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-322-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
Very well main-
tained 2-story home
with 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen and
1.5 baths. This home
also has a first floor
laundry room, duct-
less air conditioner,
gas steam heat and
a fenced yard. This
is a beauty! Make an
appointment today!
MLS#11-4433
$79,900
Karen Altavilla
570-283-09100
ext 28
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARDING
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
raised Ranch on 1
acre. Home boasts
a gas fireplace in
living room, tradi-
tional fireplace in
finished basement.
Central A/C, 2.5 car
garage, covered
deck, out of flood
zone. $179,900. Call
570-388-4244
570-388-2773
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
JENKINS TWP
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms,
1 Bath, Finished
Walk-Out
Basement, Single
Car Garage
Nice corner lot
$59,500
Call Vince
570-332-8792
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise Drive
PRICED TO SELL!
This 4 bedroom has
2 car garage with
extra driveway,
central air, veranda
over garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and wet
bar. Sunroom
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
21 Spring St.
2 or 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home. Large
fenced yard with
shed, 50x200 lot. 3
off street
parking spaces.
By Owner
$99,900
570-825-9867
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom starter
home with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
220 Wright Ave
Modern 3 bedroom
rancher. Woodburn-
ing fireplace in living
room. Gas heat.
Central air condi-
tioning. Aluminum
siding. Newer roof.
Nice yard. Extras.
(FHA financing:
$3,322 down, $542
month, 4.25% inter-
est, 30 years.) Sell-
er willing to assist
with buyer's closing
costs, up to 6% of
purchase price!
MLS 11-4225
$94,900
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
KINGSTON
29 Landon Ave N
Striking curb appeal!
Beautiful interior
including a gas fire-
place, hardwood
floors, modern
kitchen, all new car-
peting on the sec-
ond floor, extra
large recently
remodeled main
bath, serene back
patio and spacious
yard. MLS#11-3075
$144,900
Call Mary Price
570-696-5418
570-472-1395
Kingston
3 bedroom bi-level
with two modern,
full baths & one 3/4
bath. Living room
with fireplace and
skylights, built in
china cabinets in
dining room. Lower
level family room
with fireplace and
wet bar. Large
foyer with fireplace.
MLS#11-3064
$289,500
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
38 W. Walnut St.
Charming 4/5 bed-
room with 1.5
baths. Beautifully
appointed kitchen
w/granite counter
tops, cherry cabi-
nets and hardwood
floors. Gas fireplace
in living room, lead-
ed glass windows
in living room and
dining room. Nice
back deck, 2 car
garage and 4 sea-
son front porch.
MLS 11-4103
$179,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
431 Chestnut Ave.
Charming 2 story
single family home
with upgrades,
including new
kitchen cabinets,
furnace, hot water
heater, 200 amp
electric, 2 car
detached garage.
Walk up attic for
additional storage
space. MLS 11-4106
$129,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284. $74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
KINGSTON
794 Woodland Drive
Deceptively spa-
cious. Very well
kept. Quiet location.
Move in condition.
Attractive neighbor-
ing properties. Mod-
est taxes. Newish
furnace and roofing.
Nicely fenced yard.
$129,900. 11-4547
Call Dale Williams
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-256-3343
KINGSTON
799 Floralon Drive
New Listing
Split level, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 baths,
partially finished
family room, gas
heat, air, enclosed
rear porch, att-
ached garage. Fam-
ily neighborhood.
12-97 $120,000
Go To The Top...
CALL JANE KOPP!
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
A Classy Move-in
Ready 5 bed-
room, with recent
updates including
flooring, bathroom,
recessed lighting &
many new widows.
Woodburner on
brick hearth, eat in
kitchen, formal
dining room. Good
room sizes, fenced
yard, patio, private
driveway, walking
distance to park,
shopping, public
transportation,
restaurants, etc.
MLS #11-4283
$132,900.
Call Pat today @
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
570-287-1196
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
Large double, great
older home with all
modern updates.
Pantry, kitchen, liv-
ing room, formal
dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
Collect $1300 rent
from other side.
$195,000
570-288-4203
KINGSTON
Completely
remodeled, spa-
cious 4-5 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
home with tons of
original character.
Desirable
Kingston neigh-
borhood. Hard-
woods through-
out, 2 zone cen-
tral air, 2 gas fire-
places, finished
basement, new
vinyl fence. Crown
molding, ample
storage, many
built-ins.
A must see!
$275,000
Call for
appointment
570-417-6059
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$119,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON REDUCED!!
177 Third Ave.
Neat as a pin! 3
bedroom, 2.5
baths, end unit
townhome with nice
fenced yard. Bright
Spacious kitchen,
main level family
room, deck w/
retractable awning.
Gas heat/central
air, pull down attic
for storage and 1
car garage. Very
affordable town-
home in great cen-
tral location!
MLS 11-1282
$134,500
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON TWP
573 Carverton Rd
Privacy & serenity!
This 40 acre estate
features living room
with fireplace &
hardwood floor;
family room with
vaulted ceiling &
fireplace; 1st floor
master bedroom &
bath with jetted tub
& stall shower; pan-
elled den; dining
room with stone
floor & skylight; 3
additional bedrooms
& 2 baths. Central
Air, 3 outbuildings.
$725,000.
MLS 11-4056
Call Nancy Judd
Joe Moore
570-288-1401
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
LAFLIN
Lovely brick ranch
home in great
development. 2
bedrooms, 2.5
baths. All hardwood
floors, brand new
roof. 2 family rooms
suitable for mini
apartment. 1st floor
laundry, sunroom,
central air, alarm
system, 1 car
garage. Very good
condition. 11-2437
$200,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE TOWNSHIP
Reduced to
$149,900.
Owner Says Sell!
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 2 bath dou-
blewide on 2 acres
with detached 2 car
garage. Thermal
windows, wood
burning fireplace in
TV room, walk-in
closet, full base-
ment, front and rear
decks.
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
LARKSVILLE
12 First St.
Very well kept
home in a nice
neighborhood. New
kitchen with Corian
counter tops. Newly
painted rooms.
MLS 12-267
$85,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in
move in condi-
tion with updat-
ed kitchen and
baths. Nice yard
with shed and
potential off
street parking.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom & laundry.
Replacement win-
dows on 2nd floor.
5 year young full
bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar, oak cabinets.
Basement always
DRY! All measure-
ments approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LUZERNE
867 Bennett
With just a minimum
amount of TLC, this
is a great starter
home. Nice location
with great view of
Wyoming Valley and
beyond, off street
parking in rear via
alley. All measure-
ments approximate.
BeinG sold as is.
MLS 10-2774
$60,000
Call Michelle
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 7D
7
3
8
8
7
3
906 Homes for Sale
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country
living, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck & gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
MOUNTAIN TOP
21 Forest Road
Fairview Heights
ranch featuring 3
spacious bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths, fire-
place, 1st floor laun-
dry, floored attic
with walk-in cedar
closet, 2 car
attached garage.
Newer roof, fur-
nace, water heater
and more! Sellers
are licensed real
estate agents.
MLS 11-3419
$169,000
Tony Desiderio
570-715-7734
Century 21 Smith
Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
MOUNTAIN TOP
215 Patriot Circle
Townhouse. Very
good condition. 3
bedroom, 1 bath,
living room with gas
fireplace and hard-
wood floors. Kitchen
offers new stainless
steel appliances, tile
floor, laundry area,
dining room with
built in corner cabi-
nets. MLS 12-238
$124,900
James Banos
Realtor Associate
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
MOUNTAIN TOP
3071 Ablerdeen Rd
Immaculate 4 bed-
room, 2 bath home
on 1 acre. Beautiful-
ly landscaped. In-
ground pool with
solar heat. Custom
Cherry cabinets.
Hardwood floors.
Family room with
gas fireplace. 1 mile
to golf course.
MLS 11-1483
$210,000
Linda Cuono
570-715-7743
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP
33 Valley View Drive
3 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath, 2 car garage,
new roof & hot
water heater, above
ground heated pool,
finished basement.
$210,000
Contact Melissa at
570-430-8263
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$192,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAIN TOP
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night. Price
to sell, $185,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAIN TOP
Meticulously main-
tained ranch home
in convenient Moun-
tain Top location.
Features include 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, charming
foyer entrance,
bright & beautiful liv-
ing room, dining
room opens to mod-
ern eat-in kitchen,
new sun room addi-
tion, large family
room, manicured
lawn with beautiful
hardscape in front.
Large shed, large
unfinished base-
ment with half bath.
MLS#11-3607
$159,900
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAINTOP
FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP
4 bedroom ranch,
hardwood floors,
1.5 bathrooms, for-
mal dining & living
rooms, finished
basement family
room with dry bar,
exercise room, &
workshop. Two car
garage. MLS# 12-5
$161,200
Call Vieve
570-239-6236,
ext. 2772,
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#12-165
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
LINEUP
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Youre in bussiness
with classified!
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Needs work, but
columns, moldings,
and leaded glass
windows are intact.
MLS #12-133
$42,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
1206 Hanover St. S
Spacious two story
home featuring
large kitchen, living
room, formal dining
room & family room.
3 bedrooms, 1 & 1.5
baths. Well main-
tained property with
a two car detached
garage & nice lot.
Split air system &
partial finished
basement with plen-
ty of storage or pos-
sible apartment.
MLS# 11-2881
$99,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
414 Grove Street E
Remodeled 2 story
with new oil furnace,
windows, electric
kitchen, bath, door,
flooring, paint. OSP.
Seller will pay 1st
year property tax.
MLS#11-2760
$85,500
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
NANTICOKE
Great 3 Bedroom
2 story with lots to
offer. Large oak
kitchen with Corian
counters. Oversized
30 x 30 2 car
garage on a beauti-
fully landscaped
fenced lot with
plenty of rear deck-
ing & above the
ground pool for all
of your outdoor
entertaining.
$117,900
MLS# 12-457
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
NANTICOKE
Raised Ranch in
good condition with
3 bedrooms, mod-
ern bath and gas
heat. Large fenced
yard, rear deck, 1
car garage and off
street parking for 3
more cars. New
roof, windows and
bath. Basement is
partially finished.
MLS 12-130
$99,900
Call Patty Lunski
570-814-6671
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES
570-735-7494
NANTICOKE
The potential here is
endless. Former 20
bed personal care
home. Last used as
student housing for
college students,
now it awaits the
new owner. $95,000.
MLS 11-4287. Call
Donna for more
information or to
schedule a showing.
570-947-3824
NEWPORT TWP.
Five bedroom
Contemporary has
a vaulted ceiling in
living room with
fireplace.
Hardwood floors in
dining & living
rooms. 1st floor
master bedroom
with walk in closet.
Lower level family
room. Deck,
garage, separate
laundry.
$257,500
MLS#12-170
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
PENN LAKE
Come relax in your
new 3 bedroom
home while enjoying
the view of the lake.
2 of the bedrooms,
living and bright
sunroom all over-
look the beautiful
lake. $279,000.
MLS 11-4385. Call
Donna for more
information or to
schedule an
appointment.
570-947-3824
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$82,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PITTSTON
20 NEW STREET
NEW, NEW LISTING
Attractive Bi-level
with 2 bedrooms
and room for anoth-
er. 2 full baths, gas
forced air heat,
ventless gas fire-
place & sauna.
Move in condition,
$123,000
MLS 12-193
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
A lot of house for
the money. Corner
home with lots of
space. 9 rooms, 2
1/2 baths, a bonus
room of 42 x 24.
This home is conve-
niently located near
major highways, air-
port and shopping.
Two car detached
garage and nice
yard.
$75,500
MLS# 10-4350
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
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new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
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PITTSTON
Price Reduced! Price Reduced!
168 Elizabeth Street
Sturdy ranch in Ore-
gon Section. 3/4
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Price $89,000.
Call Stephen
570-814-4183
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP
SUSCON AREA
New Listing. Won-
derful home on a
huge country size
lot, in a private set-
ting, just off the
beaten path. Eco-
nomical Dual heat
system, central Air
plus ductless unit,
Lower Level family
room, detached 2
car garage, fire-
place & a great
view from the front
porch! MLS 11-3733
$229,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON TWP.
BY OWNER
459 Broad St.
3 bedroom 1 bath
attractive home in
great location,
hardwood floors
100x144 lot
asking $109,900
570.970.0650
jtdproperties.com
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$164,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own cabin
in the woods.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
A/C, Hardwood &
wall to wall. Mar-
ble tile master bath
with jetted tub &
separate shower.
$189,500
Call 570-285-5119
PLAINS
46-48 Helen St
Well maintained
double block on
quiet street, great
nei ghbor hood.
Perfect home for
you with one side
paying most of
your mortgage, or
would make a
good investment,
with separate utili-
ties & great rents.
Vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl alu-
minum siding, walk
up large attic from
one side, lower
front & rear porch-
es, with two rear
upper enclosed
porches. $119,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
REDUCED REDUCED
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$34,900 $34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
Recently remodeled
single family home
with 1st & 2nd floor
baths, modern
kitchen, large family
room with hard-
wood floors.
$70,000
MLS # 10-4618
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 1791 sq. ft.
1/2 double with
wrap around porch,
shed & garage.
Semi modern
kitchen & bath. 3
bedrooms with gas
heat and plenty of
storage. $24,900.
Possible rent to own
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PRINGLE
234 UNION ST
Previously a double
block converted
into one very
roomy, totally
remodeled single
family home. New
carpeting & flooring
throughout. 2
updated full baths,
one in master suite.
Nicely level fenced
yard with very large
deck & patio fort
entertaining. Zoned
commercial.
$131,900
MLS 11-3575
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
PRICE REDUCED
$425,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
12 Windy Drive
New construction in
the exclusive
Slocum Estates.
Stucco exterior. All
the finest appoint-
ments: office or 5th
bedroom, hard-
wood floors, crown
moldings, 9' ceil-
ings 1st & 2nd floor.
Buy now select
cabinetry & flooring.
MLS #11-1987
$499,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
3 Lehigh St. N
Nice neighborhood
surrounds this
MOVE-IN READY 3
bedroom 2 story.
Wood floors. Built-
in garage. Dallas
School District.
MLS #11-4470
$80,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level
yard with shed.
Large
sunroom/laundry
addition. Lower
level family room
with wood stove.
MLS #11-4178
$163,700
Call
Christrine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SHAVERTOWN
2 Oak Drive
Vacant land ready to
build. One of the last
lots left in this Back
Mountain develop-
ment. (1) one acre
lot. Call for details.
MLS 11-1488
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
570-696-6565
SHAVERTOWN
A home starts with
location and school
district. Triple A
neighborhood and
Dallas School Dis-
trict. Deceiving look-
ing from the exteri-
or-make an appoint-
ment to see this
3600+/-SF home on
three floors. Lots of
oak on the first floor,
kitchen, moldings,
doors, floors. Sec-
ond floor with 4
bedrooms & bonus
room with skylights
& separate comput-
er area, storage
space and walk-in
closets. Very
appealing! Finished
lower level game
room with bath,
three season room
off kitchen and large
adjacent deck for
entertaining, sepa-
rate office/den on
first floor. Dual heat-
ing and air systems,
public utilities.
MLS#11-4064
$349,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SWEET VALLEY
137 Post Office Rd
Great home on 3
acres with addition-
al 5 acres available.
Mostly level - one
third Wooded. Full
Dry Basement
ready for Finishing.
Central Air & Vac, 2
1/2 Bath with
Whirlpool in the First
Floor Master. Gen-
erator Package for
Emergency Power
Supply. Lg 20 x 12
Shed. MLS 11-3369
$219,500
570-675-4400
SWEET VALLEY
5411 Main Road
Commercial zoned
property on busy
corner. Country
Colonial home with
detached 2 car
garage, with addi-
tional office space
and entrance door.
Perfect property for
home based busi-
ness. Eat in kitchen
with brick gas fire-
place, large dining
room and living
room with coal
stove. Finished
basement with 2
rooms & 1/2 bath.
Old fashioned root
cellar off the
kitchen. Large
paved parking area.
MLS 11-2554
$188,000
570-675-4400
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 8D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
906 Homes for Sale
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice country bi-level
on 40 acres with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, kitchen, living
room, family room,
office & laundry
room plus attached
oversized 2 car
garage with work-
shop, rear deck & 3
sheds. Borders
state game lands.
MLS 11-1094.
$319,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
66 Post Office Road
Charming ranch on 1
acre lot. Modern
kitchen, living room
with gas fireplace,
lower level finished,
large deck with
above ground pool,
nicely landscaped.
MLS#11-2627
$164,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED!
4 Oliver Road
Located in the back
part of Oliver Road
in a very private part
of North Lake in
Sweet Valley. Yearn-
ing to be restored,
lake front cape cod
in a very tranquil
setting was formerly
used as a summer
home. MLS 11-2113
$93,500
Jay Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
60 Watkins St
Home features 4
bedrooms, a mas-
ter bedroom on 1st
floor with large walk
in closet, ceiling
fans, screened
porch, sunroom and
workshop. New 200
amp service, interi-
or paint & laundry
area in basement.
MLS#12-128
$105,000
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
SWOYERSVILLE
78 Maltby Ave.
Wonderful family
home in a great
neighborhood. A
large master suite
and family room
addition make this
home a must see!
There is an
inground pool and
attached in-law
suite.
MLS 11-4572
$228,000
Call Kelly
Connolly-Cuba
EXT. 37
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
New Listing!
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home on double lot.
One car garage,
two 3 season
porches, security
system & attic just
insulated.
MLS #12-31
$90,000.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond! $99,700
MLS#11-2253
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
WEST PITTSTON
220 Linden St.
Large 2 story
home with 3
bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths.
Detached
garage,
inground pool.
Home needs
work on the fi
rst floor, 2nd is i
n very good
conditi on.
Kitchen cabi-
nets ready to be
reinstalled. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-78
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
313 Race St.
This home needs
someone to rebuild
the former finished
basement and 1st
floor. Being sold as
is. 2nd floor is
move in ready.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-255
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED
18 Atlantic Ave.
Large 2 story home
with 2 baths,
attached garage.
Being sold as-is.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4475
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WEST WYOMING
550 Johnson St.
Nicely landscaped
corner lot sur-
rounds this brick
front Colonial in
desirable neighbor-
hood. This home
features a spacious
eat in kitchen, 4
bedrooms, 4 baths
including Master
bedroom with mas-
ter bath. 1st floor
laundry and finished
lower level. Enjoy
entertaining under
the covered patio
with hot tub, rear
deck for BBQs and
an above ground
pool. Economical
gas heat only $1224
per yr. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-157
$254,860
Call Michele
Reap
570-905-2336
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
FRONT VIEW
REAR VIEW
BEAUTIFUL BRICK,
SLATE, MARBLE & WOOD
HOUSE. MUST BE SEEN
TO BE APPRECIATED.
2 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. Great kit-
chen with new
stainless steel app-
liances & custom
cabinets with center
island. Dining room
with stone fireplace
& marble floor.
Hardwood floors in
living room, which
also has stone walls
& eight arched win-
dows. Hand carved
wooden staircase
leads to Master
Bedroom Suite with
large closet & large
second bedroom &
bath. Middle level
with custom pool
room. Lower level
has 1/2 bath, bar &
built in stone & glass
hutches. Two new
self-feed rice coal
stoves keep heating
bills to less than
$400 a year! New
roof with lifetime
guarantee, privacy
fence, and 12
above ground pool
with composite
deck. New 2 story,
1 car garage, & a
long driveway for
plenty of parking.
$199,000, firm.
Showings will be
held weekends for
prequalified buyers
only, please.
Call 570-233-7235
WEST WYOMING
Why pay rent when
you can own this 1/2
double? 3 bed-
rooms. Eat in
kitchen. New roof
installed 12/11.
$49,900
MLS# 10-2780
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WEST WYOMING
WHY PAY RENT?
Nice half double
with eat in kitchen,
nice yard, shed and
off street parking.
$49,900
MLS # 11-1910
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
100 Darling St
Nice two bedroom
single, gas heat,
enclosed porch,
fenced yard. Close
to downtown & col-
leges. Affordable at
$42,500. Call
TOWN & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with newer
laminate floors,
vaulted ceiling, 2
large bedrooms.
Finished lower level
with 1/2 bath and
laundry room. Large
family room built in
garage, and wood
pellet stove. No
sign, alarm system.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3290
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
185 West River St
Spacious, quality
home, brick two
story with 6 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 bath, 2
fireplaces, den,
heated sunroom off
living room,
screened porch off
formal dining room,
modern eat-in
kitchen, garage.
Many extras. Sacri-
fice, owner relocat-
ing out of state
Reduced $114,900
MLS 11-2474
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
WILKES-BARRE
2 Story, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1/2 bath
single family. Large
eat-in kitchen, 1st
floor laundry, hard-
wood floors, newer
furnace & water
heater, 1 car
garage. Off street
parking. Quiet one
way street.
$49,900
MLS 11-4171
Call Jim Banos
Coldwell Banker
Rundle
570-991-1883
WILKES-BARRE
241 Dana Street
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 1.5 baths with
textured ceilings,
updated kitchen, all
appliances including
dishwasher, tiled
bath with whirlpool
tub, 2nd floor laun-
dry room. Replace-
ment windows.
DRASTIC
REDUCTION
$60,000
MLS# 11-88
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
285 Blackman St
Great property.
Priced to sell quickly
and in move-in con-
dition! Easy access
to Interstate 81 &
shopping! 11-3215
$36,500
570-675-4400
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
35 Murray St.
Large well kept 6
bedroom home in
quiet neighborhood.
Off street parking,
good size back
yard. Owner very
motivated to sell.
MLS 10-3668
$77,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
39 W. Chestnut St.
Lots of room in this
single with 3 floors
of living space. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
with hardwood
floors throughout,
natural woodwork,
all windows have
been replaced,
laundry/pantry off of
kitchen. 4x10 entry
foyer, space for 2
additional bed-
rooms on the 3rd
floor. Roof is new.
MLS 11-325
$69,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
495-497 S. Grant St
Nice double block in
good condition with
2 bedrooms on
each side. New vinyl
siding. Bathrooms
recently remodeled.
Roof is 2 years old.
Fully rented. Ten-
ants pay all utilities.
MLS11-580.$53,500
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
60 Saint Clair St
Great 4 bedroom
home with new
kitchen, furnace and
bath. Laundry room
off kitchen. Newer
windows and roof.
Hardwood on first
floor. Off street
parking. Older one
car garage. Walk up
attic. MLS 11-1478
$69,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
Former Blessed
Sacrament Church,
Rectory and paved
parking lot. 4,372
square foot Church
1,332 square foot
Rectory. Parking for
40 vehicles.
Three adjacent lots
for one price.
$160,000
MLS#11-4037
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
WILKES-BARRE
Great 3 bedroom
home in mint condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors, fenced lot,
garage. MLS#11-2834
$79,000.
(570) 237-1032
(570) 288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
Great Investment.
Quiet street close to
everything. Nice
size rooms. Both
sides currently rent-
ed. Off street park-
ing in back with a 1
car garage.
$89,900. MLS 11-
4207. Call Donna for
more information or
to schedule a show-
ing. 570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Handyman Special
Extra large duplex
with 7 bedrooms, 2
baths, fireplace,
screened porch, full
basement and 2 car
garage on double
lot in Wilkes-Barre
City. $58,000.
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Large, stately brick
home in Historic Dis-
trict. Large eat-in
kitchen, dining room
2 fireplaces, 5 full
baths & 2 half baths.
Huge master with
office. Large 3rd
floor bedroom. 2
story attic. Custom
woodwork & hard-
wood floors. Leaded
glass, large closets
with built-ins. Needs
some updates. With
large income apt.
with separate
entrance.
Call for
appointment.
ASKING $300,000
Call 570-706-5917
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
WILKES-BARRE
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath home, with 3
season porch and
detached 1 car
garage. Good
starter home in
well established
neighborhood.
Family owned for
many years.
MLS#11-4464
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
NOW REDUCED!
191 Andover St.
Lovely single family
3 bedroom home
with lots of space.
Finished 3rd floor,
balcony porch off of
2nd floor bedroom,
gas hot air heat,
central air and
much more.
Must see!
MLS 11-59
$66,000
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
PARSONS
Reduced - $69,900
262 Stucker Ave &
Extra Lot (3rd street
after baseball field)
7 room (3 bed-
rooms), 1 1/2 baths.
Lower Level has
family room and 1
car attached
garage. To settle
Estate. Drastically
reduced. Original
price $119,900, now
reduced $69,900.
10-2472
Call Joe Bruno
570-824-4560
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
32 Wilson St
No need for flood or
mine subsidence
insurance. 2 story, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
home in a safe,
quiet neighborhood.
Aluminum siding.
Corner, 105x50 lot.
Fenced in yard.
Appraised at
$57,000. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-826-1458
for appointment
WILKES-BARRE
Pine Ridge Estates
Nicely maintained in
move-in condition!
Hardwood floors in
living room, dining
room & family
room. 4 bedrooms,
2 1/2 baths. Securi-
ty system, central
air, gas heat! Nice
room sizes!
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$65,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
1007 Morgan Drive
Beautiful two-story
traditional home
located high & dry in
Pine Ridge Estates,
one of Wilkes-
Barres newest
developments. Fea-
tures 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, master
suite with walk-in
closet, 9 ceilings
and hardwoods on
1st floor, family room
with gas fireplace,
two-car garage and
deck. MLS#11-3479
$229,900
Karen Ryan
570-283-9100 x14
WYOMING
1702 W. Eighth St.
1 story Ranch with
100x200 lot, paved
driveway, new
energy star
replacement win-
dows. Excellent
starter home. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2912
NEW PRICE
$84, 500
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
WYOMING
40 Fifth st
Very nice 2 family,
one side move in
the other rented
separate utilities, 6
rooms each side
plus 1/2 bath
upstairs each side.
Wonderful neigh-
borhood plus short
walking distance to
Wyoming Avenue.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4027. $124,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
WYOMING
768 Lewis Road
Dallas school dis-
trict - Lovely cedar
sided ranch home
on 2.7 acres with
gorgeous setting
overlooking pond.
Heated in ground
pool, 2 car garage,
plus one car garage
with workshop, cen-
tral A/C, finished
basement. Loft area
overlooking 2 story
living room, hot tub.
$5,000.00 carpet
allowance. 10-3570
$275,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
YATESVILLE
New Listing. Beauti-
ful home in Willow
View that shows
Pride of Owner-
ship thruout! Spa-
cious Florida room
that leads to a pri-
vate yard with
extensive landscap-
ing, brand new roof,
3 baths, 4 bed-
rooms, lower level
family room & more!
MLS 11-3714
$298,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Marys St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
BEAR CREEK
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
BACK MOUNTAIN/
HARVEYS LAKE
Restaurant/Bar for
sale. 8,525sf. Turn-
key with seating for
125, bar area seats
24, includes all
equipment, fixtures,
two walk-in coolers,
furnishings, kitchen
equipment, & liquor
license. Two apart-
ments with long
term tenants, gas
heat, handicap
accessible, high
traffic area.
MLS#11-4332
$499,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
HANOVER TWP
22 W. Germania St
This 6,600 sq. ft.
concrete block build-
ing has multiple
uses. 5 offices &
kitchenette. Over
5,800 sq. ft. ware-
house space (high
ceilings). 2 overhead
doors. $85,000
MLS 10-1326
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
JENKINS TWP.
1334 Main St.
1 story, 2,600
sq. ft. commePr-
cial building,
masonry con-
struction with
offices and
warehousing.
Central air,
alarm system
and parking.
Great for con-
tractors or
anyone with
office/storage
needs. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3156
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
KINGSTON
7 Hoyt St
Nice duplex zoned
commercial, can be
used for offices as
well as residential.
All separate utilities.
Keep apt. space or
convert to commer-
cial office space.
Adjacent lot for sale
by same owner.
MLS 11-2176
$85,900
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LARKSVILLE
View this view! You
no longer have to go
into the city to
watch the 4th of
July fireworks! Enjoy
home ownership.
Architecturally built
split level, living
room with beamed
ceiling and wood
burning fireplace,
large dining room
with hardwood
flooring, tiled office
with glass views,
two bedrooms, two
baths, family room,
hobby room, green
house, fish pond,
raised gardens,
grape vines, fruit
trees, 1+/- acres of
property, 2-car
detached garage.
MLS#11-1079
REDUCED TO
$229,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 PAGE 9D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
Each apartment features:
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NOW LEASING!
Leasing Office located at:
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*income restrictions apply
For seniors age 62+ or disabled according to social security guidelines
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
LUZERNE
Over 10,000SF of
storage space in
two buildings. Room
to build another
building, profession-
al, car wash,
restaurant, salon.
Minutes from Cross
Valley Expressway
Exit 6. Survey, storm
water/drainage
control plan and soil
and erosion sedi-
mentation control
plan completed if
you choose to build
a building on the
property. Also a por-
tion is available for
rent. MLS#10-320
REDUCED TO
$199,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church
St.
Great 2 family in
move in condi-
tion on both
sides, Separate
utilities, 6
rooms each. 3
car detached
garage in super
neighborhood.
Walking dis-
tance to col-
lege. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$123,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
166 Vine St.
Nice PPthree
family home in
good location,
fully occupied.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-220
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
Duplex. Aluminum
siding, oil heat, semi
- modern kitchens,
long term tenant. On
a spacious 50 x
150 lot. Motivated
Seller. REDUCED.
$37,900
Anne Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PITTSTON
Rear 49 James
St.
Two 2 bedroom
apartments,
fully rented with
separate utili-
ties on a quiet
street. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-219
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
SALE OR LEASE
PRICE REDUCED
Modern office build-
ing, parking for 12
cars. Will remodel
to suit tenant.
$1800/mo or pur-
chase for
$449,000
MLS 11-751
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PLAINS
107-109 E. Carey St.
High traffic, high
potential location
with enough space
for 2 second floor
apartments. A
stones throw away
from the casino.
Large front win-
dows for showroom
display. Basement &
sub - basement for
additional storage
or workspace.
PRICE REDUCED
$99,500
MLS# 10-1919
Call Stanley
(570) 817-0111
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
PLYMOUTH
155 E Walnut St.
Good investment
property knocking
on your door. Don't
miss out, come and
see for yourself.
Also included in the
sale of the property
is the lot behind the
home. Lot size is
25X75, known as
147 Cherry St.
$82,000
MLS# 10-2666
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST WYOMING
331 Holden St
10-847
Many possibilities
for this building. 40 +
parking spaces, 5
offices, 3 baths and
warehouse.
$249,000 with
option to lease
Maria Huggler
Classic Properties
570-587-7000
WILKES-BARRE
98-100 Lockhart St
Great Investment
Opportunity.
Separate utilities.
Motivated seller!
MLS 11-4330
$80,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
WILKES-BARRE
For Lease:
Professional Office
1625 SF 2200 SF
Very clean, land-
scaped, well man-
aged multi-tenant
professional office
with excellent
access to highway
system. Attractive
base rate. Just off
Laird Street near
Woodlands Inn.
Contact Griff Keefer
570-574-0421
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
PRICE REDUCED!
$65,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
38 Wedgewood Dr.
Laurelbrook Estates
Lot featuring 3.22
acres with great
privacy on cul-de-
sac. Has been perc
tested and has
underground utili-
ties. 4 miles to PA
Turnpike entrance.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-114
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DALLAS
$135,000
SPECTACULAR
WATER VIEW!
2 acres overlooking
Huntsville
Reservoir. Building
site cleared but
much of woodlands
preserved. Perc &
site prep done.
MLS # 11-2550.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
63 acres. Wooded
parcel. 5,000 road-
front on 2 paved
roads. Level &
rolling. In Dallas Twp.
$425,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Lot 2 Marlington Ct
THINKING OF BUILDING?
.76 acre beautiful
building lot on a cul-
de-sac in desirable
neighborhood.
Covenants apply.
Public utilities.
Dallas School
District.
MLS #11-4401
$ 64,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LAFLIN
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
FORGET THE
GROUNDHOG,
SPRING IS ON ITS
WAY! BUILD NOW!
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
$34,900
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAND FOR SALE
24 ACRES
Wyoming Co, NY
Bennington Twp.
Cotton Hill Rd.
ASKING $32,000
1-814-392-6548
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
912 Lots & Acreage
SHAVERTOWN
1 Oak Dr.
Vacant land ready to
build. One of the last
lots left in this Back
Mountain develop-
ment. Just over (4)
four acres. Call for
details. MLS 11-1486
$82,400
Christine Pieczynski
570-696-6565
SHICKSHINNY
Level *7.5 acres*
building lot with a
mountain view.
Great for horses or
organic farming.
MLS 12-306
$59,000
570-675-4400
TUNKHANNOCK
Approximately 4
acres. Perk Tested
& Surveyed. Well
above flood level.
Mountain View.
Clear land. $45,000.
Bill 570-665-9054
WILKES-BARRE
PARTLY CLEARED
VACANT LOTS:
LOT #13
E. Thomas St.
Approximately 0.57
acre MLS #11-2616
$32,000.
LOT #18
E Thomas St.,
Approximately
0.73 acre. MLS
#11-2615. $35,000
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
ASHLEY PARK
Double wide home.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. 3 season
deck & carport,
new appliances,
many upgrades,
near Rts 81, 309 &
Hanover Industrial
Park $54,500.
Serious Calls Only.
(570) 826-0887
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
PITTSTON TWP.
95 Redman
2 bedroom. Vinyl
siding, shingled
roof. Clean. NEEDS
NO WORK. Minutes
from I81 & Turnpike.
Excellent Condition.
$19,900.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $650 & 725
rent includes heat/
water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $650 & 725
rent includes heat/
water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUPONT
Totally renovated 6
room apartment with
balcony. Partially fur-
nished. Brand new
fridge / electric
range & electric
washer/ dryer. along
with new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 2
bedroom + large
attic loft bedroom,
1.5 bath, partially fin-
ished basement.
Lots of closet space.
Easy access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking. $750 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-762-8265
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DURYEA
Updated 1 bedroom
apartment & den,
neutral pottery barn
colors, open-plan
living, dining &
kitchen area, all
appliances, hard-
wood floors, park-
ing. $655.
570-451-1982
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom with
basement for stor-
age. Private ent-
rance with rear
yard. All new appli-
ances included.
Washer/dryer, sew-
er included. Pets
considered. $425/
month + 1 month
security.
Call 570-606-7884
between 9am &
9pm or Call
570-256-7837
before 9am &
after 9pm
EXETER
4 large rooms, 2nd
floor. 1 block from
the Avenue. Range,
fridge, heat/hot
water furnished.
Very clean. Quiet
neighborhood. W/w,
w/d hookup, attic
and rear porch
$675/mo + security
570-574-1276 (C)
570-288-4860
FORTY FORT
51 Dana Street
2 bedroom, 1st
floor. Heat &
1 car garage.
$650/month, 1st &
security required.
Application &
credit check
570-885-5146
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
ing, central air, off
street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
appointment.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
WYOMING
AVE
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient, first
floor, appli-
ances, laundry,
parking.
STAFFED PRO-
F E S S I O N A L
MANAGEMENT
NO PETS/
S M O K I N G
$465 + UTILI-
TIES/2 YEARS.
288-1422
FORTY FORT
Wyoming Ave.
Single level rear
house (directly
behind owners),
approximately 1100
sq ft. 1 car off
street parking, 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
plenty of storage,
quiet place, washer
/dryer/fridge/stove,
no pets or smoking,
owner pays water,
$600/mo + security
deposit.
570-592-7921
FORTY FORT
WYOMING AVENUE
Single level, rear
house, 2 bedroom,
1 bath, living room,
dining room,
kitchen, storage
areas, approximate-
ly 1100 sq. ft. 1 car
off street parking,
fridge, stove wash-
er/dryer, quiet
place. $550. 1st
month & security
deposit, no pets/no
smoking. Call
570-592-7921 or
570-212-8770
HANOVER TWP.
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, cherry
hardwood floors,
stainless appli-
ances, European
tile kitchen & bath.
Parking, A/C, cathe-
dral ceilings, fire-
place, balcony
$790/month.
Call 570-650-0278
HUDSON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hook-
up, full basement,
no pets. $625/mon-
th, water & sewer
paid, security.
570-829-5378
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room. All utilities
included. Refrigera-
tor & stove. No
pets. Available
now. $600 month.
Call
570-362-0942
KINGSTON
1 bedroom. Avail-
able now. $425 +
security & electric.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
109 N. Thomas Ave
Efficiency with sep-
arate kitchen. Mod-
ern. Heat, garbage
& hot water includ-
ed. $475, lease,
security.
570-474-5023
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, wall to wall,
refrigerator & stove,
heat & hot water.
Off-street parking.
No pets. No smok-
ing. $550/month, +
security & refer-
ences .
570-288-3119
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
modern kitchen,
new carpeting,
freshly painted,
newer appliances.
$625 + utilities.
Call 570-239-3887
KINGSTON
40 Pierce Street
1st floor. 2 bed-
room. Heat, hot and
cold water, trash
included. $725/mo.
Cats considered.
Call (570) 474-5023
KINGSTON
705 Nandy Drive
Modern, clean 2
bedroom, all appli-
ances, central air,
& off-street parking,
No pets / Non-
Smoking $660/
month + utilities
570-696-3915
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
Awsome 2 bedroom
apartments! New
appliances, wash-
er/dryer on site,
garage parking, no
pets. 2nd floor -
$925 & 1st floor -
$1,075. Heat, water,
& sewer included.
Call 570-417-2049
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
3 bedrooms, pantry
w/eat in kitchen. All
appliances. 2.5
baths, separate tub
showers. No pets
or smoking.
$1500/mo plus
security & utilities.
Call 570-288-4203
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted, security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $715.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Near Kirby Park,
attractive 1st floor,
2 bedroom duplex.
1.5 baths, washer/
dryer, refrigerator,
range, dishwasher.
Basement, off
street parking,
large covered
porch. No pets.
References & credit
check. Includes gas
heat, sewer &
water. $650 +
electric.
Call 570-474-5892
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Newly renovated. 3
bedroom. Wall to
wall carpet.
Screened in porch.
Off street parking.
Fridge, stove,
washer & dryer
included. Sewer,
lawn maintenance
& snow removal
also included. $750
+ utilities. Call
(570) 807-7204
LEAVE MESSAGE
KINGSTON
SPACIOUS 1/2 DOUBLES
3 bedrooms, back
yard. Separate utili-
ties. No pets. Back-
ground & security.
$750/month.
570-242-8380
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, appliances,
laundry room. $410
+ electric. Security
& references.
570-696-1600
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
$725, with discount.
All new hardwood
floors and tile. New
cabinets/bathroom.
Dishwasher, garb-
age disposal. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up.
Off street parking.
Facebook us at
BOVO Rentals
570-328-9984
LUZERNE
Modern, ground
floor, one bedroom
apt. Includes heat,
& hot water.$660.
570-817-8169
MCADOO
Newly constructed
1 & 2 bedroom 2nd
floor apartments.
Modern kitchen:
stainless steel
appliances, granite
countertops. Pri-
vate laundry. Off
street parking. No
pets. Includes heat,
water, garbage &
sewer. References
& security deposit
required. $850
Call (570) 929-2843
for appointment
MOOSIC
4 rooms. 2nd floor.
Heat, water &
sewer included.
$695 + security &
references. Call
570-457-7854
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom with full
kitchen. Remodeled
recently, first floor,
ample parking. Hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
On Rt 309 - close
to all amenities! No
pets. Non smoking.
$560/month + secu-
rity & references.
570-239-3827
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, off street
parking. No pets.
$450/month,
heat, water, & hot
water incl.
570-855-3958 leave
message.
NANTICOKE
603 HANOVER ST
2nd floor, 1
bedroom. No pets.
$500 + security,
utilities & lease.
Photos available.
570-542-5330
NANTICOKE
East State Street
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. Mod-
ern kitchen & bath-
rooms. All appli-
ances. Ample stor-
age. Some utilities
included. $475 &
$585 per month.
Call (570) 239-2741
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
apartment.
221 Pine St.
$520/month, sewer
& garbage included,
security deposit
required. Call
610-393-7884
NANTICOKE
Nice clean 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water, garbage fee
included. Stove,
fridge, air-condition-
ing, washer/dryer
availability. Security.
$525 per month
Call (570) 736-3125
NANTICOKE
Ready Immediately!
Spacious 2nd floor
non smoking, 2
bedroom. W/w car-
peting, all appli-
ances incl. w/d.
Electric heat. Tons
of storage, off
street parking. Yard
and porch.
$480/mo, 1 month
security, refer-
ences. Water and
sewage incl. tenant
pays other utilities
570-650-3358
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice, 2
bedroom. Water,
sewer, stove, fridge,
Garbage collection
fee included. W/d
availability. Large
rooms. Security,
$545/mo.
570-736-3125
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NUANGOLA
Adorable year round
lake cabin available
for 1 year lease. 854
sq.ft. with 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Also
features 10x25
screened porch, off
street parking &
appliances. Lake
access. Security
deposit required.
$700/month + utili-
ties. Call
Pam Mcgovern
570-474-6307 or
570-715-7749
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, pets
negotiable. $525/
month, water and
sewer paid,
security and lease
required. Call after
4pm. 570-237-6277
PITTSTON
3 room, wall to wall
carpet, appliances
washer/dryer hook-
up, includes all utili-
ties except electric.
No pets
$500/month +
security
Call 570-655-1606
PITTSTON APARTMENT
2 bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, living room,
kitchen, refrigerator
& stove provided,
off-street parking,
no pets/ smoke
free. $500/month+
utilities, security and
lease required.
570-237-0190
PITTSTON
South Main Street
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
includes heat, stove
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook-
up, sewer, front &
back porches,
fenced yard & pri-
vate parking. Lawn
maintained. No
Pets. $675/month
570-654-2257
PLAINS
1st floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location. No
smoking. No pets.
$550 + utilities.
570-714-9234
PLYMOUTH
2 bedrooms, 1 bath-
room,washer/dryer
hook-up, enclosed
porch, off-street
parking, $475 per
month + security &
utilities.
Call 570-821-9881
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer/dry-
er hookup, with
stove & refrigerator.
No pets. Refer-
ences required.
$500/month + sec-
urity + heat & lights.
570-779-4903
PLYMOUTH
Center Avenue
Efficiency. 1st
floor, heat, hot
water, refrigerator
& range included.
$395/ month +
security & refer-
ences. No pets
570-779-2257
PLYMOUTH
Large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly
painted. Includes
heat, water, sewer,
fridge & range.
$500 + security.
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedroom, private
setting with pond.
1.5 baths. Ultra
modern kitchen
with appliances,
dishwasher &
microwave includ-
ed. Plenty of closet
& storage. Wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Private drive.
$1,100/month.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Security deposit
required.
Call 570-760-2362
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor. $500
plus utilities
570-299-5471
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room kitchen, living
room, bath, and
attic storage.
Refrigerator and
stove provided.
Heat, water, and
sewer included.
Quiet neighbor-
hood, out of flood
zone. No pets.
$540/month
lease, 1st., security
deposit, and refer-
ences required.
570-466-1545
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room apartment.
All appliances.
Washer/ dryer. Off
street parking. No
pets. $525 + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
570-954-2972
WEST WYOMING
429 West 8th Street
New 2 bedroom
with off street park-
ing, private patio,
washer/dryer, stove
included. No pets.
$575/mos + security
Sewer & garbage
included other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
/SOUTH
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking. Heat
included. $525/
month, + security.
Call 570-718-0331
WILKES-BARRE
102 Westminster St
3 bedroom. $650 +
security. Section 8
welcome. Call
570-287-1349 or
570-817-1605
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
1.5 bedrooms,
newly renovated
building. Washer &
dryer available.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio & 1 bed-
room apts. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors electronically
locked. Studio -
$450. 1 bedroom -
$550. Water &
sewer paid. One
month/security de-
posit. Call
570-793-6377 or
570-208-9301 after
9:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
CROSS VALLEY
ACCESS
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient
1 bedroom,
appliances,
laundry, park-
ing. STAFFED
PROFESSIONAL
MANAGEMENT.
NO PETS/
SMOKING/$465
+ UTILITIES.
2 YEARS.
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 10D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Windows
& Doors
All types of residen-
tial remodeling.
Kitchens & baths.
Specializing in Win-
dows & Vinyl Siding.
Solar light tunnels.
30 years experi-
ence. BBB. PA025042
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-287-1982
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
HUGHES
Construction
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
See Us At
The
Home
Show
March
2, 3 & 4th
at the
Kingston
Armory
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1030 Carpet
Cleaning
Alan & Lindas
Carpet and/or
Chair Cleaning
2 FOR $39
570-826-7035
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
C&C Masonry
and Concrete.
Absolutely free
estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-766-1114
570-346-4103
PA084504
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry contrac-
tors. Chimney,
stucco & concrete.
Cleanouts and
hauling service.
570-466-2916
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
RUSSELLS
Property & Lawn
Mai ntenance
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
All types of interior
and exterior home
& business repairs
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
AAA Bob & Rays
Hauling: Friendly &
Courteous. We take
anything & every-
thing. Attic to base-
ment. Garage, yard,
free estimates. Call
570-655-7458 or
570-905-4820
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
HAUL ALL
HAULING &
PAINTING SERVICES.
Free Estimates.
570-332-5946
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
FREE SCRAP
METAL REMOVAL
Services include:
general hauling,
attics, basements,
garages, and
estate clean out.
Call Rays Recy-
cling
570-735-2399
Mikes $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
570-826-1883
VERY CHEAP
JUNK REMOVAL!
Licensed,
Insured & Bonded.
Will beat any price,
guaranteed! Free
Estimates. Over
10,000 served.
570-693-3932
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, Haz-
ard tree removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot clearing, Stone/
Soil delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A+ CLASSICAL
All phases.
Complete int/ext
paint &renovations
Since 1990 Since 1990
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
570-283-5714
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1252 Roofing &
Siding
GIVENS
CONSTRUCTION
New roofs and
repairs. Shingles,
rubber, slate, metal
roofs, terracotta,
and many others.
Licensed and Ins.
Free estimates
570-239-8534
PA 010925
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
DRIVEWAYS
SIDEWALKS
SALTING
VITO & GINOS
570-574-1275
1282 Tax
Preparation
TAX PREPARATION
by Law School
Graduate
with Tax Certificate
Reasonable
Call 570-793-6210
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Modern, 1st floor
apartment. 2 bed-
room, 1.5 baths, off-
street parking. No
pets, no smokers.
Security & credit/
background check
required. $550/
month + utilities.
570-881-4078
WILKES-BARRE
Short Term OK!
Studio near Wilkes.
Furniture available.
Lease till June or
August. $450. All
utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
WILKES-BARRE
TWO BEDROOM UNIT
For lease, available
immediately, 1 bath-
room, refrigerator &
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, 2nd floor.
$500 per month +
utilities, references,
security & back-
ground check
570-735-4074
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WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
single family
6 bedroom
large half double
HANOVER
2 bedroom
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom
large, water
included
PITTSTON
Large 1
bedroom water
included
KINGSTON
3 Bedroom Half
Double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom
water included
OLD FORGE
2 bedroom
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Quiet neighborhood.
Apartment near
Mohegan Sun, Mall
& Arena. 1 bed-
room, living room,
kitchen & bath.
Recently remod-
eled. New Stove,
washer, dryer &
fridge. included.
Heat, hot water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Off
street parking. $600
/mo. + security. Ref-
erences, credit &
background checks
required.
Call 570-861-2264
WYOMING
1 bedroom 2nd floor
at $625/month. Off
street parking. Non
smoking. No pets.
Bonus walk up attic
with tons of stor-
age. Heat, water,
garbage, sewer
included. 1 month
security, credit
check & references.
1 year lease.
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 1 & 2 bed-
room. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utili-
ties by tenant. No
pets. Non-smoking.
Elderly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
WYOMING
Completely refur-
bished, 2nd floor, 2
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove, no
pets. $600/month,
1 month security.
Heat & hot water
included.
570-693-2254 or
570-262-3003
WYOMING
Large 2 bedroom,
1st floor, lease,
security, section 8
accepted. Handicap
accessible, $695 +
electric. All other
utilities included.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
3800 SF, will divide
Office / Retail
Call 570-829-1206
GARAGES
1200 sq. ft. garage
zoned for
commercial $400
per month.
ALSO 1200 SQ.FT.
WITH LIFT $700
MONTH
(570) 814-8876
LUZERNE
125 Main Street
Office or Retail
Space available
with over 2,000 sq.
ft. plus attached
garage. High
traffic area. $650/
month + utilities.
Call 570-331-3600
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON
Main St. 1350 sq. ft.
building. Formerly
an appliance store.
$750/mo.
570-654-1243
PLAINS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
1,500 SQ.FT.
1350 River Road
Excellent location
for small business
or office. Will re-
model to suit tenant.
Call 570-760-3714
or 570-237-5664
RETAIL BUILDING
WILKES-BARRE TWP
12,000 sf. Route
309. Exit 165 off I81.
570-823-1719
315 PLAZA
1750 sf former
Physician Office.
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains Twp.
WAREHOUSE
Laird St. Complex,
Will divide for multi-
ple tenants. Rea-
sonable rates. Easy
Interstate access.
Lease 132,500
sq.ft., 12 loading
docks, 30 ft ceilings,
sprinkler, acres of
parking. Offices
Available
570-655-9732
ext. 312
WYOMING
72 x 200 VACANT
COMMERCIAL LOT
233 Wyoming Ave,
Rt. 11 (1/4 mile from
proposed Walmart)
For Sale or lease.
$96,000.
570-388-6669
947 Garages
WEST PITTSTON
4 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9x11. $55/
month. No electric.
Call 570-357-1138
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
950 Half Doubles
ALDEN / NANTICOKE
3 Bedrooms. Gas
Heat. Hookups.
Parking. Large yard.
No Pets. $545 + util-
ities Security $300
570-824-8786
950 Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
26 Oak Street
3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, all appliances
provided, washer/
dryer hookup,
garage parking,
fenced yard, pets
OK, $795/month,
plus utilities.
Call 570-415-5555
FORTY FORT
3 bedroom, excel-
lent condition, great
location. Off street
parking. Storage
basement. Washer/
dryer included.
$650 + utilities.
By application.
570-954-0505
HANOVER TWP.
221 Boland Ave
1 bedroom.
$325+utilities
Call Mark at
(570) 899-2835
(917) 345-9060
HANOVER TWP.
$650/month, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
dining room & eat
in kitchen. Appli-
ances, washer/dry-
er hook up. Off
street parking. Wat-
er, sewer & recy-
clables included.
Security, references
& credit check. No
pets. 570-824-3223
KINGSTON
ONE MONTH FREE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, front & rear
porches, full base-
ment & attic. Off-
street parking, no
pets, totally remod-
eled. $1,000/month,
+ utilities, security &
lease.
Call 570-824-7598
MINERS MILLS
Section W-B. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath. No
pets. $215 per week
(all utilities included)
References, Lease
& Security deposit
(570) 881-7864
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
Air. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
Must See!
$850 + utilities,
lease & security.
NO PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Located on
Academy St.
New paint, carpet &
windows. $700 +
utilities & security.
Small pet OK with
extra security. Off
street parking .
Call 570-760-6410
SCRANTON/NORTH
3/4 bedrooms.
porch, yard. $750
monthly. available
march 1st.
(516) 507-9403 or
516-582-9719
WANAMIE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, $575/
month, plus utilities.
Section 8 OK
Call 610-393-7884
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,000 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedrooms, 2
baths, all appli-
ances, hardwood
floors, washer/dryer
on premises, single
car attached gar-
age. No pets.
$925/month + secu-
rity. Water, sewer
& garbage paid.
Call 570-855-2687
953Houses for Rent
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, large living
room, dining room
family room,
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer /
dryer hookup.
New w/w carpet &
freshly painted.
Large yard &
screened porch.
Water, sewer,
garbage & snow
plowing included.
No pets. Non
smoking. Security
deposit, refer-
ences & credit
check required.
$1,100/per month
+ utilities.
570-709-6678
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
RENTAL-SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
202 East Union St.,
Very spacious single
family home for
rent. 3/4 bedrooms,
kitchen with break-
fast room, dining
room, living room,
3-season porch.
Range, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer
& dryer provided.
Note: there is no
yard and garage is
for owners use
only. No pets of any
kind. No smoking.
Applicant to provide
proof of income and
is responsible for
cost of credit check.
MLS#12-357 $600
per month plus
security deposit.
Tenant is responsi-
ble for all utilities
except sewer.
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Walter Belchick
696-2600 ext. 301
953Houses for Rent
PITTSTON
Completely reno-
vated 3 bedrooms,
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
Background check.
$695/month, +
utilities, security
required.
Call 570-479-0302
PLAINS Miners Mills
double with 3
bedrooms, & 1 bath.
Security deposit
required. No pets.
Utilities by tenant.
$600/month
Call Dave Gula
570-696-5435
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
SWOYERSVILLE
124 Perrin St
2 bedroom single.
Gas heat. New
appliances including
washer & dryer.
Shed. No pets. $675
+ utilities, security,
lease, references &
background check.
Call 570-406-1353
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
Renovated 2 bed-
room mobile home
with central air, new
carpeting, modern
kitchen with all
appliances, nice
neighborhood,
fenced yard and off
street parking. No
pets. Security &
lease. $495 + all util-
ities. 570-690-3086
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family
house, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, large living
& dining rooms, ex-
tra room, eat-in-kit-
chen, finished attic.
Backyard & drive-
way. Washer/dryer
hookup. $750/
month + utilities, +
1 month security.
Call 609-356-8416
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
One 4 bedroom
$740
One 3 Bedroom
$625
One 2 bedroom
$580
Plus all utilities Ref-
erences & security.
No pets.
570-766-1881
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
Great neighbor-
hood, 3 bedrooms,
modern kitchen &
bath. Wall to wall
carpet. $625 +
security & utilities.
Call 570-856-3700
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WILKES-BARRE TWP
TOWNHOUSE. 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
behind VA hospital
in Summit Place.
Kitchen appliances,
parking. $800/mo +
utilities. Call Annie
570-497-6060
959 Mobile Homes
DALLAS
220 Davenport St
Small trailer with 1
bedrooms. Private
fenced lot with
shed. Appliances
included. $500
month + 1 month
security. Tenant
pays electric, gas &
water. Available
immediately. No pets.
570-477-5747
962 Rooms
BARNESVILLE
1st floor efficiency
and bigger, all utili-
ties. $100/mo
570-929-1444
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
WILKES-BARRE
Furnished room for
rent. Close to down-
town. $90/week +
security. Everything
included. Call
570-704-8288
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Available March/April
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
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