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Lahore School of Economics BBA course outline: Water, Energy, and Society

Course Objective
The objective of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of a range of environmental issues that affect mankind. The course has been designed especially for students with a limited academic background in the sciences, and will help them relate environmental problems such as pollution and climate change to the global economy. On completing this course, students should be able to define a causal link between the two and demonstrateusing basic scientific principleshow economic systems exist and function within a broader environment. Water Issues Surface water debate Pakistan The availability debate Ecology issues Understanding water logging and salinity Water demands of agriculture Enclosing the commons: Privatizing irrigation water The dams debate Subsurface water: past, present, and future Drinking water issues

Energy Debate Power shortages The end of oil debate Oil wars and gas politics Coal: The abundant dirty fuel Carbon emissions: Profit or piety Biofuels: Green energy from food Alternative energies: Natures expensive bounty

Society Issues and the governance paradigm

Teaching Strategy
Class will typically begin with a brief recap of the previous lecture. There will be short,
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Lahore School of Economics BBA course outline: Water, Energy, and Society unannounced quizzesoral or writtenbased on material from the previous lecture. Note: Pop quizzes may occasionally refer to material taught in older lectures if there is a tangible link. Students will be informed of announced quizzes one week in advance. Lectures will run about one hour, followed by 3045 minutes of class reading and discussion. Certain issues e.g. climate change or large dams in Pakistan, will be discussed by dividing the class into two teams who will then debate the issue. Students are strongly advised to take notes in class as examinations will be based on material presented in lectures, as well as class readings and the course pack. Audio recordings of lectures in mp3 format will be made available to students towards the end of the semester for revision purposes. Class participation will form a large percentage of students final grades. Students are encouraged to actively participate and question. Homework assignments will be designed to challenge students to independent research on extant environmental issues in Pakistan. Students will receive a primer on referencing, research language usage, technique, and writing early in the semester. It should be noted that incorrect spellings, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure will be lightly penalized.

Final Assessment Criteria


Final examination Midterm examination Quizzes/assignments Term paper Class participation Class attendance 30% 20% 20% 12% 12% 06%

Core Reading List


1. Barlow, M. and T. Clarke. 2004. Water Privatization: The WBs Latest Market Fantasy. 2. Bartlett, A.A. 2004. Thoughts on Long-Term Energy Supplies: Scientists and the Silent Lie - The worlds population continues to grow. Shouldnt physicists care? Physics Today. 57 (7): 53. 3. Burki, S.J. The Weight of History: Pakistans Energy Problem. IN Hathaway (ed.) 2007. Fueling the future: meeting Pakistans energy needs in the 21st Century. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/topics/pubs/Asia_FuelingtheFuture_rptmain.pdf.
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Lahore School of Economics BBA course outline: Water, Energy, and Society 4. Campbell, Colin J. 2002. Petroleum and People. Population and Environment. 24 (2): 193-207. 5. Duncan, R.C. 1996. The Olduvai Theory: Sliding Towards a Post-Industrial Stone Age. Institute on Energy and Man. 6. Ercelawn, A. and O.A. Khan. Undated. Kalabagh: The Need for Informed Debate. 7. Ghazanfar, M. 2008. Kalabagh Dam and the Water Debate In Pakistan. Lahore Journal of Policy Studies 2(1): September 2008. 8. Ghazanfar, M. 2009. The Environmental Case of Sindh. Lahore Journal of Policy Studies 3(1): December 2009. 9. Hammond, J.R. The Role of the U.S. Private Sector in Meeting Pakistans Energy Requirements. IN Hathaway (ed.) 2007. Fueling the future: meeting Pakistans energy needs in the 21st Century. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/topics/pubs/Asia_FuelingtheFuture_rptmain.pdf. 10. Hodge, H.N. 1992. Ladakh: The Pressure to Modernize. 11. Kamal, S. 2008. Pakistans water problems: do we care enough to act? Triple bottomline: A specialized CSR journal. 12. Khan, S.R. Undated. The Kalabagh Controversy. 13. Kurtz, Jean-Paul. 2004. Dictionary of civil engineering: English-French. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. (selected pages). 14. Looney, R. Energy and the Pakistani Economy: An Exploratory Analysis to 2035. IN Hathaway (ed.) 2007. Fueling the future: meeting Pakistans energy needs in the 21st Century. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/topics/pubs/Asia_FuelingtheFuture_rptmain.pdf. 15. Malik, B.A. The Case For Kalabagh Dam. IN Bengali, K (ed.) 2003. The Politics of Managing Water. Karachi: Oxford University Press. 16. Mills, R.M. 2008. The myth of the oil crisis: overcoming the challenges of depletion, geopolitics, and global warming. Westport, Conn: Praeger. (selected pages) 17. Murphy, D. 2010. Energy Transitions and the Next Paradigmatic Image of the World. The Oil Drum. 18. Pearce, F. 2009. Ice on fire: The Next Fossil Fuel. New Scientist Magazine issue 2714. 19. Rosset, P., J. Collins, and F. Moore Lapp. 2000. Lessons from the Green Revolution: Do We Need New Technology to End Hunger? Tikkun Magazine vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 5256. 20. Shiva, V. 2002. The World Bank, WTO and Corporate Control Over Water. IN Shiva, V.
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Lahore School of Economics BBA course outline: Water, Energy, and Society 2002. Water wars: privatization, pollution and profit. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. 21. Shiva, V. 2010. Water Wisdom. ZCommunications. 22. Smil, Vaclav. 2008. Oil: a beginners guide. Oxford: Oneworld Publications. (selected pages) 23. Umar, A. The Role of the Private Sector in Pakistans Energy Sector. IN Hathaway (ed.) 2007. Fueling the Future: Meeting Pakistans Energy Needs in the 21st Century. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/topics/pubs/Asia_FuelingtheFuture_rptmain.pdf. 24. Yousaf, K. Water resources of Pakistan. IN Bengali, K (ed.) 2003. The Politics of Managing Water. Karachi: Oxford University Press.

Further Reading
Government of Pakistan. 2005. Environmental Concerns of All the Four Provinces, study III. Final Report. Islamabad: University of Water and Power and Federal Flood Commission. Government of Pakistan. 2005. Study on Water Escapages Downstream of Kotri Barrage to address Environmental Concepts, Study II, Main Report Islamabad: Ministry of Water and Power and Federal Flood Commission of Pakistan. Heynen, N. 2007. Neoliberal environments: false promises and unnatural consequences. London: Routledge. Mills, R.M. 2008. The Myth of the Oil Crisis. 317 pp. London: Praeger. Shiva, V. 2002. Water wars: privatization, pollution and profit. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Shiva, Vandana. 2008. Soil not oil: environmental justice in a time of climate crisis. Cambridge, Mass: South End Press. Shiva, Vandana. Globalisation, New Delhi: Research Foundation for Science. Speth, James Gustave, and David Zinn. 2008. The bridge at the end of the world capitalism, the environment, and crossing from crisis to sustainability. [New Haven, Conn.]: Yale University Press.

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