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Table of Contents Hammar Reliance Documents Updated 11/2011

Core Reliance Documents: .......................................................................................................... 3 Books: .................................................................................................................................... 3 Tumorigenesis/Target organs: ................................................................................................. 3 Concentration: ........................................................................................................................ 3 Fiber burden: .......................................................................................................................... 3 Attribution: ............................................................................................................................. 3 Low level exposure: ................................................................................................................ 4 PEL: ....................................................................................................................................... 4 No Safe Level: ........................................................................................................................ 4 Background: ........................................................................................................................... 5 Genetic alterations: ................................................................................................................. 5 Genetic susceptibility: ............................................................................................................. 5 Alpha by author: ......................................................................................................................... 6 Cullen: .................................................................................................................................... 6 Dodson (top cited): ................................................................................................................. 6 Egilman: ................................................................................................................................. 7 Hammar affidavits and/or declarations: ................................................................................... 7 Hammar books:....................................................................................................................... 8 Heller: ................................................................................................................................... 10 Henderson:............................................................................................................................ 11 Hillerdal:............................................................................................................................... 11 Hodgson and Darnton: .......................................................................................................... 11 Iwatsubo: .............................................................................................................................. 11 Langer and Nolan: ................................................................................................................ 12 Lemen:.................................................................................................................................. 12 Nicholson: ............................................................................................................................ 12 Reid and de Klerk: ................................................................................................................ 12 Rdelsperger: ........................................................................................................................ 13 Rolland: ................................................................................................................................ 13 Selikoff: ................................................................................................................................ 13 Suzuki:.................................................................................................................................. 13 Welch: .................................................................................................................................. 13 American Thoracic Society (ATS): ........................................................................................... 14 Helsinki: ................................................................................................................................... 14 IARC: ....................................................................................................................................... 14 IMIG Consensus Statement ....................................................................................................... 14 WHO (World Health Organization): ......................................................................................... 14 Historical: ................................................................................................................................. 14 Lung cancer, asbestosis, and pleural plaques: ............................................................................ 15 Regions: ................................................................................................................................... 16 Registers: .................................................................................................................................. 16 Calidria/UICC B asbestos: ........................................................................................................ 17 Chrysotile: ................................................................................................................................ 18 Occupations/Trades Associated with Asbestos Exposure: ......................................................... 20 General: ................................................................................................................................ 20 Construction: Carpenters/Electricians.................................................................................... 20 Page 1 of 39

Insulation workers:................................................................................................................ 20 Maintenance workers: ........................................................................................................... 21 Plumbers and Pipefitters ....................................................................................................... 21 Schools/Teachers .................................................................................................................. 21 Textile workers: .................................................................................................................... 22 Products Associated with Asbestos Exposure:........................................................................... 22 Cement pipe: ......................................................................................................................... 22 Drywall, taping and joint compounds: ................................................................................... 23 Floor tiles:............................................................................................................................. 24 Friction products/Brakes: ...................................................................................................... 24 Gaskets: ................................................................................................................................ 24 Kent cigarettes: ..................................................................................................................... 25 Longshoremen/Dockworkers/Shipbuilding Industry/Shipyard Workers................................. 25 Pulp and Paper Mills ............................................................................................................. 25 RT Vanderbilt Talc ............................................................................................................... 26 Environmental exposure to asbestos and EPA: .......................................................................... 27 Familial, Household and Non-occupational Exposure: .............................................................. 28 Low-dose exposure: .................................................................................................................. 28 Mesothelioma Types: ................................................................................................................ 29 Deciduoid mesothelioma: ...................................................................................................... 29 Localized malignant mesothelioma: ...................................................................................... 31 Metastatic mesothelioma - unusual locations ......................................................................... 31 Peritoneal mesothelioma: ...................................................................................................... 32 Pseudomesotheliomatous Adenocarcinoma: .......................................................................... 35 Mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: .......................................................................... 36 Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma: .......................................................................... 37 Asbestos: Selected Cancers ....................................................................................................... 37 Translocation: ........................................................................................................................... 38 Animal Studies: ........................................................................................................................ 38 Black spots in pleura: ................................................................................................................ 38 SV40 virus: ............................................................................................................................... 38 Radiation-induced mesothelioma: ............................................................................................. 39

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Core Reliance Documents:


Books:
1. Dodson RF, Hammar SP, eds. Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology, and Health Effects, 2nd ed. Boca Raton: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, 2011. Note: 1st edition published in 2006. 2. Hammar SP, Dodson RF. Chapter 27: Asbestos. In: Tomashefski JF Jr., ed. Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. New York: Springer, 2008. 3. Hammar SP, Henderson DW, Klebe S, Dodson RF. Chapter 43: Neoplasms of the pleura. In: Tomashefski JF Jr., ed. Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. New York: Springer, 2008. 4. Galateau-Sall F, ed. International Mesothelioma Panel: Brambilla E, Cagle PT, Churg AM, et al. Pathology of malignant mesothelioma. London: Springer, 2006. 5. Henderson DW, de Klerk NH, Hammar SP, et al. Asbestos and lung cancer: is it attributable to asbestosis or to asbestos fiber burden? In: Corrin B, ed. Pathology of Lung Tumors. Churchill Livingstone, 1997:83-118.

Tumorigenesis/Target organs:
Weinberg RA. Chapter 11, Multistep Tumorigenesis. In: The Biology of Cancer. Garland Science, Taylor & Francis Group LLC, New York 2007:399-462.

Concentration:
Dodson RF, O Sullivan M, Corn CJ, McLarty JW, Hammar SP. Analysis of asbestos fiber burden in lung tissue from mesothelioma patients. Ultrastruct Pathol 1997;21:321-336.

Fiber burden:
1. Kohyama N, Suzuki Y. Analysis of asbestos fibers in lung parenchyma, pleural plaques, and mesothelioma tissues of North American Insulation Workers. Ann NY Acad Sci 1991;643:27-52. 2. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Asbestos tissue burden study on human malignant mesothelioma. Ind Health 2001;39:150-160. 3. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Asbestos fibers contributing to the induction of human malignant mesothelioma. Ann N Y Acad Sci 2002;982:160-176. 4. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR, Ashley R. Short, thin asbestos fibers contribute to the development of human malignant mesothelioma: pathological evidence. Int J Hyg Environ Health 2005;208:201-210. 5. Dodson RF, et al. Asbestos fiber length as related to potential pathogenicity: a critical review. Am J Ind Med 2003;44:291-297. 6. Dodson RF. Analysis and relevance of asbestos burden in tissue. In: Asbestos: Risk assessment, epidemiology, and health effects, 2nd ed. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (Eds). CRC Press/Taylor Francis 2011:49-108.

Attribution:
1. World Health Organization. Environmental Health Criteria 203. Evaluation of health risks

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of exposure to chrysotile asbestos. Geneva: 1998;137-144. 2. Consensus Report, Asbestos, asbestosis and cancer: The Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution. Scand J Work Environ Health 1997;23:311-316.

Low level exposure:


1. Hillerdal G. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures. Occup Environ Med 199;56:505-513. 2. Iwatsubo Y, Pairon JC, Boutin C, et al. Pleural mesothelioma: dose-response relation at low levels of asbestos exposure in a French population-based case-control study, Am J Epidem 1998;148:133-142. 3. Rdelsperger K, Jckel KH, Pohlabein H, et al. Asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers as risk factors for diffuse malignant mesothelioma: Results from a German hospital-based case-control study, Am J Ind Med 2001;39:262-275. 4. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. The quantitative risk of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure, Ann Occup Hyg 2000;44:565-601; specifically, Table 11, page 585. 5. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. Mesothelioma risk from chrysotile. Occup Environ Med 2009. 6. Rolland P, Ducamp S, Gramond C, et al. Risk of pleural mesothelioma: A French population-based case-control study (1998-2002). Lung Cancer 2006;54:S9(35).

PEL:
Federal Register 1986, Part II: Depart of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR Parts 1910 and 1926: Occupational exposure to asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite & actinolite. Final Rules, pages 22612-22790; specifically, Table 6 on page 22644.

No Safe Level:
1. NIOSH, 1976 (page 92): excessive cancer risks have been demonstrated at all fiber concentrations studied to date. Evaluation of all available human data provides no evidence for a threshold or a safe level of asbestos exposure. 2. NIOSH, 1980 (page 3): All levels of asbestos exposure studied to date have demonstrated asbestos related disease there is no level of exposure below which clinical effects do not occur. 3. USPHS, 1980: It is important to point out that when a permissible level for exposure (PEL) to a certain carcinogen is set by OSHA, there is no implication that such a level is safe. To the contrary, it is the agency s policy that any occupational exposure to a carcinogen carries with it some risk of disease, even if it cannot be easily or precisely measured. 4. NIOSH, 1986 (page 319): a linear, no threshold, dose-response relationship Any asbestos exposure carries with it some increased risk of asbestos related disease. 5. OSHA, 1994 (page 40978): reducing exposure to 0.1 f/cc would further reduce, but not eliminate, significant risk. The 0.1 f/cc level leaves a remaining significant risk.

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6. WHO, 1998 (page 144): Exposure to chrysotile asbestos poses increased risks for asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma in a dose-dependent manner. No threshold has been identified for carcinogenic risks. 7. WTO, 2000: the experts confirm the position of the European Communities according to which it has not been possible to identify any threshold below which exposure to chrysotile would have no effect. The experts also agree that the linear relationship model, which does not identify any minimum exposure threshold, is appropriate for assessing the existence of a risk. We find therefore that no minimum threshold level of exposure or duration of exposure has been identified with regard to the risk of pathologies associated with chrysotile, except for asbestosis.

Background:
Roggli VL, Oury TD, Sporn TA, eds., Pathology of Asbestos-Associated Diseases, 2nd Edition, Springer: New York, 2004 (Table 2.2).

Environmental:
1. Goldberg S, Rey G, Luce D, et al. Possible effect of environmental exposure to asbestos on geographical variation in mesothelioma rates. Occup Environ Med 2010;67:417-421. 2. Madkour MT, El Bokhary MS, Awad Allah HI, et al. Environmental exposure to asbestos and the exposure-response relationship with mesothelioma. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal 2009;15:25-38. 3. Pan XL et al. Residential proximity to naturally occurring asbestos and mesothelioma risk in California. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005;172:1019-1025.

Genetic alterations:
Jaurand M-C. Asbestos, chromosomal deletions and tumor suppressor gene alterations in human malignant mesothelioma. Lung Cancer 2006;54 (Supp 1):S15;#59.

Genetic susceptibility:
Neri M, Ugolini D, Dianzani I, et al. Genetic susceptibility to malignant pleural mesothelioma and other asbestos-associated diseases. Mutat Res 2008;659:126-136.

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Alpha by author:
Cullen:
1. Cullen MR, et al. Predictors of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed men in the betacarotene and Retinol efficacy trial. Am J Epidemiol 2005;161:260-270. 2. Cullen MR, Baloyi RS. Chrysotile asbestos and health in Zimbabwe: I. Analysis of miners and millers compensated for asbestos-related diseases since independence (1980). Am J Ind Med 1991;19:161-169.

Dodson (top cited):


1. Asbestos content in lung tissue, lymph nodes and pleural plaques from former shipyard workers. Dodson RF et al. Am Rev Respir Dis 1990;142:843-847. 2. A comparison of asbestos burden in lung parenchyma, lymph nodes, and plaques. Ann NY Acad Sci 1991;643;53-60. 3. Analysis of asbestos fiber burden in lung tissue from (55) mesothelioma patients. Dodson RF, et al. Ultrastruct Pathol 1997;21:321-336. 4. Tissue burden of asbestos in nonoccupationally exposed individuals from East Texas. Dodson RF et al. Am J Ind Med 1999;35:281-286 5. Asbestos in extrapulmonary sites: omentum and mesentery. Dodson, et al. Chest 2000;117:486-493. 6. Asbestos content in the lymph nodes of nonoccupationally exposed individuals. Dodson RF, et al. Am J Ind Med 2000;37:169-174. 7. Asbestos content of omentum and mesentery in nonoccupationally exposed individuals. Dodson et al. Toxicology and Industrial Health 2001;17:138-143. 8. An assessment of asbestos body formation in extrapulmonary sites: liver and spleen. Williams MG, et al. Toxicology and Industrial Health 2001;17:1-6. 9. Asbestos fiber length as related to potential pathogenicity: a critical review. Dodson RF et al. Am J Ind Med 2003;44:291-297. 10. Quantitative analysis of asbestos burden in a series of individuals with lung cancer and a history of exposure to asbestos. Dodson RF et al. Inhal Toxicol 2004;16:637-647. 11. Pleural mesothelioma in a woman whose documented past exposure to asbestos was from smoking asbestos-containing filtered cigarettes. Dodson RF, Hammar SP. Inhal Toxicol 2006;18:679-684 12. Characteristics of asbestos concentration in lung as compared to asbestos concentration in various levels of lymph nodes that collect drainage from the lung. Dodson et al. Ultrastruct Pathol 2007;31:95-133 13. A technical comparison of evaluating asbestos concentration by PCM, SEM, and ATEM as illustrated from data generated from a case report. Dodson RF, Hammar SP, Poye LW. Inhalation Toxicology 2008;20:723-732. 14. Mesothelioma in an individual following exposure to crocidolite-containing gaskets as a teenager. Dodson RF, Hammar SP, Poye LW. Int J Occup Environ Health 2011;17:190-194.

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Egilman:
1. Exposing the myth of ABC, Anything but Chrysotile. Egilman D et al. Am J Ind Med 2003;44:540-557. 2. Letters to the Editor. Egilman s response re Controlled Use of Asbestos. Am J Occup Env Health 2004. 3. Abuse of epidemiology: automobile manufacturers manufacture a defense to asbestos liability. Egilman DS, Billings MA. Int J Occup Environ Health 2005;11:360-371. 4. Letters to the Editor. Egilman s response re Setting the Record Straight. Int J Occup Environ Health 2006. 5. Against anti-health epidemiology: corporate obstruction of public health via manipulation of epidemiology. Egilman D, Howe S. Int J Occup Environ Health 2007;13:118-124 6. Fiber types, asbestos potency, and environmental causation: a peer review of published work and legal and regulatory scientific testimony. Egilman D. Int J Occup Environ Health 2009;15:202-228. 7. A case of occupational peritoneal mesothelioma from exposure to tremolite-free chrysotile in Quebec, Canada: A black swan case. Egilman D, Menendez LM. Am J Ind Med 2010;

Hammar affidavits and/or declarations:


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Affidavit re asbestos and mesothelioma dated 12-22-10. Affidavit re asbestos and lung cancer dated 12-22-10. Affidavit re asbestos and joint compounds dated 12-22-10. Affidavit re exposure to asbestos products.Wheeler case for Aaron DeLuca. Affidavit re exposure to joint compounds.Palmore case for Aaron DeLuca. Affidavit re autopsies and fiber burden analysis.

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Hammar books:
Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd edition. Tomashefski JF Jr., Cagle PT, Farver CF, Fraire AE (Ed). Springer 2008 (2 volume set) Chapter 27 (volume I) Asbestos. Hammar SP, Dodson RF. Pages 950-1031 Chapter 43 (volume II) Neoplasms of the Pleura. Hammar SP, Henderson DW, Klebe S, Dodson RF. Pages 558-734 - Mesothelioma: Incidence and epidemiology, pgs 559-561 - Asbestos: Etiology, pgs 561-563 - Malignant mesothelioma in children, pg 565 - Occupations at risk, pgs 568-570 - Pleural/peritoneal mesothelioma ratios, pgs 570-571 - Latency, pg 573 - Mineral fibers and mesothelioma, pgs 573-578 - Asbestos fiber types and dose, and mesothelioma risk and induction, pgs 579-581 - Threshold or minimal level of asbestos exposure, pgs 581-582 - Chrysotile and mesothelioma, pgs 582-587 o The Quebec chrysotile cohort, pg 583 o Other chrysotile-exposed cohorts/studies, pgs 583-584 o Chrysotile content of human lung tissue from mesothelioma patients, pgs 584-585 o Chrysotile only exposure: asbestos and mesothelioma among automotive and brake mechanics, pgs 585-587 - The Molecular Pathogenesis and Pathology of Malignant Mesothelioma, pgs 587-599 - Pathologic Features of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma, pgs 599-639 o Epithelial mesothelioma, pgs 601-608 o Sarcomatoid mesothelioma, pgs 608-610 o Biphasic malignant mesothelioma, pgs 611612 o Transitional mesothelioma, pgs 612-613 o Pleomorphic mesothelioma, pg 613 o Mesotheliomas showing variable differentiation, pg 613 o Histochemical features, pgs 613-615 o Immunohistochemical features, pgs 615-631 o Ultrastructural features, pgs 631-637 o Cytogenetic and molecular features, pgs 637-639 - Rare/unusual mesotheliomas or mesothelial proliferations, pgs 639-661

Mesothelioma rates in groups exposed occupationally to asbestos, according to fiber types and duration (Table 43.8): Industry: Textile manufacture and insulation Mixed fiber exposure: crocidolite, amosite, chrysotile Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 1,520 o 25-30 = 1,710 o 31+ = 3,180 Insulation workers Mixed fiber exposure: mainly amosite Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 290 o 25-29 = 1,550 o 30-34 = 2,760 o 35-39 = 6,300 o 40-44 = 6,330 o 45+ = 8,110 Fibrous cement manufacture Mixed fiber exposure: crocidolite and chrysotile Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 2,700 o 25-29 = 6,300 o 30-34 = 9,600 Textile manufacture Chrysotile, some crocidolite Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 108 o 25-29 = 143 o 30-34 = 1,156 o 35-39 = 493 o 40+ = 1,774 Insulation manufacture Amosite

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Adenomatoid tumor of the pleura, pgs 640641 o Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma, pgs 641-642 o Noninvasive atypical mesothelial proliferations, pgs 642-648 o Small cell mesothelioma, pgs 648-649 o Deciduoid mesothelioma, pg 649 o Mucin-positive epithelial mesothelioma, pgs 649-650 o Gaucher cell-like mesothelioma, pg 650 o Multicystic mesothelioma, pg 650-652 o Desmoplastic sarcomatoid mesothelioma and its distinction from benign fibrous pleuritis, pgs 652-657 o Lymphohistiocytoid mesothelioma, pgs 657659 o Pleomorphic mesothelioma, pgs 659-660 o Localized malignant mesothelioma, pgs 660-661 Pseudomesotheliomatous tumors of the pleura, pgs 670-672 Solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura, pgs 678-683 o

Asbestos: Risk assessment, epidemiology, and health effects. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds). CRC Press/Taylor Francis 2006 o Chapter 1: The history of the Extraction and Uses of Asbestos by Arthur L. Frank o Chapter 2: Asbestos analysis and methods by James R. Millette o Chapter 3: Analysis and relevance of asbestos burden in tissue by Ronald F. Dodson o Chapter 4: Molecular and cellular responses to asbestos exposure by Mark A. L. Atkinson o Chapter 5: The pathologic features of asbestosinduced disease by Samuel P. Hammar o Chapter 6: Epidemiology of asbestos-related diseases and the knowledge that led to what is known today by Richard A. Lemen o Chapter 7: Clinical diagnosis of asbestos-related disease by Gary K. Friedman o Chapter 8: Core curriculum for practicing physicians by Jeffrey L. Levin and Paul P. Rountree Asbestos: Risk assessment, epidemiology, and health effects, 2nd ed. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds). CRC Press/Taylor Francis Group 2011 o Chapter 1: The history of asbestos utilization and recognition of asbestos-induced disease

Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 744 o 25-29 = 2,623 o 30-34 = 5,078 o 35+ = 1,842 Dockyards Mixed fiber exposure Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 120 o 25-29 = 410 o 30-34 = 220 o 35-40 = 370 o 40-44 = 1,240 o 45-49 = 1,510 Mining and milling Crocidolite Duration (years since 1st employed) and rate per 106 person-years: o 20-24 = 900 o 25-29 = 2,200 o 30-34 = 3,000 o 35-39 = 7,000

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o o o

o o o

o o o o

o o

by DW Henderson and J Leigh Chapter 2: Asbestos analysis methods by JR Millette Chapter 3: Analysis and relevance of asbestos burden in tissue by RF Dodson Chapter 4: The molecular pathogenesis of asbestos-related disorders by S Klebe and DW Henderson Chapter 5: Epidemiology of asbestos-related diseases and the knowledge that led to what is known today by RA Lemen Chapter 6: Asbestos and carcinoma of the lung by DW Henderson and J Leigh Chapter 7: Asbestos and mesothelioma by SP Hammar Chapter 8: Asbestos and other cancers by SP Hammar, RA Lemen, DW Henderson, and J Leigh Chapter 9: Asbestosis by SP Hammar Chapter 10: Asbestos-induced pleural disease by SP Hammar Chapter 11: Uncommon nonmalignant asbestos-induced conditions by SP Hammar Chapter 12: Clinical diagnosis and management of nonmalignant asbestosrelated disorders by GK Friedman Chapter 13: Malignant diseases attributed to asbestos exposure by GK Friedman Chapter 14: Core curriculum for practicing physicians related to asbestos by JL Levin and PP Rountree Chapter 15: Asbestos regulations and their applications by DT Crane and AC Malott

Heller:
1. Heller DS, Gordon RE, Westhoff C, Gerber S. Asbestos exposure and ovarian fiber burden. Am J Ind Med 1996;29:435-439.

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Henderson:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Henderson DW, Rodelsperger K Woitowitz H-J, Leigh J. After Helsinki: a multidisciplinary review of the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer, with emphasis on studies published during 1997-2004. Pathology 2004;36:517-550. WTO March 12, 2001. European communities measures affecting asbestos and asbestos-containing products. Henderson DW. Friction products (e.g. brake linings). WT/DS135/AB/R, pages 300-304. Henderson DW, et al. Asbestos and lung cancer: is it attributable to asbestosis or to asbestos fiber burden? In: Pathology of Lung Tumors. Corrin B (ed). Churchill Linvinstone 1997;83-118. Henderson DW, Roggli VL, Shilkin KB, Hammar SP, Leigh J. Is asbestosis an obligate precursor for asbestos-induced lung cancer? Chapter 4. In: Asbestos Health Effects, Treatment and Control. Peters GA, Peters BJ (eds). The Michie Company; 1995;97-168. Henderson DW, et al. Lymphohistiocytoid mesothelioma: a rare lymphomatoid variant of predominantly sarcomatoid mesothelioma. Ultrastructural Pathol 1988;12:367-384

Hillerdal:
1. Hillerdal G, Henderson DW. Asbestos, asbestosis, pleural plaques and lung cancer. Scan J Work Environ Health 1997;23:93-103. 2. Hillerdal G. Mesothelioma: Cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures. Occup Environ Med 1999;56:505-513.

Hodgson and Darnton:


1. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. Mesothelioma risk from chrysotile. Occup Environ Med 2009. Note: The authors stated the risk of mesothelioma caused by chrysotile derived from these data was higher by a factor of 10. 2. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure. Ann Occup Hyg 2000;44:565-601.

Iwatsubo:
1. Iwatsubo Y, Pairon JC, Boutin C, et al. Pleural mesothelioma: Dose-response relation at low levels of asbestos exposure in a French population-based case-control study. Am J Epidemiol 1998;148:133-142.

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Langer and Nolan:


1. Langer AM, Nolan RP. Asbestos in the lungs of persons exposed in the USA. Monaldi Arch Chest Dis 1998;53:168-180. 81 workers and 2 household persons. 33 mesos, 35 lung cancers, 12 asbestosis and 3 other cancers. Crocidolite exposure occurred among USA insulators and a large percentage of other workers. Insulation workers primarily exposed to amosite; mixed fiber exposures were associated with more mesotheliomas than single fiber exposures. Chrysotile only exposure was associated with approx. 12% of mesothelioma cases and, if tremolite exposure was associated with chrysotile exposure, the chrysotile amount exceeded that for tremolite 2. Langer AM, Nolan RP. Chrysotile biopersistence in the lungs of persons in the general population and exposed workers. Environ Health Perspect 1994;102:235-239. Lung burden analysis performed on 126 autopsy cases between 1966 and 1968; 107 were probably non-occupationally exposed. 55 of 107 cases contained short chrysotile fibers

Lemen:
1. Lemen RA. Asbestos in brakes: Exposure and risk of disease. Am J Ind Med 2004;45:229237. 2. Lemen RA. Chrysotile asbestos as a cause of mesothelioma: application of the Hill causation mode. Int J Occup Environ Health 2004;10:233-239. 3. Lemen RA. Dement JM, Wagoner JK. Epidemiology of asbestos-related diseases. Environ Health Perspect 1980;34:1-11. 4. Lemen RA. Epidemiology of Asbestos-related Diseases and the Knowledge that Led to What is Known Today. In: Dodson RF, Hammar SP (Eds.), Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology, and Health Effects, 2nd ed. CRC/Taylor & Francis 2011. 5. Lemen RA. Affidavit re joint compounds dated April 26, 2006.

Nicholson:
1. Nicholson WJ. Comparative dose-response relationships of asbestos fiber types: magnitudes and uncertainties. Nicholson WJ. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1991;643:74-84. 2. Nicholson WJ. The carcinogenicity of chrysotile asbestos-A review. Industrial Health 2001;39:57-64.

Reid and de Klerk:


1. Reid A, de Klerk N, et al. The effect of asbestosis on lung cancer risk beyond the dose related effect of asbestos alone. Occup Environ Med 2005;62:885-889.

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Rdelsperger:
1. Rdelsperger K, Jockel K-H, Pohlabein H, et al. Asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers as risk factors for diffuse malignant mesothelioma: Results from a German hospital-based case-control study. Am J Ind Med 2001;39:262-275. 2. Rdelsperger K, Jahn H, Bruckel B, et al. Asbestos dust exposure during brake repair. Am J Ind Med 1986;10:63-72.

Rolland:
1. Rolland P, Gramond C, Lacourt A, et al. Occupations and industries in France at high risk for pleural mesothelioma: A population-based case-control study (1998-2002). Am J Ind Med 2010. Note: Abstract appeared in Lung Cancer 2006;54:S9(35). 2. Lacourt A, Rolland P, Gramond C, et al. Attributable risk in men in two French casecontrol studies on mesothelioma and asbestos. Eur J Epidemiol 2010.

Selikoff:
Selikoff IJ, Hammond EC, Churg J. Asbestos exposure, smoking, and neoplasia. JAMA 1968;204:104-110.

Suzuki:
1. Translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers from the lung to other tissues. Suzuki Y, Kohyama N. Am J Ind Med 1991;19:701-704. 2. Analysis of asbestos fibers in lung parenchyma, pleural plaques, and mesothelioma tissues of North American Insulation Workers. Kohyama N and Suzuki Y. Ann NY Academy of Sciences 1991;643:27-52 3. Asbestos tissue burden study on human malignant mesothelioma. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Ind Health 2001;39:150-160. 4. Asbestos fibers contributing to the induction of human malignant mesothelioma. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Ann N Y Acad Sci 2002;982:160-176. 5. Short, thin asbestos fibers contribute to the development of human malignant mesothelioma: pathological evidence. Suzuki Y et al. Int J Hyg Environ Health 2005;208:201-210.

Welch:
1. Welch LS. Asbestos exposure causes mesothelioma, but not this asbestos exposure: An amicus brief to the Michigan Supreme Court. Int J Occup Environ Health 2007;13:318327. 2. Welch LS, et al. Asbestos and peritoneal mesothelioma among college-educated men. Int J Occup Environ Health 2005;11:254-258.

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American Thoracic Society (ATS):


Diagnosis and initial management of nonmalignant diseases related to asbestos. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2004;170:691-715.

Helsinki:
1. Asbestos, asbestosis and cancer: The Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution. Anonymous. Scand J Work Environ Health 1997;23:311-316. 2. After Helsinki: a multidisciplinary review of the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer, with emphasis on studies published during 1997-2004. Henderson DW, et al. Pathology 2004;36:517-550.

IARC:
IARC Special Report: Policy. A review of human carcinogens-Part C: metals, arsenic, dusts, and fibres. www.thelancet.com/oncology Volume 10 May 2009

IMIG Consensus Statement - Guidelines for pathologic diagnosis of malignant


mesothelioma. Arch Lab Path Med 2009;133:1317-1331.

WHO (World Health Organization):


1. WHO Policy Elimination of Asbestos-related diseases, September 2006. 2. WHO document on chrysotile asbestos Environmental Health Criteria 203, 1998

Historical:
1. Lynch KM, Smith WA. Pulmonary asbestosis III: Carcinoma of the lung in asbestosissilicosis. Am J Cancer 1935;24:56-64. 2. Wedler HW. Uber den Lungenkrebs bei Asbestose. Dtsch Arch Klin Med 1943;191:189-209. 3. Mallory TB, Castleman B, Harris EE. Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital #33111. N Eng J Med 1947;236:407-412. 4. Merewether ERA. Annual report of the Chief Inspector of Factories for the year 1947. London: His Majesty s Stationery Office 1949:78-81. 5. Editorial: Asbestosis and cancer of the lung. JAMA 1949;140:1219-1220. 6. Doll R. Mortality from lung cancer in asbestos workers. Br J Ind Med 1955;12:81-86. 7. Wagner JC, Sleggs CA, Marchand P. Diffuse pleural mesothelioma and asbestos exposure in the North Western Cape Province. Br J Ind Med 1960;17:260-271. 8. Selikoff IJ, Churg J, Hammond EC. The occurrence of asbestosis among insulation workers in the United States. Ann NY Acad Sci 1965;132:139-155. 9. Asbestos: from magic to malevolent mineral by Gee D, Greenberg M.

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Lung cancer, asbestosis, and pleural plaques:


1. Warnock ML, Isenberg W. Asbestos burden and the pathology of lung cancer. Chest 1986;89:20-26. 2. Bellis D, Andrion A, et al. Minimal pathologic changes of the lung and asbestos exposure. Human Pathology 1989;20:102-106. 3. Hughes JM, Weill H. Asbestosis as a precursor of asbestos related lung cancer: results of a prospective mortality study. Br J Ind Med 1991;48:229-233. 4. Henderson DW, Roggli VL, Shilkin KB, Hammar SP, Leigh J. Is asbestosis an obligate precursor for asbestos-induced lung cancer? In: Asbestos Health Effects, Treatment and Control. Peters GA, Peters BJ (Eds). The Michie Company, 1995;97-168. 5. Henderson DW, de Klerk NH, Hammar SP, et al. Asbestos and lung cancer: is it attributable to asbestosis or to asbestos fiber burden? In: Pathology of Lung Tumors. Corrin B (Ed). Churchill Livinstone 1997;83-118. 6. Hillerdal G, Henderson DW. Asbestos, asbestosis, pleural plaques and lung cancer. Scand J Work Environ Health 1997;23:93-103 7. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure. Ann Occup Hyg 2000;44:565-601. 8. Reid A, de Klerk N, Ambrosini GL, et al.The effect of asbestosis on lung cancer risk beyond the dose related effect of asbestos alone. Occup Environ Med 2005;62:885-889. 9. Banks DE, et al. American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement on the Respiratory Effects of Asbestos: Results of a Delphi Study. Chest 2009;135:1619-1627. 10. Roggli VL, Gibbs AR, Attanoos R, et al. Pathology of Asbestosis An update of the diagnostic criteria: Report of the Asbestosis Committee of the College of American Pathologists and Pulmonary Pathology Society. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2010;134:462-480.

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Regions:
1. Newhouse ML, Thompson H. Mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum following exposure to asbestos in the London area. Brit J Industr Med 1965;22:261-269 2. Teta MJ, et al. Mesothelioma in Connecticut, 1955-1977: Occupational and geographic associations. J Occup Med 1983;25:749-756. 3. Baris YI, et al. An epidemiological study in an Anatolian village environmentally exposed to tremolite asbestos. Brit J Industr Med 1988;45:838-840 4. Leigh J et al. Malignant mesothelioma in Australia, 1945-2000. Am J Ind Med 2002;41:188-201. 5. Rees D, et al., Asbestos lung fibre concentrations in South African Chrysotile Mine Workers. Ann Occup Hyg 2001;45:473-477 6. Case BW et al. Lung-retained fibre content in Brazilian chrysotile workers. Ann Occup Hyg 2002;46:144-149 7. Mirabelli D, et al. Excess of mesotheliomas after exposure to chrysotile in Balangero, Italy. Occup Environ Med 2008;65:815-819 8. McCulloch J. Asbestos mining in Southern Africa, 1893-2002. Int J Occup Environ Health 2003;9:230-235 9. McCulloch J. Asbestos mining and occupational disease in Southern Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, 1915-1998. History Workshop Journal 2003;56:131-152 10. British Thoracic Society Statement. Statement on malignant mesothelioma in the United Kingdom. Thorax 2001;56:250-265. 11. Rake C, et al. Occupational, domestic and environmental mesothelioma risks in the British population: a case-control study. Br J Cancer 2009;100:1175-1183. (www.bjcancer.com) 12. Musk AB et al. Mortality of former crocidolite (blue asbestos) miners and millers at Wittenoom. Occup Environ Med 2008;65(8);541-543. 13. CDC. Malignant mesothelioma mortality --- United States, 1995-2005. (www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview) 14. Madkour MT, El Bokhary MS, Awad Allah HI, et al. Environmental exposure to asbestos and the exposure-response relationship with mesothelioma. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal 2009;15:25-38. (Cairo, Egypt)

Registers:
1. Federal Register 1986: 29 CFR Parts 1910 and 1926, Volume 51, No. 119. Occupational exposure to asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite & actinolite. OSHA Final Rules. See page 22644 for Asbestos fiber concentration and cancer mortality (Table 6). 2. Federal Register 1994: 29 CFR Parts 1910, et al. Volume 59, No. 153. Occupational exposure to asbestos. Final rule. 3. Federal Register 2008: 30 CFR Parts 56, 57 and 71. Volume 73, No. 41. Asbestos exposure limit. Final rule. 4. Australian Mesothelioma Register Report 1999: The incidence of mesothelioma in Australia 1994 to 1996.

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Calidria/UICC B asbestos: (core reliance documents)


1. Calidria Material Safety Data Sheet C.A. S. No. 1332-21-4, 1309-38-2 (Plaintiff s Exhibit UC2876) 2. Deposition of Carl U. Dernehl MD in re Arthur A. Frehse vs Anchor Packing Co, pages 1, 153, and 155 3. Sayers IC. Union Carbide UK Limited, Asbestos as a Health Hazard in the United Kingdom 4. Letter to Dr. T. J. Hall from Carl U. Dernehl dated June 7, 1967 re Asbestos as a Health Hazard in the United Kingdom 5. Internal correspondence to Mr. Robert F. X. Fusaro from K.S. Lane MD dated May 22, 1973 6. Study area. Map of Clear Creek Management Area and Atlas Mine Site. 7. Atlas Asbestos Mine Region 9 Superfund. EPA #CAD980496863 8. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9 Clear Creek Management Area Asbestos Exposure Risk Assessment Frequently Asked Questions 9. Wolff MS. Letter and manuscript from Mary S. Wolff of Mt. Sinai School of Medicine dated June 7, 1976 concerning prepublication copy of the paper describing work using Calidria HG 144 and prepublication copy of manuscript by Langer AM, Wolff MS, Rohl AN, Selikoff IJ. Variation of some physical, chemical and biological properties of chrysotile asbestos subjected to prolonged milling. 10. Answers and objections of defendant Union Carbide Corporation to plaintiff s first set of interrogatories. In re Norris vs Combustion Engineering, Inc., et al., Civil Action 76-1901 11. Myers JL. The Union Carbide Calidria Asbestos Business. 5/1/79, rev. 7/11/79. 12. Yeager H, Russo DA, Yanez M, et al. Cytotoxicity of a short-fiber chrysotile asbestos for human alveolar macrophages: Preliminary observations. Environ Research 1983;30:224232. 13. Rittinghausen S et al. Atypical malignant mesotheliomas with osseous and cartilaginous differentiation after intraperitoneal injection of various types of mineral fibers in rats. Exp Toxicol Pathol 1992;44:55-58. 14. Frank AL, Dodson RF, Williams MG. Carcinogenic implications of the lack of tremolite in UICC reference chrysotile. Am J Ind Med 1998;34:314-317. 15. Longo WE, Hatfield RL. Measurements of Airborne Chrysotile Structure Sizes from Calidria Asbestos. MAS report September 2002, Revision #2 16. Egilman D. Letter to the Editor re Controlled Use of Asbestos. Int J Occup Environ Health 2004;10:99-103. 17. Turci F, Tomatis M, Compagnoni R, Fubini B. Role of associated mineral fibres in chrysotile asbestos health effects: the case of Balangeroite. Ann Occup Hyg 2009;53:491-497.

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Chrysotile: (top cited articles in bold)


1. McDonald JC, Liddell FD. Mortality in Canadian miners and millers exposed to chrysotile. Ann NY Acad Sci 1979;330:1-9. 2. Wagner JC, Berry G, Skidmore JW, Pooley FD. The comparative effects of three chrysotiles by injection and inhalation in rats. Biological effects of mineral fibers. IARC Sci Publ 1980;363-372 3. Glickman et al. Mesothelioma in pet dogs associated with exposure to their owners to asbestos. Env Research 1983;32:305-313. 4. Piolatto G et al. An update of cancer mortality among chrysotile asbestos miners in Balangero, northern Italy. British J Ind Med 1990;47:810-814. 5. Cullen MR, Baloyi RS. Chrysotile asbestos and health in Zimbabwe: I. Analysis of miners and millers compensated for asbestos-related diseases since independence (1980). Am J Ind Med 1991;19:161-169. 6. Harington JS. The carcinogenicity of chrysotile asbestos. Ann NY Acad Sci 1991;465-472. 7. Dement JM. Carcinogenicity of chrysotile asbestos: a case control study of textile workers. Cell Biol Toxicol 1991;7:59-65. 8. Suzuki Y, Kohyama N. Translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers from the lung to other tissues. Am J Ind Med 1991;19:701-704 9. Rittinghausen S, Ernest H, Muhle H, Mohr U. Atypical malignant mesotheliomas with osseous and cartilaginous differentiation after intraperitoneal injection of various types of mineral fibres in rats. Exp Tox Pathol 1992;44:55-58. 10. Pott F. Asbestos use and carcinogenicity in Germany and a comparison with animal studies. Ann Occup Hyg 1994;38:589-600. 11. Sturm et al. Use of asbestos, health risks and induced occupational diseases in the former East Germany. Toxicology Letters 1994;72:317-324. 12. Sturm W, et al. Asbestos-related diseases and asbestos types used in the former GDR. Exp Toxicol Pathol 1995;47:173-178. 13. Heller DS, Gordon RE, Westhoff C. Asbestos exposure and ovarian fiber burden. Am J Ind Med 1996;29:435-439. 14. Smith AH, Wright CC. Chrysotile asbestos is the main cause of pleural mesothelioma. Am J Ind Med 1996;30:252-266. 15. McDonald JC, McDonald AD. Chrysotile, tremolite and carcinogenicity. Ann Occup Hyg 1997;699-705. 16. Dodson RF, et al. Analysis of asbestos fiber burden in lung tissue from mesothelioma patients. Ultrastruct Pathol 1997;21:321-336. 17. World Health Organization. Environmental Health Criteria 203. Evaluation of health risks of exposure to chrysotile asbestos. 1998:137-144. 18. Landrigan PJ, Nicholson WJ, Suzuki Y, Ladou J. The hazards of chrysotile asbestos: a critical review. Ind Health 1999;37:271-280. 19. Dodson RF, et al. Asbestos in extrapulmonary sites: omentum and mesentery. Chest 2000;117:486-493. 20. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Asbestos tissue burden study on human malignant mesothelioma. Ind Health 2001;39:150-160. 21. Nicholson WJ. The carcinogenicity of chrysotile asbestos-a review. Ind Health 2001;39:57-64. 22. Yano E, Wang ZM, Wang XR, et al. Cancer mortality among workers exposed to amphibole-free chrysotile asbestos. Am J Epidemiol 2001;154:538-543. 23. Suzuki Y, Yuen SR. Asbestos fibers contributing to the induction of human malignant mesothelioma. Ann N Y Acad Sci 2002;982:160-176.

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24. Dodson RF, Atkinson MAL, Levin JL. Asbestos fiber length as related to potential pathogenicity: a critical review. Am J Ind Med 2003;44:291-297 25. McCulloch J. Asbestos mining and occupational disease in Southern Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, 1915-98. History Workshop Journal 2003:131-152. 26. In Re: Asbestos Litigation Brake Hearing, May 5, 2003. Cause No. 2004-03964. In the District Court, Harris County, Texas, 11th Judicial District 27. Egilman D et al. Exposing the myth of ABC, Anything but Chrysotile. Am J Ind Med 2003;44:540-557. 28. Lemen RA. Chrysotile asbestos as a cause of mesothelioma: application of the Hill causation model. Int J Occup Environ Health 2004;10:233-239. 29. Egilman DS, Billings MA. Abuse of epidemiology: automobile manufacturers manufacture a defense to asbestos liability. Int J Occup Environ Health 2005;11:360-371 30. Suzuki Y et al. Short, thin asbestos fibers contribute to the development of human malignant mesothelioma: pathological evidence. Int J Hyg Environ Health 2005;208:201210. 31. Hein MJ, Stayner L, Lehman E, Dement JM. Follow-up study of chrysotile textile workers: cohort mortality and exposure response. Occup Environ Med 2007;64:616-625. 32. Mirabelli D, et al. Excess of mesotheliomas after exposure to chrysotile in Balangero, Italy. Occup Environ Med 2008;65:815-819. 33. Hasanoglu H, Bayram E, et al. Orally ingested chrysotile asbestos affects rat lungs and pleura. Arch Env Occup Health 2008;63:71-75. 34. Loomis D, Dement JM, Wolf SH, Richardson DB. Lung cancer mortality and fibre exposures among North Carolina asbestos textile workers. Occup Environ Med 2009;66:535-542. 35. Yano E, Wang Z-M, et al. Case report: Mesothelioma in a worker who spun chrysotile asbestos at home during childhood. Am J Ind Med 2009;1-6. 36. Kanarek MS. Mesothelioma from chrysotile asbestos: update. Ann Epidemiol 2011;21:688-697. See discussion re chrysotile asbestos in Asbestos: Risk assessment, epidemiology, and health effects. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds), 2nd ed. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, 2011:196226. Chapter 27 by Hammar SP, Dodson RF. Asbestos. In: Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. Tomashefski JF et al. (Eds.) New York: Springer 2008

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Occupations/Trades Associated with Asbestos Exposure:


General:
1. Roggli VL et al. Malignant mesothelioma and occupational exposure to asbestos: a clinicopathologic correlation of 1445 cases. Ultrastruct Pathol 2002;26:55-65. 2. Estimates of probability of asbestos exposure according to job title. Table 27-2, Chapter 27: Asbestos. In: Dail & Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. Tomashefski JR Jr., et al. (Eds.) Springer 2008; 952-954 3. Estimates of probability of exposure according to industry title. Table 27-3, Chapter 27: Asbestos. In: Dail & Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. Tomashefski JR Jr., et al. (Eds.), Springer 2008;952-954 4. Australian Mesothelioma Register 2002. Appendix A. Exposure by trade/job title 5. See Findings Specific to Occupations, Chapter 5 by Lemen RA. In: Dodson RF, Hammar SP, ed. Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology, and Health Effects, 2nd ed. CRC Press/Taylor Francis 2011:170-189. 6. Teta MJ, Lewinsohn HC, Meigs JW, et al. Mesothelioma in Connecticut, 1955-1977. Occupational and geographic associations. J Occup Med 1983;25:749-756.

Construction: Carpenters/Electricians
1. McDonald JC, et al. Case-referent survey of young adults with mesothelioma: II. Occupational Analyses. Ann Occup Hyg 2001;45:519-523 2. Dement J et al. Cancer incidence among Union carpenters in New Jersey. J Occup Environ Med 2003;45:1059-1067

List of occupations associated with asbestos exposure, including but not limited to: Boilermakers Bakers Brake repair and instillation workers Bricklayers and masons Carpenters Cement workers Custodial workers Drywall workers Electricians Engineers Insulators Jewelers Laborers Longshoremen Machinists Maintenance workers Mechanics Merchant Seamen Millwrights Painters Petro-chemical workers Plasterers Plumbers Pipefitters Power Plant workers Railroad workers Roofers Rubber workers Sheet metal workers Shipyard workers Smelter workers School teachers Steel workers Sulfate mill workers Welders

Insulation workers:
1. Ribak J, Lilis R, Suzuki Y, Penner L, Selikoff IJ. Malignant mesothelioma in a cohort of asbestos insulation workers: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and causes of death. British J Ind Med 1988;45:182-187 2. Selikoff IJ, Seidman H. Asbestos-associated deaths among insulation workers in the United States and Canada, 1967-1987. Ann NY Acad Sci 1991;643:1-14 3. Kohyama N and Suzuki Y. Analysis of asbestos fibers

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in lung parenchyma, pleural plaques, and mesothelioma tissues of North American Insulation Workers. Ann NY Academy of Sciences 1991;643:2752.

Maintenance workers:
Burdett G, Bard D. Exposure of UK Industrial plumbers to asbestos, Part I: Monitoring of exposure using personal passive samplers. Ann Occup Hyg 2007;51:121-130

Plumbers and Pipefitters


1. Teta MJ, Lewinsohn HC, Meigs JW, et al. Mesothelioma in Connecticut, 1955-1977. Occupational and geographic associations. J Occup Med 1983;25:749-756. 2. Cantor KP, Sontag JM, Heid MF. Patterns of mortality among plumbers and pipefitters. Am J Ind Med 1986;10:73-89. 3. Teschke K, Morgan MS, Checkoway H, et al. Mesothelioma surveillance to locate sources of exposure to asbestos. Can J Publ Health 1997;88:163168. 4. Hemminki K, Li X. Time trends and occupational risk factors for pleural mesothelioma in Sweden. J Occup Environ Med 2003;45:451-455. 5. Finkelstein MM, Verma DK. A cohort study of mortality among Ontario pipe trades workers. Occup Environ Med 2004;61:736-742

Schools/Teachers
1. Asbestos in Public and Commercial Buildings: a literature review and synthesis of current knowledge. Health Effects Institute-Asbestos Research 2. Asbestos in Colorado schools. Baldwin CA, et al. Prevention 1982;97:325-___ 3. Asbestos-associated pleural mesothelioma in school teachers: a discussion of four cases. Lilienfeld DE. 4. Mesothelioma among employees with likely contact with in-place asbestos-containing building materials. Anderson HA, et al. 5. Summary statistics for average airborne fiber concentrations in U.S. schools and buildings. Darcey DJ, Alleman T. In: Pathology of Asbestos-Associated Diseases, 2nd Ed. Roggli VL, Oury TD, Sporn TA.

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Textile workers:
Loomis D, Dement JM, Wolf SH, Richardson DB. Lung cancer mortality and fibre exposures among North Carolina asbestos textile workers. Occup Environ Med 2009;66:535-542.

Products Associated with Asbestos Exposure:


Cement pipe:
1. Asbestos exposures during the cutting and machining of asbestos cement pipe. EEH report dated 03/16/1977 and commissioned by the AC Pipe Producers Association. 2. Cutting CertainTeed Asbestos Cement Pipe: Report of Results-MVA7946. Prepared by James R. Millette, PhD 3. Cutting of Certain-Teed Asbestos Containing Pipe: Work Practice Study. Materials Analytical Services report, October 2002, Revision #1 4. Investigation of the chrysotile fibers in an asbestos cement sample. HSL/2007/11. Report by G. Burdett 5. Affidavit of Susan M. Raterman, CIH, in re: John Robinson (Estate of Charles Whitehead, Jr.) et al., vs. A.O. Smith Corporation, et al. Harris County District Court, 11th Judicial District; No. 2004-51352-L 6. Nature, structure, and properties of asbestos cement dust. Baeten J, Helsen J, Deruyttere A. British J Indust Med 1980;37:33-41 7. Fiber type and concentration in the lungs of workers in an asbestos cement factory. Gylseth B, Mowe G, Wannag A. British J Indust Med 1983;40:375-379 8. Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82. Alies-Patin AM, Valleron AJ. British J Indust Med 1985;42:219-225 9. Mortality of asbestos cement workers using almost exclusively chrysotile fibre. Gardner MJ, Powell CA. J Soc Occup Med 1986;36:124-126 10. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products. Gardner MJ, Winter PD, Pannett B, Powell CA. British J Indust Med 1986;43:726-732 11. Mortality of workers employed in two asbestos cement manufacturing plants. Hughes JM, et al. British J Indust Med 1987;44:161-174 12. Mortality study of asbestos cement workers. Giaroli C, et al. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 1994;66:7-11 13. ROS-mediated genotoxicity of asbestos-cement in mammalian lung cells in vitro. Dopp E, et al. Particle and Fibre Toxicology 2005;2:9 14. Cancer risk after cessation of asbestos exposure: a cohort study of Italian asbestos cement workers. Magnani C, et al. Occup Environ Med 2007;65:164-170.

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Drywall, taping and joint compounds:


1. Affidavit of Samuel P. Hammar MD re Asbestos and Joint Compounds dated 12-22-10. 2. Hammar case report re Jerry Anderson (L09-365) dated 08-19-10 filed in Federal court for Waters & Kraus. 3. Affidavit of Richard Hatfield (undated) re the levels of exposure resulting from the use of joint compounds 4. Affidavit of Dr. Richard Lemen dated April 26, 2006. 5. Fischbein A, Rohl AN, Langer AM, Selikoff IJ. Drywall construction and asbestos exposure. Am Ind Hyg Assoc 1979;40:402-407 6. Verma DK, Middleton CG. Occupational exposure to asbestos in the drywall taping process. Am Ind Hyg Assoc; April 1980 7. Nicholson WJ, Rohl A, Fischbein SA, Selikoff IJ. Occupational and community asbestos exposure from wallboard finishing compounds. NY Acad Med 1975, Volume 51, No. 10 8. Rohl AN, Langer AM, Selikoff IJ, Nicholson WJ. Exposure to asbestos in the use of consumer spackling, patching and taping compounds. Science 1975;189:551-553 9. Evaluation of exposure to asbestos during mixing and sanding of joint compounds. Gypsum Association, Denver, Colorado, 1973-1974 10. Kaiser Gypsum Interoffice Memorandum dated March 1, 1974 from J.S. Sheahan; Subject: Dust from Joint Compound Job Operations 11. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Ban of consumer patching compounds containing respirable free-form asbestos. 16 CFR, Ch 11;1304.5 (1-1-97 Ed., source 42 FR 63362). 12. Federal Register 1986, Part II, Depart of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR Parts 1910 and 1926. Occupational exposure to asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite & Actinolite, Final Rules, pages 22612-22790; and specifically Table 6 on page 22644. 13. Galateau-Sall F, Epidemiology of Mesothelioma. In: Galateau-Sall F. Pathology of Malignant Mesothelioma. New York, Springer: 2006, page 3. 14. Helsinki Consensus Report. Asbestos, asbestosis and cancer: The Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution. Scand J Work Environ Health 1997;23:311-316. 15. Hillerdal G. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures. Occup Environ Med 1999;56:506-513. 16. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure. Ann Occup Hyg 2000;44:565-601. 17. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. Mesothelioma risk from chrysotile. Occup Environ Med 2009. 18. Iwatsubo Y, Pairon JC, Boutin C, et al. Pleural mesothelioma: dose-response relation at low levels of asbestos exposure in a French population-based case-control study. Am J Epidemiol 1998;148:133-142. 19. Rdelsperger K, Jckel KH, Pohlabein H, et al. Asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers as risk factors for diffuse malignant mesothelioma: results from a German hospital-based case-control study. Am J Ind Med 2001;39:262-275. 20. Roggli VL, Oury TD, Sporn TA, eds. Pathology of Asbestos-Associated Diseases, 2nd Ed., Springer: New York, 2004. 21. Rolland P, Ducamp S, Gramond C, et al. Risk of pleural mesothelioma: A French population-based case-control study (1998-2002). Lung Cancer 2006;54:S9(35).

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Floor tiles:
1. Crossman RN, Williams MG, Lauderdale J, Schosek K, Dodson RF. Quantification of fiber releases for various floor tile removal methods. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1996;11:11131124. 2. Murphy RL, Levine BW, Al Bazzaz FJ, Lynch JL, Burgess WA. Floor tile installation as a source of asbestos exposure. Am Rev Respir Disease 1971;104:576-

Friction products/Brakes:
1. Finkelstein MM. Asbestos fibre concentrations in the lungs of brake workers: Another look. Ann Occup Hyg 2008;52:455-461 2. Welch L. Asbestos exposure causes mesothelioma, but not this asbestos exposure: An amicus brief to the Michigan Supreme Court. Int J Occup Environ Health 2007;13:318327. 3. Egilman DS, Billings MA. Abuse of epidemiology: automobile manufacturers manufacture a defense to asbestos liability. Int J Occup Environ Health 2005;11:360-371 (see also Tab 11) 4. Lemen RA. Asbestos in brakes: exposure and risk of disease. Am J Indust Med 2004;45:229-237. 5. WTO document re friction products (e.g., brake linings). European Communities Measures affecting asbestos and asbestos-containing products: report of the panel. World Trade Organization-WT/DS135/R300-304. Henderson DW. 2000 6. Huncharek M et al. Pleural mesothelioma in a brake mechanic. Br J Ind Med 1989;46:6971. 7. Rodelsperger K et al. Asbestos dust exposure during brake repair. Am J Ind Med 1986;10:63-72. 8. Leigh, J. Letter from Dr. James Leigh to the US EPA dated 10/1/03 9. OSHA 2006. Automotive brake and clutch repair work. 10. Lorimer WV et al. Asbestos exposure of brake repair workers in the United States. Mt Sinai J of Med 1976;43:207-218. See discussion by Lemen RA concerning Brake repair and installation workers in Asbestos: Risk assessment, epidemiology, and health effects, 2nd ed. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds.) CRC Press/Taylor Francis 2011:172-175.

Gaskets:
1. Dodson RF, Hammar SP, Poye LW. Mesothelioma in an individual following exposure to crocidolite-containing gaskets as a teenager. Int J Occup Environ Health 2011;17:190194. 2. Longo WE et al. Fiber release during the removal of asbestos-containing gaskets. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 2002;17:55-62. 3. Hubbard & Longo. Detection of amphibole asbestos in chrysotile sheet gaskets. (Plaintiff s exhibit not dated) 4. Fowler DP. Exposures to asbestos arising from bandsawing gasket material. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 2000;15:404-408. 5. McKinnery WN, Moore RW. Evaluation of airborne asbestos fiber levels during removal and installation of gaskets and packing. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 1992;53:531-532. 6. Cheng RT, McDermott HJ. Exposure to asbestos from asbestos gaskets. Appl Occup

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Environ Hyg 1991;6:588-591. 7. Millette JR. Asbestos-containing sheet gaskets and packing. Sourcebook on Asbestos Diseases. 8. Millette JR et al. Releasability of asbestos fibers from asbestos-containing gaskets. EIA Technical Journal 1995;10-15. 9. Millette JR. MVA0478 report of results concerning Crane packing materials dated April 12, 1993. 10. Millette JR. MVA0858 report of results concerning Flexitallic gaskets dated April 21, 1994. 11. Millette JR. MVA6896 report on analysis of materials for asbestos in Garlock 7228 gaskets dated January 25, 2007. 12. Millette JR. MVA6896 report on analysis of materials for asbestos in Cranite gaskets dated January 25, 2007. 13. Longo WE et al. Exposure to asbestos-containing gaskets during AC compressor remanufacturing. MAS report dated May 6, 2005. 14. Asbestos exposure from gasket operations. Navy Regional Medical Center, Bremerton; May 1978. 15. Parker FM, CIH. Letter to U.S. Dept. of Labor/OSHA dated October 24, 2001.

Kent cigarettes:
1. Dodson RF, Hammar SP. Pleural mesothelioma in a woman whose documented past exposure to asbestos was from smoking asbestos-containing filtered cigarettes. Inhal Toxicol 2006;18:679-684. 2. Longo WE, Rigler MW, Slade J. Crocidolite asbestos fibers in smoke from original Kent cigarettes. Cancer Res 1995;55:2232-2235. 3. Talcott JA, Thurber WA, Kantor AF, et al. Asbestos-associated diseases in a cohort of cigarette-filter workers. N Engl J Med 1989;321:1220-1223.

Longshoremen/Dockworkers/Shipbuilding Industry/Shipyard Workers


1. McDonald JC, McDonald AD. The epidemiology of mesothelioma in historical context. Eur Respir J 1996;9:1932-1942 2. Hilliard AK, et al. The rise and fall in incidence of malignant mesothelioma from a British Naval Dockyard, 1979-1999. Occup Med 2003;53:209-212 3. Greenberg M. The doctors and the dockers. Am J Ind Med 2004;45:573-581 4. Hollins DA, et al. A visual historical review of exposure to asbestos at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (1962-1972). J Toxicol Environ Health 2009;12:124-156

Pulp and Paper Mills


1. Jappinen P. A mortality study of Finnish pulp and paper workers. Br J Ind Med 1987;44:580-587 2. Henneberger PK, et al. Mortality among pulp and paper workers in Berlin, New Hampshire. Br J Ind Med 1989;46:658-664 3. Band PR, et al. Cohort mortality study of pulp and paper mill workers in British Columbia, Canada. Am J Epidemiol 1997;146:186-194

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RT Vanderbilt Talc
1. Brown DP, Dement JM, Wagoner JK. Mortality patterns among miners and millers occupationally exposed to asbestiform talc. In: Dusts and Disease. Lemen R, Dement JM. Pathotox Publishers, Inc. 1979. Exh 564 2. Dement JM, Brown DP. Letter to Am Ind Hyg Assoc J June 1982, A-24-A25. Exh 745 3. Rohl AN, Langer AM. Fibrous mineral content of consumer talc-containing products, pages 393-403. Exh 822 4. Kleinfeld M, Messite J, Kooyman O, et al. Mortality among talc miners and millers in New York State. Arch Environ Health 1967;14:663-667. Exh 355 5. Kleinfeld M, Messite J, Zaki MH. Mortality experiences among talc workers: a follow-up study. J Occup Med 1974;16:345-349. Exh 358 6. Hull MJ, Abraham JL, Case BW. Mesothelioma among workers in asbestiform fiberbearing talc mines in New York State. Ann Occup Hyg 2002;46:132-135. Exh 189 7. Webber JS, Jackson KW, Parekh P, Bopp RF. Reconstruction of a century of airborne asbestos concentrations. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:707-714. 8. Vianna NJ, Maslowsky J, Roberts S, et al. Malignant mesothelioma: epidemiologic patterns in New York State. NY State J Med 1981;April:735-738. 9. Internal Correspondence: Johns-Manville October 11, 1974 re Optical and TEM counting of asbestos minerals in asbestine 3X, asbestine 325, Nytal 200, and Nytal 400 as currently produced by R.T. Vanderbilt Company. Exh 42 10. Internal Correspondence: Johns-Manville February 18, 1977 re Paper by C.S. Thompson concerning Asbestos in Your Future. Exh 41 11. NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. 90-390 and MHETA 86-012 re RT Vanderbilt Company. Exh 257 12. NIOSH Technical Report re Occupational Exposure to Talc Containing Asbestos. Exh 381 13. Final report Industrial Hygiene Study of the Gouverneur Talc Company, Number One Mine and Mill, Volume II, Talc Bulk Sample Analyses by NIOSH. Electron Microscope Analyses of RT Vanderbilt Talcs collected from Talc Suppliers. Analyses performed by John M. Dement and Ralph D. Zumwalde, October 1976. Exh 264 14. Summary Report of DRDS Ethical and Legal Investigation dated August 11, 1988. Memorandum to J. Donald Miller, M.D., Director, NIOSH re employees of R.T. Vanderbilt Company, Inc. Exh 436

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Environmental exposure to asbestos and EPA:


1. Goldberg S, Rey G, Luce D, et al. Possible effect of environmental exposure to asbestos on geographical variation in mesothelioma rates. Occup Environ Med 2010;67:417-421. 2. Madkour MT, El Bokhary MS, Awad Allah HI, et al. Environmental exposure to asbestos and the exposure-response relationship with mesothelioma. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal 2009;15:25-38. 3. Rake C, Gilham C, Hatch J, Darnton A, Hodgson J, Peto J. Occupational, domestic and environmental mesothelioma risks in the British population: a case-control study. Br J Cancer 2009;100:1175-1183. 4. Pan XL, Day HW, Wang W, et al. Residential proximity to naturally occurring asbestos and mesothelioma risk in California. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005;172:1019-1025. 5. Kurumatani N, Kumagai S. Mapping the risk of mesothelioma due to neighborhood asbestos exposure. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2008;178:624-629 6. Maule MM, et al. Modeling mesothelioma risk associated with environmental asbestos exposure. Environ Health Perspect 2007;115:1066-1071 7. Orenstein MR, Schenker MB. Environmental asbestos exposure and mesothelioma. Curr Opin Pul Med 2000;6:371-377. 8. Magnani C, et al. Multicentric study on malignant pleural mesothelioma and nonoccupational exposure to asbestos. British Journal of Cancer 2000;83:104-111 9. EPA Region 9: Response to the November 2005 National Stone, Sand & Gravel Association Report prepared by the R.J.Lee Group, Inc. Evaluation of EPA s analytical data from the El Dorado Hills Asbestos Evaluation Project. April 20, 2006 (Rejection of Berman-Crump and statement that a concentration of 0.0002 f/cc translates in the protocol to an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000 exposed individuals, which is outside the acceptable cancer risk ranges of EPA, Cal/EPA and most other state and federal health agencies - see pages 12-14 of document) 10. Statement by the EPA concerning each and every exposure. U.S. EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance: A guideline for ship scrappers: Tips for regulatory compliance, Summer 2000. EPA 315. 11. Berry M. Mesothelioma incidence and community asbestos exposure. Environ Research 1997;75:34-40. 12. Magnani C, et al. Pleural malignant mesothelioma and non-occupational exposure to asbestos in Casale Monferrato, Italy. Occup Environ Med 1995;52:362-367.

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Familial, Household and Non-occupational Exposure:


a. Hammar SP et al. Malignant mesothelioma in women. Lung Cancer 1997;18, suppl 1:236. b. Dodson RF et al. Tissue burden of asbestos in nonoccupationally exposed individuals from East Texas. Am J Ind Med 1999;35:281-286. c. Dodson RF et al. Asbestos content of omentum and mesentery in nonoccupationally exposed individuals. Toxicol Ind Health 2001;17:138-143. d. Dodson RF et al. Quantitative analysis of asbestos burden in women with mesothelioma. Am J Ind Med 2003;43:188-195. e. Hillerdal G. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures. Occup Environ Med 1999;56:506-513 f. Vianna NJ, Polan AK. Non-occupational exposure to asbestos and malignant mesothelioma in females. Lancet 1978;1:1061-1063. g. Goldberg M. Luce D. The health impact of nonoccupational exposure to asbestos: What do we know? European J Cancer Prevention 2009. h. NIOSH. Report to Congress on Workers Home Contamination Study Conducted Under the Workers Family Protection Act (29 U.S.C. 671a). U.S. Dept of Human and Health Services, Sept. 1995. DHHS(NIOSH) Publication No. 95-123. i. Familial Exposure to Asbestos (List of 50 references) j. Familial Exposure to Asbestos: Citations and Summary

Low-dose exposure:
a. Hillerdal G. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures. Occup Environ Med 1999;56:506-513 b. Iwatsubo Y, et al. Pleural mesothelioma: dose-response relation at low levels of asbestos exposure in a French population-based case-control study. Am J Epidemiol 1998;148:133-42. c. Rodelsperger et al. Asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers as risk factors for diffuse malignant mesothelioma: results from a German hospital-based case-control study. Am J Ind Med 2001;39:262-275. d. Hodgson JT, Darnton A. The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure. Ann Occup Hyg 2000;44:565-601. e. Rolland P, et al. Risk of pleural mesothelioma: A French population-based case-control study (1998-2002). Lung Cancer 2006;54:S9(35). f. Federal Register 1986/Vol. 51 No. 119/pg. 22644 g. OSHA asbestos PELs and risk. E-mail from Dodson See discussion on Take Home and Community Exposures to Asbestos in Chapter 5 by Lemen RA in: Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology, and Health Effects, 2nd ed. Dodson RA, Hammar SP (eds.). CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group 2011:189-192.

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Mesothelioma Types:
Deciduoid mesothelioma:
1. Talerman A, Chilcote RR, Montero JR, et al. Diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in a 13-year-old girl. Am J Surg Pathol 1985;9:73-80 2. Crotty TB, Myers JL, Katzenstein AL, et al. Localized malignant mesothelioma. A clinicopathologic and flow cytometric study. Am J Surg Pathol 1994:18:357-363. 3. Nascimento AG, Keeney GL, Fletcher CDM. Deciduoid peritoneal mesothelioma: an unusual phenotype affecting young females. Am J Surg Pathol 1994:18:439-445. 4. Orosz Z, Nagy P Szentirmay Z, et al. Epithelial mesothelioma with deciduoid features. Virchows Arch 1999:434:263-266. 5. Ordonez NG. Epithelial mesothelioma with deciduoid features: report of four cases. Am J Surg Pathol 2000:24:816-823. 6. Shanks JH, Harris M, Banerjee SS, et al. Mesotheliomas with deciduoid morphology: a morphologic spectrum and a variant not confined to young females. Am J Surg Pathol 2000:24:285-294. 7. Desai S, Kane S, Bharde S, et al. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma deciduoid or anaplastic variant? Point to ponder. Indian J Pathol Microbiol 2000:43:479-483. 8. Putlaguata L, Vriend RA, Nguyen G. Deciduoid epithelial mesothelioma of the pleura with focal rhabdoid change. Am J Surg Pathol 2000:24:1440-1443. 9. Gloeckner-Hofmann K, Zhu X, Bartels H, et al. Deciduoid pleural mesothelioma affecting a young female without prior asbestos exposure. Respiration 2000:67:456-458. 10. Gillespie FR, van der Walt JD, Derias N, Kenney A. Case report: deciduoid peritoneal mesothelioma: a report of the cytological appearances. Cytopathology 2001;12:57-61 11. Henley JD, Loehrer PJ Sr, Ulbright TM. Deciduoid mesothelioma of the pleura after radiation therapy for Hodgkin s disease presenting as a mediastinal mass. Am J Surg Pathol 2001:25:547-548. 12. Monaghan H, Al-Nafussi A. Deciduoid pleural mesothelioma. Histopathol 2001:39:100-107. 13. Okonkwo A, Musunuri S, Diaz L Jr, et al. Deciduoid mesothelioma: a rare, distinct entity with unusual features. Ann Diag Pathol 2001:5:168-171. 14. Shia J, Erlandson RA, Klimstra DS. Deciduoid mesothelioma: a report of 5 cases and literature review. Ultrastructural Pathology 2002;26:355-363. 15. Reis-Filho JS, Pope LZB, Milanezi F, et al. Primary epithelial malignant mesothelioma of the pericardium with deciduoid features: cytohistologic and immunohistochemical study. Diag Cytopathol 2002:26:117-122. 16. Serio G, Scattone A, Pennella A, et al. Malignant deciduoid mesothelioma of the pleura: report of two cases with long survival. Histopathol 2002:40:348-352. 17. Chung DJ, Kang YW, Kim BK, et al. Deciduoid peritoneal mesothelioma: CT findings with pathologic correlation. Abdom Imaging 2003:28:614-616. 18. Asroli S, Piaz GD, Damiani S. Localized pleural malignant mesothelioma: report of two cases simulating pulmonary carcinoma and review of the literature. Virchows Arch 2004:445:206-209. 19. Maeda S, Hosone M, Katayama H, et al. Deciduoid mesothelioma in the pelvic cavity. Pathol lnterna 2004:54:67-72. 20. Mourra N, de Chaisemartin C, Goubin-Versini I, et al. Malignant deciduoid mesothelioma: a diagnostic challenge. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2005:129:403-6. 21. Kimura N, Ogasawara T, Asonuma S, et al. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and interleukin 6-producing diffuse deciduoid peritoneal mesothelioma. Mod Pathol 2005:18:446-450.

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22. Baker PM, Clement PB, Young RH. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in women: a study of 75 cases with emphasis on their morphologic spectrum and differential diagnosis. Am J Clin Pathol 2005:123:724-737. 23. Allen TC, Cagle PT, Churg AM, Colby TV, Gibbs AR, Hammar SP, Corson JM, Grimes MM, Ordonez NG, Roggli V, Travis WD, Wick MR. Localized Malignant Mesothelioma. Am J Surg Pathol. 2005;29:866-873. 24. Kondi-Pafiti A, Grapsa D, Kontogianni-Katsarau K, et al. Ectopic decidua mimicking metastatic lesions report of three cases and review of the literature. Eur J Gynaec Oncol 2005:26:459-461. This entity is discussed in Dail & Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition. Volume II, Chapter 43, page 649

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Localized malignant mesothelioma:


1. Tanzi S, Tiseo M, Internullo E, et al. Localized malignant pleural mesothelioma: report of two cases. J Thorac Oncol 2009;4:1038-1040. 2. Allen TC, Cagle PT, Churg AM, et al. (US-Canadian Mesothelioma Panel paper). Localized malignant mesothelioma. Am J Surg Pathol 2005;29:866-873. 3. Takahashi H, Harada M, Maehara S, Kato H. Localized malignant mesothelioma of the pleura. Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;13:262-266. 54-year-old man with history of asbestos exposure for three years; biphasic meso 4.5 cm; RX resection. 4. Hirano H, Takeda S, Sawabata Y, et al. Localized pleural malignant mesothelioma. Pathol Int 2003;53:616-621. 78-year-old man with 2 x 5 cm nodule extrapleural; localized mass 3.2 x 3.1 cm; recurrence. 5. Erkilic S, Sari I, Tunzozgur B. Localized pleural malignant mesothelioma. Pathol Int 2001;51:812-815. 61-year-old male with no history of cigarette smoking or asbestos exposure; 5-cm RUL lung mass; epithelial; RX surgery; recurrence 5 months following surgery. 6. Okamura H, Kamei T, Mitsuno A, et al. Localized malignant mesothelioma of the pleura. Pathol Int 2001;51:654-660. 56-year old Japanese male with no hisotyr of asbestos exposure; RX surgery; sarcomatoid localized malignant mesothelioma; recurrence yes; metastases yes. 7. Ojeda HF et al. Localized malignant mesothelioma: a case report. Am Surg 1998;64:881885. 66-year-old with history of asbestos exposure; 5 cm left posterior mass; ? recurrence; poorly-differentiated malignant mesothelioma. 8. Crotty TB, Myers JL, Katzenstein AL, et al. Localized malignant mesothelioma: a clinicopathologic and flow cytometric study. Am J Surg Pathol 1994;18:357-363 9. Myers J, Tazelaar H, Katzenstein A-L, et al. Localized malignant epithelioid and biphasic mesothelioma of the pleura: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric analysis of three cases. Lab Invest 1992;66:115A. 10. Kishimoto T. A case of benign localized mesothelioma with occupational history of asbestos exposure. Article in Japanese: Nihon Kyobu Shikkan Gakkai Zasshi 1991;29:16031607. Localized mass; history of asbestos exposure. ? sex, ? age. 11. Dalton WT, Zolliker AS, McCaughey WTE, et al. Localized primary tumors of the pleura: an analysis of 40 cases. Cancer 1979;44:1465-1475 This entity is also discussed in: Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd edition. Tomashefski JF Jr., Cagle PT, Farver CF, Fraire AE (Ed). Springer 2008. See pages 660-661 of Volume II, Chapter 43 Henderson DW, Klebe S, Dodson RF. Neoplasms of the Pleura. Hammar SP,

Metastatic mesothelioma - unusual locations:


Draft of Table 43-24 from Dail & Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Ed. Tomashefski JF Jr. et al. (eds.) Springer 2008

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Peritoneal mesothelioma:
1. Acheson ED, Gardner MJ. Mesothelioma and exposure to mixtures of chrysotile and amphibole asbestos. Arch Environ Health 1979;34:240-242. 2. Langer AM, Nolan RP. Asbestos in the lungs of persons exposed in the USA. Monaldi Arch Chest Dis 1998;53:168-180. 3. Dodson RF, O Sullivan M, Corn CJ, et al. Analysis of asbestos fiber burden in lung tissue from mesothelioma patients. Ultrastructural Pathology 1997;21:321-336. 5 peritoneal mesotheliomas with high concentrations of asbestos fibers/bodies identified in 3 cases and significantly lower concentrations in 2 cases. Findings show that peritoneal mesotheliomas occur at a variety of concentrations of asbestos in lung tissue. 4. Dodson RF, O Sullivan MF, Huang J, Holiday DB, Hammar, SP. Asbestos in extrapulmonary sites omentum and mesentery. Chest 2000;117:486-493. Asbestos fibers reach areas in the peritoneal cavity where some mesotheliomas develop. This study suggests their presence can be predicted based on concentrations and characteristics of fiber burdens in lung tissue. 5. Dodson RF, et al. Asbestos content of omentum and mesentery in nonoccupationally exposed individuals. Toxicology and Industrial Health 2002;17:1-6. Asbestos fibers in occupationally exposed individuals relocate from the lung to extrapulmonary sites. A mechanism for relocation is via the lymphatic circulation. This study shows that asbestos fibers also reach the mesentery and omentum in the peritoneal area. 6. Heller DS, Gordon RE, Westhoff C, Gerber S. Asbestos exposure and ovarian fiber burden. Am J Ind Med 1996;29:435-439. 9/13 women exposed to asbestos had asbestos in their ovarian tissue (69.23%); 3 (23%) had counts over 1 million fibers per gram of wet weight; 6/17 women had detectable asbestos in their ovaries (35%) with 1 (6%) having a count over 1 million fibers/gram wet weight; 13 women had a history of domestic bystander exposure to asbestos. 7. IARC. A special report: policy. A review of human carcinogens Part C: metals, arsenic, dusts, and fibres. www.thelancet.com/oncology; The Lancet 2009;10:453-454. 8. NIOSH Report to Congress on Workers Home Contamination Study Conducted Under the Workers Family Protection Act (29 USC. 671a) in 1995. See Table 2 re Health Effects of Take-Home Asbestos Exposure (Cohort Studies). 9. Boffetta P. Epidemiology of peritoneal mesothelioma: a review. Ann Oncol 2007;18:985-990. 10. Clement PB. Selected miscellaneous ovarian lesions: small cell carcinomas, mesothelial lesions, mesenchymal and mixed neoplasms, and non-neoplastic lesions. Modern Pathol 2005;18:S113-S129. 11. Deraco M, Bartlett D, Kusamura S, Baratti D. Consensus Statement on Peritoneal Mesothelioma. J Surg Oncol 2008;98:268-272. 12. Husain AN, Colby TV, Ordonez NG, Krausz T, et al. Guidelines for the pathologic diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma: a consensus statement from the International Mesothelioma Interest Group. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2009;133:1317-1331. 13. Kurimoto R, Kishimoto T, Nagai Y, et al. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: quantitative analysis of asbestos burden. Pathology International 2009;59:823-827. 14. Rittinghausen S, Ernst H, Muhle H, Mohr U. Atypical malignant mesotheliomas with osseous and cartilaginous differentiation after intraperitoneal injection of various types of mineral fibres in rats. Exp Tox Pathol 1992;44:55-58. 15. Andrion A, Bosia, Paoletti L, et al. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in a 17-year-old boy with evidence of previous exposure to chrysotile and tremolite asbestos. Human Pathology 1994;25:617-622. A 17-year-old boy whose lung tissue contained 316,000 fibers

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of chrysotile asbestos per gram of dry lung tissue and 194,000 fibers of tremolite asbestos per gram of dry lung tissue. The length of the chrysotile fibers ranged from 1.5 to 20 microns and had a mean of 12 microns. The tremolite fibers ranged from 0.5 to 15 microms and had a 5 micron average length. 5% of the chrysotile fibers were >5 microns long and 30% of the tremolite fibers were 5 microns long. 16. Berry G, de Klerk NH, Reid A, et al. Malignant pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomas in former miners and millers of crocidolite at Wittenoom, Western Australia. Occup Environ Med 2004;61:e14. 33 peritoneal mesotheliomas. 17. Borow M, Conston A, Livornese L, Schalet N. Mesothelioma following exposure to asbestos: a review of 72 cases. Chest 1973;64:641-646. Twenty-one peritoneal mesotheliomas in individuals who worked in an asbestos mill where chrysotile was the only fiber used in the textile division of the mill. 18. Dement JM, Harris RL Jr., Symons MJ and Shy CM. Exposures and mortality among chrysotile asbestos workers, Part II: Mortality. American Journal of Industrial Medicine 1983;4:421-433. One peritoneal mesothelioma occurring in a chrysotile textile production operation worker. 19. Godwin MC, Jagatic C. Asbestos and mesothelioma. JAMA 1968;204:1009. A case of peritoneal mesothelioma in a man who had worked as a young adult three years weaving brake lining made from chrysotile asbestos. 20. Maltoni C, Pinto C, Mobiglia A. Mesotheliomas due to asbestos used in railroads in Italy. Annals of New York Academy of Science 1991;643:347-367. Four peritoneal mesotheliomas that occurred among railroad workers in Italy where chrysotile was the type of asbestos prevalently used. 21. Mancuso TF et al. Methodology of industrial health studies: The cohort approach with special reference to an asbestos company. Archives of Environmental Health 1963;6:210226). Four peritoneal mesotheliomas occurring in workers in the manufacturing of brake linings. 22. Mirabelli D, et al. Excess of mesotheliomas after exposure to chrysotile in Balangero, Italy. Occup Environ Med 2008;65:815-819. 2 peritoneal mesotheliomas. 23. Morinaga K, Kohyama, Yokoyama K, Yasui Y, Hara I, Sasaki M, Suzuki Y, Sera Y. Asbestos fiber content of lungs with mesothelioma in Osaka, Japan: A preliminary report. IARC Science Publication 1989; 90:438-443. One peritoneal mesothelioma occurring in a 54-year-old design engineer whose lung tissue contained only chrysotile asbestos. 24. Musk AB et al. Mortality of former crocidolite (blue asbestos) miners and millers at Wittenoom. Occup Environ Med 2007. 32 cases of peritoneal mesothelioma. 25. Newhouse ML, Thompson H. Mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum following exposure to asbestos in the London area. Br J Ind Med 1965;22:261-269. 27 peritoneal mesotheliomas. 26. O Donnell WM, Mann RH, Grosh JL. Asbestos: an extrinsic factor in pathogenesis of bronchogenic carcinoma and mesothelioma. Cancer: 1966;19:1143-1148. Three peritoneal mesotheliomas and one peritoneal/pleural mesothelioma in patients employed in an asbestos textile factory. 27. Oury TD, Hammar SP, Roggli VL. Asbestos content of lung tissue in patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: a study of 40 cases. Lung Cancer 1997;18(Suppl 1):235-236. Abstract 923. 28. Saitoh K, Muto H, Hachiya N, Takizawa V. Asbestos body and fiber concentrations of pathological autopsy tissues of patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 1993;50:325-332. Two peritoneal mesotheliomas, one occurring in a 62-year-old male with probable asbestos exposure and a 42-year-old female nurse with unlikely known exposure to asbestos. Chrysotile

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fibers were identified in the lung tissue of each case with lower concentrations in the nurse. 29. Seldman H, Selikoff IJ, Gelb SK. Mortality experience of amosite asbestos factory worker: dose-response relationships 5 to 40 years after onset of short-term work exposure. Am J Ind Med 1986;10:479-514. 9 peritoneal mesotheliomas. 30. Teta BE, Lewinsohm HC, Miegs JW, Vidone RA, Mowad LZ, Flanner JT. Mesothelioma in Connecticut (1955-1977), occupational and geographical associations. Journal of Occupational Medicine 1983;25:749-756. Identified 29 cases of peritoneal mesothelioma (18 males, 11 females). 31. Reid A, de Klerk N, Ambrosini G, et al. The additional risk of malignant mesothelioma in former workers and residents of Wittenoom with benign pleural disease or asbestosis. Occup Environ Med 2005;62:665-669. 20 peritoneal mesotheliomas (18 in workers and 2 in residents). 32. Vianna NJ, Polan AK. Non-occupational exposure to asbestos and malignant mesothelioma in females. Lancet 1978;1:1061-1063. 20 confirmed deaths from peritoneal mesothelioma in women residing in NY State between 1966 and 1977 (asbestos exposure in 2 textile workers, 1 milliner, 1 paraoccupational exposure). 33. Welch LS et al. Asbestos and peritoneal mesothelioma among college-educated men. Int J Occup Environ Health 2005;11:254-258. 40 primary peritoneal mesotheliomas from a single institution. 22 out of 24 men (92%) with peritoneal mesothelioma reported potential exposure to asbestos. Odds ratio 6.6 for asbestos exposure among this group of primary peritoneal mesotheliomas with relatively slight asbestos exposure. 34. Egilman D, Menendez LM. A case of occupational peritoneal mesothelioma from exposure to tremolite-free chrysotile in Quebec, Canada: A black swan case. Am J Ind Med 2010. This entity is also discussed in Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology and Health Effects. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds), 2nd ed. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group 2011.

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Pseudomesotheliomatous Adenocarcinoma:
1. Babolini G, Blasi A. The pleural form of primary cancer of the lung. Diseases of Chest 1956;29:314-322. 2. Harwood TR, Gracey DR, Yokoo H. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung. A variant of peripheral lung cancer. Am J Clin Path 1976;65:159-167. 3. Broghamer WL Jr., Collins WM, Mojsejenko IK. The cyto-histopathology of a pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung. Acta Cytologica 1978;22:239-242. 4. Lin JI, Tseng CH, Tsung SH. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung. Southern Medical Journal 1980;73:655-657. 5. Nishimoto Y, Ohno T, Saito K. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung with histochemical and immunohistochemical study. Acta Pathol Jpn 1983;33:415-423. 6. Simonsen J. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung with asbestos exposure. Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1986; 7:49-51. 7. Dessy E, Pietra GG. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of three cases. Cancer 1991;68:17471753. 8. Koss M, Travis W, Moran C, Hochholzer. Pseudomesotheliomatous adenocarcinoma: A re-appraisal. Sem Diag Pathol 1992; 9:117-132. 9. Robb JA, Hammar SP, Yooko H. Pseudomesotheliomatous lung cancer: a rare asbestosrelated malignancy readily separable from epithelial pleural mesothelioma. Lab Invest 1993;68:134A. 10. Hartmann C-A, Schutze H. Mesothelioma-like tumors of the pleura: a review of 72 autopsy cases. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 1994;120:331-347. 11. Falconieri G, Zanconati F, Bussani R, et al. Small cell carcinoma of lung simulating mesothelioma. Pathol Res Pract 1995;191:1147-1151. 12. Corrin B, Dewar A. Adenocarcinoma simulating mesothelioma. Ultrastruct Pathol 1996;20:327-329. 13. Koss MN, Fleming M, Przygodzki RM, Sherrod A, Travis W, Hochholzer L. Adenocarcinoma simulating mesothelioma: A clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 29 cases. Ann Diagn Pathol 1998;2:93-102. 14. Shah IA, Salvatore JR, Kumnet T, et al. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma involving pleura and peritoneum: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of three cases. Ann Diag Pathol 1998;3:148-159. 15. Tang P, Vatsia SK, Teichberg S, Kahn E. Pulmonary adenocarcinoma simulating malignant mesothelioma. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2001;125:1598-1600. 16. van Hengel P, van Geffen F, et al. Atypical carcinoid presenting as mesothelioma. The Netherlands Journal of Medicine 2001;58:185-190. 17. Hammar SP. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma of the lung: a report of three unusual cases with review of the literature. 2002 18. Attanoos RL, Gibbs AR. Pseudomesotheliomatous carcinomas of the pleura: a 10-year analysis of cases from the Environmental Lung Disease Research Group, Cardiff. Histopathology 2003;43:444-452 This entity is also discussed in: Hammar SP, Henderson DW, Klebe S, Dodson RF. Neoplasms of the pleura. In Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd edition. Tomashefski JF Jr.(ed). Springer 2008:670-672. Hammar SP. The pathologic features of asbestos-induced disease. In Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology, and Health Effects, 2nd ed. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (Eds). CRC

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Press/Taylor & Francis 2011:419-431.

Mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis:


1. Brimo F, Illei PB, Epstein JI. Mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis: a series of eight cases with uncertain malignant potential. Modern Pathology 2010;23:1165-1172. We have full article. 2. Chen JL, Hsu YH. Kaohsiung J. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: a case report and review of the literature. Med Sci 2009;25:77-81. 3. Candura SM, Canto A, Amatu A, et al. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis in a petrochemical worker exposed to asbestos. Anticancer Res 2008;28:1365-1368. 4. Liguori G, Garaffa G, Trombetta C, et al. Inguinal recurrence of malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis: one case report with delayed recurrence and review of the literature. Asian J Androl 2007;9:859-860. We have full article. 5. Al-Qahtani M, Morris B, Dawood S, Onerheim R. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis. Can J Urol 2007;14:3514-3517. 6. Schure PJ, van Dalen KC, Ruitenberg HM, van Dalen T. Mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: a rare malignancy mimicking more common inguino-scrotal masses. J Surg Oncol 2006;94:162-164. 7. Gorini G, Pinelli M, Sforza V, Simi U, et al. Mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: report of 2 cases with asbestos occupational exposure. Int J Surg Pathol 2005;13:211-214. We have full article. 8. Garcia de Jalon A, Gil P, Azua-Romeo J. et al. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis: report of a case without risk factors and review of the literature. Int Urol Nephrol 2003;35:59-62. 9. Dodson RF, O Sullivan MF, Brooks DR, Bruce JR. Asbestos content of omentum and mesentery in nonoccupationally exposed individuals. Toxicology and Industrial Health 2002;17. We have full article. 10. Murai Y. Malignant mesothelioma in Japan: analysis of registered autopsy cases. Arch Environ Health 2001;56:84-88. 11. Attanoos RL, Gibbs AR. Primary malignant gonadal mesotheliomas and asbestos. Histopathology 2000;37:150-159. We have full article. 12. Plas E, Riedl CR, Pflger H. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: review of the literature and assessment of prognostic parameters. Cancer 1998;83:2437-2446. We have full article. 13. Ascoli V, Faccioli F, Rahimi S, et al. Concomitant malignant mesothelioma of the pleura, peritoneum, and tunica vaginalis testis. Diagn Cytopathol 1996;14:243-248. 14. Jones MA, Young RH, Scully RE. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis: a clinicopathologic analysis of 11 cases with review of the literature. Am J Surg Pathol 1995;19:815-825. 15. Antman K, Cohen S, Dimitrov NV, et al. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis. Journal of Clinical Oncology 1984;2:447-451. We have full article. 16. Japko L, Horta AL, Schreiber K, et al. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: report of first case with preoperative diagnosis. Cancer 1982;49:119-127. We have full article. 17. Fligiel Z, Kaneko M. Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis propria testis in a patient with asbestos exposure: a case report. Cancer 1976;37:1478-1484. We have full article.

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Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma:


1. Butnor KJ, Sporn TA, Hammar SP, Roggli VL. Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma. Am J Surg Pathol 2001;25:1304-1309. 2. Galateau-Sall F, Vignaud JM, Burke L, Gibbs A, et al. Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma of the pleura: a series of 24 cases. Am J Surg Pathol 2004;28:534-540. 3. Tumors of the Serosal Membranes. See pages 33 (Figure 4-16) and page 50 (Figure 455).

Asbestos: Selected Cancers


Asbestos: Selected cancers. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. National Academy of Sciences, 2006. This book discusses pharyngeal cancer, laryngeal cancer, esophageal cancer, stomach cancer, and colorectal cancer. The committee found a causal association or lack thereof between asbestos as listed below:
Cancer: Conclusion: Colorectal Suggestive of, but insufficient Esophageal Inadequate Laryngeal Sufficient Pharyngeal Suggestive of, but insufficient Stomach (GI) Suggestive of, but insufficient We (SPH, DWH, JL, RAL) agree with the above findings by the US Institute of Medicine Committee. We also find evidence of a causal relationship or lack thereof between the following cancers: Cancer: Conclusion: Pseudomesotheliomatous Lung CA Sufficient, depending upon individual case data Kidney/Renal Possible Ovarian Sufficient, depending upon individual case data Lymphoma Insufficient Autoimmune Disease Likely in many cases

From Chapter 8: Asbestos and Other Cancers. In: Asbestos: Risk Assessment, Epidemiology and Health Effects, 2nd Ed. Dodson RF, Hammar SP (eds.), CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group 2011.

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Translocation:
1. Dodson et al. Asbestos in extrapulmonary sites: omentum and mesentery. Chest 2000;117:486-493. 2. Suzuki Y, Kohyama N. Translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers from the lung to other tissues. Am J Ind Med 1991;19:701-704. 3. Heller DS et al. Asbestos exposure and ovarian fiber burden. Am J Ind Med 1996;29:435439.

Animal Studies:
1. Wagner JC et al. The effects of the inhalation of asbestos in rats. Br J Cancer 1974;29:252-269. 2. Glickman LT et al. Mesothelioma in pet dogs associated with exposure of their owners to asbestos. Environ Res 1983;32:305-313. 3. Rittinghausen S et al. Atypical malignant mesotheliomas with osseous and cartilaginous differentiation after intraperitoneal injection of various types of mineral fibers in rats. Exp Toxicol Pathol 1992;44:55-58. 4. Hasanoglu HC et al. Orally ingested chrysotile asbestos affects rat lungs and pleura. Arch Env Occup Health 2008;63:71-75

Black spots in pleura:


1. Boutin C, et al. Black spots concentrate oncogenic asbestos fibers in the parietal pleura. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1996;153:444-449 2. Muller K-M, et al. Black spots of the parietal pleura: Morphology and formal pathogenesis. Respiration 2002;69:261-267 3. Mitchev K, et al. Black spots and hyaline pleural plaques on the parietal pleura of 150 urban necropsy cases. Am J Surg Pathol 2002;26:1198-1206 4. Miserocchi G, et al. Review: Translocation pathways for inhaled asbestos fibers. Environmental Health 2008;7:4 See also page 989 in Dail and Hammar s Pulmonary Pathology, 3rd Edition, Chapter 27, Volume I

SV40 virus:
1. Manfredi JJ, Dong J, Wen-jun L, et al. Evidence against a role for SV40 in human mesothelioma. Cancer Res 2005;65:2602-2609 2. Lopez-Rios F, Illei PB, Rusch V, Ladanyl M. Evidence against a role for SV40 infection in human mesotheliomas and high risk false-positive PCR results owing to presence of SV40 sequences in common laboratory plasmids. Lancet 2004;364:1157-1166

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Radiation-induced mesothelioma:
Articles (list of) and Table prepared by Hammar SP.

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