Anda di halaman 1dari 10

Antenna Azimuth Position Control System

Mechatronics

Date Assigned: 2/3/2011 Date Due: 2/6/2011

Introduction The purpose of the project was to simulate the control system for the position of an azimuth antenna using MATLAB Simulink, and run sensitivity analysis to determine best the preamplifier gain in order to produce the desired system response for three different

configurations within a parameter of 10% (See Figure 1 & 2 and Table 1). The objective was to determine the best gain value in the preamplifier of the three configurations by iterating the results. Determining the desired gain is critical in order to change the output response of the system and provide the best stability and performance of the azimuth antenna. It is also important to consider the weight of the large antenna, in order to prevent jerking which could damage the equipment.

Figure 1 Layout and schematic of Azimuth Antenna System Control

Figure 2 Block diagram of the Azimuth Antenna System Control

The system block diagram shows how the antenna controls work. First, the operator inputs the

desired angle using the potentiometer, then the signal is sent to a preamplifier (k), where the signal is boosted and sent to power amplifier. Once the power is amplified it is used to power the motor and load which then turns the gears to change the position of the antenna. Feedback is sent to the system through another potentiometer, which corrects signal glitches or errors. Finally the output of the system is the desired angle. The following table shows the given parameters and the initial value that was selected for the gain of the preamplifier (K):
Table 1 Block Diagram Parameters Block Diagram Parameters Parameter Configuration 1 Configuration 2 (+10%) Configuration 3 (-10%) Kpot 0.318 0.3498 0.31482 K 100 110 90 K1 100 110 99 A 100 110 99 Km 2.083 2.2913 2.06217 am 1.71 1.881 1.6929 Kg 0.1 0.11 0.099 The ideal value of K for each curve provided by the analysis run in MATLAB Simulink for each configuration found to be K=30

Simulation Model Using the Model in Figure 2, a new model was made in MATLAB Simulink. The output system response would be displayed on the scope when the system would be run in MATLAB Simulink. A step-function was used as the operator input and gain blocks were used to model the

potentiometers, preamplifier, and gears. The transfer functions were modeled using transfer function blocks. Finally, the scope produced a graphical result for the system for each configuration (See Figure 4).

Figure 3 Block Diagram of simulation of the Servo Motor Model using Simulink

Figure 4 Simulink system control results on scope with configuration 3 and k =30 Sensitivity Analysis A sensitivity analysis was performed within 10% of the given parameters to determine the best system response. Using the simout function, plots of multiple values of K were made for

each system configuration. The following graph shows the system response for configuration 1, where the initial value used to determine the preamplifier value is plotted in red. The plot in

Figure 4 System response produced in MATLAB iterating K values from 10 to 90 Figure 4 also shows various values for the preamplifier (K). The same was done for the next two configurations (See Figure 5 and 6).

Figure 5 System response produced in MATLAB iterating K values from 10 to 100

Figure 6 System response produced in MATLAB iterating K values from 10 to 80 Appendix A shows the MATLAB code that was used to derive the system response for every change in configuration (See Figures 8, 9, 10 and 11).

Figure 7 System response produced in MATLAB for all configurations The initial value of K was plotted for each system, and the optimum value of K was determined and plotted in red.

Analysis and Results Comparing the initial values for configuration 1, 2, and 3, it is apparent that the higher the gain, the higher the overshoot will be. Therefore, the highest overshoot can be seen in the system with a preamplifier value (K) of 110 (See Figure 7). Comparing all three systems it was best to use the third configuration with a preamplifier value of 90, because it had the least amount of overshoot. Using the iterations for the preamplifier value of K in Figure 6, the best system response was selected where K equals to 30. The system response at the highest K value was under-damped, which would cause the antenna to jerk. The lowest value of K in Figure 5 produced an over-damped system response, which was ideal, but took too long to stabilize. Therefore, the optimum value was found to be a preamplifier gain (K) of 30 using the third configurations, where the system would not cause the antenna to jerk or take too long to stabilize. Conclusion The sensitivity analysis made in MATLAB Simulink of azimuth antenna system control determined
that the optimum value for the preamplifier gain was the third configuration at a K value of 30. Determining the system response for the azimuth antenna further enhanced our understanding of the effect the amplifier gain has on an actual response of the system. Understanding the system response of the azimuth antenna control system could aid in avoiding mechanical failure, poor stability, and poor performance.

References
1.

Nise, Norman S. "Antenna Azimuth Position Control System." Control Systems Engineering. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2011. Print.

Appendix A % group 4 Antenna simulation clc clear all close all %configuration 1 kpot = .0318; k = 100; k1 =100; a =100; km =2.083; am = 1.71; kg = .01; sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'b') hold on title('System Response ') xlabel('Time(sec)') ylabel('Response ') % configuration #2 kpot = .0318* (1.1); k = 100*(1.1); k1 =100*(1.1); a =100*(1.1); km =2.083*(1.1); am = 1.71*(1.1); kg = .01*(1.1); sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'g') %configuration #3 kpot = .0318* (.9); k = 100*(.9); k1 =100*(.9); a =100*(.9); km =2.083*(.9); am = 1.71*(.9); kg = .01*(.9); sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'c'). % optimum value of k kpot = .0318* (.9); k = 100*(.3); k1 =100*(.9); a =100*(.9); km =2.083*(.9); am = 1.71*(.9); kg = .01*(.9); sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'r') legend ('k=100','k=110','k=90','optimum value of k ') hold off ;

Figure 8 - MATLAB Code for all configurations

% group 4 Antenna simulation clc clear all close all %configuration 1 kpot = .0318; k = 100; k1 =100; a =100; km =2.083; am = 1.71; kg = .01; sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'dr') hold on for k = 10 : 90 sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'b') title('System Response for configuration 1 ') xlabel('Time(sec)') ylabel('Response ') end legend ('k=100','k between 10 and 90') hold off

Figure 9 - MATLAB Code for configuration 1


% group 4 Antenna simulation clc clear all close all %configuration #2 kpot = .0318* (1.1); k = 100*(1.1); k1 =100*(1.1); a =100*(1.1); km =2.083*(1.1); am = 1.71*(1.1); kg = .01*(1.1); sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'dr') hold on for k = 10 : 100 sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'g') title('System Response for configuration 2 ') xlabel('Time(sec)') ylabel('Response ') end legend ('k=110','k between 10 and 100') hold off

Figure 10 - MATLAB Code for configuration 2

%configeration #3 kpot = .0318* (.9); k = 100*(.9); k1 =100*(.9); a =100*(.9); km =2.083*(.9); am = 1.71*(.9); kg = .01*(.9); sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'dr') hold on for k = 10 : 80 sim('antenna',10) plot(simout.time,simout.signals.values,'c') title('System Response ') xlabel('Time(sec)') ylabel('Response ') end legend ('k=90','k between 10 and 80') hold off ;

Figure 11 - MATLAB Code for configuration 3