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TECHNICAL NOTE

OPC Configuration

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OPC Configuration

DOCUMENT
Document number External Reference Author Internal Reference Document Name

TN_RF_011

Version Publication date

V1.0 20/02/2012 N.A.

Christophe DONTEGREUIL
Project Code OPC Configuration

VALIDATION
Function Reader Author Maneli PARSY Recipients For For Validation information X X

MAILING LIST
Function Staffer 1 Staffer 2 Recipients Loic PENELON Christophe DONTEGREUIL For action X X For Info

Updates
Version V1.0 Date 20/02/2012 Author Maneli PARSY Evolution & Status First version of the document

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Contents
1. 2. 3. 4. TECHNICAL SUPPORT .................................................................................................................................... 4 VISUAL SYMBOLS DEFINITION ...................................................................................................................... 5 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................... 6 RELATED DOCUMENTS .................................................................................................................................. 7 4.1 Applications Notes ..................................................................................................................................... 7 4.2 Technical Notes ......................................................................................................................................... 8 AIM OF THE DOCUMENT ................................................................................................................................ 9 SOME DEFINTIONS ....................................................................................................................................... 11 6.1 What is the OPC ? ................................................................................................................................... 11 6.2 DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) ....................................................................................... 12 6.3 OPC and DCOM ...................................................................................................................................... 12 INSTALLING THE OPC CORE COMPONENTS ............................................................................................ 13 CONFIGURING COM AND DECOM WHEN USING A CLIENT ON A SEPARATE COMPUTER ................. 14 CONFIGURING THE OPC ON WINDOWS 7 ................................................................................................. 24

5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

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Disclaimer

The information contained in this document is the proprietary information of BeanAir. The contents are confidential and any disclosure to persons other than the officers, employees, agents or subcontractors of the owner or licensee of this document, without the prior written consent of BeanAir Ltd, is strictly prohibited. BeanAir makes every effort to ensure the quality of the information it makes available. Notwithstanding the foregoing, BeanAir does not make any warranty as to the information contained herein, and does not accept any liability for any injury, loss or damage of any kind incurred by use of or reliance upon the information. BeanAir disclaims any and all responsibility for the application of the devices characterized in this document, and notes that the application of the device must comply with the safety standards of the applicable country, and where applicable, with the relevant wiring rules. BeanAir reserves the right to make modifications, additions and deletions to this document due to typographical errors, inaccurate information, or improvements to programs and/or equipment at any time and without notice. Such changes will, nevertheless be incorporated into new editions of this document. Copyright: Transmittal, reproduction, dissemination and/or editing of this document as well as utilization of its contents and communication thereof to others without express authorization are prohibited. Offenders will be held liable for payment of damages. All rights are reserved. Copyright BeanAir Ltd. 2012.

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1. TECHNICAL SUPPORT

For general contact, technical support, to report documentation errors and to order manuals, contact BeanAir Technical Support Center (BTSC) at: tech-support@beanair.com For detailed information about where you can buy the BeanAir equipment/software or for recommendations on accessories and components visit: www.beanair.com

To register for product news and announcements or for product questions contact BeanAirs Technical Support Center (BTSC). Our aim is to make this user manual as helpful as possible. Please keep us informed of your comments and suggestions for improvements. BeanAir appreciates feedback from the users.

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2. VISUAL SYMBOLS DEFINITION

Visual

Definition

Caution or Warning Alerts the user with important information about BeanAir wireless sensor networks (WSN), if this information is not followed, the equipment /software may fail or malfunction.

Danger This information MUST be followed if not you may damage the equipment permanently or bodily injury may occur.

Tip or Information Provides advice and suggestions that may be useful when installing BeanAir Wireless Sensor Networks.

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3. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

AES CCA CSMA/CA DA GTS kSps LLC LQI LDCDA MAC PAN PER OPC RF SD WSN

Advanced Encryption Standard Clear Channel Assessment Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance Direct Access Guaranteed Time-Slot Kilo samples per second Logical Link Control Link quality indicator Low duty cycle data acquisition Media Access Control Personal Area Network Packet error rate Ole for Process Control Radio Frequency Secure Digital Wireless sensor Network

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4. RELATED DOCUMENTS

In addition to this User manual, please consult the application notes & technical notes:

4.1

APPLICATIONS NOTES
Nom du document Produits concerns All BeanAir products Description Wireless sensor deployment guidelines networks

AN_RF_007 : Beanair_WSN_Deployment

AN_RF_006 How to extend your wireless All BeanAir products range AN_RF_005 Ver 1.0- BeanGateway & Data BeanGateway Terminal Equipment Interface AN_RF_004 V1.0-1. Interferences@2.4GHz Coexistence And All BeanAir products

A guideline very useful for extending your wireless range DTE interface Architecture on the BeanGateway Coexistence & interferences of different RF technologies in the 2.4 GHz frequencies band. Comparison between 868 MHz frequency band and a 2.4 GHz frequency band.

AN_RF_003 V1.1 IEEE 802.15.4 2.4 GHz Vs All BeanAir products 868 MHz (English)

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4.2

TECHNICAL NOTES
Document name Concerned products OPC & BeanScape Description
The aim of this document is to help deploying the OPC DA and all associated services.

TN_RF_011 OPC Configuration

TN_RF_010 Management

BeanDevice

Power All the BeanDevice

This technical note describes the sleep & active power mode on the BeanDevice.

TN_RF_009 BeanGateway management BeanGateway on LAN infrastructure TN_RF_008 Data acquisition modes All the BeanDevice available on the BeanDevice

BeanGateway integration on a LAN infrastructure Data acquisition modes available on the BeanDevice

TN_RF_007 BeanDevice DataLogger User All the BeanDevice Guide

This document presents the DataLogger feature on the BeanDevice

TN_RF_006 BeanDevice network association

wireless All the BeanDevice

Description of the BeanDevice network association This document presents Pulse counter (ex: energy metering application) and binary data acquisition features on the BeanDevice SUN-BN.

TN_RF_005 Pulse counter & binary data BeanDevice SUN-BN acquisition on the BeanDevice SUN-BN

TN_RF_004 - Ambient Light sensor technical BeanDevice specifications (Ecosensor) RF_TN_003 V1.0- Wireless Network capacity All the products RF_TN_002 V1.0 - Current consumption in BeanDevice active & sleep mode RF_TN_001 V1.0benchmarking Wireless range BeanDevice

Technical description of the Ambient light sensor available on the BeanDevice SUNSUN-XX XX products

Network capacity characterization Beanair Wireless Sensor Networks

of

Current consumption estimation of the BeanDevice in active and sleeping mode


Wireless range BeanDevice benchmarking of the

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5. AIM OF THE DOCUMENT

The aim of this document is to help deploying the OPC DA and all associated services.

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6. SOME DEFINTIONS

6.1

WHAT IS THE OPC ?

OPC is all about Open Productivity & Connectivity in industrial automation and the enterprise systems that support industry. Interoperability is assured through the creation and maintenance of open standards specifications. There are currently seven standards specifications completed or in development. Based on fundamental standards and technology of the general computing market, the OPC Foundation adapts and creates specifications that fill industry-specific needs. OPC will continue to create new standards as needs arise and to adapt existing standards to utilize new technology. OPC is a series of standards specifications. The first standard (originally called simply the OPC Specification and now called the Data Access Specification) resulted from the collaboration of a number of leading worldwide automation suppliers working in cooperation with Microsoft. Originally based on Microsoft's OLE COM (component object model) and DCOM (distributed component object model) technologies, the specification defined a standard set of objects, interfaces and methods for use in process control and manufacturing automation applications to facilitate interoperability. The COM/DCOM technologies provided the framework for software products to be developed. There are now hundreds of OPC Data Access servers and clients. Everyone's favorite analogy for needing the original Data Access Specification is printer drivers in DOS and then in Windows. Under DOS the developer of each application had to also write a printer driver for every printer. So AutoCAD wrote the AutoCAD application and the printer drivers. And WordPerfect wrote the WordPerfect application and the printer drivers. They had to write a separate printer driver for every printer they wanted to support: one for an Epson FX-80 and one for the H-P LaserJet, and on and on. In the industrial automation world, Intellution wrote their Human Machine Interface (HMI) software and a proprietary driver to each industrial device (including every PLC brand). Rockwell wrote their HMI and a proprietary driver to each industrial device (including every PLC brand, not just their own). Windows solved the printer driver problem by incorporating printer support into the operating system. Now one printer driver served all the applications! And these were printer drivers that the printer manufacturer wrote (not the application developer). Windows provided the infrastructure to allow the industrial device driver's solution as well. Adding the OPC specification to Microsoft's OLE technology in Windows allowed standardization. Now the industrial devices' manufacturers could write the OPC DA Servers and the software (like HMIs) could become OPC Clients. The resulting selfish benefit to the software suppliers was the ability to reduce their expenditures for connectivity and focus them on the core features of the software. For the users, the benefit was flexibility. They could now choose software suppliers based on features instead of "Do they have the driver to my unique device?" They don't have to create a custom interface that they must bear the full cost of creating and upgrading through operating system or device vendor changes. Users were also assured of better quality connectivity as the OPC DA Specification codified the connection mechanism and compliance testing. OPC interface products are built once and reused many times; hence, they undergo continuous quality control and improvement. The user's project cycle is shorter using standardized software components. And their cost is lower. These benefits are real and tangible. Because the OPC standards are based in turn upon computer industry standards, technical reliability is assured. The original specification standardized the acquisition of process data. It was quickly realized that communicating other types of data could benefit from standardization. Standards for Alarms & Events, Historical Data, and Batch data were launched.

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6.2

DCOM (DISTRIBUTED COMPONENT OBJECT MODEL)

DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) is a set of Microsoft concepts and program interfaces in which client program object s can request services from server program objects on other computers in a network. DCOM is based on the Component Object Model (COM), which provides a set of interfaces allowing clients and servers to communicate within the same computer (that is running Windows 95 or a later version). For example, you can create a page for a Web site that contains a script or program that can be processed (before being sent to a requesting user) not on the Web site server but on another, more specialized server in the network. Using DCOM interfaces, the Web server site program (now acting as a clientobject ) can forward a Remote Procedure Call ( RPC ) to the specialized server object, which provides the necessary processing and returns the result to the Web server site. It passes the result on to the Web page viewer. DCOM can also work on a network within an enterprise or on other networks besides the public Internet. It uses TCP/IP andHypertext Transfer Protocol . DCOM comes as part of the Windows operating systems. DCOM is or soon will be available on all major UNIX platforms and on IBM's large server products. DCOM replaces OLE Remote Automation. DCOM is generally equivalent to the Common Object Request Broker Architecture ( CORBA ) in terms of providing a set of distributed services. DCOM is Microsoft's approach to a network-wide environment for program and data objects. CORBA is sponsored by the rest of the information technology industry under the auspices of the Object Management Group ( OMG ).

6.3

OPC AND DCOM

The OPC specifications Data Access, Alarms & Events and Historical Data Access are based on the Distributed Component Object Model, which is part of all Windows operating systems. The nearly "ubiquitous" Microsoft platform, even in industrial environments, is certainly one reason for the rapid distribution of OPC. However, DCOM restricts the use of OPC technology to Windows operating systems. For years now, industry has been calling on the OPC Foundation to provide an OPC standard that can be utilized on different operating systems (manufacturers of ERP systems on Unix platforms and manufacturers of embedded systems with real-time operating systems such as VxWorks, QNX, etc).OPC XML-DA and OPC UA are no longer based on DCOM but on a service oriented architecture (SOA).

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7. INSTALLING THE OPC CORE COMPONENTS

Note: Before you begin this task, you must have a Windows administrator account.

OPC core compnent installation

Log onto Windows using an administrator account. Insert the distribution CD. The OPC Products Installer window opens. If the disk does not start (Windows settings can cause this), locate and select the file named autorun.exe. Click to install the OPC Core Components Redistributable. The OPC Core Components Redistributable Setup Wizard starts. Click Next. At the Select Installation Folder step, do the following: Document: 553701 Issue 1.2: March 2011 2-3 Accept the default folder for the installation. Select the radio button for Everyone. Click Next. Review and accept the Licence Agreement, click Next. At Confirm Installation, click Next to start the installation. When Installation Complete appears, click Close. You have now installed the OPC Core Components Redistributable.

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8. CONFIGURING COM AND DECOM WHEN USING A CLIENT ON A SEPARATE COMPUTER

You can use the OPC DA Server in a system with the clients and the server on separate computers. To do this, you need to set up the Distributed COM (DCOM) protocol on each computer. This will enable the remote clients to communicate with the OPC Portal Server.

Note: You must use the same user name and password for the Windows accounts on each computer.

Note: Before you begin this task, you must have a Windows administrator account.
To configure DCOM, do the following:

Step 1: Accessing the component service

Log onto Windows using an administrator account. Open the Windows Control Panel and navigate to Administrative Tools. Select Component Services. The Component Services applet starts. Within the Component Services applet, navigate to Component Services Computers My Computer.

On windows 7

On Windows XP

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Step 2: Setting default the property


On Windows 7

Right-click on My Computer to display the My Computer Properties, select the Default Properties tab. Put a tick in the box labeled Enable Distributed COM on this computer. Set the Default Authentication Level to None. Set the Default Impersonation Level to Identify.

On Windows XP

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Step 3: Creating a group for remote access

Select the COM Security tab. Go to the Access Permissions area, click Edit Default. The Access Permission dialog box opens. Add a group named ANONYMOUS LOGON and allow Local Access and Remote Access. Similarly add a group named Everyone and allow Local Access and Remote Access. Click OK to close the Access Permission dialog box.

On Windows XP & 7

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Step 4: Setting the persmission for remote launch and activation

Return to the COM Security tab of the My Computer Properties dialog box. Go to the Launch and Activation Permissions area, click Edit Default. The Launch Permission dialog box opens. Add the group ANONYMOUS LOGON you created earlier and allow all permissions Local Launch, Remote Launch, Local Activation and Remote Activation. Similarly add the group Everyone and allow all options. Click OK.

On Windows XP & 7

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Step 5: Setting the persmission for remote access

Return to the COM Security tab of the My Computer Properties dialog box. Go to the Access Permissions area, click Edit Limits. The Access Permission window opens. Set the group ANONYMOUS LOGON to allow Local Access and Remote Access. Similarly set the group Everyone to allow local and remote access. Click OK.

On Windows XP & 7

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Step 6: Setting persmission for remote launch and activation

Return to the COM Security tab of the My Computer Properties dialog box. Go to the Launch and Activation Permissions area, click Edit Limits. The Launch Permission window opens. Set all four permissions for both Administrators and Everyone. Click OK.

On Windows XP & 7

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Step 7: Setting the authentification level

Return to the Component Services applet. Expand the My Computer item and select DCOM Config. Locate the ICSTriplexOPCServer in the list. Right-click to open the properties for the server, select the General tab. Set the Authentication Level to None.

On Windows XP and windows 7

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Step 8: configuring DCOM

Go to the Identity tab. Select the radio button labelled The system account (services only). OPC Portal Server User Guide (AADvance Controller) Click OK to save the new settings and close the OPC Portal Server Properties. If you are not configuring a workgroup to use DCOM, reboot the computer. The configuration of DCOM is complete.

On Windows XP and windows 7

Step 9: configuring DCOM (Workgroup Case)

If you are configuring a workgroup to use DCOM, you must set the OPCEnum properties. Return to the DCOM Config section of the Component Services applet. Scroll down to locate OpcEnum. Right-click to open the properties for OpcEnum, select the Security tab. In the Launch and Activation Permissions, select Use Default. Similarly, in the Access Permissions, select Use Default. Click OK. Reboot the computer. The configuration of DCOM is complete.

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On Windows XP and windows 7

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9. CONFIGURING THE OPC ON WINDOWS 7

Sometimes deploying software on windows 7 may result problems. By switching on the windows XP compatibility mode some of the issues can be solved, however the Beanscape and the OPC DA server ar both windows 7 compliant and operate perfectly without turning on the XP compatibility mode.

Apply the same procedure to your OPC client

Step 1: Accessing the property window

Go to Windows program menu select the beanscape.exe right click browse through the Drop down menuright click on properties The property window appears.

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Step 2: Compatibility settings

Go to compatibility Tab and Make sure that the windows XP compatibility checkbox is checked, if not then tick the check box Make sure that the execute program as administrator checkbox is checked, if not then tick the check box

Step 3: Save your setting

Click on OK The property window will close Your setting will be saved If necesary, go to the property window and check if your setting has been saved correctly

Apply the same procedure to your OPC client

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