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ENV Setup doc

Required softwares:
1. Java:
Java refers to several computer software products and specifications from Sun Microsystems (which has since merged with Oracle Corporation), that together provide a system for developing application software and deploying it in a cross-platform environment. Java is used in a wide variety of computing platforms from embedded devices and mobile phones on the low end, to enterprise servers and supercomputers on the high end. While less common ondesktop computers, Java applets are sometimes used to provide improved and secure functions while browsing the World Wide Web. Writing in the Java programming language is the primary way to produce code that will be deployed as Java bytecode. There are, however, bytecodecompilers available for other languages such as Ada, JavaScript, Python, and Ruby. Several new languages have been designed to run natively on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), such as Scala, Clojure and Groovy. Java syntax borrows heavily [6] from C and C++, but object-oriented features are modeled afterSmalltalk and Objective-C. Java eliminates certain low-level constructs such as pointers and has a very simple memory model where every object isallocated on the heap and all variables of object types are references. Memory management is handled through integrated automatic garbage collectionperformed by the JVM. Installation: Downloading and installing Java is easy and free. There are a couple ways by which you can get Java for Windows Online download Offline download Online Manual installation downloads an IFTW (Install From The Web) executable program file and requires minimum user intervention. When you run this program, it fetches all the required files from the web, so you must remain connected to the Internet during the installation. Instructions to download and install Java for Windows online Administrative Permission is required in order to install Java on Microsoft Windows. If you face difficulty using the Online download option, try the Offline download option. Offline Offline installation requires you to download an executable file available at the manual Java download page, which includes all the files needed for the complete installation at the user's discretion. There is no need to remain connected to the Internet during the installation. The file can also be copied to and installed on another computer that is not connected to the Internet. Instructions to download and install Java for Windows offline Administrative Permission is required in order to install Java on Microsoft Windows.

Jsp:
Architecturally, JSP may be viewed as a high-level abstraction of Java servlets. JSPs are loaded in the server and are operated from a structured special installed Java server packet called a Java Enterprise Edition (EE) Web Application, often packaged as a file archive. JSP allows Java code and certain pre-defined actions to be interleaved with static web markup content, with the resulting page being compiled and executed on the server to deliver an HTML or XML document. The compiled pages and any dependent Java libraries use Java bytecode rather than a native software format, and must therefore be executed within a Java virtual machine (JVM) that integrates with the host operating system to provide an abstract platform-neutral environment. JSP syntax is a fluid mix of two basic content forms: scriptlet elements and markup. Markup is typically standard HTML or XML, while scriptlet elements are delimited blocks of Java code which may be intermixed with the markup. When the page is requested the Java code is executed and its output is added, in situ, with the surrounding markup to create the final page. JSPs must be compiled to Java bytecode classes before they can be executed, but such compilation is needed only when a change to the source JSP file has occurred. Java code is not required to be complete (self contained) within its scriptlet element block, but can straddle markup content providing the page as a whole is syntactically correct (for example, any Java if/for/while blocks opened in one scriptlet element must be correctly closed in a later element for the page to successfully compile). This system of split inline coding sections is called step over scripting because it can wrap around the static markup by stepping over it. Markup which falls inside a split block of code is subject to that code, so markup inside an if block will only appear in the output when the if condition evaluates to true; likewise markup inside a loop construct may appear multiple times in the output depending upon how many times the loop body runs. The JSP syntax adds additional XML-like tags, called JSP actions, to invoke built-in functionality. Additionally, the technology allows for the creation of JSP tag libraries that act as extensions to the standard HTML or XML tags. JVM operated tag libraries provide a platform independent way of extending the capabilities of a web server. Note that not all commercial Java servers are Java EE specification [which?] compliant. Starting with version 1.2 of the JSP specification, JavaServer Pages have been developed under the Java Community Process. JSR 53 defines both the JSP 1.2 and Servlet 2.3 specifications and JSR 152 defines the JSP 2.0 specification. As of May 2006 the JSP 2.1 specification has been released under JSR 245 as part of Java EE 5. As of Dec 10, 2009 the JSP 2.2 specification has been released as a maintenance release of JSR 245.

Installation:
JSP needs any web server; this can be tomcat by apache, WebLogic by bea, or WebSphere by IBM. All jsp should be deployed inside web server. We will use Tomcat server to run JSP, this Tomcat server can run on any platform like windows or linux.

Servlets:
A Servlet is a java based server side web technology, as the name says it serves a client request and get a response from the server. Technically speaking a Servlet is a Java classin Java EE that conforms to the Java Servlet API, a protocol by which a Java class may respond to requests. They are not tied to a specific client-server protocol, but are most often used with the HTTP protocol. Therefore, the word [2] "Servlet" is often used in the meaning of "HTTP Servlet". Thus, a software developer may use a servlet to add dynamic content to a Web server using the Java platform. The generated content is commonly HTML, but may be other data such as XML. Servlets are the Java counterpart to non-Java dynamic Web content technologies such as CGI andASP.NET. Servlets can maintain state in session variables across many server transactions by using HTTP cookies, or URL rewriting. To deploy and run a Servlet, a Web container must be used. A Web container (also known as a Servlet container) is essentially the component of a Web server that interacts with the servlets. The Web container is responsible for managing the lifecycle of servlets, mapping a URL to a particular servlet and ensuring that the URL requester has the correct access rights. The servlet API, contained in the Java package hierarchy javax.servlet, defines the expected interactions [2] of the Web container and a servlet. A Servlet is an object that receives a request and generates a response based on that request. The basic servlet package defines Java objects to represent servlet requests and responses, as well as objects to reflect the servlet's configuration parameters and execution environment. The package javax.servlet.http defines HTTP-specific subclasses of the generic servlet elements, including session management objects that track multiple requests and responses between the Web server and a client. Servlets may be packaged in a WAR file as a Web application. Servlets can be generated automatically from JavaServer Pages (JSP) by the JavaServer Pages compiler. The difference between Servlets and JSP is that Servlets typically embed HTML inside Java code, while JSPs embed Java code in HTML. While the direct usage of Servlets to generate HTML (as shown in the example below) has become rare, the higher level MVC web framework in Java EE (JSF) still explicitly uses the Servlet technology for the low level request/response handling via the FacesServlet. A somewhat older usage is to use servlets in conjunction with JSPs in a pattern called "Model 2", which is a flavor of the model-view-controller pattern. A servlet is a Java component that can be plugged into a Java-enabled web server to provide custom services. These services can include: New features Runtime changes to content Runtime changes to presentation New standard protocols (such as FTP) New custom protocols

Springs: The Spring Framework is an open source application framework and Inversion of Control container [1] for the Java platform. The first version was written by Rod Johnson, who released the framework with the publication of his book Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development in October 2002. The framework was first released under the Apache 2.0 license in June 2003. The first milestone release, 1.0, was released in March 2004, with further milestone releases in September 2004 and March 2005. The Spring 1.2.6 [2][3] framework won a Jolt productivity awardand a JAX Innovation Award in 2006. Spring 2.0 was released in October 2006, Spring 2.5 in November 2007, Spring 3.0 in December 2009, and Spring 3.1 in [4] December 2011. The current version is 3.1.0. The core features of the Spring Framework can be used by any Java application, but there are extensions for building web applications on top of the Java EE platform. Although the Spring Framework does not impose any specific programming model, it has become popular in the Java community as an alternative to, replacement for, or even addition to the Enterprise JavaBean (EJB) model.

Installation:

To download the Spring Frame work click on "Download" link.

Then select "spring-framework-2.5.1-with-dependencies.zip" link. This download contains all the dependencies required to run the spring framework.

Save the downloaded file onto your favorite directory.

Now extract the downloaded file (spring-framework-2.5.1-with-dependencies.zip) into your favorite directory. Depending upon the system speed it will take around 1 minute. Once extract go to the extracted folder and you will find many files. Here are some of the file names: build.bat build.xml build-continuous.xml changelog.txt license.txt maven.xml

notice.txt project.properties readme.txt tests.bat

Here is the screen shot of the directory:

The dist directory of the spring framework contains the spring modules (modules directory) library files. We are mostly concern with these jar files. We will copy these jar files into our development environment. These jar files are: spring-aop.jar spring-beans.jar spring-context.jar spring-context-support.jar spring-core.jar spring-jdbc.jar spring-jms.jar spring-orm.jar spring-test.jar spring-tx.jar spring-web.jar spring-webmvc.jar spring-webmvc-portlet.jar spring-webmvc-struts.jar

We will be using these libraries as per our requirement in our application. Another most important directory is "lib", which contains required library files for the application. The following libraries are included in the Spring Framework distribution because they are required either for building the framework or for running the sample apps. Note that each of these libraries is subject to the respective license; check the respective project distribution/website before using any of them in your own applications.

* ant/ant.jar, ant/ant-launcher.jar, ant-trax.jar, ant-junit.jar - Ant 1.7 (http://ant.apache.org) - used to build the framework and the sample apps

* antlr/antlr-2.7.6.jar - ANTLR 2.7.6 (http://www.antlr.org) - required for running PetClinic (by Hibernate)

* aopalliance/aopalliance.jar - AOP Alliance 1.0 (http://aopalliance.sourceforge.net) - required for building the framework - included in spring.jar and spring-aop.jar

* aspectj/aspectjweaver.jar, aspectj/aspectjrt.jar, (aspectj/aspectjtools.jar) - AspectJ 1.5.4 (http://www.aspectj.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's AspectJ support

NOTE: aspectjtools.jar is not included in the Spring distribution because of its size. It needs to be taken from the AspectJ distribution or from Spring CVS. Note that this is only necessary if you want to rebuild the Spring jars including the AspectJ aspects.

* axis/axis.jar, axis/wsdl4j.jar - Apache Axis 1.4 (http://ws.apache.org/axis) - required for building the framework - required for running JPetStore

* bsh/bsh-2.0b4.jar - BeanShell 2.0 beta 4 (http://www.beanshell.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's BeanShell support

* bnd/bnd.jar - BND tool 0.0.208 (http://www.aqute.biz/Code/Bnd) - required for adding OSGi entries to the jar manifests at build time

* c3p0/c3p0-0.9.1.2.jar - C3P0 0.9.1.2 connection pool (http://sourceforge.net/projects/c3p0) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's C3P0NativeJdbcExtractor - required for running Image Database

* caucho/hessian-3.1.3.jar - Hessian/Burlap 3.1.3 (http://www.caucho.com/hessian)

- required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Hessian/Burlap remoting support

* cglib/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar - CGLIB 2.1_3 with ObjectWeb ASM 1.5.3 (http://cglib.sourceforge.net) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when proxying full target classes via Spring AOP

* commonj/commonj-twm.jar - CommonJ TimerManager and WorkManager API 1.1 (http://dev2dev.bea.com/wlplatform/commonj/twm.html) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's CommonJ support

* concurrent/backport-util-concurrent.jar - Dawid Kurzyniec's JSR-166 backport, version 3.0 (http://dcl.mathcs.emory.edu/util/backport-utilconcurrent) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's backport-concurrent support

* dom4j/dom4j-1.6.1, dom4j/jaxen-1.1-beta-7.jar - DOM4J 1.6.1 XML parser (http://www.dom4j.org) - required for running PetClinic (by Hibernate)

* easymock/easymock.jar, easymock/easymockclassextension.jar - EasyMock 1.2 (JDK 1.3 version) (http://www.easymock.org) - required for building and running the framework's test suite

* ehcache/ehcache-1.3.0.jar - EHCache 1.3.0 (http://ehcache.sourceforge.net) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's EHCache support - required for running PetClinic (by Hibernate)

* freemarker/freemarker.jar - FreeMarker 2.3.11 (http://www.freemarker.org)

- required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's FreeMarker support

* glassfish/glassfish-clapi.jar - GlassFish ClassLoader API extract (http://glassfish.dev.java.net) - required for building the framework

* groovy/groovy-1.5.1.jar - Groovy 1.5.1 (http://groovy.codehaus.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Groovy support

* hibernate/hibernate3.jar - Hibernate 3.2.5 (http://www.hibernate.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Hibernate support

* hibernate/hibernate-annotation.jar - Hibernate Annotations 3.3.0 (http://www.hibernate.org) - required for building the "tiger" part of the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Hibernate Annotations support

* hibernate/hibernate-entitymanager.jar - Hibernate EntityManager 3.3.1 (http://www.hibernate.org) - required for building the "tiger" part of the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Hibernate-specific JPA support

* hibernate/jboss-archive-browsing.jar - JBoss Archive Browsing 5.0.0 alpha - required at runtime when using Hibernate EntityManager

* hsqldb/hsqldb.jar - HSQLDB 1.8.0.1 (http://hsqldb.sourceforge.net) - required for running JPetStore and PetClinic

* ibatis/ibatis-2.3.0.677.jar

- iBATIS SQL Maps 2.3.0 b677 (http://ibatis.apache.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's iBATIS SQL Maps 2.x support

* itext/iText-2.0.7.jar - iText PDF 2.0.7 (http://www.lowagie.com/itext) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's AbstractPdfView

* j2ee/activation.jar - JavaBeans Activation Framework 1.1 (http://java.sun.com/products/javabeans/glasgow/jaf.html) - required at runtime when using Spring's JavaMailSender on JDK < 1.6

* j2ee/common-annotations.jar - JSR-250 Common Annotations (http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=250) - required at runtime when using Spring's Common Annotations support on JDK < 1.6

* j2ee/connector.jar - J2EE Connector Architecture 1.5 (http://java.sun.com/j2ee/connector) - required for building the framework

* j2ee/ejb-api.jar - Enterprise JavaBeans API 3.0 (http://java.sun.com/products/ejb) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's EJB support

* j2ee/el-api.jar - JSP 2.1's EL API (http://java.sun.com/products/jsp), as used by JSF 1.2 - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JSF 1.2 support

* j2ee/jaxrpc.jar - JAX-RPC API 1.1 (http://java.sun.com/xml/jaxrpc) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JAX-RPC support

* j2ee/jms.jar - Java Message Service API 1.1 (java.sun.com/products/jms) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JMS support

* j2ee/jsf-api.jar - JSF API 1.1 (http://java.sun.com/j2ee/javaserverfaces) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JSF support

* j2ee/jsp-api.jar - JSP API 2.0 (http://java.sun.com/products/jsp) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JSP support

* j2ee/jstl.jar - JSP Standard Tag Library API 1.1 (http://java.sun.com/products/jstl) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JstlView

* j2ee/jta.jar - Java Transaction API 1.1 (http://java.sun.com/products/jta) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JtaTransactionManager

* j2ee/mail.jar - JavaMail 1.4 (http://java.sun.com/products/javamail) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JavaMailSender

* j2ee/persistence.jar - Java Persistence API 1.0 (http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/ias/toplink/jpa) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JPA support

* j2ee/rowset.jar

- JDBC RowSet Implementations 1.0.1 (http://java.sun.com/products/jdbc) - required at runtime when using Spring's RowSet support on JDK < 1.5

* j2ee/servlet-api.jar - Servlet API 2.4 (http://java.sun.com/products/servlet) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's web support

* jakarta-commons/commons-attributes-api.jar, jakarta-commons/commons-attributes-compiler.jar - Commons Attributes 2.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/attributes) - commons-attributes-api.jar has a patched manifest (not declaring QDox and Ant as required extensions) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Commons Attributes support

* jakarta-commons/commons-beanutils.jar - Commons BeanUtils 1.7 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/beanutils) - required for running JPetStore's Struts web tier

* jakarta-commons/commons-collections.jar - Commons Collections 3.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/collections) - required for building the framework - required for running PetClinic, JPetStore (by Commons DBCP, Hibernate)

* jakarta-commons/commons-dbcp.jar - Commons DBCP 1.2.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/dbcp) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's CommonsDbcpNativeJdbcExtractor - required for running JPetStore

* jakarta-commons/commons-digester.jar - Commons Digester 1.6 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/digester) - required for running JPetStore's Struts web tier

* jakarta-commons/commons-discovery.jar - Commons Discovery 0.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/discovery) - required for running JPetStore (by Axis)

* jakarta-commons/commons-fileupload.jar - Commons FileUpload 1.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/fileupload) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's CommonsMultipartResolver

* jakarta-commons/commons-httpclient.jar - Commons HttpClient 3.1 (http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's CommonsHttpInvokerRequestExecutor

* jakarta-commons/commons-io.jar - Commons IO 1.3.1 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/io) - required at runtime when using Spring's CommonsMultipartResolver (by Commons FileUpload)

* jakarta-commons/commons-lang.jar - Commons Lang 2.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/lang) - required at runtime when using Spring's OpenJPA support (by OpenJPA)

* jakarta-commons/commons-logging.jar - Commons Logging 1.1 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/logging) - required for building the framework - required at runtime, as Spring uses it for all logging

* jakarta-commons/commons-pool.jar - Commons Pool 1.3 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/pool) - required for running JPetStore and Image Database (by Commons DBCP)

* jakarta-commons/commons-validator.jar - Commons Validator 1.1.4 (http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/validator) - required for running JPetStore's Struts web tier on servers that eagerly load tag libraries (e.g. Resin)

* jakarta-taglibs/standard.jar - Jakarta's JSTL implementation 1.1.2 (http://jakarta.apache.org/taglibs) - required for running JPetStore, PetClinic, Countries

* jamon/jamon-2.4.jar - JAMon API (Java Application Monitor) 2.4 (http://www.jamonapi.com) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JamonPerformanceMonitorInterceptor

* jarjar/jarjar.jar - Jar Jar Links 1.0 RC5 (http://code.google.com/p/jarjar) - required for building the framework jars

* jasperreports/jasperreports-2.0.2.jar - JasperReports 2.0.2 (http://jasperreports.sourceforge.net) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JasperReports support

* jaxws/jws-api.jar, jaxws/jaxws-api.jar, jaxws/jaxb-api.jar, jaxws/saaj-api.jar - JAX-WS 2.1.2 API (https://jax-ws.dev.java.net) - required at runtime when running Spring's JAX-WS support tests on JDK < 1.6

* jdo/jdo2-api.jar - JDO API 2.0 (http://db.apache.org/jdo) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JDO support (or jdo.jar for JDO 1.0)

* jexcelapi/jxl.jar - JExcelApi 2.6.6 (http://jexcelapi.sourceforge.net) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's AbstractJExcelView

* jmx/jmxri.jar - JMX 1.2.1 reference implementation - required at runtime when using Spring's JMX support on JDK < 1.5

* jmx/jmxremote.jar - JMX Remote API 1.0.1 reference implementation - required at runtime when using Spring's JMX support on JDK < 1.5

* jmx/jmxremote_optional.jar - JMXMP connector (from JMX Remote API 1.0.1 reference implementation) - required at runtime when using the JMXMP connector (even on JDK 1.5)

* jotm/jotm.jar - JOTM 2.0.10 (http://jotm.objectweb.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JotmFactoryBean

* jotm/xapool.jar - XAPool 1.5.0 (http://xapool.experlog.com, also included in JOTM) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's XAPoolNativeJdbcExtractor

* jruby/jruby.jar - JRuby 1.0.1 (http://jruby.codehaus.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JRuby support

* junit/junit-3.8.2.jar, junit/junit-4.4.jar - JUnit 3.8.2 / 4.4 (http://www.junit.org) - required for building and running the framework's test suite

* log4j/log4j-1.2.14.jar - Log4J 1.2.14 (http://logging.apache.org/log4j) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Log4jConfigurer

* oc4j/oc4j-clapi.jar - Oracle OC4J 10.1.3.1 ClassLoader API extract (http://www.oracle.com/technology/tech/java/oc4j) - required for building the framework

* openjpa/openjpa-1.0.1.jar - OpenJPA 1.0.1 (http://openjpa.apache.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JPA support with OpenJPA as provider

* poi/poi-3.0.1.jar - Apache POI 3.0.1 (http://jakarta.apache.org/poi) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's AbstractExcelView

* portlet/portlet-api.jar - Portlet API 1.0 (http://jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/final/jsr168) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Portlet support

* qdox/qdox-1.5.jar - QDox 1.5 (http://qdox.codehaus.org) - used by Commons Attributes 2.2 to parse source-level metadata in the build process - required for building the framework and the attributes version of JPetStore

* quartz/quartz-all-1.6.0.jar - Quartz 1.6.0 (http://www.opensymphony.com/quartz) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's Quartz scheduling support

* serp/serp-1.13.1.jar - Serp 1.13.1 (http://serp.sourceforge.net) - required at runtime when using OpenJPA

* struts/struts.jar - Apache Struts 1.2.9 (http://jakarta.apache.org/struts) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using the Struts 1.x support or Tiles 1.x TilesView - required for running JPetStore's Struts web tier

* testng/testng-5.5-jdk15.jar - TestNG 5.5 (http://testng.org) - required for building and running the framework's test suite

* tiles/tiles-api-2.0.5.jar, tiles/tiles-core-2.0.5.jar, tiles/tiles-jsp-2.0.5.jar

- Apache Tiles 2.0.5 (http://tiles.apache.org) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using the Tiles2 TilesView

* tomcat/catalina.jar, tomcat/naming-resources.jar - Apache Tomcat 5.5.23 (http://tomcat.apache.org) - required for building the Tomcat-specific weaver

* toplink/toplink-api.jar - Oracle TopLink 10.1.3 API (http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/ias/toplink) - required for building the framework - replaced with full toplink.jar at runtime when using Spring's TopLink support

* toplink/toplink-essentials.jar - Oracle TopLink Essentials v2 b41 (http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/ias/toplink/jpa) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's JPA support with TopLink as provider

* velocity/velocity-1.5.jar - Velocity 1.5 (http://jakarta.apache.org/velocity) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using Spring's VelocityView

* velocity/velocity-tools-view-1.4.jar - Velocity Tools 1.4 (http://jakarta.apache.org/velocity/tools) - required for building the framework - required at runtime when using VelocityView's support for Velocity Tools You can use above libraries in your application as per your requirement.

Hybernet:
Hibernate is an object-relational mapping (ORM) library for the Java language, providing a framework for mapping an object-oriented domain model to a traditional relational database. Hibernate solves objectrelational impedance mismatch problems by replacing direct persistence-related database accesses with high-level object handling functions. Hibernate is free software that is distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License.

Hibernate's primary feature is mapping from Java classes to database tables (and from Java data types to SQL data types). Hibernate also provides data query and retrieval facilities. Hibernate generates the SQL calls and attempts to relieve the developer from manual result set handling and object conversion and keep the application portable to all supported SQL databases with little performance overhead.

Installation:

1. Know your Eclipse & JBoss Tools version to download


First, you have to find out the correct version of Hibernate/JBoss tool for your Eclipse IDE. Go here http://www.jboss.org/tools/download for the available combination version to download. For example, 1. If you are using Eclipse 3.6 / Helios , download JBoss Tools 3.2 2. If you are using Eclipse 3.5 / Galileo, download JBoss Tools 3.1

2. Eclipse update site for JBoss Tools


Point to your correct version, right click to copy the Eclipse update site for JBoss tools. For Eclipse 3.6, the URL is http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/stable/helios/

3. Install It
In Eclipse IDE, menu bar, select Help >> Install New Software , put the Eclipse update site URL.

Type hibernate in the filter box, to list down the necessary components for Hibernate tools. Select all the Hibernate Tools components and click next to download.

4. Restart Eclipse
After the download progress is completed, restart Eclipse to take effect.

5. Verification
If Hibernate tools is installed properly, you are able to see the Hibernate Perspective in Windows >> Open Perspective >> Others.

My Eclipse:
My Eclipse is a commercially available Java EE and Ajax IDE created and maintained by the company Genetic, a founding member of the Eclipse Foundation. My Eclipse is built upon the Eclipse platform, [2] solutions into the development environment.
[1]

and integrates both proprietary and open source


[3]

My Eclipse has two primary versions (apart from the "Blue Edition and "My Eclipse Spring [4] [5] Edition referred to below): a professional and a standard edition. The standard edition adds database tools, a visual web designer, persistence tools, Spring tools, Struts and JSF tooling, and a number of other features to the basic Eclipse Java Developer profile. It competes with the Web Tools Project, which is a part of Eclipse itself, but My Eclipse is a separate project entirely and offers a different feature set. My Eclipse has also been made available via Pulse (ALM), a provisioning tool that maintains Eclipse software profiles, including those that use My Eclipse. Additionally, My Eclipse is offering a customized [7] version for IBM products, "My Eclipse Blue Edition", that adds specific support for Rational Software and Web Sphere development. Currently, My Eclipse Blue Edition is available for Windows and Linux, though Mac is unsupported.
[6]

Installation:

Ant: Apache Ant is a software tool for automating software build processes. It is similar to Make but is implemented using the Java language, requires the Java platform, and is best suited to building Java projects. The most immediately noticeable difference between Ant and Make is that Ant uses XML to describe the build process and its dependencies, whereas Make uses Make file format. By default the XML file is named build.xml. Ant is an Apache project. It is open source software, and is released under the Apache Software License.

Installation: Download a .zip binary distribution from the ANT Binary Page.
Save the .zip file to a temporary location on your hard-disk (such as the desktop) Expand the contents the folder inside of the .zip file into a directory on your hard drive (i.e. C:\dev\ant) Go to your "System" Control Panel. In Vista, click the "Change Settings" button under the "Computer name, domain, and workgroup" heading. On the "Advanced" tab, click the button at the bottom labeled "Environment Variables" At the top of the screen, add a new User variable. The name should be ANT_HOME, and the value should be the path your zip file was extracted to. (i.e. ANT_HOME = C:\dev\ant)

Add your java JDK Path to the user variables as well. The name should be JAVA_HOME and the value should be the path to the JDK software on your hard-drive. (i.e. JAVA_HOME = C:\Program Files\java\jdk1.6.0_02) If there is already a PATH variable, edit it and add to it. Otherwise, create one more variable named PATH, and add to it; %ANT_HOME%\bin.

SVN: Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after the command name svn ) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed under an open. Developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation. Its goal is to be a mostly-compatible successor to the widely used Concurrent Versions System (CVS). The open source community has used Subversion widely: for example in projects such as Apache Software Foundation, Free Pascal, FreeBSD, GCC,Django, Ruby, Mono and Source Forge. Google Code also provides Subversion hosting for their open source projects. Bounty Source systems use it exclusively. CodePlex offers access to Subversion as well as to other types of clients. The corporate world has also started to adopt Subversion. A 2007 report by Forrester Research recognized Subversion as the sole leader in the Standalone Software Configuration Management (SCM) category and as a strong performer in the Software Configuration and Change Management (SCCM) category. Installation: Step by step instructions Here are my notes for installing Subversion, TortoiseSVN (a Subversion client which integrates with Windows Explorer), and Subclipse (the plugin for Eclipse integration) on Windows. This assumes you already have Eclipse installed. Also, these notes are geared towards version control for individual use as opposed to team use. 1. Install Subversion and TortoiseSVN using SVN 1-Click Setup Go to http://svn1clicksetup.tigris.org/, click "Download the latest version", run the installer, and accept all the defaults. This is a Windows installer used "to simplify the process of setting up a Subversion repository on a Windows-based computer. Svn1ClickSetup takes a user through the steps necessary to install the Subversion command-line utilities and TortoiseSVN, as well as creating a repository and initial project." --from svn1clicksetup.tigris.org To check that something went right, go to Windows Explorer and right-click on a file. You should see the "TortoiseSVN" context menu item.

2. Install the Subclipse plugin using the instructions at http://subclipse.tigris.org/install.html.

3. Define the SVN Repository In Eclipse, from the "Window" menu, select "Open Perspective" > "Other...". Select "SVN Repository Exploring" and click "OK".

Inside the "SVN Repository" window, right-click in the big empty space, and select "New" > "Repository Location...". In the "Url:" box, type "svn://localhost". Click "Finish". (Use this url to connect to the repository hosted on the SVN server on your local machine created using svn1clicksetup. I got this tip fromhttp://james.cooley.ie/2006/12/01/version_control_with_eclipse_on_windows.html. If you want to use a repository on another server, then point to that location instead. "file://, http://, or https:// are the other protocols that can be used.)

4. Add an Eclipse project to the repository In the "Navigator" window, right-click on a project and select "Team" > "Share Project...". Select "SVN" and click "Next" Your repository, "svn://localhost", (which you added in step 3) should show up here. Click "Next". Click "Next" again. Click "Finish". I got the following output in the "Console" window: mkdir -m "Initial import." svn://localhost/my_project checkout -N -r HEAD svn://localhost/my_project Filesystem has no item svn: URL 'svn://localhost/my_project' non-existent in that revision

Checked out revision 5. Select the files you want to add and click "OK". I got the following output in the "Console" window: add -N C:\path\to\my_project\test.py A C:/path/to/my_project/test.py

commit -m "Initial import." C:/path/to/my_project/test.py Adding path/to/my_project/test.py

Transmitting file data ...

Committed revision 6. See this article for more information: How to use Subversion with Eclipse

5. Modify and commit a file Edit one of the newly added files and save it. In the "Navigator" window, right-click on the file, and select "Team" > "Commit...". Enter a comment and click "OK". I got the following output in the "Console" window: commit -m "test" C:/path/to/my_project/test.py Sending path/to/my_project/test.py

Transmitting file data ... Committed revision 7.

6. Show the history for a file In the "Navigator" window, right-click on the file, and select "Team" > "Show History". The "History" window should open showing the revisions of your file. Double-click on a revision to open it or right-click for other options. Jenkins: Jenkins, previously known as Hudson, is an open source continuous integration tool written in Java. The project renamed itself after a dispute with Oracle, which claims the right to trademark the Hudson name and has applied for such a trademark as of December 2010. Complicating matters, Oracle has decided to continue development under the Hudson name, creating two parallel versions that each considers the other a fork. Jenkins provides continuous integration services for software development, primarily in the Java programming language. It is a server-based system running in a servlet container such as Apache Tomcat. It supports SCM tools including CVS, Subversion, Git, Mercurial, Perforce and Clearcase, and can execute Apache and Apache Maven based projects as well as arbitrary shell scripts and Windows batch commands. The primary developer of Jenkins is Kohsuke Kawaguchi. Released under the MIT License, Jenkins is free software. Builds can be started by various means, including being triggered by commit in a version control system, scheduling via a cron-like mechanism, building when other builds have completed, and by requesting a specific build URL. Installation: First, you need to start Jenkins before installing it. This can be done from JNLP, or by running "java -jar jenkins.war". Now connect to Jenkins by going to the following URL http://<hostname>:8080/ Once Jenkins is started this way, look for the "Install as Windows Service" link in the "Manage Jenkins" page (requires Microsoft .NET framework version 2.0):

choose the directory where Jenkins shall be installed (directory must already exist. If not create it before hand). This will become JENKINS_HOME and used to store data files and programs alike. Upon successful completion of the installation, you should see a page asking you to restart Jenkins.

This is to re-launch Jenkins as a newly installed Windows service. When you click yes, you'll be asked to wait until the restart completes:

At this point you can use the service manager to confirm that Jenkins is running as a service.