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Math Science Partnership Classroom Instruction Observation Protocol (CIOP)

Classroom Instruction Observation Protocol (CIOP) Packet and Directions for Use The CIOP packet includes the following: 1. Pre-Observation Class Reflection: This form should be given to the classroom teacher to be observed at
least three days prior to the observation. The teacher completes the form and the evaluator contacts the teacher for any further information needed to complete the form during a confirmation call for the observation. 2. Class Information Sheet: This sheet should be completed by the evaluator first during the observation. 3. Lesson Rubric Sheets: These sheets serve two purposes. First, the evaluator, while observing the class, writes down evidence she/he observes in each of the areas listed on each rubric sheet. The sheets include Lesson Design, Lesson Implementation, Content, and Learning Culture. Second, preliminary judgments can be made on each area within each rubric to capture an early evaluation of the lesson. These sheets should be completed during the observation. 4. Reflections and Interpretations: This form asks a number of questions to gather a narrative of the observed class and general impressions related to implementation, related professional development, and student engagement. This form should be completed by the evaluator as soon as possible following the observation (preferably before observing another class). 5. Overall Impression of the Lesson: After the observation is complete and all other forms have been reviewed (including the rubrics, pre-observation reflection, reflections and interpretations, and if available, the postobservation reflection), the evaluator should reconsider the early evaluation of the lesson made via the Lesson Rubric Sheets. After further consideration of the totality of evidence, the evaluator may wish to revise some of these ratings and comments. Once that task is completed, the evaluator is asked to choose one level that best describes the lesson from ineffective to highly effective. Only one level should be chosen based on the evidence gathered during the observation and considering the other reflection inputs. If Level 3 is selected, further delineation of low, solid or high is required. Additional questions ask you to provide a rationale for your capsule rating. 6. Post-Observation Class Reflection: This form should be given to the classroom teacher to be observed at least three days prior to the observation along with the pre-observation form. The teacher completes the form after the class that was observed concludes. Suggest to the teacher that they complete the form the same day as the observation and provide an envelope for them to return the survey to the evaluation team.

MSP-UPitt

Classroom Observation Protocol- page 1

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Pre-Observation Class Reflection


Teacher please complete this form prior to your class and return to Cara Ciminillo, Department of Administrative & Policy Studies, 4315 Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. Phone: 412.624.7240. Fax: 412.648-1784. Email: cara.ciminillo@verizon.net Date of Lesson: Teacher: District: Content Focus: Mathematics Science Grade: Class Descriptor: Anticipated Class Size: ____ School: Period:

Numeration and Operations Inquiry and Design Measurement Unifying Themes of Science Problem Solving and Communication Life Science/Biology Mathematical Reasoning and Connections Environmental Science Algebra Earth and Space Science Geometry Physical Science Data Analysis and Probability Chemistry Other: Physics Other:
.................................................................................................................................................................................... 1. What do students already know about this topic? (How do you know they know this?)

2. What do you hope students will learn as a result of the work you have planned? (How will you know if they learned what you planned?)

3. Please describe any of the teaching techniques, content, activities, or other insights that you intend to use in this class that were connected to the professional development you received as part of the Math Science Partnership (MSP).

4. What is the next step for this class if students progress as expected?
MSP-UPitt Classroom Observation Protocol- page 2 06-07

Classroom Instruction Observation Protocol


Observation Date: School: Teacher: Basic Descriptive Information 1. Teacher Gender: Teacher Ethnicity: Male Female American Indian or Alaskan Native Asian Black or African-American Hispanic or Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White Science Time: Start: District: End:

2. Subject Observed: Mathematics 3. Grade Level(s): 4. Course Title (if applicable) Class Period (if applicable) 5. Student Gender: Number of Females

Number of Males

6. Type of class (gifted, special education, advanced placement, etc): 7. Did you collect copies of instructional materials? Yes No, explain:

MSP-UPitt

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Date of Lesson: Class Descriptor: Teacher:

Grade:

Period:

Class Size:

Observer:

LESSON DESIGN
Element A. Purpose
Highly Effective

Highly Effective Instruction Teacher clearly conveys learning objectives through learning activities. activities are highly relevant to students and are connected to a big idea.
Effective Moderately Effective

Learning

Ineffective

Examples: B. Prior Knowledge & Common Misunderstandings


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Teacher identifies prior knowledge of students through multiple strategies.

Effective

Moderately Effective

Ineffective

Examples: C. Materials/ Resources/ Manipulatives


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist The resources, including manipulatives, are identified, selected and employed to meet the scope of student needs.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: D. Lesson Sequencing


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Coherent structure, pacing and transitions of activities lead to conceptual understanding/sense-making.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: E. Assessment of Student Understanding


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Balanced multiple assessment strategies aligned to learning objectives allow on-going evaluation of all students understanding.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: F. Closure
Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Lesson sequence allows time for student reflection, questioning, and culminating in a summary of learning of the lesson.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

MSP-UPitt

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LESSON IMPLEMENTATION
Element A. Misconceptions of Science/Math
Highly Effective

Highly Effective Instruction Teacher implements instructional strategies that elicit, identify, and correct misconceptions of science/math.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

B. Teacher as Facilitator
Highly Effective

Teacher allows students to take charge of the learning process and monitors students understanding, modifying the lesson when necessary.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

C. Student Engagement in Learning


Highly Effective

Teacher encourages active student engagement resulting in students taking responsibility for constructing their own understanding.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

D. Teachers Use of Questions


Highly Effective

Teachers questioning strategies enhance the development of student conceptual understanding/problem solving.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

E. Communication of Big Ideas


Highly Effective

Teacher makes sure that students understand the connections between the activities and the big idea or major themes of the lesson.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

MSP-UPitt

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CONTENT
Element A. Appropriateness
Highly Effective

Highly Effective Practices The science/math content is accurate and developmentally appropriate in breadth and depth. The content of the entire lesson is significant and worthwhile.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

B. Engagement with Big Ideas


Highly Effective

The students are engaged with important ideas and collaborative discussion that focus on the content of the lesson.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

C. Science/Math as Dynamic Body of Knowledge


Highly Effective

The science/math is presented as a dynamic body of knowledge that encourages searching for truth through investigation, analysis, and explanation.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

D. Conceptual Understanding
Highly Effective

The degree of conceptual understanding of the content is appropriate for the developmental needs of the students. Any identified misconceptions of content are addressed.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

E. Life Connections
Highly Effective

The content of the lesson makes meaningful connections to student experiences outside of the classroom.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

MSP-UPitt

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LEARNING CULTURE
Element A. Climate Highly Effective Practices There is a consistent climate of respect for students ideas, questions, and ways of thinking about and understanding math/science. The climate of the lesson encourages students to generate ideas, questions, conjectures, and/or propositions.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Highly Effective

Examples: B. Classroom Management


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Teacher manages classroom resources, including time and structure necessary to explore mathematical/scientific ideas, and student behavior in such a way that supported orderly, focused and active participation of students in the lesson.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: C. Equity
Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Teacher encourages all students to achieve, including paying attention to and supporting alternative reasoning strategies.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: D. Rigor
Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Intellectual rigor, constructive criticism, and the challenging of ideas are valued.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: E. Collaboration
Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Interactions reflect productive, collaborative working relationships among students, when appropriate.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples: F. Grouping Strategies


Highly Effective

Doesnt Exist Teacher displays an understanding of when, why, and how to group students so that students work independently or collaboratively to make sense of mathematics/science thereby creating a community of learners.
Effective Moderately Effective Ineffective

Examples:

Doesnt Exist

Reflections and Interpretations


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Directions: As soon after observing the class as possible, the evaluator should look over the evidence comments included on each of the observation rubric sheets and any other notes and then complete the following questions. Do not wait to complete this sheet. 1. Describe an overall narrative of the class. What happened?

2. What element(s) of instruction did this teaching episode accomplish best? (see rubrics for elements)

3. Provide a narrative/vignette of an example of this/these element(s) of instruction below:


MSP-UPitt Classroom Observation Protocol- page 8 06-07

--------------BE AS SPECIFIC AS POSSIBLE---------- What did the teacher do? What did the student(s) do? What materials were used? What strategies? Content addressed? How was conceptual understanding developed? What assessment was used? How was the environment organized and managed?

MSP-UPitt

Classroom Observation Protocol- page 9

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Overall Impression of the Lesson


In this final rating of the lesson, consider all available information about the lesson, its context and purpose, and your own judgment of the relative importance of the ratings you have made. Select the capsule description that best characterizes the lesson taught. Keep in mind that this rating is not intended to be an average of all the previous ratings, but should encapsulate your overall assessment of the quality and likely impact of the lesson. Please provide a brief rationale for your final capsule description of the lesson in the space provided. Choose one: Level 1: Ineffective Instruction There is little or no evidence of student thinking or engagement with important ideas of science or math. Instruction is unlikely to enhance students understanding of the discipline or to develop their capacity to successfully "do" science or math. The lesson was characterized by either (select one option below): Passive Learning Instruction is pedantic and uninspiring. Students are passive recipients of information from the teacher or textbook; material is presented in a way that is inaccessible to many of the students. Activity for Activitys Sake Students are involved in hands-on activities or other individual or group work, but it appears to be activity for activitys sake. Lesson lacks a clear sense purpose and/or a clear link to conceptual development. Level 2: Moderately Effective Instruction ---- Some Elements of Effective Instruction Instruction contains some elements of effective practice, but there are substantial problems in the design, implementation, content, and/or appropriateness for many students in the class. For example, the content may lack importance and/or appropriateness; instruction may not successfully address the difficulties that many students are experiencing, etc. Overall, the lesson is quite limited in its likelihood to enhance students understanding of the disciplines or to develop their capacity to successfully "do" science or math. Level 3: Moderately Effective Instruction ----- Beginning Stages of Effective Instruction (select one of three choices): Low Beginning Solid Beginning High Beginning Instruction is purposeful and characterized by quite a few elements of effective practice. Students are, at times, engaged in meaningful work, but there are some weaknesses in the design, implementation, or content of instruction. For example, the teacher may short circuit a planned investigation by telling students what they "should have found"; instruction may not adequately address the needs of the number of students; or the learning culture may limit the accessibility or effectiveness of lesson. Overall, the lesson is somewhat limited in its likelihood to enhance students understanding of the disciplines or to develop their capacity to successfully "do" science or math. Level 4: Effective Instruction Instruction is purposeful and engaging for most students. Students actively participate in meaningful work (for example, investigations, teacher presentations, discussions with each other or the teacher, reading). The lesson is well-designed and a teacher implements it well, but adaptation of content or pedagogy in response to student needs and interests is limited. Instruction is quite likely to enhance most students understanding of the disciplines and develop their capacity to successfully "do" science or math. Level 5: Exemplary Instruction Instruction is purposeful and all students are highly engaged most or all of the time in meaningful work (for example, investigation, teacher presentations, discussions with each other or the teacher, reading). The lesson is well-designed and artfully implemented, with flexibility and responsiveness to students needs and interests. Instruction is highly likely to enhance most students understanding of the disciplines and to develop their capacity to successfully "do" science or math. Please add any comments or notes that will help you to recall and critically review this lesson: Please provide your rationale for the capsule rating indicated on the previous page:
MSP-UPitt Classroom Observation Protocol- page 10 06-07

MSP-UPitt

Classroom Observation Protocol- page 11

06-07

Post-Observation Class Reflection


Teacher please complete this form as soon as possible after your class and return to Cara Ciminillo, Department of Administrative & Policy Studies, 4315 Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. Phone: 412.624.7240. Fax: 412.648-1784. Email: cara.ciminillo@verizon.net Date of Lesson: Teacher: District: Grade: Class Descriptor: Actual Class Size: School: Period:

1. Did students learn what you expected based on what you had planned? (Did students know what you expected them to already know? What did students learn as a result of the work completed in this lesson? How did you know they learned this?)

2. Did the intended items (techniques, content, activities, etc.) from Math Science Partnership (MSP) professional development contribute to this lesson? If so, please describe how.

3. What is the next step for this class, based on the student progress you observed?

MSP-UPitt

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