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Teacher Candidate: Sabattis Twichell

Hackett 2012 Unit Topic: Bonnes vacances!

Essential Question(s): How is the imperfect tense used in storytelling? What are the differences between using the imperfect and the pass compos to describe past events? Why is it important to be able to use the imperfect tense when reading and writing stories? Lesson Number: LE Lesson #4: les contes des fes State Standards being Assessed Standard 1: Students will be able to use a language other than English for communication. Performance Indicators Reading & Writing: Read and comprehend materials written for native speakers when the topic and language are familiar. Use cognates and contextual and visual cues to derive meaning from texts that contain unfamiliar words, expressions, and structures Standard 1: Students will be able to use a language other than English for communication. Performance Indicators Reading & Writing: Write short notes, uncomplicated personal and business letters, brief journals, and short reports Produce written narratives and expressions of opinion about selected stories, songs, and literature of the target language. Approximate Time: ~2-3 days +20 hours prep time Acceptable Evidence and Type of Assessment 1. Daily Story Starter & Pre-Assessment Writing Assignment using the imperfect and pass compos to complete stories, and describe picture scenes (formative)

Objectives (Utilize Blooms Taxonomy and Label) 1. Students will be able to interpret selected texts written for native speakers and summarize the main idea of the stories (comprehension, analysis)

2. Students will be able to produce and illustrate a written fairy tale completion using the imperfect and pass compos tenses in French (application)

2. Racontez une histoire: Happily Ever After Fairy Tale Poster Project & Alternate Ending using the imperfect and past tense (summative)

Teacher Candidate: Sabattis Twichell Unit Title: Bonnes vacances! Subject: French II

Hackett 2012 Date: April 27, 2012 Grade Level: 10th Grade/Checkpoint B

Essential Question(s): How is the imperfect tense used in storytelling? What are the differences between using the imperfect and the pass compos to describe past events? Why is it important to be able to use the imperfect tense when reading and writing stories? Lesson Title/Number Common Core, State Standards, and/or Performance Indicators
Only include what will be assessed.

LE Lesson #4: Les contes des fes Standard 1: Students will be able to use a language other than English for communication. Performance Indicators Reading & Writing: Read and comprehend materials written for native speakers when the topic and language are familiar. Use cognates and contextual and visual cues to derive meaning from texts that contain unfamiliar words, expressions, and structures Write short notes, uncomplicated personal and business letters, brief journals, and short reports Produce written narratives and expressions of opinion about selected stories, songs, and literature of the target language. 1. Students will be able to interpret selected texts written for native speakers and summarize the main idea of the stories (comprehension, analysis) 2. Students will be able to produce and illustrate a written fairy tale completion using the imperfect and pass compos tenses in French (application) 1. Daily Story Starter & Pre-Assessment Writing Assignment using the imperfect and pass compos to complete stories, and describe picture scenes(formative) 2. Racontez une histoire: Happily Ever After Fairy Tale Poster Project & Alternate Ending using the imperfect and past tense (summative) Day 1: 1. The Teacher will begin the lesson by presenting a Story Starter and accompanying picture on the Overhead/Smartboard, and instruct students to copy it onto their daily Bell-Ringer Sheets. The Teacher will then have a few students come to the board and underline all of the verbs that use the imperfect tense in the in the story. The Teacher will call on a few more students to come to the board and circle all of the verbs that use the pass compos in the story. The Teacher will then call on several students to read and translate various lines of the Story Starter aloud, doing their best to summarize it in English using their own words (CFU-content). The Teacher will ask students what they think happened next in the story, and they will brainstorm a few ideas together on the board (visual). The Teacher will then instruct students to continue the story by adding at least 3 more sentences on their Bell-Ringer sheets (Bell-Ringer). 2. The Students will copy the Story Starter and review the difference between the imperfect and pass compos by underlining and circling the verbs on the board and giving reasons as to why each tense was used in the story. They will then continue the story in their Bell-Ringer logs by adding 3 of their own sentences using either the

Lesson Objectives
(Blooms Taxonomy)

Must be numbered. Acceptable Evidence


*Could be collected for accountability/auditing purposes.

Procedure
Teacher input, development, instructional method(s), modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

Label: Bell Ringer


Also may be called: set induction, anticipatory set, introduction/review

Label: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic Accommodations for learning modalities

Hackett 2012 Label: Checks for Understanding: directions, procedures/routines, and/or content (formative)
Ex. (CFU directions)

imperfect or pass compos to continue the action. 3. The Teacher will then distribute a Pre-Assessment containing 2 parts. The Teacher will explain the directions aloud orally as the students follow along on their papers (auditory, visual). The first section will have a short story for students to read and as they read, they must circle the correct tense for each verb in the story, determining whether to use the imperfect or the pass compos in order to make the story make sense. The second part of the assessment will contain a picture (visual) and ask students to describe the scene, providing guiding questions for what they should include in their response, as well as a vocabulary list of useful words. The Teacher will call on students to reiterate the directions and read the sample words and questions aloud (CFU-directions). 4. The Students will complete the Pre-Assessment as the Teacher monitors their progress, checks their work and offers corrective feedback and positive reinforcement (RBIS-setting objectives and providing feedback). 5. The Students will turn in their Pre-Assessments to be scored by the Teacher and used as formative assessment to group students for the next days activity. 6. To review conjugating verbs in the imperfect and pass compos, the Teacher will have Students play an inter-active review game to help prepare them for their projects the next day. The Teacher will divide the class into two teams and display a Connect-Four grid on the Smartboard or Overhead. The top of the grid will list verbs the students should be familiar with, and down the side of the grid, all of the Subject Pronouns will be listed. The Teacher will explain the directions, instructing students that they are going to play Connect-Four using the imperfect form of the verbs. The students will be familiar with how the game is played as they have played it before to review different units. The Teacher will call on several students to explain the directions aloud, clarifying anything that isnt mentioned (CFUroutines). The Teacher will model filling in a square on the grid using a verb that is not listed (CFU-procedures). 7. The Two Teams of Students will take turns sending a team member (in order so that everyone participates), up to the board to fill in a square with the correct imperfect verb conjugation, working to get 4 in a row, and strategizing to block the other team from getting 4 in a row (visual, kinesthetic) (RBIS-cooperative learning, individual and group accountability). When one of the Teams wins the Connect-Four game, the Teacher will give all of the members an eraser prize and continue the game with a different grid of new verbs, this time having students use the pass compos conjugations of each verb. 9. To close the lesson, the Teacher will display an Exit Question on the Smartboard/Overhead and have students write a response in their Exit Journals. The Exit Question will display a photo that was taken while on a vacation in France (visual). The Students will be asked 3 questions to help them describe the photo: Quel temps faisait-il? Combien de gens est-ce quil y avait dans le caf ? Questce quils faisaient ? 10. The Students will respond to the photo and Exit Questions in their Exit Journals, to be read and receive corrective feedback from the Teacher. Day 2: 1. Based on the scores of the students Pre-Assessments, the Teacher will have established who in the class is above-target, on-target, and below-target in terms of using the imperfect tense in combination with the pass compos to write stories. Knowing the ability level of each student, the Teacher will be able to determine which group to place them in to work on their summative Fairy Tale Projects.

Hackett 2012 2. The Teacher will begin the lesson by passing out cards containing pictures of different Fairy Tale characters on them to all of the Students. The Students who are below-target and may need further assistance using the imperfect tense and pass compos in their writing will have cards with pictures of Goldie-Locks and the 3 Bears on them. The students who are on-target will have pictures with little red riding hood characters on them, and those who are above-target will have pictures of characters from Jack and the Beanstalk. The Teacher will know that the student groupings were intentional, but the students will not. 3. The Students will be told to find their groups based on the character cards they were handed and the first group to find all of their members and sit together underneath the large picture of their fairy tale taped over a group work station without making any noise or speaking at all will win a prize (visual, kinesthetic). 4. Once all of the students have found their groups and are sitting at their separate work stations, the Teacher will explain the directions for the Fairy Tale Activity aloud, as well as display them visually on the overhead/Smartboard. Each group will receive a Story Packet containing a French version of the Fairy Tale they were assigned (There may be more than 1 group at the same target level who will receive a different fairy tale to match their levelgroups will be kept to 4-5 students). First, Students will read the packet and work individually to fill in the missing blanks with the correct form of the verb in the imperfect or pass compos. When they have finished filling in the blanks, they will go over the answers together as a group in order to check answers and correct any mistakes. Next, the Students will work together to brainstorm ideas and story-board an alternative ending to their Fairy Tale, using the pages provided at the end of the story packets. Each student will receive their own packet to fill in the blanks, brainstorm ideas, and story-board. However, the entire group will decide on writing one alternative ending and they will work together to create their ending of at least 1 paragraph and illustrate it on poster paper over the next few days. The Teacher will ask the students what they are going to do individually first, what they will do second, and third (CFU-directions). Although the assignment is the same for all 3 groups, the stories are at various difficulty levels and the number of fill-in-the blanks will be slightly modified depending on the groups target level, and the below-target level may receive question prompts to help them write their alternate ending (RBIS-cooperative learning, positive interdependence, group processing). 5. The Teacher will then distribute different colored role cards to each group member within the group, describing and explaining their specific role for the project (RBIS-cooperative learning, individual and group accountability). The roles students will receive are as follows: The Tense Tamer: In charge of double checking all verb conjugations and helping verbs to make sure the correct tenses are being used throughout the final written product. The Grammar Guru: In charge of double checking all grammatical mechanisms and structures such as subject/pronoun/adjective agreements, and correct use of articles and fluent flow/transition. The Vocab Viking: In charge of double checking all vocabulary spelling and masculine/feminine, singular/plural article agreements. May look words up in the dictionary as needed. The Concept Crafter: This person may be in charge of artistic aspects such as illustrating or finding pictures, charts, or graphics to accompany the

Hackett 2012 project. They may also record brainstorming ideas or help keep the group on task The Culture Connector: In charge of making pertinent connections and gathering information for the assigned project on how it relates to French or francophone culture (ex. Looking up where the fairy tale originated or when it was adapted by the French and how well known it is among French children)

Assessment/Evaluation Label: formative or summative and describe purpose

6. The Students will work in their groups to complete the Fairy Tale Reading Packets, filling in the blanks with the correct imperfect or past tense verb forms, and brainstorming ideas for an alternate ending (auditory, visual). For the final group Poster Project and Alternate Ending, each person must be held accountable for completing their specified role within the group. The roles will help students edit and proofread their final draft, making different students responsible for double checking and being involved with various aspects of the writing. 7. The Teacher will walk around offering corrective feedback, positive reinforcement, and assistance as needed (RBIS-setting objectives & providing feedback). 8. The Students will continue to work on the Fairy Tale Happily Ever After Projects for ~2 class periods. 9. To close the lesson, when the students have finished illustrating and writing their alternate ending posters, the groups will present their alternate endings to the class, reading them aloud and deciding where to display the visual representation posters within the classroom (auditory, visual). 10. The fill-in-the blank story packets will be assessed individually, assigning each student in the group a summative grade. The final poster and alternate ending will also be given a summative grade and each student will fill out a self-evaluation and group evaluation of the roles they were given and the participation of others within the group. All group members will receive the same summative grade for the poster project based on a writing rubric, unless their self-evaluation or group evaluation reflect an extreme lack of participation and effort, in which case they may lose a few points in this section of the rubric. 11. To close the lesson, the Teacher will have students respond to an Exit Question in their Exit Journals, asking them: Why is it important to be able to use the imperfect tense when reading and writing stories? 12. The students will respond to the Exit Question in their Exit Journals, as well as fill out their self/group-evaluation/accountability log for the Group Project (RBIScooperative learning, individual and group accountability). 1. Daily Story Starter & Pre-Assessment Writing Assignment using the imperfect and pass compos to complete stories, and describe picture scenes(formative) The purpose of the Belll-Ringer Daily Story Starter, and Pre-Assessment are for the Teacher to formatively assess the students target levels in their use of the imperfect tense in combination with the pass compos. The Teacher will grade these assignments formatively in order to determine which students are below-target and may need some more time and extra help using the imperfect, those who are ontarget and progressing at a normal rate, and those who are above-target and may be prepared to read and write a higher-level text using the imperfect and pass compos. 2. Racontez une histoire: Happily Ever After Fairy Tale Poster Project & Alternate Ending using the imperfect and past tense (summative)

Closure

Accommodations and/or Interactions with Support Staff

Hackett 2012 The purpose of the Happily Ever After Fairy Tale Project and Alternate Ending will be to summatively assess the students knowledge, comprehension, and application of using the imperfect and pass compos to write about past events. To close the lesson, the Students will respond to an Exit Question in their Exit Journals, asking them: Why is it important to be able to use the imperfect tense when reading and writing stories? They will also fill out a self and groupevaluation/accountability log for the Group Project. This lesson includes activities that will accommodate auditory, visual, as well as kinesthetic learners. This lesson also groups students based on target-levels and provides specific accommodations depending on the group. Although the Fairy Tale Happily Ever After Project assignment is the same for all groups, the stories are at various reading difficulty levels and the number/difficulty of fill-in-the blanks will be slightly modified depending on the groups target level. In this way, the Group Project differentiates instruction based on student ability level. The below-target level group will receive a Fairy Tale containing more familiar vocabulary (with a complete list of unfamiliar vocabulary included in the front of the story packet) and there will be more fill-in-the-blanks that use the imperfect tense (rather than mixing the imperfect with the pass compos, which is more difficult to determine). This target level will also receive more question prompts to help them brainstorm and write their Alternate ending. The on-target group will receive a fairy tale that contains some new and familiar vocabulary, and fill-in-the-blanks that include a combination of imperfect and pass compos verb conjugations. They will also have some question prompts to aid with the brainstorming of their alternate ending. The above-target group will receive a Fairy Tale containing more upper-level/new vocabulary. They will also have a mixture of imperfect and pass compos fill-inthe-blank questions which may include some new verbs. This group will receive few question prompts to help them write the alternate ending. Students with exceptional learning needs may receive extra time to perform tasks, more one-on-one help or attention, be partnered with above average students or a student aid, receive written directions or updates sent home to parents, or any other accommodations as outlined on specific student IEPs. Text: McDougal Littell Discovering French Blanc 2 Whiteboard/Smartboard/Overhead Projector Daily Story Starter Question Pre-Assessment Exit Journals PowerPoint with Exit Questions/Bell-Ringers Fairy Tale Story Packets with vocabulary lists http://www.clicksouris.com/liens.htm Boucle dOr et les trois ours, by Jan Brett Jacques et le haricot magique, by Pierre Smidor Quatre histoires du Petit Chaperon rouge, by Charles Perrault Connect-Four Grid Fairy Tale Character Grouping Cards Colored Role Description Cards Self/Group Evaluation Rubrics & Accountability Logs

Resources/Materials

Hackett 2012 Time Required ~2-3 days +20 hours prep time Reflection: This lesson was specifically developed to meet NYS LOTE learning Standard 1 (Students will be able to use a language other than English for communication) in areas of Reading & Writing. In this lesson, students learn how to interpret and summarize the meaning of texts written for native speakers which use the imperfect and pass compos to describe past events. The students develop their writing skills by using the imperfect tense in combination with the pass compos to write and illustrate an alternate ending to a French Fairy Tale. Within this lesson, current scholarship in the field of French is reflected through the use of specific grammatical structures, using the imperfect tense in combination with the pass compos to describe past events while reading and writing. This lesson helps students increase their reading and writing fluency by analyzing texts written for native speakers and writing story descriptions or completions these texts. Best classroom practice is demonstrated through the use of research-based instructional strategies, using cooperative learning strategies such as face-to-face promotive interaction, interpersonal and small group skills, identifying similarities and differences in the use of the imperfect and pass compos, and providing homework, practice, and positive reinforcement. Students are engaged in the lesson through auditory, visual, and kinesthetic stimulants, and they are given positive reinforcement through corrective feedback, independent, and group practice. The lesson demonstrates knowledge of content, adapting teaching strategies to meet the needs of diverse learners, as well as knowledge of pedagogy, using recursive learning to engage different learning styles and differentiate instruction based on ability to build progressively upon the curriculum. Professional skills are also demonstrated through modeling commitment and caring for students through accommodations, differentiation, and positive reinforcements. This lesson prepares students for life outside of the classroom as they will develop stronger reading and writing skills and have a better understanding of how to communicate effectively using the French language. Students will also increase their fluency using the imperfect in combination with the pass compos to describe past events through storytelling. Mastering the use of these past tenses will be useful in everyday conversation, reading, and writing in the French language which will allow students to communicate more effectively about topics of interest with native speakers.